Franklin - Brentwood Edition - September 2021

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 7  SEPT. 14OCT. 11, 2021

ONLINE AT

VOTER GUIDE

CANDIDATE Q&AS

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IMPACTS

WINE &DESIGN

PASTA& CREAM

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2021 V O T E R G U I D E Local turnout The city of Franklin’s Board of Mayor and Aldermen election has historically not attracted the same number of registered voters as a state or national election, although 2013 2012 2011

Local districts navigate COVID19policies to keep cases down, schools open

7.13%

71.8%

BY WENDY STURGES

2.03%

Following the 2020-21 school year, local and state ocials havemade commitments to teaching students in person as much as possible, in line with recommen- dations from the Tennessee Department of Education and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, with active COVID-19 cases on the rise in schools and overall countywide, school ocials have expressed concerns about how to keep schools open while ensuring safety mitigations are in place. CONTINUED ON 19

6.14%

2015

Williamson County ocials said that is typical.

72.11%

2016

At-large race Presidential election

9.18%

2017

7.2%

2019

Ward race

78.79%

2020

SOURCES: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION, TENNESSEE SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COVID-19 ON CAMPUS Cases in Williamson County Schools declined in early September. 700

Mask mandate Students Sta

Ocialsworking to boost voter turnout in upcoming Franklin alderperson election

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BY WENDY STURGES

this year’s ballot will include one at-large seat that was left vacant following the death of former alder- person Pearl Bransford in November. Additionally, Incumbent Ward 1 Alderperson Beverly Burger is running unopposed. Competition for the remaining four seats is also expected to be sti as 13 candidates have led to run this year, a factor that could encourage more people to vote, according to local ocials. Although the past ve city elections have seen less than CONTINUED ON 13

Registered voters in Franklin have the chance Oct. 26 to head to the polls to pick who will repre- sent their ward and the city as a whole. This year’s race will determine which four new candidates will join the board, representing the highest level of turnover since 2007, when four new alderpersons and a new mayor were elected. The 2021 election will look dierent than in years past. Typically, ward and at-large alderpersons are elected separately, in staggered years; however,

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SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLACY: Ask any resident in Williamson County who has been here for more than 10 years, and they will tell you Franklin and Brentwood look very dierent today as new developments seem to be popping up each week. Our Development Updates section (see Page 7) has the latest information on projects in your area. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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FROMWENDY: Election Day in the city of Franklin is only a few weeks away, and several candidates are in the running for the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Our cover story features Q&As with each candidate to help you learn about where they stand on local issues. For more information, check out our Voter Guide (see Page 13). Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 CTGrace , a family-owned women’s clothing boutique, opened Sept. 10 at 122 E. Main St., Franklin. The store will be stocked with fashion’s latest brand-name clothing and accessories. Store owner, Colleen Burke, moved to Franklin 10 years ago with her family. The store name comes from a company her late husband started for her, combining the rst letters of their names—Colleen and Tim—with “the grace they aspire to live out every day,” a Face- book post for the business said. 949-933-8802. www.facebook.com/ CTGraceboutique 2 F8 Well Centers began seeing patients June 3 and hosted an open house Aug. 5 at 5409 Maryland Way, Ste. 120, Brentwood, in Gateway Plaza 1. Founded by Dr. Benjamin Galyardt, the center uses the Galyardt Method to oer individualized and comprehensive care promoting optimal health and increased well-being, according to the F8 Well Centers of Nashville Facebook page. Other locations include Phoenix and Fort Collins, Colorado. 615-915-2954. https://fmcenters.com/locations/ nashville-tennessee 3 The Lash Lounge opened a Franklin location Aug. 30 at 3046 Columbia Ave., Ste. 106. The salon specializes in lash extensions, lash lifts, brow and lash tint- ing, and brow threading. 615-395-6542. www.thelashlounge.com/ tn-franklin-south 4 A new Chuy’s location opened in Brentwood on Aug. 24 at 100 E. Park Drive. The Tex-Mex eatery that origi- nated in Austin has ve Nashville metro area locations with the opening of the Brentwood restaurant. With a menu fea- turing queso, nachos, fajitas, enchiladas and margaritas, Chuy’s oers dine-in, curbside to-go and delivery services. 615-436-6969. www.chuys.com/ locations/tennessee/brentwood 5 I Love Juice Bar opened in early August at 7011 Executive Center Drive, Ste. B104, Brentwood. The shop oers smoothies, juices and acai bowls with fresh fruits and vegetables. Seasonal menu items are available. www.ilovejuicebar.com/brentwood

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6 F-45 Training opened in the spring at 7030 Executive Center Drive, Ste. 150, Brentwood. The tness studio, which also has locations in Cool Springs and Franklin, oers circuit and high-intensity training programs and workouts. 615-985-4545. www.f45training.com 7 Mimosa Nail Bar held a grand opening in mid-June at 7030 Executive Center Drive, Ste. 102, Brentwood. The nail salon oers manicures, pedicures and waxing services. 615-818-0162. www.mimosanailbar.com 8 A new Starbucks location opened in early August at 601 Hillsboro Road, Franklin. The location is the fth to open in the Franklin area, according to the company’s website. The Seattle-based company oers specialty coee and tea drinks as well as food and coee beans for home use. www.starbucks.com Jericho Coee Co. , a mobile coee trailer, celebrated its grand opening July 17. Named after the Biblical story of Jericho, the coee company sources its beans from fair-trade workers, and a portion of sales go toward nonprots. The business also sells six dierent cof- fee roasts in 12-ounce bags. Subscription services are also available, according to the business. 615-275-9374. https://jericho.coee COMING SOON 9 A new Burlington Coat Factory lo- cation is set to open at 545 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 100, Franklin, in the Thor- oughbred Shopping Center. The shop, which oers clothing, shoes and acces- sories for men, women and children, is

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GRAND OPENING | REOPENING | ANNIVERSARY GROUND BREAKING | EXPANSION | RENOVATION TAKE A LOOK AT BENEFITS LIKE MEDIA COVERAGE, COMPLIMENTARY FOOD, MARKETING MATERIALS AND MORE BY SCANNING THE CODE OR VISITING WILLIAMSONCHAMBER.COM

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ANDY COMER, BETH MARSHALL & WENDY STURGES

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The Lash Lounge

Westhaven

COURTESY THE LASH LOUNGE

COURTESY SOUTHERN LAND COMPANY

RELOCATIONS 11 SilverPointe Properties relocated its oces from 7105 Crossroads Blvd., Ste. 102, Brentwood, to 206 Gothic Court, Ste. 301, Franklin, in July. According to the company, it oers real estate ser- vices for homes and commercial proper- ties in Middle Tennessee. 615-771-7877. www.silverpointe.com ANNIVERSARIES 12 Spark: An Art Studio marked its rst anniversary in Brentwood in August. The make-your-own art studio, owned by siblings Lynn Harnen and RJ Chesna, is located at 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 110, Brentwood, and features glass, tile pieces and other materials for guests to make their own mosaics. 615-483-9847. www.sparkartbrentwood.com

slated to open in October, according to the company’s website. The store is the latest retailer to join the shopping center that is also home to a new Trader Joe’s that opened in late August. www.burlington.com 10 Ocials with master-planned com- munity Westhaven broke ground July 30 on a new venture that will pro- vide additional residential options in the area. Development will soon begin on an active adult community for residents age 55 and older, to be located at the south- east corner of Hwy. 96 and Boyd Mill Avenue near existing Westhaven prop- erties, according to developer Southern Land Co. The community will feature 200 for-sale homes as well as 200 rent- al units as part of an independent-living community within the development. https://southernland.com/westhaven

Trader Joe’s opened in August along Cool Springs Boulevard.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Trader Joe’s opened a new location Aug. 27 at 545 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin, in the Thoroughbred Shopping Center. The grocery store oers a variety of specialty snacks such as almond butter cups, plantain chips, and Scandinavian Swimmers gummies as well as produce, meats, cheeses, frozen items, owers and personal care items. This is the third location to open in the Greater Nashville area; other locations are open in Green Hills and the Belle Meade area. 615-771-3697. www.traderjoes.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

TODO LIST

September & October events

COMPILED BY KASEY SALISBURY & WENDY STURGES

SEPT. 24

BOOTLEGGER’S BASH CARTON HOUSE

SEPT. 2526

PILGRIMAGEMUSIC & CULTURAL FESTIVAL THE PARK AT HARLINSDALE FARM

The Franklin Theatre is located in downtown Franklin.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Hosted by nonprot The Battle of Franklin Trust, the Bootlegger’s Bash will feature tastings from Tennessean distilleries, vineyards and breweries; a traditional Southern buet of local cuisine; and live music provided by Rock & Roll Pianos at the historic Carton house, which served as a eld hospital during the Civil War’s Battle of Franklin in 1864. 6-11 p.m. $47 (tasting only), $77 (full event). 1345 Eastern Flank Circle, Franklin. 615-794-0903. https://boft.org

Dave Matthews Band, The Black Keys, Maren Morris and other artists of various genres will perform at the Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival. The event will also include a comedy showcase and exhibits. Attendees are required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test result. 10 a.m. (Sat.), 9:30 a.m. (Sun.). $239 (two-day general admission). The Park at Harlinsdale Farm, 239 Franklin Road, Franklin. https://pilgrimagefestival.com

LIVEMUSIC FRANKLIN THEATRE 419 Main St., Franklin 615-538-2076 www.franklintheatre.com SEPTEMBER 17 Max Weinberg’s Jukebox, 8 p.m. 1819 Charles Esten, 8 p.m. 2223 Joseph, 8 p.m. 2930 Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder, 8 p.m. OCTOBER 0102 Mandy Barnett, 8 p.m. 10 Rickie Lee Jones, 8 p.m. FIRST BANKAMPHITHEATER 4525 Graystone Quarry Lane, Franklin 615-763-3367 www.rstbankampitheater.com SEPTEMBER 1617 Jonas Brothers with Kelsea Ballerini, 7 p.m. 21 TLC with Bone Thugs-N- Harmony, 7 p.m. 29 Santana, 8 p.m. OCTOBER 01 Nathaniel Rateli & The Night Sweats, 6:45 p.m. 10 H.E.R, 7:30 p.m. 11 Bush & Stone Temple Pilots, 7 p.m.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY PILGRIMAGE MUSIC & CULTURAL FESTIVAL

SEPTEMBER 16 THROUGH 19

615-370-4672. https://www.owlshill.org/ family-camp-out 09 SEE DANCE PERFORMANCES FROMAROUND THEWORLD The Williamson County Performing Arts Center hosts Celebration of Nations, a multicultural music and dance event. Performers include the Natchez Trace Band, Sankofa African Drum & Dance and St. Rafael Latin Music. Proceeds from the event go to support Sister Cities of Franklin and Williamson County. 1-3:30 p.m. $10 (general admission). 112 Everbright Ave., Franklin. 615-786-0186, ext. 2524. www.wcpactn.com 12 SUPPORT LOCAL SENIORS AND CAREGIVERS The Morning Pointe Foundation, a nonprot that supports caregivers across the region, will host a talent show of 10 local “young at heart” seniors. Prizes will be awarded to rst, second and third place. 6 p.m. (meet and greet), 7 p.m. (show). $20 (sponsorships available). Franklin Theatre, 419 Main

and supervised, according to event organizers. 6 p.m. $30. 7100 Executive Center Drive, Brentwood. www.goatyoganashville.com 25 PROMOTE PUBLIC SAFETY Brentwood families can meet rst responders, tour a re engine and experience re safety demonstrations at this outdoor annual festival. 9 a.m. Free. City Park, 300 Franklin Road, Brentwood. 615-371-0170. https://www.brentwoodtn.gov OCTOBER 02 THROUGH03 CAMP OUTWITH THE FAMILY For one night, Owl’s Hill Nature Sanctuary will be open for overnight camping. Activities will include marshmallow roasting, an owl presentation, a guided night hike, crafts and breakfast. Campers should bring their own dinner and tent. 4 p.m. (Oct. 2 check-in), 8:30 a.m. (Oct. 3 checkout). $65 (per tent of up to four people). Owl’s Hill Nature Sanctuary, 545 Beech Creek Road S., Brentwood.

SEE A SHAKESPEAREAN

PERFORMANCE The 33rd annual Summer Shakespeare Festival returns with two performances from the Nashville Shakespeare Festival and the Kennie Playhouse. Performances include a production of August Wilson’s “Jitney.” (Sept. 16-17) as well as “12th Night” (Sept. 18-19). Guests are encouraged to bring their own chairs and blankets. Gates open at 5:15 p.m. $10 (suggested donation). Williamson County Performing Arts Center at Academy Park, 112 Everbright Ave., Franklin. 615-786-0186, ext. 2524. www.wcpactn.com 20 TAKE A YOGA CLASSWITH BABY GOATS AT CITY PARK Goat Yoga Nashville hosts a yoga class in Brentwood’s City Park where attendees can take a yoga course surrounded by baby goats. Attendees should bring their own water bottles and towel. Children must be accompanied by parents

St., Franklin. 615-538-2076. www.franklintheatre.com

Find more or submit Franklin and Brentwood events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

DUSTY SLAY October 26, 2021 at The Factory in Franklin Tickets on sale now for $100 Includes dinner, drinks & show! www.wavesinc.com/standup

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES WilliamsonCounty

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECT

to discontinue emissions tests Drivers in Williamson County will no longer have to have their cars tested for emissions following a change to Tennessee’s air quality plan approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation announced Aug. 17 that drivers in ve counties—Hamilton, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson and Wilson— will no longer have to complete emissions testing when registering their vehicles. According to the TDEC, air quality in the region has improved in recent years, removing the need to check emissions. The change is also consistent with the federal Clean Air Act and the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. “This decision by EPA is a major step that means an end to mandatory

CHESTNUT BEND TRAIL

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 8. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. project will connect to the existing Chestnut Bend Trail. The project is funded through the city’s capital im- provements program and is slated to begin construction this fall, according to the city. Timeline: September 2021-late 2022 Cost: $3.03 million Funding source: city of Franklin Harlinsdale Farm bridge construction The city of Franklin began a project in September to construct a new green- way and bridge over the Harpeth River in The Park at Harlinsdale Farm along Franklin Road north of downtown. The

Beginning Jan. 14, 2022, divers will no longer be required to pass emissions testing in order to register their vehicles. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

tests of vehicles for many Tennes- seans,” TDEC Commissioner David Salyers said in a release. “It’s a recognition of the improvement of our state’s air quality and demon- strates the diligence Tennesseans have shown toward achieving and maintaining this goal.” The change is slated to become eective for drivers beginning Jan. 14, 2022, according to the TDEC, meaning drivers renewing their vehicle registration on or after that date will not be required to show

a passing emissions test. Drivers registering vehicles on Jan. 13 or earlier will still be required to pass emissions testing. Local lawmakers said the end of emissions testing will help remove nancial strains for drivers. “Finally, we will see an end to the unnecessary stress, long waits and nancial burdens placed on hard- working families in [those] counties where emissions testing is required,” Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson, RFranklin, said in a release.

Garrett Williamson, CFP® & Zack Chichelo, JD 615-376-8316 Garrett.Williamson@PeachtreePlanning.com Zack.Chichelo@PeachtreePlanning.com Realize Your Legacy Retirement & Care Planning • Business Exit Planning Wealth Development 615-376-8316 Call Today!

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Local construction projects

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CAROTHERS CROSSINGWEST Carothers Crossing West, located along Carothers Parkway and Liberty Pike in the Cool Springs area, is a new mixed-use center that will feature oce and retail space as well as more than 300 apartment units, according to developer SouthStar. SouthStar has also developed other projects in the area, including Carothers Crossing, which is anchored by LifeTime Fitness.

OMAN New homes are still under construction at Oman, a 21-lot community located along Franklin Road and the newly-constructed Crews Lane in Brentwood. The homes, built by Grove Park Construction, are located on 34 acres, and the neighborhood features a community mailbox area. A new trac signal has been placed at the entrance of the neighborhood for easier access along Franklin Road.

Gov. Bill Lee and his wife, Maria, spoke during the BrightStone event in Williamson County.

FEATURED PROJECT BRIGHTSTONE

Sta and volunteers with Franklin nonprot organization BrightStone held an event Aug. 13 to celebrate the start of construction on its new campus on Columbia Pike. The event was attended by Gov. Bill Lee and First Lady Maria Lee, who spoke of the nonprot’s mission to employ and educate adults with developmental disabilities. “I want to thank all of those who have supported BrightStone in the past and will continue to support them in the future,” Maria Lee said. “All have given of their time, their talents and their presence to support the life learning and job training here. Men and women are able to live the quality of life that we all live today.” When completed, the campus will feature student housing, a job training center, a gymnasium, a medical center and additional capacity to expand the nonprot’s existing programs. The rst phase of the project is slated to be complete in September 2022, according to BrightStone Founder and CEO Brenda Hauk. “We are so excited about what is going to be happening on this 140 acres,” Hauk said during the event. “We will only be a small part of the solution, but, by golly, we’re going to be part of the solution.”

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FRANKLIN CHRISTIANACADEMY Crews at Franklin Christian Academy, located along Old Charlotte Pike in west Franklin, are working to complete construction improvements to the soccer and football eld as well as a new building that will add new classrooms, oce space and a common area for students. The new building is slated to be complete in 2022, according to a construction estimate from the school.

Construction is ongoing at the new Williamson County Animal Center building, located along Old Charlotte Pike in Franklin. The new facility, expected to open in November, will feature 33,000 square feet and will include training areas, increased capacity, a medical wing, and walking and exercise trails.

Ground work on the new campus is already underway.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Williamson County districts see TCAP scores above state average

DISTRICTLEVELDATA

WCS FSSD State

On Aug. 11, the Tennessee Department of Education released district results of the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program, which includes TNReady and end-of-course testing. In Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District, students consistently scored above the state average.

BY WENDY STURGES

weeks analyzing the data more deeply to determine appropriate next steps and to purposefully implement the strategies we have already identied.” While the Tennessee General Assembly passed legislation in 2020 waiving accountability requirements for districts and students taking tests during the 2020-21 school year, both districts still saw high rates of participation in state assessments, which provides data on what addi- tional instruction may be needed. Approximately 95% of students participated in testing in WCS, and 99% of students were tested in FSSD. Despite lower state scores, local districts are still seeing higher scores than the state average. Just over 60% 32%. For seventh grade math, 39.1% of students in FSSD and 50.5% of students in WCS showed prociency, compared to the state average of 24%. “We are in the process of drilling down to particular standards that were tested to see what we can glean from those tests for our folks,” WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said in the Aug. 16 board of education meeting. “Compared to the state, we continue to be pretty spectacular, of third graders in WCS and 48% in FSSD showed prociency in English language arts, compared to the state average of

Third-grade reading scores are an indicator of academic prociency.

With students now settled back at school, district ocials are looking ahead at what students will need throughout this school year to help make up for lost time due to the pandemic. On Aug. 11, the Tennessee Depart- ment of Education released district level scores for the 2020-21 Ten- nessee Comprehensive Assessment Program, which includes TNReady and end of course testing for students in grades three through 12. Williamson County Schools and Franklin Special School District ocials said the test results show the eects of extended closures during the spring of 2020, when schools

Third grade English TNReady prociency

2018-19

67.9%

59.8%

36.9%

2020-21

60.4%

46.5%

32%

Seventh grade math scores show a base level of math prociency.

Seventh grade math TNReady prociency

2018-19

68%

46.1%

across the state closed for weeks while the state

“WE’RE GOING TO MAKE SURE TO TAKE THAT TEST DATA AND FINDWAYS TO GROWAND IMPROVE OURSELVES.” JASON GOLDEN, WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT

33.6%

2020-21

grappled with the beginning of the coronavirus pan- demic. Statewide, student achieve- ment dropped in several areas, which

50.5%

39.1%

25%

SOURCE: TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

is a trend seen locally as well. “There are many areas to cele- brate as we continue to review the assessment data. We are extremely proud of the dedicated work and support our teachers provide daily to students of all talent levels. There are also certainly some areas on which to focus and improve,” FSSD Director of Schools David Snowden said in a release. “We will spend the next few

but the reality is it’s very dicult to compare apples to apples in that context. We’re going to make sure to take that test data to nd ways to grow and improve ourselves.” According to the TDOE, ELA scores for third graders are signicant as they can be an indicator of future academic success. Additionally, sev- enth grade math is also foundational for math skills and future courses.

To help give more support to students, local districts are working to bring on additional sta, such as inter- vention paraprofessionals to work on learning loss and clinical social workers to address mental health. “As we welcomed students back for in-person learning last year, our goal was for students to feel supported by everyone in the school,” Snowden said in a release.

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9

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News from Franklin, Brentwood & Williamson County

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

NUMBER TOKNOW District that were designated as reward schools for high academic performance during the 2020- 21 school year by the Tennessee Department of Education. Freedom Intermediate School as well as Franklin, Moore, Liberty and Poplar Grove elementary schools were named as reward schools, according to the district. 5 CITY& COUNTY HIGHLIGHTS This is the number of schools in the Franklin Special School WILLIAMSONCOUNTY As of Sept. 7, the Williamson County Health Department has moved COVID-19 vaccinations and testing back to the Ag Expo Center on Long Lane in Franklin. Ocials cited the rising number of active cases as the need for a large venue. Residents can receive a vaccine free of charge with or without an appointment from 1-3 p.m. Mon.-Fri., according to the health department. FRANKLIN The city of Franklin will hold community meetings Sept. 21-22 at City Hall to discuss the city’s urban growth boundaries, which determine how future development is guided. Sessions will cover various parts of the city and will be held at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on both days. Residents can nd more information at www.franklintn.gov BRENTWOOD In addition to school donations, the Brentwood City Commission awarded $102,250 in funds to local community groups including Brentwood Blaze, FiftyForward Martin Center, Mid-Cumberland Human Resource Agency and YMCA Brentwood. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen meets Sept. 28 and Oct. 12 at 7 p.m. at 109 3rd Ave. S., Franklin. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. In-person seating may be limited. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission meets Sept. 27 and Oct. 11 at 7 p.m. at 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education meets Sept. 20 at 6:30 p.m. at 1320 W. Main St., Franklin 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education meets Sept. 20 at 6:30 p.m. at Freedom Intermediate School, 840 Glass Lane, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Brentwood donates $238K to local public schools BRENTWOOD Carrying on a 35-year tradition, the city of Brent- wood has awarded thousands of dollars in funds to local schools and community groups. The Brentwood City Commission presented checks to the groups during its Aug. 23 meeting. Recipients included Brentwood-area schools in Williamson County Schools. According to the city, Brentwood and Ravenwood high schools each received $62,000; Sunset and Wood- land middle schools each received $15,600; and Crockett, Edmondson, Jordan, Kenrose, Lipscomb and Scales elementary schools each received $10,400. Sunset Elementary School, which has a lower percentage of Brent- wood-area students, received $4,785. Funds will be used to pay for new technology and intervention course materials.

A large number of parents and community members showed up to protest during the Aug. 10meeting. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

County to investigate protests at Aug. 10 school boardmeeting

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Williamson County Sheri Dusty Rhoades announced Aug. 12 his oce will launch an investigation regarding behavior seen during the Williamson County Schools Board of Education special-called meeting on Aug. 10. During the meeting, tensions were high as parents called for the board to vote against requiring masks for students. At several points during the meeting, board Chair Nancy Garrett called for order amid multiple interruptions and outbursts. Law enforcement ocials were present during the meeting and were asked to escort individuals from the room when outbursts became too frequent. The board ultimately voted 7-3 to approve mask requirements for

elementary school students and sta through at least Sept. 21. Following the hourslong meeting, several parents and residents—who were unable to attend the meeting indoors due to capacity limits— stood outside chanting “No more masks” and threatened legal action against board members. According to video circulated on social media, some individuals blocked cars from leaving the parking lot while yelling at individuals wearing masks as well as district ocials. “When expression crosses over into behavior that is violent, law enforcement’s role is clear, and the Williamson County Sheri’s Oce will intervene to address those criminal acts when observed or when they are brought to our attention,” Rhoades said.

The city donated $238,000 to local schools. (Courtesy city of Brentwood)

Brad Fiscus resigns frompost on Williamson County Schools board WILLIAMSON COUNTY

District approves teacher COVID19 sick leave for 202122 WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS During a special-called meeting Aug. 26, the Williamson County Schools Board of Education approved a resolution to grant additional sick days to teachers and sta if they have to quarantine due to COVID-19. The measure allows teachers to be granted up to 10 paid days of leave should they have a conrmed case of COVID-19 that would be retroactively eective as of Aug. 2. This paid leave would be in addition to existing sick leave granted to employees, according to WCS Superintendent Jason Golden.

SCHOOLS Williamson County Schools Board of Education mem- ber Brad Fiscus will resign from his position at the end of September. According to a social media post, Fiscus, who represents District 4, will leave the county as his family plans to move to northern Virginia.

Brad Fiscus

Williamson County commissioners Gregg Lawrence and Chad Story—both of whom represent District 4—will nominate an individual to replace Fiscus. That person must be approved by the commission. Once appointed to the board, that individual will serve the rest of Fiscus’ term, to expire in August 2022. As of press time Sept. 9, a new board appointee had not been named.

SICK DAYS Williamson County Schools will allow teachers to take up to 10 paid sick days should they contract COVID-19.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Wine&Design Paint and sip studio serves as creative space W hen Niccole Jackson and her daughter, Alexa, moved to the Middle Ten- building event to a date night or birthday celebration.

BY WENDY STURGES

Jackson said the studio also oers private rentals for birthdays, bach- elorette parties and other events. But attendees can also sign up for Pop-in & Paint or Open Studio where individuals can choose from a smaller number of paintings with limited or no instruction. Children are also welcome at the studio, Jackson said. Wine & Design can host children’s birthday parties as well as Art Buzz Kids, classes speci- cally for kids with special themes, and Mommy & Me classes. In addition to painting, Wine & Design also oers classes for crafts and other home decor. Going into the fall and winter seasons, the studio will host workshops where attendees

nessee area, she said she was looking to leave her corporate job and start her own business while fostering her daughter’s creative side. “I wanted to help her gure out who she was, what are her natural gifts and what she’s really good at,” Jackson said. “I came across this franchise and thought that it would be something my daughter and I could do together.” In 2017, Jackson opened Franklin’s rst location of Wine & Design. The business allows individuals to come in by themselves or with a group to learn more about painting in a fun environment, she said. In addition to being able to choose frommore than 6,000 dierent painting options, the studio also

The studio hosts events, date nights and parties. (Photos courtesy Wine & Design)

AWIDE SELECTION Wine & Design oers a variety of dierent class types.

Pop-in & Paint

Virtual classes

Team building

can make chunky knit blankets, front porch signs and custom-painted wine glasses. Jackson said one of the things she enjoys the most

“WE TELL PEOPLE IT’S ABOUT THE FUNAND THE EXPERIENCE; DON’T STRESS TOOMUCH ABOUT THE PAINTING.” NICCOLE JACKSON, OWNER OF WINE & DESIGN

oers classes for themed paintings like fall landscapes or even Paint Your Pet classes. Attendees can work with a class instructor to guide

Open Studio

Date night

DIY

about the studio is seeing people who do not think of themselves as painters begin to really enjoy the creative process. “We tell people it’s about the fun and the experience; don’t stress too much about the painting,” Jackson said. “People come in and think they have to match the painting, but if you come in and think, ‘I’m just going to have fun,’ you’ll nd that painting can be very relaxing.”

Private party

Art Buzz Kids

Mobile paint classes

Owner Niccole Jackson opened the studio in Franklin in 2017.

them through the painting process. Adults age 21 and older can bring beer or wine to enjoy while painting, and nonalcoholic drinks and limited snacks are allowed. While preregistration for all classes is required, Jackson said the studio can accommodate a number of events for a variety of outings, from a ladies night or corporate team

Wine&Design 101 Holiday Court, Franklin 615-224-8082 www.wineanddesign.com/franklin-tn Hours: Mon.-Fri. noon-9 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. noon-6 p.m.

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HOLIDAY CT.

96

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Tickets $100.00 person Table for 10 $1,000.00 RSVP at petersonforparkinsons.org/peteys-preds-party • Or contact the PFP office 615-269-5312 • email brent@petersonforparkinsons.org

11

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

Owners Eric and Felour Shanklin opened Pasta & Cream on Murfreesboro Road in 2014.

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PICK YOUR PASTA In addition to signature house dishes, Pasta & Cream also has options for diners to build their own pasta.

• Angel hair • Fettuccine • Gluten-free penne • Penne • Spaghetti PASTA

SAUCE

DINING FEATURE

Ivan ala Vodka: This creamy marinara sauce is made with a splash of vodka and served on top of pasta with chicken or shrimp. ($8.95-$11.45)

• Alfredo • Bacon cheddar • Bolognese • Bualo blue

• Cajun • Felour • Pesto • Priscilla • Tomato basil

Pasta&Cream Franklin family eatery features fresh ingredients, unique recipes S ince 2014, Felour and Eric Shanklin have owned and operated Pasta & Cream on Mur- freesboro Road in Franklin, steadily building from a family business to a go-to for unique pasta dishes with fresh ingredients. Eric said his philosophy around pasta sauce is BY WENDY STURGES

PROTEIN

The Shanklins also drew inspiration from their family for the menu when naming dishes—diners will nd dishes like the Ivan ala Vodka and the Priscilla, each named for the couple’s children. Other signature sauces include The Rockefeller—a cream sauce with smoked bacon, red onion and fresh spinach—and the Felour, a smoked gouda sauce with onions, mushrooms and baby spinach. Everything on the menu can also be made to be vegetarian or gluten-free, Felour said. The kitchen cooks up to 50 pounds of pasta a day, and sometimes more if needed, she said. The Shanklins said much of their business was built through word of mouth and that diners will often come from out of town. “We get tons of people, whole families, from Indiana or Ohio passing through on their way to the beach,” Eric said. “They’ll say, ‘One of our colleagues found you on vacation in a little town called Frank- lin.’ It’s pretty funny that we’re known in other states in our little spot here.”

Chicken

Meatballs

Shrimp

Pasta&Cream 1203 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-224-3971 www.pastaandcream.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-8 p.m., closed Sun.

simple: Start and nish with fresh ingredients. Each dish is cooked to order with simple ingredients like cheese, cream and tomatoes, and they are topped with fresh herbs and spices, he said. “We’re kind of famous for our sauces,” Eric said. “Everything is fresh and homemade. It’s pretty amazing how avorful it is with very few ingredi- ents. Simplicity at its nest.” Pasta & Cream oers a menu of customizable pasta dishes with a variety of pasta types and sauces. Eric, who is also the eatery’s executive chef, designed the menu based on dishes he cooked while working as a chef and as the food service director for Middle Tennessee State University.

65

N

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CONTINUED FROM 1

2 0 2 1 V O T E R G U I D E

Theword on wards

10% voter turnout, ocials said this year’s races could draw more people to the polls. “This time around, we’ve got a lot of incumbents not seeking re-election, and there’s a lot of new faces on the ballot,” Williamson County Elections Administrator Chad Gray said. “If they get out and campaign a lot, that’s cer- tainly going to raise more awareness.” Getting theword out Although turnout in presidential elections are higher—reaching 78% in theNovember 2020 election, according to the Tennessee Secretary of State’s oce—Gray said the type of turnout seen in Franklin is fairly typical for a municipal election because they often do not occur in the same year as a pres- idential or state election. “The turnout is usually somewhat dismal to be quite honest,” Gray said. “We’re lucky if we get 20% to 25% for a countywide election that’s just for county candidates. In munici- pal elections, we’re lucky if we get maybe 12% or 13%.” Gray said many cities typically choose to hold elections separately from state and national elections to make sure people know more about the candidates running. In a nation- wide election, local matters are typ- ically placed at the bottom of the ballot, he said. City Administra- days for people who work during normal business hours to have more time to vote. “Just going a little bit later allows us to maybe catch some people after work, so that seemed like a smart move and that’s a minimal additional cost for that,” Stuckey said. Future precinct changes Ocials said one barrier to vot- ing can be convenience. Williamson County uses convenience voting cen- ters—meaning voters can choose any polling place in the county, not just voting locations in their precincts. But some wards in the city are located farther from centers than others, something ocials are looking to tor Eric Stuckey said the city has worked with the county elec- tion commission to expand early voting hours from ending at 4:30 p.m. to ending at 6 p.m. on week-

Ward representatives

An at-large alderperson represents the city as a whole and can live anywhere in the city. A ward alderperson represents one portion of the city and must live in his or her ward. Each alderperson serves a four-year term , and elections are staggered every two years between at-large and ward alderpersons. Should the city need to replace an alderperson before their term has expired, a special election can be held or that seat can be added to the next upcoming election.

Ward 2

31

The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen is made up of two kinds of alderpersons: at- large and ward-specic.

431

96

Ward 1

Ward 4

96

Because wards are based on population, they vary widely in geographic size, according to Williamson County.

Ward 3

65

31

431

2017 turnout

The last ward alderperson election was in 2017, and voter turnout was close in each ward, with about 10% or less of registered voters in each ward casting ballots.

N

Ward 1 9.01% 9.6% 9.4% 10.05% Ward 2 Ward 3 Ward 4

SOURCES: CITY OF FRANKLIN, WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Drawing new lines Over the past 10 years, the city of Franklin has grown by nearly one-third in population size, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. As a result, the city will undergo redistricting.

remediate. During its Aug. 24 meeting, mem- bers of the Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen discussed expanding the number of voting sites in the city to help encourage more residents to participate. Williamson County has established eight locations that will be open in

1. The city will assess population increases throughout its geographical boundary.

2. Districts will be redrawn to ensure population sizes within each ward are as equal as possible.

3. New maps will be submitted to the Tennessee General Assembly for approval before Dec. 31.

4. Once approved, the wards will have newly assigned polling locations.

Franklin on Elec- tion Day. However, only one is located on the east side of I-65, a portion of the city experiencing

“THE TURNOUT IS USUALLY SOMEWHAT DISMAL TOBE QUITE HONEST.” CHAD GRAY, WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION ADMINISTRATOR

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

signicant growth, according to o- cials. Additionally, only one location will be open during early voting Oct. 6-21. “A lot of people had been asking about having an early voting option east of Mack Hatcher [Parkway]; we don’t have anything except one loca- tion and it’s all the way down West Main at the county administration building,” Burger said. “I think early voting is really important to people.” However, Stuckey said because the election commission nalizes voting locations by mid-September, it likely would not be feasible to establish a new voting location in time. Addi- tionally, the extra location could cost the city between $10,000-$11,000 per additional site for stang, plus any additional rental costs.

“You’d need it for 14 days. It’s not like an election day site where you can get a school that’s closed,” Stuckey said. But those geographical limitations may not be the case for long, according to county ocials. This city of Frank- lin election will be the last the county hosts before it undergoes redistrict- ing, a process required by law to occur after each decennial Census count. Following the 2020 Census, William- son County and individual cities will undergo a process to redraw wards based on population growth. Preliminary data from the U.S. Cen- sus Bureau found the city of Frank- lin’s population grew by about one third since 2010 to more than 83,000 residents in 2020. Due to that growth,

the city will recalculate the boundar- ies of each of the city’s four wards to make them more equal in population size. As a result, residents may see a change in who represents them on a local level. Should the city and county agree on new voting precinct locations, those would go into eect for voters in the October 2023 election. “Historically, we’ve always had [early voting] at our oce here on West Main Street and that’s been the only location, but in the future I think [the city] might want to explore some other options there,” Gray said.

For more election information, see pages 14-17 .

13

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

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