North San Antonio Edition - April 2022

NORTH SANANTONIO EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 7  APRIL 14 MAY 12, 2022

ONLINE AT

HIGHDEMAND, LAGGING SUPPLY Housing industry analysts say San Antonio-area home sales and prices remain high partially due to population and economic growth. But tight home inventories and rising interest rates and rents are complicating housing aordability issues, driving many house-seekers into a hot rental market.

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P R I M A R Y E L E C T I O N G U I D E

City leaders call proposed $1.2B bond a ‘historic investment’

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

2.6%

19%

18.2% hike in overall local rents December 2020-December 2021

93% total local rental occupancy as of December 2021

95K San Antonio households spend more than 30% of their income on housing

San Antonio voters going to the polls for the May 7 election will consider the city’s biggest bond proposi- tion yet: a $1.2 billion total proposal, 53% of which is designed to address high-priority street and drainage issues, including more improvements on Vance Jack- son Road, Evans Road and Sonterra Boulevard. Local leaders said an approved bond package will not raise the property tax rate. Ocials also said the bond will help the city x failing streets, enhance CONTINUED ON 14

hike in Texas home sales from October 2021-November 2021

hike in local median home price November 2021 over November 2020

SOURCES: SAN ANTONIO BOARD OF REALTORS, APARTMENTDATA.COM, SAN ANTONIO APARTMENT ASSOCIATION, ZONDA, CITY OF SAN ANTONIO COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Single-family, aordable housing inventory reaches ‘critical shortage’ in SanAntonio

BIGGEST BOND YET San Antonio’s proposed $1.2 billion bond will be split into six propositions on the May 7 ballot.

Proposition A: $471.56M (39%) 62 projects for streets, bridges and sidewalks Proposition B: $169.87M (14%) 23 projects for drainage and ood control Proposition C: $271.92M (23%) parks and recreation for 82 projects Proposition D: $58.38M (5%) 9 projects for libraries and cultural facilities Proposition E: $78.28M (7%) 6 projects for public safety facilities Proposition F: $150M (13%) aordable housing split across 5 categories

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

seek out new, quality, economical housing. Will McIntosh, USAA Real Estate’s global head of research, said lower unemployment, economic, job and population growth all will keep propelling housing demand in the area, even with ination and creeping interest rates. “As these housing units continue to get absorbed, even if single-family [housing] starts grow, there remains a critical shortage of single-family hous- ing,” McIntosh said in the San Antonio Apartment Association’s State of the Industry event in Janu- ary. “Not only in the San Antonio market, but in the CONTINUED ON 18

According to single- and multifamily hous- ing data, the overall San Antonio housing market remains busy for renters and homeowners alike, with home prices and sales rising and rent increases forecasted to slow down slightly. However, government ocialsandhousing indus- try observers say a lagging supply of single-family homes is helping to fuel home sale price increases, which in turn creates aordability challenges. San Antonio ocials said they hope a new push for aordable housing will help low-income renters and homeowners to stay in improved residences or

SOURCE: CITY OF SAN ANTONIOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PRIMARY ELECTION GUIDE 2022

MEADOW NEIGHBORHOOD EATERY + BAR

LESLIE DAVIS MET HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUMDIRECTOR

TODO LIST

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Contact 21

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Curious what is selling in your neighborhood? Scan me *All prices shown are list price

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

PENDING

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3 bds

2.5 ba 2,527 sq ft

4 bds

2 ba

2,668 sq ft

4 bds

3 ba

2,321 sq ft

10039 Ramblin River Rd, San Antonio, TX 78251 Nova Stephenson | 210-361-6000

3314 Edge View, San Antonio, TX 78259 Adam Schwab | 210-837-0113

10222 Kopplin Rd, New Braunfels, TX 78132 Nick Insalata | 210-870-9170

6662 Bowie Cove, Schertz, TX 78108 Sabrina Maddry | 210-630-7222

PENDING

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$1,200,000

4 bds

3 ba

3,022 sq ft

4 bds

4 ba

3,250 sq ft

3 bds

2.5 ba 2,440 sq ft

4 bds

4 ba

4,070 sq ft

23226 Woodlawn Ridge, San Antonio, TX 78259 Jean Reich | 210-241-0268

1719 Argos Star, San Antonio, TX 78245 Christina Hiser | 210-557-1102

1210 Country Pike, Canyon Lake, TX 78133 Clark Gray | 512-554-9618

406 Candelaria, Helotes, TX 78023 Jackson Team | 210-288-4779

PENDING

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

realtysanantonio.com/p/1593875

realtysanantonio.com/p/1583623

realtysanantonio.com/p/1588220

realtysanantonio.com/p/1593188

$1,300,000

$395,000

$1,189,500

$1,450,000

4 bds

3.5 ba 3,343 sq ft

5 bds

3.5 ba 2,956 sq ft

4 bds

3.5 ba 3,371 sq ft

4 bds

4.5 ba 5,097 sq ft

2115 Stagecoach Way, Canyon Lake, TX 78133 Hilary Vanstone | 512-777-8632

709 July Johnson Dr, Austin, TX 78737 Gigi Jacks McClaskey | 512-968-0482

5132 Black Horse, Schertz, TX 78108 Sarita Elliott | 210-361-6000

967 Belle Oaks Blvd, Bulverde, TX 78163 Budd Group | 210-378-4249

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • APRIL 2022

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROM JASELLE: Real estate experts forecast San Antonio and the surrounding cities are on the brink of a busy residential selling season. Reporter Edmond Ortiz takes a look in this month’s front page story at the market, some challenges—such as higher prices and low inventory—and what experts say could be solutions, such as building more multifamily housing. Jaselle Luna, PUBLISHER

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FROMTRICIA: With the primaries behind us, we can now turn our attention to May elections and runos. In this month’s Election Guide, our editorial team digs into the proposed $1.2 billion San Antonio bond election, which city ocials say would be used to make citywide infrastructure improvements. If voters approve it, the bond will be the largest ever for the Alamo City. Tricia Schwennesen, EDITOR

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • APRIL 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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STONE OAK

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CAMP BULLIS

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Evolve Human Optimization Labs

COURTESY EVOLVE HUMAN OPTIMIZATION LABS

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HOLLYWOOD PARK

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SHAVANO PARK

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Crosswinds Apartment Homes

EMBASSY OAKS

RENDERING COURTESY PEDCOR INVESTMENTS

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physical and mental wellness services, including cold water immersion, contrast therapy, an infrared sauna, cognitive and neuro training, compression sleeves, vibration therapy, metabolic analysis and more. 210-562-3310. www.evolvehumanlabs.com 7 Crossway Bible Church is renovating a former Gold’s Gym in Hill Country Village at 15759 San Pedro Avenue. According to a filing with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation, the church is building a new sanctuary, spaces for Sunday school classrooms, offices and bathroom facilities. The $1.5 million proj- ect is expected to wrap up this April or May. Crossway’s congregation has been gathering for worship at Verse by Verse Fellowship, 551 E. Nakoma St., San Anto- nio. 210-802-8616. www.crosswaysa.org 8 The Houston-based Morgan Group began developing Caroline at Rogers Ranch, a 351-unit apartment complex at 3331 N. Loop 1604 W., San Antonio, in December. Scheduled for completion in winter 2023, the development will have one- to three-bedroom units, half

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NOWOPEN 1 Ross Dress for Less opened in February at 1209 N. Loop 1604 W., San Antonio. The new Vineyard retail center store occupies a former Bealls location. The retail chain is also renovating a space at The Village at Stone Oak shopping center at 22610 N. US 281 that is slated to open in August. 210-494-1113. www.villageatstoneoak.com 2 Quality First Cleaners held a grand opening March 5 at 10942 Wurzbach Road, San Antonio. The fully automated cleaner includes a 24-hour pickup and drop-off kiosk, full-service walk-in and drive-thru service, free pickup and delivery, and more. Quality First Cleaners also offers

services to area hotels and apartments. 210-479-3111. www.qualityfirstcleanerssa.com 3 Hairstylist Jennifer Harris opened the salon Gypsie Red on Feb. 10 at Sola Salon Studios, 22906 N. US 281, Ste. 104, San Antonio. Harris said her specialties in- clude all types of hair extensions, scissor and razor cutting, keratin treatments and Japanese straightening. 210-505-2186. www.solasalonstudios.com/ salon-professional/jennifer-harris COMING SOON 4 Taco Palenque is developing a seventh San Antonio restaurant at 20518 N. US 281, San Antonio. The Laredo-based chain

specializes in Mexican food with touches of South Texas cuisine. The company has not provided a scheduled opening date. 866-233-8226. www.tacopalenque.com 5 Austin-based Summer Moon Coffee plans to open its fourth San Antonio storefront at 21134 N. US 281, Ste. 105, San Antonio. In addition to coffee drinks, Summer Moon offers coffee pods, bags of roasted coffee and other merchandise. Company officials said they hope to open in the spring, but have not yet set a grand

opening date. 210-598-0025. www.summermooncoffee.com

6 Evolve Human Optimization Labs is scheduled to open at 502 Embassy Oaks, Ste. 103, San Antonio, near Hill Country Village this April. Evolve offers various

Ticket prices start at $40. To purchase go to: www.OperaSA.org

VERDI’S RIGOLETTO FORGIVENESS OR REVENGE? MAY 7 & 9 | 7:30 PM TOBIN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TO-DO LIST

April-May events

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

APRIL 23

CELEBRATE EARTHDAY SHAVANO PARK

MAY 06-07

WATCHA BALLET SAN ANTONIO

The city of Shavano Park will host a public Earth Day/Arbor Day celebration at City Hall. The event includes a tree giveaway, a petting zoo, pony rides and participants of the Blattman Elementary School Earth Day poster contest. 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Free. 900 Saddletree Court, Shavano Park. 210-493-3478. www.shavanopark.org

ministries. This year’s Hollywood- themed event includes food and entertainment. 5-10 p.m. $20 (online bid ticket), $50 (for an in-person auction ticket). Pedrotti’s Ranch, 13715 FM 1560, Helotes. 210-479-1477. https://concordia.churchcenter.com MAY 02 DO GOODON THE GREEN The 18th annual “Do Good on the Green” Golf Tournament benefits the San Antonio and New Braunfels food banks. 8 a.m. shotgun start. $300 (individual), $1,200 (team). TPC San Antonio, 23808 Resort Parkway, San Antonio. 210-431-8393. www.safoodbank.org/doing-good/ register 07 GET THE HOUSE INORDER San Antonio’s Office of Historic Preservation will host the 13th annual historic homeowner fair, connecting owners and occupants of aging homes with local professionals and services. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free (admission). TriPoint Event Center, 3233 N. St. Mary’s St., WATCH JOHNSON STUDENTS PERFORMONE-ACT PLAYS Johnson High School theater students will present one-act plays directed by JHS senior theater students at the campus auditorium. 7 p.m. May 19 and 20. Patrons are expected to wear a mask. Tickets are not yet on sale and prices were not available. 23203 Bulverde Road, San Antonio. 210-207-0035. www.sarehabberclub.com/hhf 19 AND 20 The Children’s Ballet of San Antonio presents “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp,” based on a folktale from “The Book of One Thousand and One Nights.” Attendees are asked to wear a mask inside the venue. 7 p.m. May 6; 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. May 7. $45 210-462-7660. www.childrensballetofsanantonio. org/productions-and-events

Sushi Haya offers patrons all-you-can-eat sushi and steak.

COURTESY SUSHI HAYA

of which will be allocated for renters earning at or less than 60% or 80% of the area median income. Amenities will include a swimming pool, a business cen- ter and a dog park. 713-361-7200. www.morgangroup.com 9 Massachusetts-based CVS Health on March 7 said it will invest more than $15.3 million with Pedcor Investments and WNC to build Crosswinds Apartment Homes , a 312-unit affordable housing apartment complex at 4114 N. Loop 1604 E., San Antonio. A news release said Crosswinds will contain 13 three-story residential buildings, and serve individuals and fam- ilies earning from 30%-60% of the area median income. Planned amenities in- clude a community room, a fitness center, a swimming pool and more. San Antonio Housing Trust is a project partner. No construction schedule was provided. www.cvshealth.com. www.pedcorcompanies.com RELOCATION 10 Texas Leather Interiors is mov- ing from 1602 N. Loop 1604 W. into a 15,470-square-foot building that is under construction at 4323 N. Loop 1604 W., San Antonio. Texas Leather Interiors offers a variety of leather home furniture and accessories. Construction on TLI’s new $3.6 million store is scheduled for completion this June or July. 210-492-3300. www.texasleatherinteriors.com FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Sushi Haya , all-you-can-eat venture, held a soft opening March 9 at 226 W. Bitters Road, Ste. 120, San Antonio, just outside Hill Country Village. The restaurant oers a range of seafood and steaks, and a full bar with cocktails, wine, beer and premium sake. 210-718-6123. www.facebook.com/ Sushi-Haya-100214462513812

APRIL 19 AND 20

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SEE DRAMA STUDENTS

PERFORMONE-ACT PLAYS Reagan High School drama students will perform one-act plays consisting of original and previously published works at the campus theater. 7 p.m. April 19 and 20. $10. 19000 Ronald Reagan Drive, San Antonio. 210-356-1828. https://rrhssa.booktix.com 23 PLAY GOLF FOR A CAUSE The Lady Bird Johnson High School golf program and the Jaguar Pride Association present Jaggyshack, the 13th annual fundraiser for JHS athletics. Jaguar golfers will be on hand. This year’s event features on- course contests and raffles. 8 a.m. shotgun start; afternoon shotgun available. $150 (individual golfers), $600 (teams). Sponsorships are available. Canyon Springs Golf Club, 24405 Wilderness Oak, San Antonio. www.jaguarpride.org/golf 23 GET THINGS SHREDDED The Stone Oak Property Owners Association invites Stone Oak residents to take part in a free shredding event at the North Central Baptist Hospital parking lot. Residents may pull up and stay in their vehicles as volunteers take acceptable materials, such as white or colored paper, folders, staples, paper clips and rubber bands. Other items will not be accepted. Residents are asked to wear a mask. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. or until trucks are full. Free. Corner of Stone Oak Parkway and Madison Oak Drive, San Antonio. www.stoneoakpoa.com 23 SUPPORT CONCORDIA Concordia Lutheran Church will hold its 22nd annual auction to benefit the Rogers Ranch-area church’s improvement efforts, missions and

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ANNIVERSARIES 11 Woof Gang Bakery marked its 10th anniversary with a March 19 event at 10005 NW Military Hwy., Ste. 1105, San Antonio, that included adoptions with Schnauzer Rescue of Texas, swag bags, prizes, nail trims and pup lattes. 210-492-2275. www.woofgangbakerysanantonio.com IN THE NEWS 12 San Antonio City Council on March 3 approved rezoning an existing 0.324-acre tract of land at 14397 Blanco Road, providing the prospective tenant with a specific use authorization for a fit- ness center/health club/gymnasium/nata- torium/sport court. The existing umbrella zoning for the land—Commercial Camp Bullis Military Lighting Region 2 Airport Hazard Overlay District—will remain, ac- cording to a city memorandum. The city said the prospective tenant, whose busi- ness name has not yet been announced, will retrofit an existing 3,060-square- foot space to develop a gym. CLOSINGS 13 Trilogy Burger Bistro at 20079 Stone Oak Parkway, Ste. 3100, San Antonio, closed in mid-March following two years of service. Owner/operator John Gladders said his other restaurant, Trilogy Pizza, 19141 Stone Oak Parkway, Ste. 113, will remain open. 210-404-1818. www.trilogypizza.com

San Antonio. 210-356-0400. www.johnsontheatre.com

All events are conrmed at press time. Check with event organizers for potential cancellations or postponements due to COVID-19 and its variants.

Find more or submit North San Antonio events at communityimpact.com/event- calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • APRIL 2022

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Wurzbach Parkway expansion

including new sidewalks; left-turn lanes on Bitters at Partridge Trail, Silverhorn Drive and Savannah Pass; and a right- turn lane from Bitters onto northbound Blanco. Cost: $5.13 million Timeline: October 2020-May 2022 Funding Source: city of San Antonio 3 Vance Jackson Road upgrades The Vance Jackson Road low-water crossing improvement project is expected to be complete by August. The contractor for a San Antonio bond-supported project was working on utilities in the Orsinger Lane/Tree Hill Street area. The overall project upgrades low-water crossings on Vance Jackson at Orsinger Lane and south of Tree Hill Street. It includes street, curb and sidewalk reconstruction, and improvements to utilities. Recent project work included channel excavation and the installation of curb inlet drainage boxes. Cost: $8.10 million Timeline: May 2021-August 2022 Funding Source: city of San Antonio

1604

HOLLYWOOD PARK

Efforts to expand and improve Wurzbach Parkway between Northwest Military Highway and Elm Creek Street is set for completion this summer, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. Upcoming activities include sidewalk and ramp island construction on the southwest corner of Wurzbach Parkway and Northwest Military; widening the north side of Wurzbach Parkway between Lockhill Selma and Elm Creek Street; and sidewalk/ramp construction along Wurz- bach Parkway on the east side of Lockhill Selma. The overall project adds dual left- turn lanes on all approaches at Wurzbach Parkway and Northwest Military, extends three right-turn lanes and adds dual right-turn lanes on Wurzbach Parkway’s westbound approach to Northwest Mili- tary Highway. Timeline: October 2021-July 2022 Cost: $8.1 million Funding source: TxDOT

SHAVANO PARK

PARTRIDGE TRAIL

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SILVERHORN DR.

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2 Bitters Road/Blanco Road intersection improvements

Work on the overall project is expected to be complete by early May. All lanes were opened, and new signals were opera- tional by mid-March. The San Antonio bond-funded project provided upgrades to Bitters from Blanco to Savannah Pass,

TREE HILL ST.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NSANEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION NISD, NEISDuse federal COVID19 funds to boost employee pay

NORTHSIDE ISD’S COVID19 FINANCIAL RELIEF Academic supports to address learning loss topped the list of Elementary and Secondary Schools Emergency Relief funds expenditures for Northside ISD.

Total awarded: $173M Initial allocation received to date: $115.3M

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

and librarians, and a 1% supplement of staers’ annualized pay grade midpoint. “Our employees are committed to doing everything they can to meet the needs of our students,” NEISD Superintendent Sean Maika said. “This retention incentive is one small way we can show our appreciation to [employees] for making a positive and lasting dierence.” Per federal rules,

Two of San Antonio’s North Side school districts are using federal COVID-19 relief funds to provide employees with one-time retention stipends. Ocials with North East and Northside ISDs approved expenditures in February from their allocated por-

Health safety: $5.1M COVID-19 preparedness and personal protective equipment for students and sta Miscellaneous: $14.3M sta retention supplement and indirect costs

Academic supports to address learning loss: $133.1M Includes expanding full-day pre-K program; expanding reading academics to pre-K, fourth and fth grades; and accelerated learning during summer school Wraparound services: $20.6M Including social emotional/ mental health support for youth; hygiene kits and backpacks for homeless students; and engaging students with high absenteeism

tions of the Elemen- tary and Secondary School Emergency Relief funds. Both districts are using some of that money for employee recruitment and retention, with NEISD approving nearly $5 million and NISD approving $14.4 million in pay supplementation. The $1.9 trillion American Rescue

NOTE: FIGURES DENOTE BUDGET PLAN FOR TOTAL ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL EMERGENCY RELIEF FUNDS.

“THIS RETENTION INCENTIVE IS ONE SMALLWAYWE CAN SHOWOUR APPRECIATION TO EMPLOYEES FOR MAKINGAPOSITIVE AND LASTING DIFFERENCE.” SEAN MAIKA, NORTH EAST ISD SUPERINTENDENT

districts must direct at least 20% of their ESSER fund allocation toward countering learning loss, the academic eect of lost instruction time. School systems are required to review and update their ESSER spending plans by this June.

NORTH EAST ISD’S COVID19 FINANCIAL RELIEF Facility security tops the list of planned expenditures of Elementary and Secondary Schools Emergency Relief funds for North East ISD.

Total awarded: $117.1M Initial allocation received to date: $78.06M

Plan Act, which President Joe Biden signed into law in March 2021, con- tains the third round of ESSER funds totaling $122 billion. NEISD was awarded $117.1 million in ESSER III money, having received $78.1 million to date with the rest expected later, ocials said. NEISD ocials said they determined about $4.3 million in ESSER funding was available to permit a one-time retention supplement for the second semester of the 2021-22 school year. NEISD’s retention supplement is being provided to eligible employees, including $575 for full-time teachers

From their $173 million award, NISD ocials said the district is using $14.4 million on a one-time retention supplement, including $1,000 for full-time sta, $750 for long-term substitute teachers and $500 for qual- ied part-time sta and substitutes. NISD District 3 Trustee M’Lissa Chumbley said the ESSER funds provided NISD a chance to thank employees. “We have been talking since COVID[-19] began about how to let our teachers know howmuch we appreci- ate the work they do, and we recognize how hard it is,” Chumbley said.

Facility security and pandemic safety: $29.27M Instruction and accelerated education funding for learning loss; full-time substitutes at every campus; and training and support for specialists: $15.04M Instructional resources, including iPads, Chromebooks and intervention kits for students struggling in language articulation: $11.19M Other: $8.7M

Tutoring; after-school and summer programming; extended school year programming; aid for dyslexic students; transportation sta to support late buses: $5.95M Sta recruitment and retention: $4.86M Social, mental and emotional support for students: $2.11M Professional learning for teachers: $920,560

NOTE: TOTAL COSTS ARE SHOWN AS BEING SPENT BETWEEN 2021 AND 2024. SOURCES: NORTH EAST ISD, NORTHSIDE ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • APRIL 2022

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from North East & Northside ISDs

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North East ISD will meet May 9 at 5:30 p.m. 8961 Tesoro Drive, San Antonio 210-407-0000 • www.neisd.net Northside ISD will meet April 26 at 6 p.m. 5900 Evers Road, San Antonio 210-397-8500 • www.nisd.net MEETINGSWE COVER may have come into close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19 or if they are experiencing symptoms. Rapid tests are available by appointment only, according to the district. DISTRICT HIGHLIGHTS NORTHEAST ISD NEISD’s wrestlers, swimmers and divers who qualied for their respective University Interscholastic League state events in February were recognized at the March 14 NEISD school board meeting. Those recognized include Johnson High School junior Jada Scott, who won the gold medal in the girls’ 100-meter freestyle race, making her the top swimmer in the state. Scott also placed second in the girls’ 200-meter individual medley. Scott and her teammates Michelle Parsons, Elsa Musselman and Michaela Moore all placed third in the girls’ 200-meter medley relay and the girls’ 200-meter freestyle. NORTHEAST ISD NEISD ceased conducting COVID-19 testing at its North East Sports Park on March 28 due to a steep decline in COVID-19 cases and a drop in demand, the district announced in an email sent to parents. The district reported oering nearly 6,000 rapid tests to employees and their families who used the drive-up service. Testing will continue to be oered at school clinics for students and employees who NUMBER TOKNOW Northside ISD received a $26,340 grant to support Project A.C.O.R.N (Area Children Organized to Replant Natives): Birding Adventures. Project A.C.O.R.N works to improve environmental literacy through inquiry-based science explorations. The grant was awarded through the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department’s Community Outdoor Outreach Program, according to a TPWD news release. $26K

North East ISD shares results of controversial library book review

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

BY THE NUMBERS North East ISD reviewed more than 400 library books. 311 library books remain unchanged

NORTH EAST ISD Ocials at the March 14 North East ISD school board meeting released results of a districtwide library book review that has sparked some controversy among community members. NEISD ocials said they had checked more than 400 library books to determine whether the content was age-appropriate for campuses and whether books were outdated. State Rep. Matt Krause, RFort Worth, chair of the Texas House Committee on General Investigating, told the Texas Education Agency last October that he was starting an inquiry into school library books containing “material that might make students feel discomfort.” Residents, students and educators in many Texas public school districts have since criticized the inquiry, arguing it was a politically motivated eort to censor certain subjects, according to discussion at the school board meeting.

110 titles replaced with books of similar topics 11 books relocated to another school level

SOURCE: NORTH EAST ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NEISD ocials said their review resulted in relocating 11 books to another level such as middle school to high school, replacing 110 titles with books of similar topics, and leaving another 311 books unmoved. The school district said the “review was consistent with existing board policy regarding the selection and maintenance of instructional materi- als, such as library books.” Review results can be viewed at www.neisd.net/libraryservices.

Northside ISD named three rst-year and three veteran teachers District Educators of the Year.

COURTESY NORTHSIDE ISD

NISD recognizes educators of the year

BY EDMOND ORTIZ

Clark High School. Veteran elementary school educa- tors of the year from the area include: Monica Sanchez, Blattman; Ashley Hann, Colonies North; and Lindsey Lopez, Locke Hill. Veteran middle school educators of the year from the area include: Jaime Liendo, Hobby; and Hannah Narvaez, Rawlinson. The veteran high school educator of the year is Clark High School’s Heather Draker. NISD ocials said the district’s nominee for the 2022 Trinity Prize for Excellence in Teaching is Judy Hudson, a music teacher at Boone Elementary School.

NORTHSIDE ISD The school district held events March 29 and 30 to recognize rst-year and veteran educators of the year for the 2021-22 academic year at each NISD campus. First-year educators of the year from north San Antonio area elemen- tary schools include: Rachel Webber, Blattman; Naomi Marko, Colonies North; and Britney Ramos, Locke Hill. First-year educators of the year from north San Antonio area middle schools include: Sterling Gardner, Hobby; and Isabel Pisano, Rawlinson. The rst-year high school educator of the year is Rebecca Berringer at

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Bexar County, Hill Country Village, Hollywood Park & San Antonio

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

Bexar County Commissioners Court meets April 19 and May 3 at 9 a.m. Bexar County Courthouse, 100 Dolorosa St., Ste. 2.01, San Antonio 210-335-2011. www.bexar.org Hill Country Village City Council meets May 19 at 5 p.m. 116 Aspen Lane, Hill Country Village 210-494-3671. www.hcv.org Hollywood Park City Council meets May 17 at 6 p.m. 2 Mecca Drive, Hollywood Park 210-494-2023. www.hollywoodpark-tx.gov San Antonio City Council meets April 21 and 28, May 5 and 12 at 9 a.m. 114 W. Commerce St., San Antonio. 210-207-7040 www.sanantonio.gov MEETINGSWE COVER HIGHLIGHTS SANANTONIO City Council on Feb. 3 approved renewing a lease between the city and Park Oaks Ltd., the landlord at 16500 San Pedro Ave., to permit the Council District 9 field office to remain there. City officials said the district office has been a tenant at Park Oaks since December 2009, and Council Member John Courage expressed interest in staying. N BEXAR COUNTY Commissioners court unanimously voted March 22 to adopt a homestead exemption providing a $5,000 deduction from the appraised value for primary county residences. HILL COUNTRYVILLAGE At its regularly scheduled March 17 meeting, the Hill Country Village City Council approved implementing the city’s midnight curfew for juveniles for another three years. Minors under age 17 are prohibited from being in a public place from midnight-6 a.m.

HollywoodPark council member files noise complaint against city

STONE OAK PKWY.

1604

HOLLYWOOD PARK

HOLLYWOOD PARK City Council Member Michael Voorhies and his wife, Norelle Voorhies, filed a lawsuit against the town of Hollywood Park, claiming frequent noises emanating from a nearby community center disrupt their lives. City officials said they were alerted Feb. 22 about a lawsuit being filed Feb. 9 in the 225th District Court. They did not respond to requests for comment on the suit. According to the lawsuit, the Voorhieses, who live 60 feet from the Voigt Center in Voigt Park, consider noisy activities around the facility an

ongoing nuisance that keeps them from enjoying their home. The suit claims mainly parties held at Voigt Center, including those that last “well past the stated lease agreement time” have little to no city oversight and that noise complaints relayed “to the police are constant, but no action is taken.” The couple also claims two large air conditioning units at the center “are loud and run continuously,” and sounds caused by post-party cleanup efforts and city mainte- nance workers exacerbate matters. “Plaintiff Michael Voorhies works

Voigt Center

from home secondary to COVID-19 and can hardly hear himself think while in his home office, and this disruption is adversely affecting his employment,” the lawsuit said. The lawsuit said the Voorhieses are seeking a permanent mandatory injunction against the city regarding Voigt Center activities, costs associ- ated with legal fees and damages they claim have occurred to their home and their property value.

City officialsmull partnership with ElonMusk company SANANTONIO Officials with the Alamo Regional Mobility Authority said March 16 there will be further talks with officials from entrepreneur Elon Musk’s venture The Boring Co. about possibly developing an underground tunnel between the San Antonio Interna- tional Airport and downtown to help curb increasing traffic between north and central San Antonio. According to ARMA officials, preliminary estimated project costs range from $247 million to $289 million. “The [ARMA board] has continually sought innovative ways to finance transportation projects to ensure a bright future for the community in a way that bridges technology and accelerates the delivery of needed projects,” Board Chair Mike Lynd said. Musk’s firm and Bexar Automated Transport were finalists in a process that began in October 2019. A com- pany has not been chosen, nor has a route been mapped or a funding sources identified.

Non-Hollywood Park resident rental fees Effective immediately Mon.-Thu.

ALL-DAY USE Old $2,000 | New $1,000 REFUNDABLE DEPOSIT Old $700 | New $500

4-HOUR RENTAL Old $600 | New $400 AFTER INITIAL 4 HOURS (per hour) Old $200 | New $100

SOURCE: CITY OF HOLLYWOOD PARK

Nonresidents to pay new community center fees HOLLYWOOD PARK City Council voted March 15 to approve a new fee schedule at the Voigt Center for use of the facility for meetings and events. The new rates, which start at $400 for the first four hours, apply to non-Hollywood Park residents between Mondays and Thursdays. The new fee schedule can be found at www.hollywoodpark-tx.gov/public-works.

Shavano Park City Council meets April 25 at 6:30 p.m.

900 Saddletree Court, Shavano Park 210-493-3478. www.shavanopark.org

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • APRIL 2022

L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E GUIDE Candidates and information for local elections

M AY 7 E L E C T I O N D A T E S T O K N O W April 25 First day of early voting for May 7 elections April 26 Last day to apply for ballot by mail for May 7 elections

W H E R E T O V O T E

Registered Bexar County voters can cast a ballot at their assigned precinct during early voting or on election day. Voters can nd their precinct location at www.bexar.org/elections-department

May 3 Last day of early voting for May 7 elections May 7 Last day to receive ballot by mail for May 7 elections

S A M P L E B A L L O T

N O R T H S I D E I S D B O N D “Shall the board of trustees of the Northside Independent School District be authorized to issue and sell bonds of the district in the principal amount of not to exceed $992 million for the purposes of designing, constructing, renovating, improving, upgrading, updating, acquiring and equipping school facilities in the district (and any necessary or related removal of existing facilities); the purchase of the necessary sites for school facilities; and the purchase of new school buses, such bonds to mature serially or otherwise (not more than 40 years from their date), in accordance with law; any issue or series of such bonds to bear interest per annum at such rate or rates (xed, oating, variable or otherwise) as may be determined within the discretion of the board of trustees, provided that such rate or rates of interest shall not exceed the maximum rate per annum authorized by law at the time of the issuance of any issue or series of such bonds; and shall the board of trustees of the district be authorized to levy and pledge, and cause to be assessed and collected, annual ad valorem taxes on all taxable property in the district sucient, without limit as to rate or amount, to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds and the cost of any credit agreements executed in connection with the bonds?” S H A V A N O P A R K B O N D “The issuance of bonds for designing, demolishing, constructing, renovating, improving, extending and making permanent street, sidewalk, drainage and any related improvements in the aggregate principal amount not to exceed $10 million, and levying a tax in payment thereof, with priority given to the following: Bent Oak Drive, Chimney Rock Lane, Cliside Drive, End Gate Lane, Fawn Drive, Saddletree Road, Shavano Drive, Wagon Trail Road, Windmill Road and Post Oak Way; Cul-de-Sacs: Elm Spring Lane, Honey Bee Lane, Hunters Branch, Hunters Branch South, Turkey Creek Road and DeZavala Road.” Shavano Park will also ask voters to reauthorize a sales tax supporting regular local road maintenance.

*Incumbent

Candidates in contested races for Hollywood Park and Northeast ISD are listed here. Hill Country Village and the Trinity-Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District canceled their City Council and board of directors elections, respectively.

NORTH EAST ISD Single-Member District 2 Jacqueline Klein Terri Williams* Rhonda Rowland Single-Member District 3 Diane Sciba Villarreal Omar Leos* Single-Member District 7

Shavano Park does not have a contested council election. HOLLYWOOD PARK City Council Place 2

Marsha Landry Joseph Trevino Sandy Winkley*

Michael Hall Todd Kounse

H O L L Y W O O D P A R K P R O P O S I T I O N

“The reauthorization of the local sales and use tax in the town of Hollywood Park, Texas, at the rate of one-fourth of 1% to continue providing revenue for maintenance and repair of municipal streets. The tax expires on the fourth anniversary of the date of this election unless the imposition of the tax is reauthorized.” PROPOSITION A

S A N A N T O N I O B O N D P R O P O S I T I O N S

PROPOSITION A

PROPOSITION B

PROPOSITION C

Streets, bridges and sidewalks The issuance of bonds in the amount of $471.6 million for streets, bridges and sidewalks, and levying a tax in payment thereof

Drainage and ood control The issuance of bonds in the amount of $169.9 million for drainage and ood control, and levying a tax in payment thereof

Parks and recreation The issuance of bonds in the amount of $271.9 million for parks, recreation and open space, and levying a tax in payment thereof

PROPOSITION D

PROPOSITION E

PROPOSITION F

Library and cultural facilities The issuance of bonds in the amount of $58.4 million for library and cultural facilities, and levying a tax in payment thereof

Public safety facilities The issuance of bonds in the amount of $78.3 million for public safety facilities and levying a tax in payment thereof

Aordable housing The issuance of bonds in the amount of $150 million for aordable housing and levying a tax in payment thereof

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE, BEXAR COUNTY ELECTIONS DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2022

COMPILED BY EDMOND ORTIZ

M AY 2 4 P R I M A R Y R U N O F F E L E C T I O N D A T E S T O K N O W Runo elections are set to determine the winners in races where a single candidate did not garner 50% of the vote or greater in the March primary elections. The top two vote contenders run against one another, and the winner then faces his or her challenger from the opposing party in the November elections.

S T A T E W I D E P R O P O S I T I O N S

Senate Joint Resolution 2 Second special session of 87th Texas Legislature

PROPOSITION 1

The constitutional amendment authorizing the Legislature to provide for the reduction of the amount of a limitation on the total amount of ad valorem taxes that may be imposed for general elementary and secondary public school purposes on the residence homestead of a person who is elderly or disabled to reect any statutory reduction from the preceding tax year in the maximum compressed rate of the maintenance and operations taxes imposed for those purposes on the homestead.

May 24 Election day, polls remain open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. May 24 Last day to receive ballot (or May 25 if carrier envelope is postmarked by 7 p.m. at location of election)

April 25 Last day to register to vote May 13 Last day to apply by mail (received, not postmarked) May 16-20 Early voting for May 24 runo

Senate Joint Resolution 2 Third special session of 87th Texas Legislature

PROPOSITION 2

The constitutional amendment increasing the amount of the residence homestead exemption from ad valorem taxation for public school purposes from $25,000 to $40,000.

S A M P L E B A L L O T

*Incumbent

D Democrat R Republican Only candidates in contested races are listed below.

Member, State Board of Education, District 3 D Melissa N. Ortega D Laura Marquez LOCAL Bexar County judge

STATEWIDE Lieutenant Governor D Michelle Beckley D Mike Collier General Land Oce commissioner D Sandragrace Martinez D Jay Kleberg R Dawn Buckingham R Tim Westley Attorney general R Ken Paxton* R George P. Bush D Rochelle Mercedes Garza D Joe Jaworski Comptroller of public accounts

P O L L I N G L O C A T I O N S

Encino Branch Library 2515 East Evans Road, San Antonio Indian Springs Elementary 25751 Wilderness Oak, San Antonio Parman Library at Stone Oak 20735 Wilderness Oak, San Antonio Shavano Park City Hall 900 Saddletree Court, Shavano Park Timberwood Park Clubhouse 26631 Timberline Drive, San Antonio NOTE: BEXAR COUNTY POLLING LOCATIONS ARE LISTED AS REPORTED APRIL 7. ELECTION

BEXAR COUNTY EARLY VOTING

D Ina Minjarez D Peter Sakai Congressional District 21 D Claudia Andreana Zapata D Ricardo Villarreal Texas House District 122 R Elisa Chan R Mark Dorazio

Polling location hours: 8 a.m.-6 p.m. April 25-29; 8 a.m.-8 p.m. April 30 and May 2-3; noon-6 p.m. May 1; 7 a.m.-7 p.m. May 7 Brook Hollow Library, San Antonio 530 Heimer Road, San Antonio Castle Hills City Hall 209 Lemonwood Drive, Castle Hills Cody Library 11441 Vance Jackson Road, San Antonio

D Janet T. Dudding D Angel Luis Vega Railroad commissioner R Wayne Christian R Sarah Stogner

DAY AND PRIMARY RUNOFF POLLING LOCATIONS, FOR MAY 7 AND MAY 24, RESPECTIVELY, HAVE NOT YET BEEN ANNOUNCED.

For election results visit www.communityimpact. com/news/san-antonio

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NORTH SAN ANTONIO EDITION • APRIL 2022

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