Richardson September 2021

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 1  SEPT. 27OCT. 24, 2021

ONLINE AT

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H I G H E R E D U C A T I O N G U I D E

UTDallas primes tech talent pool

Degrees awarded

ADDR E SS I NG T H E NE E D Thousands of students who have earned degrees through the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at UT Dallas have gone on to hold tech- related jobs in the region, according to university ocials.

1,572

2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

1,621

+31.6%

1,752

1,840

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

2,069

As the tech industry continues to boom in North Texas, The Univer- sity of Texas at Dallas is zeroing in on programs aimed at preparing the next generation of students to enter the workforce. Dallas-Fort Worth’s tech talent labor pool was the sixth largest in North America in 2020 with 189,200 work- ers, up 16.3% since 2015, according to a July report from commercial real estate services and investment rm CBRE. Despite a seemingly healthy pipeline, industry leaders say supply has not caught up with demand. According to a monthly analysis by The Computing Technology Industry Association, the Dallas metropolitan area had 16,936 tech jobs available in August—the third-highest number of postings in the U.S. “That kind of demand [creates] a lot of diculty [in] getting supply and is causing a lot of wage ination,” said Bill Sproull, president and CEO of the Rich- ardson Chamber of Commerce. “You CONTINUED ON 14

SOURCE: THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IMPACTS

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VOTER GUIDE

XXXXXXX PROPOSITIONS

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One of the university’s largest investments in tech infrastructure was a 200,000-square-foot, $110million engineering and computer science building that opened in 2018. (Courtesy The University of Texas at Dallas)

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BUSINESS FEATURE

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Voters to decide on $190million city bond

PACKAGE BREAKDOWN

$8M

$7.5M

The bond is broken down into ve propositions that will be voted on individually by residents.

$8.5M

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

$190M City bond package

Street improvements Public buildings Drainage projects

Richardson is seeking approval from voters for ve bond propositions total- ing $190 million that are largely aimed at infrastructure improvements. CONTINUED ON 21

Sidewalks

Parks projects

$64M

$102M

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DINING FEATURE

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLEANNE: Community Impact Newspaper is celebrating our third year in Richardson this month. Back in September 2018, we launched the sixth of what is now seven DFW editions. We recently announced immediate expansion plans to the San Antonio area. As we continue to grow our mission in DFW and beyond, we’re also looking to grow our team. Please follow us online for updates on open positions. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMOLIVIA: This November, voters will have the chance to decide on ve separate city bond propositions covering a slew of infrastructure projects across Richardson. There are also eight proposed amendments to the state’s constitution that voters can weigh in on. To learn more about the propositions and how to vote, see our Voter Guide on Page 16. Olivia Lueckemeyer, SENIOR EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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RELOCATION 7 Fit Body Boot Camp held a grand reopening Sept. 4 in its new location at 1310 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 125, Richard- son. The gym relocated from its previous space in Suite 116 of the same develop- ment. The new space is 5,000 square feet, which is twice the size of the gym’s previous location. The business offers boot camps that combine its signature Afterburn workouts with smart nutrition coaching and personalized accountability. 972-855-8938. http://fitbodybootcamp. 8 Dickey’s Barbecue Pit is celebrating its 80th anniversary this year. The restau- rant has Richardson locations at A 1150 N. Plano Road and B 2150 N. Coit Road. Known for its barbecue wings, ribs and brisket, Dickey’s is offering limited-time menu items such as its sweet and smoky pit-smoked wings, Dr Pepper barbecue sauce and brisket chili. com/9560-richardson-tx ANNIVERSARY

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3 Fukuro Poke & Sushi & Tea opened in August at 3000 Northside Blvd., Ste. 600, Richardson. The eatery’s menu features signature bowls, such as the Fukuro Bowl, which includes salmon, tuna, spicy crab, avocado and more. Fukuro also offers sushi, fruit tea, milk tea, cheese tea and more. 972-528-9888. www.fukurotx.kwickmenu.com 4 Blaze Pizza expected to open Sept. 28 at 1450 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson, as of this paper’s Sept. 23 deadline. The fast-casual restaurant allows guests to customize signature pizzas or create their own. It also offers gluten-free and keto-friendly crusts as well as vegan cheese. 972-430-9777. www.blazepizza.com COMING SOON 5 HTeaO plans to open a new loca- tion just east of Richardson’s south-

eastern edge at 3428 W. Buckingham Road, Garland. The business will offer a drive-thru, 25 flavors of Texas-style iced tea, Yeti products and snack items. An opening date and phone number for the new location have not been announced. www.facebook.com/hteaogarland 6 Greenville Avenue Pizza Co ., also known as GAPCo, is planning a late- October or early-November opening for its new location at 520 Lockwood Drive, Richardson. The eatery originally hoped to open its Richardson location by the end of 2020, but delays related to construction and the coronavirus pandemic pushed that date back. GAPCo offers made-from-scratch pizzas with a thin, crispy crust and homemade sauce. The business has a Facebook page for its Richardson location where it is providing updates on progress of the new space. 214-826-5404 (Greenville location). www.facebook.com/gapcorichardson

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

NOWOPEN 1 Alamo Drafthouse reopened its theater Sept. 17 at 100 S. Central Ex- pressway, Ste. 14, Richardson. The movie theater chain initially closed its locations in March 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic but reopened its Richardson location in August 2020 before closing again in early October. 469-331-8703. www.drafthouse.com/theater/richardson 2 Drink shop Happy Lemon opened Sept. 18 at 169 N. Plano Road, Richard- son. The Chinese boba company sells a variety of fruit teas, milk teas, cheese teas, smoothies and slushes. After ex- panding to the U.S. in 2014, the Rich- ardson store is the first Texas location for the company. 817-779-2220. www. happylemonwest.com/texaslocations

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Ladies Night $23

Bella Flan offers desserts such as rice pudding, flan, tres leches and more.

COURTESY BELLA FLAN BAKERY AND CAFÉ

EVERYWEDNESDAYNIGHT Three-CourseMenu - LadiesOnly! RESERVATIONS ONRESY.COM Visit jaspersrichardson.com for full menu Enjoy covered free parking garage behind our restaurant Located in CityLine, on the corner of State St. and Plano Rd 1251 State St Richardson, TX 75082 | 214.716.2610

972-907-8494 (North Plano Road loca- tion). 972-907-3644 (North Coit Road location). www.dickeys.com NAME CHANGE 9 Tasty Tails changed its name to Chelle’s Seafood Kitchen this sum- mer and debuted a new menu. The new restaurant held its grand opening Sept. 10 at 100 S. Central Express- way, Ste. 21, Richardson. Its menu includes specialties such as shrimp and grits, seafood vodka pasta, and lob- ster ravioli as well as oysters, burgers, tacos, wraps and more. 214-377-8603. www.chellesseafoodkitchen.com RENOVATION 10 Renovations at the Taco Bell location at 1606 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson, were completed Sept. 16. Work on the restaurant’s dining room briefly closed the location’s interior, but its drive-thru remained open for the majority of the work, according to FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Bella Flan Bakery and Café plans to open this fall at 819 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 56, Richardson. While owner Siv Lopez is operating out of the Corner Food Mart in Garland, she said the new bakery will be Bella Flan’s agship location. “We will have a full menu with our savory items [in Richardson],” Lopez said, noting the menu will include Cuban sandwiches, potato balls and meat pies. “It’s a Cuban bakery with an Asian fusion.” Lopez said she started oering desserts under the Bella Flan name in 2020, specializing in Cuban an, chocoan and tres leches. “I’ve been making ans for 20 years,”

she said. “My mother-in-law, she’s Cuban, [and] it’s her recipe. It’s just a lot of fun, and I like to share it.” The Garland location will become a Bella Flan Express once the new location opens in the Arapaho Village Shopping Center, Lopez said. 214-566-3656 (Garland location). www.bellaan.com

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a company spokesperson. The East Belt Line Road restaurant is one of two Taco Bells in Richardson. The other is located at 517 W. Arapaho Road. 972-783-4689. www.tacobell.com CLOSINGS 11 Super Chix closed its CityLine loca- tion this summer at 1551 E. Renner Road, Ste. 830, Richardson. The restaurant, which serves breaded and grilled chicken tenders, chicken sandwiches, and frozen custard, still has locations in Dallas and Frisco. 972-788-0660 (Dallas location). www.superchix.com 12 Home improvement store Rockler Woodworking and Hardware closed its location in the Promenade North Shop- ping Center at 800 N. Coit Road, Ste. 2500, Richardson, in July. In addition to hardware and workshop essentials, Rock- ler offered power tools, hand tools, lum- ber, expert advice and classes on wood- working techniques. The business still has stores in Garland, Frisco and Arlington. 800-279-4441. www.rockler.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

TODO LIST

October events

Now Open for Lunch Dine in, to-go, and curbside pick up avai lable. Wed-Fr i at 11:30

OCT. 05

SUPPORT THE POLICE DEPARTMENT RICHARDSON, TX

The National Night Out event in support of the Richardson Police Department is happening in various parks around Richardson. The event is hosted by the department’s Community Relations Unit. Ocers and city ocials visit parks, such as Crowley Park and Heights Park, throughout the night to spread crime prevention awareness and build community relationships. A map of parks where the event is being held can be found on the police department’s website. 6-8 p.m. Free. Various locations throughout Richardson. www.richardsonpolice.net (Courtesy Richardson Police Department)

Editor’s note : These events were still on as of press time Sept. 16 but may change due to coronavirus concerns. Check the website or call before attending.

COMPILED BY ERICK PIRAYESH OCTOBER 01 THROUGH 3 ATTEND A BOOK SALE Friends of the Richardson library is holding its semiannual book sale to benet the Richardson Public Library. More than 30,000 books, CDs, DVDs and other media are available for purchase. Most items are $2 or less. Sunday is Fill the Bag Day, where attendees can ll their bags with as many books as they want for $15. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Fri.-Sat.), 2-5 p.m. (Sun.). Basement Program Room of the library, 900 Civic Center Drive, Richardson. 972-226-2167. www.richardsonfol.org 08 LISTEN TO PERSIAN POP Persian pop singer-songwriter Sasy performs at the Eisemann Center in Richardson. The performance is part of the artist’s Tehran-Tokyo Tour. Tickets can be purchased online or at the box oce. 9 p.m. $45-$129. 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com 21 HEAD TO A DRIVE IN The nonPareil Institute, a post- secondary school in Plano that works with adults with autism, hosts a dinner and a movie fundraiser at The Drive-In Carbaret. The event includes a screening of “Avengers: End Game” as well as a costume contest, rae and dinner. Tickets can be purchased online. 5 p.m. $100. 300 N. Coit Road, Richardson. 469-247-1101. www.one.bidpal.net/ npplano/welcome 24 CREATE YOUR OWN TERRARIUM Modern Emporium Boutique hosts an event where participants are given succulent plants and decorations to design

their own terrarium. Drinks and snacks are provided. 11:30 a.m. $55. 508 W. Lookout Drive, Richardson. 469-209-9656. www.modernemporium.com 28 MAKE A CUSTOM JEAN JACKET CityLine hosts an art workshop where attendees learn to paint a custom-made jean jacket. The Creative Arts Guild of Wylie leads the class in the plaza. Reservations can be made online. All materials are provided. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $55. 1150 State St., Richardson. 469-209-1907. www.cagwylie.com 28 THROUGH 29 PLAY BRIDGE FOR A GOOD CAUSE Richardson Woman’s Club holds its annual Bridge Festival in its Founder’s Hall. The two-day event includes lunch from Chocolate Angel, door prizes and a silent auction. Attendees can play party bridge or other games Oct. 28 and duplicate bridge Oct. 29. Proceeds go toward community outreach eorts and scholarships provided by the club. Participants must register at www.rwctx.org by clicking on the Bridge link. Registration closes Oct. 19. 9:30 a.m. $25. 2005 N. Clie Drive, Richardson. 972-238-0841. www.rwctx.org 30 ATTEND A PREHALLOWEEN MUSIC AND MOVIE BASH The South Austin Moonlighters are performing at Six Springs Tavern in Richardson. The night starts o with a performance from the soul and country band from Austin before a midnight screening of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” 7 p.m.-close. $12.50. 147 N. Plano Road, Richardson. 469-917-3040. www.sixspringslive.com

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Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

Jeng Chi Restaurant & Bakery

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400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 www.jengchirestaurant.com

HOV lanes are normally reserved for vehicles with more than one occupant. (Courtesy Adobe Stock)

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Ocials to pilot HOV incentive

The council of governments has decided to remove barriers seg- menting the HOV lanes, which will increase safety and open up the lanes to solo drivers, Lamers said. Two options have been proposed for single-occupancy vehicles in the HOV lanes. The rst would make the lanes free for solo drivers, while the second would impose a nominal toll. Lamers said the council of govern- ments is working with TxDOT and the Federal Highway Administration on implementation, and they hope to have a decision soon. To continue providing an incentive for carpooling, the council of govern- ments is proposing that high-occu- pancy vehicles receive a monetary reward for using the lanes. In order to study the eectiveness of the plan, the council of govern- ments needs to track who is using the lanes, when they are using them, and what their occupancy is. A $10 million grant from the federal government would pay for the use of a GoCarma, a system that could track those metrics. Lamers said the pilot project would be rolled out in phases between late 2022 and 2024.

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North Central Texas Council of Governments is proposing new uses for high-occupancy vehicle lanes on US 75 and is asking the public to provide feedback on the plan. A pilot project in the corridor between I-635 and the Sam Rayburn Tollway will evaluate the eective- ness of allowing solo drivers to use the HOV lane while also providing an incentive to cars with more than one occupant, according to a Sept. 13 news release. The existing HOV lanes on this stretch of US 75 are “not as useful as they once were,” Dan Lamers, senior programmanager at NCTCOG, said during a Sept. 9 board meeting. The council of governments has joined with the Texas Department of Transportation and partners in Collin County to identify innovative ways to use that additional capacity, Lamers said during the meeting. “US 75 is a complex corridor,” he said. “There are some safety issues, some congestion issues, some operational issues, so we are looking for a way to improve the situation in its entirety.” The city of Richardson has been awarded $97.4 million in federal funds for new technology that will enhance its ability to respond to vehicle accidents. The FARO 3D Scanner electronically recreates FEDERAL FUNDS TO PAY FORNEWTRAFFIC TECHNOLOGY

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crash scenes for analysis and allows the police department to clear accidents more quickly. A video management system will upgrade the city’s trac management system and enhance the city’s ability to respond to trac incidents, according to city documents. A resolution approved by City Council during its Sept. 13 meeting paves the way for implementation of both systems.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

DEVELOPMENT Planning commission approves revised restaurant parkproposals

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BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

In 2019, Eiland pitched his idea for a coee roasting warehouse and restau- rant on the north end of the restaurant park. After four hours of impassioned commentary by residents in favor and opposed, council voted down the proposal, citing potential trac congestion on the US 75 frontage road and insucient parking. In June, council denied Herman- sen’s request to add Dave’s Hot Chicken to the development. The objection rested primarily on the desired full-service drive-thru, which the majority of council said is incon- gruous with the vision for the area. Hermansen’s latest request elim- inates one of two drive-thru lanes and obscures the drive-thru window by pushing the building farther back from the road. It also removes the approved drive-thru component from a separate restaurant pad Hermansen plans to develop in the future.

The latest iteration of expansion plans for Richardson Restaurant Park has been greenlighted by the city plan commission, paving the way for coun- cil to once again consider approval of the proposal Oct. 11. Richardson Restaurant Park, located near the intersection of Spring Valley Road and US 75, was approved by council in 2014. The rst building opened in 2017, but much of the property has remained undeveloped due to snags in the approval process for additional tenants. Developer Kirk Hermansen of Hermansen Land Development and Clay Eiland, owner of Eiland Coee Roasters, briefed the commission on their revised plans at a Sept. 21 meeting. Both applicants want to bring drive-thru restaurants to the property, triggering the need for special permits.

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The proposed outdoor Biergarten would include a bar, picnic tables, a game court, space for entertainment and more. (Rendering courtesy Hermansen Land Development)

His plan also incorporates a 16,000-square-foot outdoor dining and entertainment plaza known as the Biergarten. The area would include picnic tables, a bar, cabanas, a game court for cornhole and space for a food truck, among other amenities. Food would be served in the Biergarten, he said, from both the adjacent Dog Haus Biergarten restau- rant and from a small kitchen on-site. Hermansen likened the environment of the Biergarten to that of the Katy Trail Ice House in Dallas. Eiland also presented his revised

plan for the second location of Eiland Coee Roasters. It includes a two-story restaurant with a drive- thru as well as an adjacent coee roasting warehouse and administra- tive oces. Jason Claunch, president of Cat- alyst Commercial, said this version of Eiland’s plan eliminates access from the frontage road, which should alleviate trac. It also includes cross access and cross parking with Hermansen’s property, he said. The commission unanimously approved both requests.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Richardson, Richardson ISD & Plano ISD

HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s board of directors unanimously approved a major bus network redesign during its Aug. 24 meeting. The DARTzoom Final Bus Network Plan was designed to address signicant growth in Richardson and the surrounding areas. In Richardson, DART is adding two on-demand shuttle zones. One will cover portions of three existing bus routes in the northeastern portion of the city, while the other will focus on central Richardson, covering portions of three current bus routes. RICHARDSON ISD Trustees are considering a partnership that would expand Dallas College’s Richland Collegiate High School program and provide more opportunities for students to earn college credits. If approved, RISD would develop ninth and 10th grade programs, which would potentially expand enrollment in the school to up to 900 students. PLANO ISD The district began its Virtual Academy for students in kindergarten through sixth grade Sept. 13 following approval of state funding. Senate Bill 15 allows independent school districts to oer virtual programs without a reduction in state funding. Per a Sept. 21 board vote, the districtwide mask mandate expired Sept. 24. Richardson City Council meets Oct. 4, 11, 18 and 25 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. The meetings are open to the public and are streamed live online. Richardson ISD meets Oct. 4 and 18 at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD meets Oct. 5 and 19 at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER

KDC announces plans to add three high-rises to CityLine

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON Three new oce buildings are coming to CityLine after developer KDC announced Sept. 21 plans to add 1.4 million square feet to the development. The buildings—Five Cityline, Six Cityline and Seven Cityline—will include 18, 13 and 15 stories, respectively. They will join the 2.6 million square feet of oce space and 200,000 square feet of restaurant, retail and enter- tainment space already present in the development, according to a KDC news release. Corporate tenants include State Farm and Raytheon. CityLine also includes apartments and hotel space. According to the release, more than 4,000 residents are within walking distance of the development. “CityLine is one of the metroplex’s most successful urban, transit-oriented developments,” Walt Mountford, executive vice president of development for KDC, said in a statement. “These three new towers build upon the proj- ect’s success and will provide an exceptional opportunity for tenants seeking oce space in an already established and thriving walkable community.”

The three buildings will be constructed once tenants are signed. (Rendering courtesy Corgan and Associates)

Space in the buildings is already being marketed to prospective tenants, the release said. They can be cus- tomized to meet specic tenant needs and are available for pre-lease to large users, according to the release. Aarica Mims, senior vice president and director of leading for KDC, said CityLine is ideal for employee retention and recruitment because the development provides “high-quality buildings with easy access to great amenities.” Construction will begin once a single tenant or multi- ple tenants are secured, Mims said. KDC has a policy of not sharing costs associated with projects, according to a spokesperson.

RISD lowers tax rate

Census revealsmore residents, diversity

POPULATION ON THE RISE More than 20,000 new residents were added to Richardson’s population in the decennial census.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

RICHARDSON ISD Trustees adopted a slightly lower property tax rate at a Sept. 20 meeting. The adopted rate of $1.3909 per $100 valuation is nearly 1% lower than the rate passed last year. However, it will raise more taxes for maintenance and operations than last year’s rate, according to district documents. This is due to a rise in property values. With this new rate, the average RISD homeowner will pay about $33 more in school property taxes than the last scal year, per the district.

2020 119,469

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON The city’s popu- lation has grown more than 20%, according to decennial census data released Sept. 16. Richardson was home to 119,469 people in 2020 and 99,223 in 2010, according to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The number of residents who identify as Black or African Amer- ican increased by more than 52%, from 8,238 to 12,615, according to the bureau.

2010 99,223

+20.4% INCREASE

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The city’s share of Asian res- idents grew by nearly 37%, and residents who identify as Hispanic or Latino increased by nearly 30%. Residents who identify as white increased by almost 5%.

Sain Catholic C is one of o schools in T ICLE school a a n Catholic C is one of on schools in T ICLE school a

WHY A CATHOLIC CLASSICAL EDUCATION? Encouraging children to seek truth, goodness and beauty in all things will ultimately lead them to walk with Christ. At SPCCS, our fundamental tenets are faith, wisdom and virtue; the devel- opment of these tenets in our students helps build a foundation in Christ while providing them an enriching education. a classical curriculum i clud s e liberal arts, grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, geometry, music, astronomy, and Latin. a classical curriculum includes the liberal arts, grammar, logic, rhetoric, arithmetic, geometry, music, astronomy, and Latin. see beautiful works of art on the walls, the great books on our shelves, and thriving gardens outside our windows. The Catholic Classical student is curious, asks questions, and approaches the exciting journey of learning with a sense of wonder. In addition to the pursuit of goodness, truth and beauty, exciting journey of learning with a sense of wonder. In addition to the pursuit of goodness, truth and beauty, see beautiful works of art on the walls, the great bo ks on our shelves, and thriving gardens outside our windows. The Catholic Classical student is curious, asks questions, and ap roaches the

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

INSIDE INFORMATION

2 0 2 1 H I G H E R E D U C A T I O N G U I D E

ENROLLMENT TRENDS COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER The following includes facts and gures about education levels in Richardson and the surrounding areas. The majority of Richardson residents have gone on to receive a bachelor’s degree or higher following high school. SOURCES: 2019 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATES, TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CAMPUS CLOSEUP

These higher education institutions each have campuses in Richardson. The demographics here are for student enrollment, and degrees and certicates awarded at these college systems.

White African American Hispanic

Other

International

DALLAS COLLEGE RICHLAND CAMPUS 2,557 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19 17,414 Total enrolled at university in fall 2019

Fall 2019

Fiscal year ending Aug. 31, 2019

Degrees/certicates

Student enrollment

EDUCATED POPULATIONS

21.9%

19.6%

Here is a look at educational attainment among residents age 25 and older.

17%

17.3%

Some college, no degree Associate degree Bachelor’s degree Graduate or professional degree

High school graduate (includes equivalency)

26.8%

34.3%

18.7%

17.8%

Less than ninth grade Ninth-12th grade, no diploma

11.1%

15.6%

RICHARDSON

DALLAS COUNTY

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

29,543 Total enrolled at university in fall 2019 7,908 Degrees/certicates issued scal year 2018-19

Degrees/certicates

Student enrollment

19.1%

11.5%

28.8%

28.2%

34.1%

19.9%

4.9%

5.6%

6.4%

5.7%

19.7%

19.6%

11.5%

14.4%

12.9%

22.6%

24.9%

33.2%

9.5%

4.2% 3.5%

18.7%

29.8%

11.1%

NOTE: SOME PERCENTAGES MAY NOT EQUAL 100% DUE TO ROUNDING.

NOTE: “OTHER” REFERS TO ALL OTHER RACES NOT INDIVIDUALLY LISTED, INCLUDING UNKNOWN ORIGIN.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION

2 0 2 1 H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N G U I D E

Collin College planning to expand bachelor’s degree options in 2022

those roles. “There was a lot of work done on the front end to gather the informa- tion from the community on where the workforce jobs are,” said Sherry Schumann, Collin College executive vice president of preparations for each of the college’s degree programs. Next steps While the construction manage- ment degree program was approved by the college’s board earlier this year, Schumann said there are still several steps and approvals needed before it becomes ocial. Chief among those are approvals from the Texas Higher Education Coor- dinating Board and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. “[If] everything goes smoothly, it can take as much [as] a year to a year and a half before we’re actually through those approval processes,” Schumann said. Collin College was authorized earlier this year to oer up to ve bachelor’s degree programs. Johnson said the college is evaluating data about future programs that would benet students and the community. “We are community-centered, and we want to continue to oer aordable higher education oppor- tunities for our communities,” he said. “Every partnership [with the college] is crucial, whether it’s an [independent school district] or … business and industry leadership. All of these are very key stakeholders in our collaboration as we move into deciding on programs.” Brooklynn Cooper contributed to this report.

LOCAL DEMAND The Texas Workforce Commission projects continued demand for qualied employees in applied technology, applied science and nursing. The following projections are for 2018-28 in the state’s north central region.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

director. Career and technical educa- tion programs like those are valuable to economically disadvantaged stu- dents, said Renda Songer, teaching and learning consultant at Region 10 Education Service Center. Region 10 oers professional development and other assistance to North Texas school districts. “We know that over 60% of students come back and make their living right around the area that they attended high school,” Songer said. “If we’re preparing students for careers that don’t exist within their regional area, we’re preparing them to have to move away from home in order to earn a living.” Need for construction workforce Graduates with a bachelor’s degree in construction management have the opportunity to seek entry- level positions that oer an annual starting pay of around $90,000, according to Collin College sta. Songer said construction-related classes are likely to expand in local high schools if Collin College is approved to oer a construction management degree. “There’s so many [job] openings right now, but we just expect those openings to expand over the next decade,” Songer said of the construc- tion industry. Collin College’s plan for the construction management degree came about after doing an analysis that indicated a high demand for industry workers who could fulll

Collin College’s plan to oer more bachelor’s degrees will help address gaps in workforce training and oer a more aordable path to higher education for students. One planned addition is a con- struction management bachelor’s degree that could be oered at Collin College as early as fall 2022. That would be the third bachelor’s degree path available at Collin College, joining nursing and cybersecurity. “Any degree that we oer must oer [the] opportunity for our graduates to get a job and move ahead in life,” said Abe Johnson, Collin College’s senior vice president of campus operations. Pursuing a bachelor’s degree through Collin College is more aordable than the traditional uni- versity route, Johnson said. Collin County residents can save more than 80% when compared to the average cost for two semesters at a public state university, according to the Texas Higher Education Coordinat- ing Board. Plano ISD oers Career and Tech- nical Education courses that tie into many of the degrees and certica- tions oered by Collin College. This includes the opportunity to partici- pate in the Collin College Industries Academy Construction Management program. That program provides career-spe- cic training and industry certica- tions, according to Karen Buechman, PISD Career & Technical Education

ConstructionManagers

1,080 projected new jobs 423 average annual openings 28.2% annual growth

RegisteredNurses

3,659 projected new jobs 1,180 average annual openings 27.2% annual growth

Information SecurityAnalysts

696 projected new jobs 160 average annual openings 75.6% annual growth

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

CONTINUED FROM 1

TECH JOB GROWTH Several categories that did not exist in 2015 were present in 2019. Below is a breakdown of those jobs.

A BURGEONING INDUSTRY Between 2015 and 2019, employment in STEM-related elds more than doubled in Dallas-Fort Worth, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Below is a sampling of growth in two of those elds, tech and engineering.

Bioengineers and biomedical engineers Materials engineers Computer hardware engineers Engineers (all others) Aerospace engineers Architectural and engineering managers

2015

2019

740

19,460

5,690

49,990 total

11,490

Electrical engineers Mechanical engineers Industrial engineers Cost estimators

12,610

Computer Systems Analysts Network and Computer Systems Administrators Computer occupations (all other) Computer network architects Computer and Information Research Scientists

Electronics engineers (except computers) Computer and information systems managers

0

2,000

4,000

6,000

8,000

10,000

12,000

Number of employees in DFW

SOURCES: U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, UT DALLASCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

don’t just mint an engineer or a com- puter scientist overnight. It takes a while to get a degree in those elds.” Thousands of students were enrolled in UT Dallas’ Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Com- puter Science in fall 2020. The vast majority are pursuing a bachelor’s degree in computer science, a degree path that has seen enrollment grow by just shy of 467% over the past decade, according to data from the university. Other majors oered in the school include mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, biomedical engineering, computer engineering and software engineering. The average tech salary in the Dallas-Fort Worth region in 2019 was just over $95,000, a nearly 6% annual increase, according to a 2021 Tech Salary Report from Dice, a

The university has also doubled down on its investment in research, Jamison said. That is a big draw for companies looking to relocate to the Dallas area, he said. “Because we are engaged in under- graduate research, our students can transition and go into the work envi- ronment and continue that research,” he said. Several local companies have tapped into UT Dallas’ talent pool by oering student internships. Since 2016, students interested in cyber- security and software development have had the option of interning with State Farm’s Information Technol- ogy Department. The program has historically accepted 12-18 UT Dallas students per semester, said Amanda Morgan, a technology analyst on State Farm’s workforce team who is

marketplace for technologists that helps professionals manage their careers and employers connect with highly skilled tech talent. “When you look at the tech indus- tries overall, what we have done is ex … our ability to prepare our work- force moving forward,” said Calvin Jamison, UT Dallas’ vice president for facilities and economic develop- ment. “We have the infrastructure, and then we also have the pipeline.” Addressing the need In response to North Texas’ bur- geoning tech industry, UT Dallas has invested millions of dollars in related infrastructure. In 2018, the univer- sity opened a 200,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art engineering and computer science building that cost $110 million.

responsible for recruiting student interns. The State Farm Internship Program involves honing technical skills, but it also focuses on the development of soft skills. Students learn how to work on a team, how to adapt to changing scenarios, and how to com- municate with leadership, Morgan said. “We are looking to build our future leaders,” Morgan said, noting that the intern to full-time employee conver- sion rate for the UT Dallas program is about 90%. “I can’t tell you how many executives, directors, manag- ers and senior-level engineers have been through our intern program.” Strength in numbers One of the ways UT Dallas acts as an “economic engine for the region,”

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 H I G H E R E D U C A T I O N G U I D E

TOP TECH TALENT LABOR POOLS DFW’s tech-talent labor pool was the sixth largest in North America in 2020, according to a report from real estate investment and services rm CBRE.

TOP METRO AREAS FOR TECH JOB POSTINGS Between July and August, slightly fewer tech jobs were posted; however, the DFW region still ranks among the highest in the nation for available tech jobs. Experts say this is because supply has not caught up with demand.

premier tech hub in Texas.” This partnership will “help culti- vate the next generation of entrepre- neurs,” said Joseph Pancrazio, UT Dallas vice president for research, said in a previous interview with Community Impact Newspaper . Ensuring a healthy pipeline of tal- ent for the region’s tech industry requires sparking an early interest in science, technology, engineering and math, said Tad McIntosh, president and CEO of Dallas-based HumCap Recruiting. “We have a really big issue with STEM talent, so the best thing we can do is continue to encourage math and sciences younger and younger to keep up as a local market,” he said. In 2018, Richardson ISD launched its Future Ready: STEM for All ini- tiative, which aims to provide access to STEM education for all students through problem-based learning, career and technical education, elec- tives, competitions, clubs and more. The introduction of STEM concepts in RISD happens as early as elemen- tary school, said Kyndra Johnson, executive director of STEM and inno- vation with RISD. The district is also beginning to oer STEM clubs to ele- mentary-age students. “We [believe in] crayons to college to careers,” Johnson said. “We begin with our smallest, most curious indi- viduals, and we build their capacity as they move through our district so that when they get to high school they will know what cybersecurity or biotechnology is, and they can enroll in those areas and hopefully pursue STEM majors when they leave us.”

Market

Tech talent total Change since 2015

July

August

San Francisco Bay Area

373,430 348,330 270,400 265,370

+16.4% +6.7% +42.8%

-1,451

New York Metro

+847

-382

-1,337

-110

Toronto

Washington, D.C.

+10%

Los Angeles/Orange County 228,720

+18.6% +16.3% +35.4% +7.2% +4.6% +31.4%

Dallas/Fort Worth

189,200 184,660 168,090 167,380 160,700

Seattle Boston

Chicago Montreal

New York Washington D.C. Dallas Los Angeles Chicago

SOURCE: THE COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CBRECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Jamison said, is through its partner- ships with regional industry leaders. A prime example of this is the UTDe- sign program, which pairs regional companies with senior engineer- ing and computer science students to solve real-world engineering problems. Since 2014, more than 4,200 stu- dents in the UTDesign program have worked with 364 companies on 834 projects, nine of which have won national rst place awards, according to UT Dallas. One of the biggest advantages for the program’s corporate partners is the potential for recruitment, said Robert Hart, a director of the pro- gram who is also a clinical associate professor of mechanical engineering. “They get an eight-month-long job interview with six students,” Hart said. “They really get to see how students perform in all kinds of situ- ations, and that’s a lot better than a two-hour job interview on some ran- dom day of the week.” For their UTDesign project, Trent

win second place in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Student Manufacturing Design Competition. This real-world experience, com- bined with other internships, clubs and courses he has been a part of through UT Dallas, has given Sakak- ini the condence and skills to enter the workforce after college, he said. “Having all of these opportunities helped me to develop myself as an engineer as well as a person,” he said. “I’ve had experience, I’ve had a lot of practice—I’m ready to go.” The road ahead Another valuable partnership is the one the university has with the city of Richardson, Jamison said. UT Dallas recently announced it will open ve new research centers as well as an extension of its Venture Development Center within the city’s newly minted Innovation Quarter, a 1,200-acre industrial area east of Central Expressway that Richardson ocials plan to transform into “the

Sakakini’s team designed a product for UTDallas spino company Adap- tive3D. The assignment was to design a sorting machine for the company’s 3D-printed nasal swabs. “Nobody ever told us what to do— there were no guidelines,” he said. “They said, ‘Here’s what we need. You guys gure it out.’” Adaptive3D President and CEO Walter Voit is also an alumnus and associate professor of materials sci- ence and engineering at UT Dallas. He said partnering with UTDesign is a cost-eective way to gain fresh per- spectives on open-ended problems that lack specic solutions. “Not only does it help us accom- plish near-term needs in design and innovation, but it also provides a robust recruiting pipeline to allow students to get to know us as a com- pany,” he said. “Students get a chance to work with us, and be a part of our culture and our vision, and buy into how we see the world.” The product Sakakini’s team designed for Adaptive3D went on to

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