Central Austin Edition - September 2021

DINING FEATURE

BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE

Hank’s has a drive-thru window for coee and call-in orders. During the pandemic, business picked up through the drive- thru as the dining room had to briey close. It helped maintain business, owner Andy Means said. Today, the restaurant is doing well enough to expand its catering services and even eye a second location. WHENADOOR CLOSES, OPENA PICKUPWINDOW

OLIVIA ALDRIDGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Bacon Marmalade Chicken is one of Hank’s “classic with a twist” dishes.

The bar at Hank’s Austin oers happy hour prices every day.

The Garden & Goat Salad ($13) features goat cheese and golden beets.

COURTESY GABY DEIMEKE

COURTESY GABY DEIMEKE

COURTESY ROSEE QUALLS

Hank’s Austin Windsor Park eatery aims to be a ‘neighborhood hub’ W hen Andy Means opened Hank’s Austin in 2017, he said he aimed to create a

the size of Henri’s. With the added space, Means was also able to oer more menu options than at the wine-and- cheese-focused Henri’s. “We wanted to make sure that every eater had something to eat— whether you’re a vegan or gluten- free or dairy-free, so we developed the menu as kind of home-cooked staples that [have] a little bit of a twist on them,” he said. Means cut his teeth in the restaurant industry in California, where he came to appreciate laid-back, healthy meals. He said he fused those inuences with Southern staples from his

upbringing in Atlanta. While a brined fried chicken is on the menu, so is a crispy brown rice bowl with lemongrass and ginger. Also popular are lemon ricotta pancakes, he said, a top seller during brunch. Hank’s got its name from the owner’s roots in Georgia, too. When Means’ grandfather, Henri, emigrated from France in the 1940s, his new friends in Augusta, Georgia, gave him the nickname Hank. “He entertained a lot, and always had parties in his driveway,” Means said. “That was where the Hank’s vibe came from, was how he used to live his life: Everything was casual, and nothing was buttoned up.”

Owner Andy Means said he wants Hank’s to feel like a local watering hole.

OLIVIA ALDRIDGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

local institution. “We wanted to be a neighborhood hub, kind of a country club type of thing for that neighborhood where you could go meet friends any time of day,” he said. Hank’s, which serves classic American dishes alongside its all- day coee shop, rose from the ashes of Means’ rst Austin venture, Henri’s, a small South Austin bistro that burned down in 2016. Not long afterward, Means learned about a 12,000-square-foot space in East Austin’s Windsor Park area, 10 times

Hank’s Austin 5811 Berkman Drive, Austin 512-609-8077 www.hanksaustin.com Sun.-Thu. 8 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 8 a.m.-10 p.m.

290

183

35

N

Explore a new collection of unique forts in our Texas Arboretum. OCTOBER - JANUARY

31

CENTRAL AUSTIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2021

Powered by