Richardson September 2020

ONLINE AT 2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1  SEPT. 10OCT. 8, 2020 VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1  SEPT. 10OCT. 8, 2020 RICHARDSON EDITION ANEWNORMAL Richardson ISD embarks on unprecedented school year BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

INSIDE 18

KEY DATES TO KNOW:

Alexandria Marquez teaches rst grade students from an empty classroom at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet. (Courtesy Richardson ISD)

Aug. 19: All students start virtual instruction.

Sept. 8: Some elementary and special education students return to campuses.

Sept. 14: Some junior high students return to campuses.

Sept. 21: Some high school students return to campuses.

Sept. 30-Oct. 2: Parents can change their child’s method of learning.

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Richardson expands upon regional, local trail system

• 93MILES of trails In Richardson, there are • 87MILES that are hard surface • 6MILES that are soft surface

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

to connect with an existing concrete hike-and-bike trail on Collins. The $3.1 million project—paid for by federal, county and city dollars—should wrap up in November. “When we are done with this current project, we will have fully completed the entire trail corridor that was identied in the Six Cities Trail Plan,” Parks Superintendent Kurt Beilharz said at a June meeting. CONTINUED ON 21

Richardson is weeks away from making good on a nearly two-decade-old agreement to provide a key trail corridor within a regional system. The 1.5-mile extension of Duck Creek Trail begins at the intersection of Apollo and Plano roads and runs north along Plano. At Arapaho Road, it goes west and enters the creek corridor before proceeding north to Collins Boulevard. From there, it jogs west

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER See inside for a map of regional trails. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

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EDUCATION E D I T I O N 2020 PUBLIC

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Expectant parents have a lot to think about and do, from understanding the changes in mom’s body to preparing your home for baby’s arrival. At Methodist Richardson Medical Center, our birthing philosophy is centered on providing a supportive birthing experience that encourages family involvement. Methodist Richardson joyfully welcomes hundreds of babies to our community each year. Our maternity facilities and services are designed to meet the needs of expectant families, and we are proud to set high standards of care for mom and baby. We offer: • Nicely appointed labor and delivery and postpartum suites featuring baby rooming-in • Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit • Full-time neonatologists

• 24-hour obstetric hospitalist and anesthesia support • New parent education classes and lactation consultants. Trust. Methodist.

To find an OB-GYN on the medical staff or to schedule a maternity tour, visit MethodistHealthSystem.org/Richardson.

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Health System, Methodist Richardson Medical Center or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Richardson's b ank for non-profits

We Non-Profits

Why are all these non-profit leaders smiling?

CHARLOTTE DONALDSON Financial and Administrative Assistant Northrich Baptist Church

MELISS VON GOERTZ President Canyon Creek Elementary PTA

LOREE BIRKENBACK Head of School St. James Episcopal of Dallas

KATIE PATTERSON Executive Director Richardson Adult Literacy Center

BILL ALSUP President Richardson East Rotary Club

SUSAN STEPHENS Executive Director Exodus Ministries

KATE GROSS President Richardson Symphony League

SHARON ROBINSON President Richardson Women's Club

BILL RO D GERS President Richardson Citizen Police Academy Alumni

GINGER MAYO President Richardson Rotary Club

They are all experiencing

for their non-profit organization.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Information on ongoing projects CITY& COUNTY 11 Latest local news

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com

FROMLEANNE: Just like that, summer is over, and the school year has begun. While it’s the most unconventional start in the history of Richardson ISD and of Plano ISD, teachers and administrators are working hard to ensure that students nd some normalcy in their classroom experiences. This year, our annual Public Education Edition focuses on what has changed for face-to-face and virtual instruction and what parents in Richardson ISD should expect during this historic year (see Page 18).

SENIOR EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTERS Makenzie Plusnick, Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

PUBLIC EDUCATION

SNAPSHOT

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Data from Richardson and Plano ISDs

The end of summer also means milder temperatures and more time to explore the outdoors. The city’s trail system is expanding and will soon provide key connections into neighboring cities. Our story (see Page 21) has all the details you need before you lace up your jogging shoes or pump up your bike wheels and get out there to explore. Local businesses remain committed to serving members of the community, so don’t forget to support our advertising partners as they work to rebound this fall. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

BUSINESS FEATURE

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

158

New businesses 5

Local sources 12

Transit projects 3

DINING FEATURE Edith’s French Bistro REAL ESTATE Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

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New listings

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CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up to date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. learning,” it should have said Collin College faculty members needing accommodations due to risk factors associated with COVID-19 had an option to teach online. CORRECTION: VOLUME 2, ISSUE 12 In a cover story called “Area community colleges prepare for in-person, virtual

stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 2146189001 PRESS RELEASES ricnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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The Barber & Co.

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Monkey King Noodle Company

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

COURTESY MONKEY KING NOODLE COMPANY

patients, was supposed to open in Febru- ary but was delayed due to the pandemic. 469-676-2777. www.ourish.dental 4 Interurban Bar n Grill opened at the beginning of August at 221 W. Polk St., Richardson. The business oers American food and craft cocktails and is open every day until 2 a.m. It will soon oer delivery via Uber Eats. 972-479-9944. Facebook: Interurban Bar n Grill 5 As of this paper’s print deadline, Jasper’s Richardson was scheduled to reopen for dinner service Sept. 10 at its location in the CityLine development. The restaurant, located at 1251 State St., Ste. 950, has been closed for several months due to COVID-19. Occupancy will be limited to 50%, according to a recent email from the business. The high-end casual restaurant’s menu includes a brisket cheeseburger, pan-seared trout and slow-cooked short rib, among

other items. Reservations can be made through www.resy.com. 214-716-2610. www.abacusjaspers.com 6 Studio Movie Grill reopened its location at 13933 N. Central Expressway, Dallas, on Aug. 21. The business, which oers full-service, in-theater dining, has been temporarily closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. 469-405-8521. www.studiomoviegrill.com 7 Rocco’s Italian Cafe opened Aug. 31 at 908 Audelia Road, Richardson. The restaurant’s menu includes pizza, pasta, wings and salads, according to the owner. 469-886-8209. Facebook: Rocco’s Italian Cafe COMING SOON 8 Monkey King Noodle Company should open by the end of September at 520 Lockwood Drive, RIchardson. The restaurant hails from its original

location in Deep Ellum and is known for its authentic Northern Chinese street food, including hand-pulled, made-to- order noodle dishes and soup dumplings. 469-713-2648 (Deep Ellum location). www.monkeykingnoodlecompany.com 9 Organic Life Dry Cleaning will open in mid- to late September at 120 W. CityLine Drive, Ste. 400, Richardson. The business provides high-end dry cleaning services using wet-cleaning technology, which is an eco-friendly alternative to the standard dry cleaning system. 469-834-5316. www.organiclifecleaners.com 10 Sticky Rice expects to open in Oc- tober at 120 W. CityLine Drive Ste. 500, Richardson. The family-owned restaurant serves authentic, fresh Thai and Laos cui- sine, including fried rice, noodle dishes, curries, soups and desserts. It also has a location in Murphy. 972-424-0970 (Mur- phy location). www.stickyricetx.com

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER AND MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

NOWOPEN 1 The Barber & Co. opened June 20 at 525 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 23, Richardson. The business oers men’s haircuts and shaves. Guests of legal drinking age receive beer with service. 469-399-0990. www.thebarberco.org 2 Divine Headboards opened Aug. 1 at 904 Business Parkway, Richardson. The business, formerly located in Irving, oers custom beds and headboards at aordable prices. 972-855-0866. www.headboardsdivine.com 3 Flourish Dental Boutique opened June 1 at 1415 State St., Ste. 800, Richard- son. The holistic, all-natural practice oers general dentistry services and dental sur- gery. The business, which is accepting new

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GAPCo pizzas are made with thin and crispy crusts.

COURTESY GAPCO

RELOCATIONS 11 Walnut Dental started seeing patients Aug. 18 at its new oce at 810 N. Plano Road, Ste. 210, Richardson. The practice, previously located at 9751 Walnut St., Ste. 100, Richardson, oers general and family dental services, including cosmetic dentistry, implants and crowns and bridges. 972-699-9800. 12 Canyon Creek Art & Frame celebrat- ed its 25th anniversary on Aug. 15. The business, located at 1360 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 112, Richardson, specializes in custom framing of art, photography and artifacts. It also oers printing services using a giclee printer—a machine that uses archival inks to create high-quality, long-lasting images on either canvas or ne art paper. Landscape and oral photography by owners Jerry and Barbara Cornelius is also available for purchase in the shop. 972-690-6216. www.canyoncreekart.com www.walnut-dental.com ANNIVERSARIES FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Greenville Avenue Pizza Company, also known as GAPCo, will open around the end of 2020 at 520 Lockwood Drive, Richardson. GAPCo oers made-from-scratch pizzas with thin and crispy crust and homemade sauce. Customers can customize their toppings or choose from a slew of featured options. The menu also includes wings, salads, pasta dishes, sandwiches and desserts. The restaurant hails from its original location on Greenville Avenue in Dallas. This will be GAPCo’s third location. “When we opened our rst location on Lowest Greenville back in 2007, we never dreamed that we’d have two restaurants, let alone three,” owner Sammy Mandell said in a recent news release. “We can’t wait to bring our unique pizza concept to Richardson and join our neighbors at one of the best corners in town.”

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The Richardson location is unique in that it will include an indoor/outdoor bar as well as a dedicated space for corporate lunches, rehearsal dinners, parties and other events, according to the release. The restaurant will share the building with Monkey King Noodle Company. 214-826-5404 (Greenville location). www.gapc.co

400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 www.jengchirestaurant.com

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Canyon Creek Art & Frame

OLIVIA LUECKEMEYERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NAME CHANGES 13 Frankie’s Mexican Cuisine has changed its name to Dos Arroyos , according to its owner. The restaurant, located in the II Creeks Plaza develop- ment at 2701 Custer Parkway, Richard- son, will continue to serve the same menu and drinks under its new name. It reopened Aug. 18 after temporarily closing for renovations. 972-231-8667. www.dosarroyoscomidacasera.com

(214) 695-5950

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES DART releases preliminary designs

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

ONGOING PROJECTS

W. CAMPBELL RD.

for Silver Line stations Richardson and Plano stations along the upcoming Dallas Area Rapid Tran- sit’s Silver Line will feature unique designs related to their surrounding areas. According to newly released plans, an 8-foot-10-inch metal logo for The University of Texas at Dallas will sit on a riser in front of the planned UT Dallas station. The logo will be lit at night. “This landmark will be a destination for students and visitors alike and will invite thousands of photo opportuni- ties,” DART Community Engagement Representative Chris Walters said during an Aug. 20 presentation. The materials used and the design of the platform borrow inspiration from the campus, Walters said. Uniform limestone and metal columns with UT Dallas logos will line the platform alongside inspirational quo- tations from notable alumni. Fencing will also feature logos. The CityLine/Bush station, also in Richardson, will converge with the Red Line and a pedestrian hike- and-bike trail. It will feature arches along its green space—a symbol that represents the growth of Richardson in the future, Walters said. Arches are also a symbol that will be widely used for the Silver Line project as a whole, he said. The platformwill have a similar growth theme, with arches surround- ing the structure. The elevated 12th Street station in Plano will feature an airy theme, with weaving lines featured on the fencing.

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Campbell Road auxiliary lane project In the coming weeks, the contractor will install new storm-sewer inlets on Campbell. On the southbound US 75 frontage road, the contractor will complete the right-turn lane as well as work on the inside left-turn lane. While work progresses, the U-turn

under US 75 will be closed. Timeline: May-December Cost: $2 million

Funding sources: city of Richardson, Texas Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

The UT Dallas station will feature a university logo. (Rendering courtesy DART)

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 26. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Shiloh Road waterline construction The North Texas Municipal Water District is installing an additional 8,000 feet of 24-inch treated water pipeline. It will be installed mostly along Shiloh Road from Renner Road to 14th Street in Plano. The project will provide additional water capacity to residents and businesses in the area. Construction began last fall and is 75% complete. Timeline: September 2019-end of 2020 Cost: $6.3 million Funding source: NTMWD

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The pedestrian street connection for the station is still under design but will include a stairway and elevator for transit users. The 12th Street at-grade station will have an earthbound theme, featuring some industrial pieces that nod to the area’s past. Brick and iron will be used along the platform, and the shape of gears or machines is included in the design. The fourth station, Shiloh Road station in Plano, will have the Oncor power substation visible behind it. The design draws from this and the

station’s connectivity to the rest of the metroplex, with the plan to make it the “Plano power portal,” Walters said. Energetic terms will cover each column, alluding to the power of the area. Electrical lightning-like patterns will be included on pavement and other parts of the station. Members from each community gave input on the stations’ designs through a number of meetings, Walters said. Construction on the Silver Line is expected to be complete by March 2023.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

DEVELOPMENT LockwoodDistrict prepares to welcome new restaurants, retail

LOCKWOOD DISTRICT

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BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

and restaurant Lockwood Distilling Co. is owned and operated by Evan and Sally Batt. Durkin Properties also owns the empty building between Communion and Lockwood. Part of that space will be absorbed by Lockwood, which is expanding its spirits production. The remaining 3,900 square feet will be subdivided into two storefronts, Durkin said. Possible tenants include a yoga studio and a hair salon, Durkin said. Whatever ends up lling each space will embody the locally driven vision, he added. “We are targeting people that care about the community [and] live in the community,” he said. One of the most recent additions to the district is Monkey King Noodle Company, which will open in the next month or so in the building that formerly housed Bollywood Grocery.

Richardson residents will soon have access to more dining and retail options in the newly created Lock- wood District. Developer Manasseh Durkin, the president of Durkin Properties LLC, said his vision for the area, which is tucked just northwest of the intersec- tion of Belt Line Road and US 75, was to create a diverse neighborhood retail center focused on local businesses. “We wanted a neighborhood spot that people could ride their bike to, that they could walk to, that [included] nothing that was a chain,” he said. The district currently houses two businesses run by local husband-wife teams. Communion Neighborhood Cooperative, a hybrid restaurant, coee shop and coworking space, is owned by Tim and Amy Kahle. A few doors down, the small-batch distillery

Lockwood Distilling Co. is a small-batch distillery and restaurant in Lockwood District. (Courtesy Durkin Properties LLC)

Owner Andrew Chen is a Richardson resident, Durkin said. Monkey King will share the build- ing with Greenville Avenue Pizza Co., also known as GAPCo, which is expected to open around the end of this year. TNT Dental, a custom dental website design and marketing rm, occupies the other standalone building in the district, but it will be relocating to a larger space in the new year. Durkin and his team are already in the process of scouting a new tenant for that building. “It will most likely be a single-use

oce tenant, and we have three or four [potential tenants] ... looking at it,” he said. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, businesses in the district are thriv- ing, Durkin said. Lockwood Distilling Co. and Communion were both forced to pivot operations earlier this spring but are regaining momentum several months into the pandemic. Durkin said he thinks this is because Richardson locals are so invested in supporting businesses owned by their friends and neighbors. “They’re blessed to be in Richard- son because of that,” he said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson and Dallas County

QUOTEOFNOTE “THESE NUMBERS ARE ESTIMATES. THE UNCERTAINTY THAT WE HAVE IN THE CONTEXT OF, ‘WHAT DOES NEXT YEAR REALLY LOOK LIKE?’ IS CHALLENGING.” MAYOR PAUL VOELKER ON THE CITY’S FISCAL YEAR 2020-21 BUDGET CITY HIGHLIGHTS COLLIN COUNTY Commissioners approved the Collin CARES Small Business Grant Program at an Aug. 24 meeting. The program distributes federal funds to qualifying companies that had gross revenue losses of more than 15% because of the pandemic. COLLINCOUNTY Officials revised a disclaimer on the county’s COVID-19 dashboard Aug. 24 to acknowledge that the state is working to make the data more accurate. The move came one week after the addition of the disclaimer, which said the county had no confidence in the accuracy of the data. Richardson City Council Meets Sept. 14, 21, 28 and Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net Richardson ISD Meets Sept. 21 and Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. at the Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org. Plano ISD Meets Sept. 15 and Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. The board has been holding meetings via video conference, which can be viewed at www.pisd. edu/pisdlive. MEETINGSWE COVER

City expects revenue shortfall

BUDGET SNAPSHOT

FY 20-21

FY 19-20

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

-4.3% -2.3%

was approved unanimously. This year’s general fund expendi- tures are projected to land at about $134 million, down 2.3% from FY 2019-20. Despite cuts to the budget, the city is allocating millions to street maintenance, alley rehabilitation, parks maintenance and economic development. The city’s other operating funds are expected to vary in year-over-year performance. The hotel-motel tax fund, which is sustained through revenue from tourism and events, is projected to take the biggest hit, with an annual revenue nosedive of about 60%, down to $1.7 million. The city’s water and sewer fund

$150M $120M $90M $60M $30M $0

RICHARDSON Council voted Aug. 24 to approve a budget that carries a year-over-year general fund revenue shortage of roughly $5.8 million. Staff is budgeting about $130.6 million in new general fund reve- nue, down from the $136.4 million estimated for fiscal year 2019-20, according to the budget. This money will be supplemented by an initial fund balance of about $31.8 million. The revenue loss is due in part to a dip in citywide property valuations. Instead of implementing a property tax rate increase, the city chose to cut expenses. An unchanged tax rate of $0.62516 per $100 property valuation

Revenue Expenditures SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

receive results, County Judge Clay Jenkins told commissioners at an Aug. 18 meeting. “The most galling part is that it was taking over 3.5 days [on average] for the test that was done on a person to make it to Austin,” Jenkins said. “You could take it on a bicycle in three and a half days.” The city of Dallas made an agreement with Honu in early July in hopes that the move would improve the timeliness of results, according to a June 30 county press release. That, in turn, would have improved the accuracy of coronavi- rus data in North Texas. “It is completely unacceptable that we would switch to a vendor that would then hold onto a test for any length of time,” Jenkins said. Parkland Hospital took over testing at the Eastfield site Aug. 31. and solid waste fund are expected to see slight revenue bumps. Council approved an unchanged water and residential solid waste rate; however, it did slightly increase the commer- cial solid waste rate.

City sales tax receipts increase again in June

County nixes testing vendor’s contract

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON The city continues to see an upward month-over- month trend in sales tax collections, according to data from the Texas Comptroller’s Office. The city collected $4.6 million in sales tax revenue in June, which is 43% more than the $3.2 million received in May and 14.9% more than this time last year, according to data. This brings the city’s year-to-date collections to $29.1 million, a 9% increase year over year. Despite the favorable outcome in monthly sales tax receipts, staff still projects collections to be down at the end of the year due to affects of the coronavirus pandemic.

DALLAS COUNTY Officials in Dallas County announced Aug. 18 they are switching vendors at one of the county’s public coronavirus test sites following an alleged pattern of delayed results. Private vendor Honu Manage- ment Group had been administer- ing tests at the county’s Eastfield College site in Mesquite for more than a month. Multiple complaints of slow results led to an investigation by Dr. Philip Huang, the director of the county’s health and human services department. Huang found that, in some cases, it was taking up to 10 days for a patient to

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

INSIDE INFORMATION

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Texans are weeks away from casting votes in a slew of local, state and federal races Nov. 3. The following information details how to prepare for early voting and Election Day. SOURCE: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER FREQUENTLY ASKEDQUESTIONS ABOUT VOTING

IMPORTANT DATES TOKNOW OCT. 5 Last day to register to vote OCT. 23 Last day to apply for ballot by mail*

OCT. 13-30 Early voting NOV. 3 Election Day *DATE RECEIVED, NOT POSTMARKED

Q: Am I registered to vote? A: Voters can nd their registration status online at www.sos.state.tx.us. Q: If I’m not registered, what do I do? A: Voters can register by mail or in person. Texas does not oer online registration. Q: Where can I register to vote? A: Voters can register at their county’s voter registrar’s oce. To nd your county’s oce, search ‘county voter registration ocials’ on the Texas secretary of state’s website. Q: I don’t want to register in person. Can I register by mail? A: Voters can ll out an application online, print it, sign it and mail it to their county’s voter registrar’s oce. The registration is eective 30 days after it is received and ac- cepted by the registrar. Applications are also available at many post oces, public librar- ies, government oces and high schools. Q: I’m voting in person. Where do I go? A: Each voter is provided with a Voter ID card. This includes a precinct number, which indicates where a voter is eligible to vote. In some counties, residents can vote at any designated polling location in their county during early voting and on Election Day.

To check whether your county participates in the Countywide Polling Place Program, search ‘countywide polling place list’ on the Texas secretary of state’s website. Q: I don’t have an ID. Can I still vote? A: Voters without a photo ID are required to sign a sworn adavit that exempts them from the ID requirement, but they must still provide another form of identication. Q: Can I vote by mail in Texas? A: Only some Texas voters are eligible to re- quest mail-in ballots. Residents must be age 65 or older, be disabled, be out of the coun- ty on Election Day or during early voting by personal appearance, or be conned in jail. Q: I fall into one of those eligible categories. How do I apply? A: Voters can print an application to vote by mail from the Texas secretary of state’s web- site. It must be printed, lled out, signed and mailed or faxed to the early voting clerk in the voter’s county. Check the secretary of state’s website to nd information on your county’s early voting clerk.

VOTER IDREQUIRED

Texas voters are required to present one of seven specic forms of photo identication before they may cast their ballots. Voters must present one of the following forms of ID to vote.

DRIVER

CHL

PASSPORT

U.S. CITIZEN

Texas driver’s license*

U.S. passport

Texas concealed handgun license

U.S. citizenship certicate with photo

ELECTION

PERSONAL

Texas Election Identication Certicate*

U.S. military ID card with photo MILITARY

Texas personal ID card

Voters who cannot obtain one of the seven acceptable forms of photo ID due to a reasonable impediment may present a supporting form of identication and execute a Reasonable Impediment Declaration. For additional information regarding voter ID laws, visit www.votetexas.gov/register- to-vote/need-id.html.

*ISSUEDBY THE TEXASDEPARTMENTOF PUBLICSAFETY SOURCE: TEXAS SECRETARYOF STATE’SOFFICE/COMMUNITY IMPACTNEWSPAPER

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

R I C H A R D S O N I S D  P L A N O I S D S N A P S H O T DISTRICT DATA COMPILED BY LIESBETH POWERS Richardson ISD has for the most part grown in enrollment over the past ve years, while Plano ISD enrollment is on the decline. Both districts have comparable average base salaries and diverse student populations, though not as diverse as neighboring Dallas ISD.

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

201920 TEACHER STATS

*Estimated STUDENT ENROLLMENT

RICHARDSON ISD STATS TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 5,418 TOTAL NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 55 FUNDING PER STUDENT $9,382 TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 6,886 FUNDING PER STUDENT $6,950 TOTAL NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 67 YEAR FOUNDED 1899 PLANO ISD STATS YEAR FOUNDED 1854

2,743.53 3,855.13 TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHERS

Dallas ISD: 9,989.47 NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

$59,290 $58,317 STARTING TEACHER SALARY

2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21*

Dallas ISD: $60,146 NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

FROM 201617 +2.2% -3.7%

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

56.83%

28.13%

18.24%

32.83%

60.24%

20.26%

STATE AVERAGE

STATE AVERAGE

13

RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

Public Education Edition 2020

News from Richardson and Plano ISDs

PISDapproves virtual learning plan

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

developed a system that had both elements,” she said. “However, we also need to consider methods of providing instruction and support for students who are unable to connect during the live instruction.” The district is required to submit its remote learning proposal to the state by Oct. 1 in order to secure funding, Hasley said. Students enrolled in remote learn- ing follow the same daily schedule as they would at their home campus. Engagement is tracked through Google Classroom participation, election scheduled for Nov. 3. The district was notied in early August that Eager’s opponent, Bridgett Hudson, had dropped out of the race for At-Large Place 6—a move that eectively upended the last contested race on the ballot. Gov. Greg Abbott previously “strongly encouraged” local

PLANO ISD District ocials unanimously approved a plan for remote learning at an Aug. 18 board meeting. While the district is proposing a primarily asynchronous model, it will involve some real-time instruction, said Katrina Hasley, PISD assistant superintendent for academic services. “Overwhelmingly, teachers, sta, parents and students wanted live interaction in contact with teachers, which is one of the reasons we

Trustees approved the plan in August. (Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

long as they’re able to engage in the learning for that content area sometime during that day, they can be counted present,” she said. Engagement guidelines and expec- tations are published on the district’s website for parents and students. who was running unopposed, after former trustee Kristin Kuhne’s term expired. Unlike Bono, Kuhne was no longer eligible to hold the position because she does not reside within District 3 boundaries. As of press time, Eager and Rente- ria were scheduled to be sworn in at the Sept. 8 board meeting.

teacher-student interaction during live activities and through assign- ments and submissions, Hasley said. “If a student was not able to log in during a synchronous time—maybe their connectivity wasn’t working well enough at that point in time—as governments to postpone their May elections to Nov. 3; trustees voted to do so later in May. Outgoing At-Large Place 6 trustee Justin Bono agreed to stay in the seat until that time. The District 3 seat was also set to appear on the November ballot. Trustees voted in May to fast-track the installation of Debbie Rentería,

RISDvotes to cancel November election

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

RICHARDSON ISD Unopposed candidate Eric Eager will join the Richardson ISD board early fol- lowing a trustee vote to cancel the

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RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

Public Education Edition 2020

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT R I C H A R D S O N I S D D ATA A N D D E M O G R A P H I C S B Y C A M P U S CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY LIESBETH POWERS These tables show the demographic makeup of students at Richardson ISD. This information is broken down by campuses across the district.

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

1 Aikin

705 88% <10 87 267 293 -

<30 37 43, 52 <30 314 48, 55 <10 17 45, 50 <30 136 42, 50

2 Arapaho Classical Magnet

584 25% <10 33 58 147

-

3 Audelia Creek 4 Big Springs

662 86% <10 19 367 245 -

336 33% <10 40 43 92

-

5 Bowie

651 12% <10 26 20 106 <10 34 462 46, 49, 54, 55

6 Brenteld

829 7% <10 35 <30 104 -

37 626 46, 54 <20 216 47, 54 <10 <10 46, 47, 48 49, 54, 55

-

7 Canyon Creek

293 15%

<10 18 34 -

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

8 Carolyn G. Bukhair

755 97% <10 <10 35 711

-

-

9 Dartmouth

383 39% <10 56 51 82 454 85% <20 92 303 -

<30 171 <10 35

42, 50

10 Dobie Pre-Kindergarten School

N/A

2 0 1 8  1 9 S T U D E N T  T E A C H E R DEMOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN

-

11 Dover

600 88% <10 12 57 491 728 95% <10 33 451 211 597 80% <10 113 167 215 447 81% <10 <10 31 341 692 59% <10 27 292 201

<10 32 48, 55 <20 17 43, 52 <20 82 45, 50 14 54 47, 54

12 Forest Lane Academy

-

-

13 Forestridge

14 Greenwood Hills

-

15 Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet

<10 39 127 42, 45, 50

DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

16 Jess Harben 17 Lake Highlands

428 62% - 700 29% -

82 116 90 - <10 41 222 -

16 124 45, 50 <20 416 44, 52 <10 34 42, 50

STUDENTS

TEACHERS

18 Mark Twain

521 88% <10 22 52 404 -

19 Math / Science / Technology Magnet 591 46% -

105 191 144 <10 <30 125 N/A

22.0%

12.6%

0.3%

10.6%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

20 Merriman Park

574 42% -

<10 190 104 <10 20 250 43, 52

21 Mohawk

497 5% <10 21 <20 37

-

18 405 47, 54 19 324 43, 52

22 Moss Haven 23 Northlake 24 Northrich

513 24% <10 <10 102 59 -

579 80% <10 48 215 237 <10 21 56 44, 52

0.3%

0.4%

0.3%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

413 61% <10 <20 76 197

-

14 114 47, 54 22 120 49, 54, 55

25 Northwood Hills

473 63% <10 <20 70 250 -

26 O. Henry

487 85% -

120 62 259 <10 <10 37 45, 50

27 Prairie Creek

328

-

<10 15 <10 <30 -

10 268 47, 54

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

7.0%

4.7%

2.9%

1.9%

28 Prestonwood

480 41% <10 <10 49 151

<10 24 244 46, 49, 54, 55

29 Richardson Heights 30 Richardson Terrace

471 62% -

19 36 242 <10 <20 156 48, 55

539 71% <10 62 163 125 <10 36 151

42, 50

38.7%

52.6%

14.9%

27.7%

HISPANIC

31 Richland

619 72% -

102 289 111

<10 <30 88 42, 45, 50

32 RISD Academy

911 95% <10 10 51 820 -

<10 27 46, 47, 48 49, 54, 55 <30 43 43, 52 <10 257 49, 54, 55 <10 31 49, 54, 55

33 Skyview

812 94% <10 66 408 271

-

3.0%

2.4%

1.5%

1.1%

MULTIPLE RACES

34 Spring Creek 35 Spring Valley 36 Springridge 37 Stults Road

412 25% <10 18 31 96 -

408 85% -

<10 <10 354 -

333 63% <10 52 128 56 <10 10 85 45, 50

707 78% <10 34 291 318 -

<10 52 43, 52

29.0%

27.4%

70.6%

58.4%

WHITE

38 Thurgood Marshall

595 95% <10 35 446 76 <10 21

12 44, 52

39 Wallace

766 61% <10 166 132 232 <10 14 219 44, 52 920 14% <20 94 108 <10 36 662 44, 52

40 White Rock

Ranges (e.g., <10, <20) indicate counts are not available (i.e., masked) to comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

41 Yale

434 34% <10 43 45 103 -

<30 211

42, 50

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Public Education Edition 2020

PLANO ISD Information on PISD schools shown below are from campuses that serve students living in the city of Richardson.

DEMOGRAPHICS

A PLANO ISD OVERALL RATING 2019 RATING

JUNIORHIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

42 Apollo

660 59% <10 74 148 227 <10 <10 182

50

DEMOGRAPHICS

PLANO ISD ELEMENTARY

43 Forest Meadow 44 Lake Highlands

835 69% <10 22 316 317 <10 17 159 52

869 53% <10 47 221 264 <10 32 302

52 50 54 54

45 Liberty 46 Parkhill

643 78% <10 78 241 251

<10 10 61

SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

703 46% <10 12 24 350 <10 18 295 717 42% <10 12 63 336 <10 20 281

Feeder schools

47 Richardson North

48 Richardson West Junior High Arts and Technology Magnet

1 Aldridge 2 Miller 3 Schell 4 Stinson

577 22% <10 152 55 100 - 577 22% <10 97 30 46 - 628 24% <10 347 62 49 -

<30 241 <30 176 <10 27 30 181

7 5 6 6

799 56% <10 33 102 417 <10 18 226 55

Westwood Junior High – The Math, Science and Leadership Magnet

49

669 58% -

57 150 282 <10 <30 153 54, 55

594 10% - 284 43 55

-

DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGRAPHICS

PLANO ISD MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

50 Berkner High School and STEM Academy 51 Christa McAulie Learning Center

5 Murphy

1,172 12% <10 392 96 147 <10 47 485

8

2,535 59% <10 375 676 952 <10 76 449 87.8%

6 Otto

1,103 35% -

412 128 285 <10 <40 239 10

7 Wilson

848 42% <10 42 151 266 <10 33 348 9

<80

-

-

<10 27 32

-

<10 <10 N/A

52 Lake Highlands

2,749 54% <10 144 879 887 <10 57 773 89.1%

DEMOGRAPHICS

53 Memorial Park Academy

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

N/A

2,373 36% <20 69 139 1,077 <10 60 1016 90.7%

54 Pearce

PLANO ISD HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

55 Richardson (students can apply for RHS magnet program)

2,763 49% <10 189 465 1,260 <20 84 748 94.0%

Feeder schools

ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster label for their 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. Texas students take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness each year to measure standards in reading, writing, math, science and social studies and are traditionally given letter grades ranging from A-F based on performance. Although the coronavirus pandemic is ongoing, the state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR exam in 2021, as of press time. The ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance. FOR 2020 AND BEYOND

8 McMillen

1,269 33% <10 240 150 391

<60 428 12

-

2019 RATING

9 Vines

994 32% <10 87 125 272 <10 42 462

11

B RICHARDSON ISD OVERALL RATING Exemplary performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of

10 Williams

994 32% <10 251 163 503 -

<30 236 12

DEMOGRAPHICS

PLANO ISD SENIORHIGH

SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

11 Plano

2,647 27% <20 480 331 579 <10 108 1.134 94.3%

improvement Unacceptable performance

12 Plano East

2,995 31% <10 919 333 831

<10 82 823 96.7%

Ranges (e.g., <10, <20) indicate counts are not available (i.e., masked) to comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

17

RICHARDSON EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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