Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | May 2021

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 7  MAY 12JUNE 15, 2021

ONLINE AT

FlowerMound mayor’s race heads to runo

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BY ALEX COPELAND

No candidate earned more than 50% of the vote May 1 in the ve-way race for mayor of Flower Mound. That leaves the top two contenders, Derek France and Itamar Gelbman, to face each other in a runo June 5. Election results also gave Lewisville a new mayor, saw several incumbents re-elected and added some new faces to area boards and councils. Voter turnout in Denton County was 8.84%, according to the county elec- tions oce. CONTINUED ON 16

FLOWERMOUND A Run Off IN

Lewisville reghter Mike Farley watches for hazards on Lewisville Lake. (Alex Copeland/Community Impact Newspaper)

It is a cloudy and unseasonably cool day in mid-April, and Lewisville Fire Department’s dive team is cruising on Lewisville Lake. A monitor at the helm indicates that the lake water is a brisk 64 degrees. It’s not quite boat season, but in the coming months, thousands of boaters will ock to Lewisville Lake en At about 29,000 acres and 233 miles of shoreline, Lew- isville Lake is a regional tourism draw under normal cir- cumstances. During COVID-19, it has been even more so. “We have denitely seen higher activity on the lake, and CONTINUED ON 14 Busyboat seasonanticipatedonLewisvilleLake masse from all over North Texas and beyond with their personal or rental watercraft. BY ALEX COPELAND

VS.

DEREK FRANCE

ITAMAR GELBMAN

See inside for Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village election results

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMBARB: Local elections are vital to Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village. Check out our front-page story to see who your new city council and school board members are. You’ll also learn about the Flower Mound runo election. I also encourage you to reach out to our new editor, Alex Copeland, as he gets to know the communities. Barb Delk, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMALEX: I’m happy to introduce myself as your new editor. Joining Community Impact Newspaper means returning to North Texas where I started as a freelancer and journalism educator. I’ve spent the past month becoming reacquainted with this growing area. But there is always more to learn. It’s essential for me to hear from you about what matters most. Contact me at acopeland@communityimpact.com. Alex Copeland, EDITOR

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2021

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY ALEX COPELAND & KIRA LOVELL

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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counties are eligible for membership in the not-for-prot nancial coopera- tive. DATCU oers a variety of services for individuals and small businesses, including checking and savings accounts, mortgages and loans. 940-387-8585. www.datcu.org 7 ER of Texas opened the doors to its Highland Village facility March 29 at 3160 Justin Road. Its 24/7 emergency services include treatment of both minor and major injuries, including trauma, sports-related injuries, concussions, chest pain, hearts attacks and more. The Highland Village location joins another location in Little Elm in serving citizens of Denton and Collin counties. 214-247-7728. www.eroftexas.com 8 Texas Health Breeze Urgent Care opened March 16 in Flower Mound at 4630 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 210. The oce treats most minor illnesses and injuries, accepts most major insurance

GRAPEVINE LAKE

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Triumph Sporting Arms opened March 31 at 3351 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound. The family-owned shop specializes in rearms, ammunition, accessories and gunsmithing services and aims to be the “friendliest gun store in Texas, especially for families or those just starting out,” according to owner Robert 2 Dynasty Dance Academy opened May 1 at 2021 Justin Road, Ste. 145, Flower Mound. From hip-hop to salsa and beyond, this all-ages studio oers more than dance classes. It also features after-school programs, DIY crafting work- shops, art classes and tness programs, Swackhamer. 972-951-1077. https://triumphguns.com

according to its website. 214-642-6468. https://ddatexas.com 3 Blessed Hands by Ms. P and Peggy’s Fashion Closet in Lewisville opened May 1 at 101 E. Corporate Drive, Ste. 150C, Lew- isville, on May 1. Blessed Hands by Ms. P provides natural hairstyling and special- izes in braids and extensions, box braids, cornrows, twists and more. Clients can shop for clothes, shoes and accessories at the adjoining Peggy’s Fashion Closet during the appointment. 214-524-4859.

charcuterie plates, coee and a broad selection of wines. So far, the collection features 104 varieties of wine native to Texas. 972-449-5000. www.makarseemarket.com 5 LipSerVce Cosmetics opened the doors to its permanent home May 1 at Music City Mall, 2401 S. Stemmons Free- way, Lewisville, after previously operat- ing there as a pop-up shop. The company sells vegan cosmetics and skin care products. LipSerVce also provides beauty and business workshops and private label services for those interested in entering the beauty industry. 972-863-2836. www.lipservce.com 6 DATCU Credit Union opened a Lew- isville branch April 8 at 1080 Civic Circle. Residents of Denton and 10 other Texas

www.blessedhandsbymsp.com, www.peggysfashioncloset.com

4 Makarsee Market opened its doors in Flower Mound on April 16 at 1900 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 116. While a full menu is still in the works, the eatery serves up

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FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Baja Cantina opened its fth Dallas-Fort Worth location April 19 in Old Town at 253 W. Church St., Lewisville. The restaurant oers a laid back atmosphere alongside its Swirl Ritas, sh tacos and Issa’s Queso, according to its website. The small chain also has restaurants in Keller, North Richland Hills, Roanoke and Watauga. 469-240-0165. www.eatbajacantina.com plans and oers a at fee of $185 for those without insurance. 469-495-9112. https://breezeurgentcare.texashealth.org REOPENING 9 Wound Care 2U opened April 15 at 4441 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 40, Flower Mound, following a temporary closure due to damage from the winter storm earlier this year. The clinic oers treat- ment at its clinic and at patient homes. It focuses on wound care and treats a variety of conditions, such as skin tears, burns, abrasions and ulcers. 214-285-9200. http://woundcare2u.com COMING SOON 10 Zalat Pizza is slated to open its new location in Flower Mound at 5801 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 690. This pizza kitchen makes its dough in-house and is known for its wide range of specialty pies, such as Elote, Pho Shizzle and The OG. The opening date has not yet been announced. 469-483-0420. www.zalatpizza.com 11 Worth the Pour is coming soon to Sojourn at Castle Hills at 3517 Windhav- en Parkway, Bldg. 1, Ste. 100. The lease for the 3,000-square-foot location was brokered in early April. This upscale liquor, beer and wine concept by Michael Reyes, who recently sold Kindred Spirits & Wine in Dallas, looks to provide personal service as well as hard-to-nd or specially requested products, according to a news release. A phone number and website are not available. 12 I Heart Mac & Cheese is opening a new Texas restaurant in Highland Village at 2250 Justin Road, Ste. 112. The Baja Cantina is now open in Old Town Lewisville. ALEX COPELANDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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fast-casual restaurant chain specializes in build-your-own macaroni and cheese bowls and grilled cheese sandwiches. www.iheartmacandcheese.com RELOCATION 13 Old Town Jewelers in Lewisville settled into its new location March 14 at 251 S. Mill St., Ste. 160, on the rst oor of the Awesome Center building. This family-owned, father-and-son-operat- ed business provides a personal touch with repairs, ttings and custom jewelry design from a master jeweler with more than four decades of experience in the business, according to the company web- site. 972-221-4975. 14 Leonard Chiropractic is celebrating its 20th year of operation. Serving the Lewisville and Flower Mound area, its of- ces are at 4441 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 300, Flower Mound. The family practice treats everyone, from babies to senior citizens, in their search for full health and wellness, according to its website. 972-899-2650. 15 Local franchise Jakes Burgers and Beer , located at 1141 Flower Mound Road, Ste. 630, Flower Mound, changed own- ership in April. The restaurant is known for its locally sourced beef burgers and selection of local brews and Texas spirits. There are eight Jakes Burgers and Beer lo- cations across North Texas. 972-503-5253. https://jakesburgersandbeer.com http://oldtownjewelers.net ANNIVERSARIES leonardfamilychiropractic.com NEWOWNERSHIP

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Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd. Ste 110

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2021

TODO LIST

May & June events

COMPILED BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

MAY 15

TEXAS TUNES: LOS TEXMANIACSWITHSPECIAL GUESTAUGIEMEYERS LEWISVILLE GRAND THEATER

Grammy award winners Los Texmaniacs will perform in concert with Augie Meyers. This event is part of the Texas Tunes Concert Series and is funded in part by the Texas Commission on the Arts. 8 p.m. $25-$35. Lewisville Grand Theater, 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. www.mclgrand.com (Courtesy Los Texmaniacs)

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31 MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY The town of Flower Mound will host a Memorial Day ceremony featuring keynote speakers, a color guard presentation and patriotic music. An Honor Wall with the names and photos of those who lost their lives in combat will also be on display. Those interested in submitting a fallen hero for the Honor Wall may ll out a form online or call 972-874-6300. Deadline for submissions is 5 p.m. May 21. The ceremony is hosted by the town’s parks and recreation department. 9 a.m. Free. Senior Center, 2701 W. Windsor Drive, Flower Mound. 972-874-6300. https://tinyurl.com/4c47d33j JUNE 01 AND 08 SOUNDS OF LEWISVILLE This concert series will feature a dierent musical act every Tuesday in June and July. 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St., Lewisville. www.cityoewisville.com 05 CELEBRATE HIGHLAND VILLAGE This annual event celebrates the beginning of summer. Festivities feature live music, including a performance by the band Live 80, food vendors and a reworks show at dark. Attendees are advised to bring chairs, blankets and bug spray. 6 p.m. (gates open), 6:15 p.m. (live entertainment). Free. On-site parking limited. Shuttle buses available. Copperas Branch Park, 101 Highland Village Road. www.highlandvillage.org/525/ Celebrate-Highland-Village 12 BIRDWALK Visitors explore prime birding locations with an expert birder along the nature trails. Age 10 and up. 7:30-10:30 a.m. Free (with $5 entry per vehicle to LLELA). Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area, 201 E. Jones St. Registration required online or by calling 972-219-3550 beginning May 10. www.llela.org

CONCERTS IN THE PARK Concerts in the Park will be held on Friday nights in May with a variety of family- friendly music. Food trucks and vendors will be available for additional cost. Glass and alcohol are prohibited. 7 p.m. Free. Heritage Park, 600 Spinks Road, Flower Mound. www.ower-mound.com/ 1370Concerts-in-the-Park 15 BIKEWITH THE BLUE 5K RUN AND BIKE RACE The Flower Mound Police Department will host the inaugural Bike with the Blue 5K Run and Bike Race. In addition to a 5K run, there will be a youth bike ride with multiple law enforcement agencies, a civilian bike race and a police bike race. There will also be music, refreshments and bike obstacle courses. Proceeds benet Journey to Dream-Kyle’s Place, a transitional living program for homeless teens in Denton County. 7:30 a.m. (on-site registration), 8:30 a.m. (5K run and kid zone opens). Free (youth ride), $25-$35 (registration for 5K and civilian bike race). Lakeside DFW, 2400 Lakeside Parkway, Flower Mound. www.ower-mound.com/BikewiththeBlue 21 BIKE TOWORK DAY The Denton County Transportation Authority will celebrate Bike to Work Day by oering free rides on the A-train to passengers who bring their bikes aboard. The free rides on May 21 also apply to the Connect Bus (Denton and Lewisville), DDTC Evening and Lewisville Lakeway On-Demand service, and the University of North Texas campus shuttles. All day. Free. Bike racks are located in rail cars and on the exterior front of the bus. https://tinyurl.com/2hy4rcf3 29 FIESTA CHARRA This family-friendly event features activities that can be found in a traditional charreada, “which is like a rodeo and practiced in Mexico,” according to the city of Lewisville. 4-10 p.m. Free. Lewisville Rodeo Arena, 101 Parkway Drive, Lewisville. www.cityoewisville.com

The Four Seasons Farmers Market in Highland Village oers a variety of produce. (Courtesy Four Seasons Farmers Market)

FEATURED EVENT FOUR SEASONS FARMERS MARKET The Four Seasons Farmers Market has locations in Flower Mound and Highland Village. The year-round markets oer produce, meat, eggs, honey, breads and jam. They also have pastries and other baked goods as well as wares from various artisans. A Highland Village: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (Saturdays). 1100 Village Parkway, Highland Village B Flower Mound: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. (Sundays). Parker Square, 1500 Cross Timbers Road, Flower Mound. www.fourseasonsmarkets.com MAY 01 THROUGH SEPTEMBER The Heritage Springs splash pad at Heritage Park has opened for the season. It features 14 dierent water features as well as a separate area for toddlers and shaded seating areas. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. daily through Sept. 30. Free. Heritage Park, 600 Spinks Road, Flower Mound. www.ower-mound.com/splashpad. 01 THROUGH SELECT DATES DOUBLETREE RANCH PARK SPLASH PAD The splash pad at Doubletree Ranch Park has 15 water features and one waterfall. It is open on weekends in May. Beginning May 31, the splash pad will be open from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily with closures every Tuesday for maintenance. Free. 310 Highland Village Road, Highland Village. www.highlandvillage.org/673/ Doubletree-Ranch-Park HERITAGESPRINGSSPLASHPAD

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08 THROUGH JUNE 5 ‘MAELSTROM’ ARTEXHIBITION An exhibition featuring the works of master of ne arts student Maria Haag will be on display. Titled “Maelstrom,” the exhibit highlights works on paper, panel and canvas. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Lewisville Grand Theater, 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. www.mclgrand.com 14 AND 21 MOVIES IN THE PARK Highland Village will host Movies in the Park on two Friday nights in May. Guests should bring lawn chairs or blankets. “Onward” will be shown May 14, and “Trolls World Tour” will be May 21. The movie will begin at dark. Free. Doubletree Ranch Park, 310 Highland Village Road, Highland Village. www.highlandvillage.org/501/ Movies-in-the-Park

Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ALEX COPELAND

UPCOMING PROJECTS

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Forest Vista Drive reconstruction project The Forest Vista Drive project extends from Chancellor Drive to Morriss Road and consists of a total reconstruction of the four-lane divided roadway and the replacement of a 12-inch water main. The project is entering Phase 2, with reconstruction of the inner west- bound and eastbound lanes underway. Outside lanes are used as travel lanes during this phase. Timeline: August-May Cost: $2,735,000 Funding source: town of Flower Mound

Main and Mill project Pavement marking is underway as the project wraps up. Paving and cleanup tasks remain at some locations. Minor irrigation and landscaping work needs to be done as well. The Old Town project includes of a stretch of Mill Street running from Purnell Street to past Walters Street, a stretch of Main Street from Mill to the rail station and a portion of Charles Street in front of the MCL Grand Theater. Timeline: January 2019-May 2021 Cost: $8.53 million Funding sources: city of Lewisville, North Central Texas Council of Gov- ernments

N Midway Road rehabilitation project The rehab of Midway Road consists of the replacement of the existing as- phalt street to a wide concrete street with sidewalks on the south side of Midway from Huffines Boulevard to the Holfords Prairie Road intersection. The project will also install storm inlets, culverts and drainage pipes. Timeline: October 2019-May 2021 Cost: $5.2 million Funding sources: Denton County, city of Lewisville

Intersection improvements at Morriss Road and Valley Ridge Boulevard This project is an upgrade of the existing southbound left-turn lane on Morriss Road at Valley Ridge Boule- vard and the construction of a west- bound right-turn lane on Valley Ridge. Concrete pouring has been completed in some sections, but additional pour- ing is required with a completion date anticipated in early May. Timeline: September 2019-May 2021 Cost: TBD Funding source: town of Flower Mound

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 23. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

DFW HIGH-SPEED TRANSPORTATION VIRTUAL PUBLIC MEETINGS May 19 12:00 PM: (855) 756-7520 Ext. 72698# May 20 6:00 PM: (855) 756-7520 Ext. 72699#

NCTCOG is scheduling virtual public meetings to receive comments on the Dallas-Fort Worth High-Speed Transportation Connections Study. This study is evaluating high-speed transportation options, both potential routes and transportation modes, to modernize and enhance mobility between Dallas and Fort Worth. For special accommodations due to a disability or for language translation, contact 817-695-9240 or HST_DFW@nctcog.org. Para ajustes especiales por discapacidad o para interpretación de idiomas, llame al 817-695-9240 o por email a HST_DFW@nctcog.org. Se harán las adaptaciones razonables. To pre-register for one of the meetings, email hst_dfw@nctcog.org or call 817-695-9240 and provide your phone number as well as which date you plan to attend. Presentation materials will be posted for review on May 14 at www.nctcog.org/dfw-hstcs. Presentation information will be the same at both meetings.

SUBMIT COMMENTS & QUESTIONS VIA

Email: HST_DFW@nctcog.org Online: nctcog.org/dfw-hstcs Phone: 817-695-9240 Fax: 817-640-3028 Mail: P.O. Box 5888 Arlington, TX 76005-5888

www.nctcog.org/dfw-hstcs

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2021

HISTORY

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resubmitted to address the commit- tee members’ specications regard- ing the monument’s reinstallation. These included adding a descrip- tion of the history of slavery in America and its causal impact on the Civil War as well as a description of the African American experience as it relates to the legacy of the Civil War at the time of the memorial’s construction in 1918. “We realized that probably inside our museum was the best location so we could provide the interpretation and historical context that we all wanted to tell, both THC and Denton County,” Denton County Judge Andy Eads said. “We came up with a good location within the courthouse museum and prepared the plan, which not only has elements of the monument, but it also has photo- graphs and historical context and explanations and more background

The Texas Historical Commission executive committee approved plans to relocate the Confederate monu- ment once displayed in front of the Denton County Courthouse to a new home inside the nearby Courthouse- on-the-Square Museum. “Although the Confederate Statue relocation and contextual additions have taken time, it’s been well worth it,” said John Baines, member of the Denton County Courthouse-on- the-Square Art Committee. “The committee has worked together to come up with what we think is the best thing for Denton County and the memorial.” The Denton County Commissioners Court approved a resolution June 9, 2020, executing a State Antiquities Code Permit Application to remove and relocate the monument. Eight days later, the permit application was

The Confederate memorial outside the Denton County Courthouse-on-the-Square was erected in 1918 and taken down June 25, 2020. (Community Impact Newspaper sta)

on it than just the granite structure.” The exhibit will be surrounded on three sides by a 3-D version of the Confederate monument where it was once located on the courthouse lawn. The display will include a narrative detailing the memorial’s history and the history of slavery locally and statewide. The debate over the county’s Confederate memorial reached a climax in 2019 following years of discussion regarding its fate as the national conversation turned to other

such monuments across the country. Some argue the monuments should be preserved, while others decry them as monuments to slavery. “We believed bringing the statue indoors was the best stewardship we had for a statue we’ve had for 100 years on our lawn so we can preserve it for future generations to admire and learn from,” Eads said. Last June, Denton County had the monument removed and relocated to climate-controlled storage owned by the county, where it has stayed since.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Lewisville ISD

COMPILED BY KARIN SHAW ANDERSON

and next. These include improvements to HVAC systems, roofing and flooring. The improvements were included in the 2017 bond referendum. Wellington is lo- cated at 3900 Kenwood Drive in Flower Mound. The same bond program will pay for turf replacement this summer at B Flower Mound, C Hebron and D The Colony high schools. The total cost for replacement is estimated to be $3.4 million, according to documents from the April 12 meeting. 3 District authorizes payment for 2017 storm damage at 8 schools During an April 12 board meeting, Lewis- ville ISD trustees voted to authorize the final payment related to hail and wind damage incurred at eight district campus- es during a March 2017 storm. A Marcus High School suffered the most extensive damage, according to district documents. Repairs to that campus cost the district’s insurance carrier more than $6.8 million. The district paid a deduct- ible of $250,000, which covered the damage at all eight schools. The final re- pair cost for the high school campus was $1.4 million less than initial estimates because of contingencies built into the estimate that were not used. B Briarhill, C DeLay and D Lamar middle schools and E Valley Ridge, F McAuliffe, G Heritage and H Highland Village ele- mentary schools were also damaged.

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BELLAIRE BLVD.

1A

1A

BRON PKWY.

1F

FLOWER MOUND

35E

F L

R

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

1 Four middle school campuses shift to STEM academies

2 Board OKs costs to upgrade Wellington Elementary School A Wellington Elementary School in Flower Mound will receive an estimated $9.65 million in improvements to its building and playground. Lewisville ISD board of trustees mem- bers approved the expenses at the April 12 meeting. Construction of a new playground will begin soon and is scheduled to be complete before the start of the 2021- 22 school year. Updates to the school building will take place this summer

ronment dedicated to teaching students science, technology, engineering and math skills.” A Creek Valley, B Hedrick, C Downing and D Forestwood middle schools will be STEM academies next year, and E Memorial Elementary School will join F Donald, G Polser, H Valley Ridge and I Bridlewood as an elementary STEM academy. Students at STEM academies receive engineering instruction every day in addi- tion to foundational curriculum, accord- ing to the district.

Lewisville ISD is converting four middle school campuses and one elementary campus to STEM academies for the 2021- 22 school year. It will be the first time middle schoolers in the district will participate in a dedi- cated science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, program, according to information from the April 12 board of trustees meeting. The district describes the program as “a hands-on, collaborative learning envi-

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

LewisvilleOKs rezoning for NorthernGateway development

BY ALEX COPELAND

LEWISVILLE A zoning change will clear the way for Fronterra, a proposed mixed-use development with 201 townhomes, 773 multifamily units and 40,000 square feet of ground oor commercial space. The Lewisville City Council approved an ordinance granting the zone change at its April 19 meeting. The 35.77-acre tract will move from a light industrial to a planned develop- ment and mixed-use district. “The proposed development before you tonight is consistent with multiple plans: the Northern Gateway Plan, the Lewisville 2025 Vision Plan, the Corridor Redevelopment Plan,” Lewisville Planning Director Richard Luedke said at the meeting. “It’s harmonious with the surrounding neighborhoods compared to the current light industrial zoning that is now in place.” The Fronterra development is part of a wedge-shaped swath of the

35E

JUSTIN RD.

407

N

Public spaces, such as plazas, outdoor spaces and trails, are included in the proposed development. (Rendering courtesy city of Lewisville)

Northern Gateway Plan bounded by McGee Lane to the west, I-35E to the east and FM 407 to the south. The proposal includes three subdistricts: townhomes, urban living and commercial core. Trails would connect open spaces within the property to surrounding neigh- borhoods, and a large water feature

would serve as a landmark in the urban core district. “Overall, I love this project,” Council Member R. Neil Ferguson said. “Part of it is simply because it’s been a long road to get to this point from light industrial. It’s everything we want on the site.” Ferguson, however, expressed

concerns about overow parking. “It comes from a history of seeing projects where we don’t sometimes stop to think about Thanksgiving or Christmas at every third or fourth house,” he said. The zoning ordinance included ve alternative standards to the I-35E Overlay Core Subdistrict.

FlowerMoundkicksomaster planning for trails, bikeways

Security upgrades approved for HighlandVillage facilities

The town of Flower Mound is getting started with its Trails and Bikeways Master Plan. Here is the process. TIMELINE FOR THE MASTER PLAN

2021

Phase 1: Community understanding February-March 2021 Phase 2: Community visioning April 2021-January 2022 Phase 3: Needs assessment April-July 2021 Phase 4: Proposed network April-November 2021 Phase 5: Action program November 2021-January 2022

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

BY KRISTINE HUGHES

FLOWERMOUND The Parks and Recreation Department is looking for feedback as it develops a master plan for trails and bikeways. The plan “will serve as a roadmap to guide short- and long-range priorities for the trails and bikeways network in Flower Mound over the next 10-plus years,” according to a town news release. People may provide input on the plan through a virtual public engagement room available at www.owermoundtrailsplan.com.

HIGHLAND VILLAGE The City Council unan- imously approved a bid April 13 to complete security upgrades to city facilities. The bid by Weil Construction Inc. totaled $454,384—more than $45,000 below the $500,000 project budget. The project will increase security measures at public service desks and replace the city’s outdated access control system in the four main city buildings: the municipal complex, municipal service center, re station and police department.

2022

SOURCE: TOWN OF FLOWER MOUNDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COUNTY HIGHLIGHT DENTONCOUNTY A program is now underway to provide COVID-19 vaccines to residents who are unable to leave their homes. Now, when registering through Denton County’s online waitlist, applicants can indicate that they are homebound, making the new service available to them. The service was approved at the April 20 Commissioners Court meeting and went into action on April 22. The program is open only to Denton County residents. Visit www.dentoncounty.gov. MEETINGSWE COVER Lewisville City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Monday of each month. www.cityoewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. the rst and third Monday of each month. www.ower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. www.highlandvillage.org

Transportation agency seeks feedback for a proposed on-demand service

Lewisville City Council approves newTasers, accountability tools

BY ALEX COPELAND

purchase trips in person. The board will discuss user feed- back and approval of the proposed service at the end of July. The Denton County Transportation Authority is proposing an on-demand rideshare service called GoZone. Here is how it works: PROPOSED SERVICE

BY ALEX COPELAND

DENTON COUNTY Public feedback is being sought on a new GoZone on-demand rideshare service from the Denton County approved the proposed service plan after researching options and con- cluding that an on-demand service model would be best for the agency and riders, according to a release. The service would replace most of Transportation Authority. DCTA’s board of directors the agency’s xed-route service. GoZone would function through a new app from service provider River North Via. Passengers will use personal accounts on the app where they will be able to purchase tickets for GoZone and other DCTA services. Users without smartphone access can book trips over the phone by contacting the agency’s customer service team or visiting the Down- town Denton Transit Center to

LEWISVILLE The City Council approved a service and purchasing agreement with Axon Enterprise that will provide the Lewisville Police Department with new Tasers, digital storage for evidence and body camera footage, and an assortment of accountability and transparency tools. The agreement will cost $3.37 million over ve years. The original contract signed in 2017 provided the LPD with body cameras and TaserX2 for all sworn ocers. The Ocer Safety Plan 7 Plus approved by council has a host of new tools. It will track ocers with geo-mapping, activate a body camera when a rearm is removed from its holster, provide automatic transcription of videos, make it easier to redact videos and increase third-party storage.

Rider selects pickup location and destination App proposes pickup location, wait time and fare Rider accepts and tracks vehicle in real time on map Vehicle picks up rider App allows rider to track location, upcoming stops and estimated arrival time

1

2

3

4 5

Public comments are being accepted through June 25. Learn more at https://dctafeedback.net. SOURCE: DENTON COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE Altitude Pole Fitness &Aerial Arts Classes in Highland Village aim to build strength and condence one session at a time A llison Roussel was laid o from her corporate informa- tion technology job in 2017. they could never do it because of the negative connotations,” Roussel said. “It takes about 15 minutes, then they forget all their nerves.” Aerial hoops is the second most

BY KAREN CHANEY

IN THE STUDIO Altitude Pole Fitness & Aerial Arts oers a variety of classes that help build cardio, exibility and conditioning.

APPARATUSES

aerial silks, aerial yoga, aerial hoop, pole tness

SKILL LEVELS

beginning, intermediate, advanced

EXTRAS

kids circus classes, teen yer classes, private lessons and private parties

While looking for another job, she found herself entertaining a lifelong goal of opening her own business. She had been taking classes for ve years at Altitude Pole Fitness & Aerial Arts in Frisco and approached the business owner, Tricia Lauerman, about the possibility of expanding. “I really liked Tricia’s brand and what she presented,” Roussel said. “Tricia said, ‘Let’s do it.’” Roussel opened the Altitude Pole Fitness & Aerial Arts Highland Village location in March 2018. Of the many classes oered, Roussel said pole tness is the most popular. She said women are sometimes trying to nd themselves beyond their role as a mom. This class is a good way to do that as well as gain self-condence and self-es- teem, she said. “They think about it and then say “IF YOUARE LIFTING YOUR BODYWEIGHT FORAN ENTIRE HOUR, EVERY CLASS YOU COME TO, IT’S EXPONENTIAL HOWQUICKLY YOU GAIN STRENGTHAND

requested class, due in part to the 2017 movie, “The Greatest Showman.” Roussel said she recommends customers try aerial hammock and aerial yoga to get the feel of the material before advancing to aerial silks, which are also in demand. Roussel said many rst-time cus- tomers, even those already in great shape, are surprised by how dicult the classes are and how sore they are the next day. However, the results are worth the eort, she said. “Every time you try to pull yourself up in the fabric or climb a pole, you’re lifting your entire body weight,” she said. “If you are lifting your body weight for an entire hour, every class you come to, it’s exponential how quickly you gain strength and start toning.” Because these classes encourage customers to step out of their comfort zone, they see a remarkable increase in physical, mental and emotional strength, she said. “We have people who walk in with their shoulders down. Over time they stand up straighter,” Roussel said. “They are excited to be here and help other students. They come out of their shell.”

Owner Allison Roussel demonstrates aerial silks. (Photos by Karen Chaney/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Owner Allison Roussel started taking pole tness classes in 2012.

Altitude Pole Fitness & Aerial Arts is located in Highland Village.

Altitude Pole Fitness &Aerial Arts 1800 Justin Road, Ste. 1830A, Highland Village 940-441-5453

HIGHLAND VILLAGE RD.

JUSTIN RD.

407

www.altitudetnesshv.com Hours: Mon.–Fri. 4-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–3 p.m., Sun. 1:30–6:30 p.m.

BROWNING DR.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THREE DISHES TO TRY

Not Just a Grilled Cheese Sandwich ($9.95) includes smoked brisket; American, Swiss and cheddar cheese; and ancho chili barbecue sauce served on sourdough bread with a side of fries.

DINING FEATURE

Loaded Nachos ($8.95) include chips, queso, cheddar cheese, jalapenos, sour cream, pico de gallo and beans.

ALEX COPELANDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

YVONNE BROWNCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Tavern on the Plaza Old Town eatery gets new name, menu overhaul T avern on the Plaza is exactly that: an old-fashioned pub-restaurant sandwiched between Wayne Ferguson Plaza and Main BY YVONNE BROWN

Jumbo Soft Baked Pretzel with Queso ($4.50) is among the appetizers at Tavern on the Plaza.

YVONNE BROWNCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“We kept the doors open all the time during restrictions,” Anwar said. “It has been challenging, but now we are starting to see the clouds lift as more people drop by.” Looking to the future, the hope is to extend the hours and open for lunch again, he said. Commu- nity events are gradually returning to Old Town Lewisville along with investment and refurbish- ment of nearby buildings. New apartment homes are also in the works. All of those have the potential to bring more trac to Tavern on the Plaza. Entertainment options at Tavern on the Plaza include live music and karaoke on weekends and mid-week trivia nights. TVs placed around the tav- ern allow patrons to monitor key sporting events, and there is a daily happy hour. The signature drink is the Tavern Margarita. Another customer favorite is the Western Son Mule, made with a locally brewed vodka from Pilot Point, according to manager Shannon La Bree. She describes the venue as having a real “Cheers” vibe, in reference to the 1980s sitcom. “It’s a neighborhood venue where you can drop in and always meet someone you know or even make new friends,” she said. “The goal is for people to spend more time and not just enjoy a meal but stay a while and soak in the fun, friendly atmo- sphere, too.”

Street in Old Town Lewisville. Owner Matt Anwar has over 10 years’ experience in the restaurant trade and took over the business in early 2020. He said he had been simultaneously working in the corporate world but eventually retired to focus full-time on the restaurant. “With space and potential to oer a variety of entertainment, I was looking for a larger venue, and this seemed like the perfect choice,” Anwar said. He decided to change the business name—for- merly Alkeys Lounge and Eatery—to reect an inviting local establishment to gather with friends and family. Including “tavern” in the name also helped to emphasize the bar aspect and the array of drinks oered in addition to casual American food, he said. He said he also overhauled the menu to make it more mainstream and lowered prices to become more aordable. The tavern oers burgers, sandwiches, wraps, wings and classics, including chicken-fried steak, sh and chips, a brisket plate and loaded mac and cheese. When COVID-19 hit, however, the challenges began.

Old Town Burger ($10.95) includes a beef patty with caramelized onions, bacon, cheese, lettuce and tomatoes and topped with a fried egg on a brioche bun and a side of fries.

YVONNE BROWNCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Tavern on the Plaza 165 W. Main St., Lewisville 972-537-5977 www.tavernontheplazalewisville.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 4-10 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 4 p.m.-1 a.m., closed Sun.

CHURCH ST.

MAIN ST.

N

C H

HILL DR.

COFFEE 151

Gunsmith on site | Retail | Family-owned (972) 951-1077

SAGEBRUSH DR.

3351 Long Prairie Rd, Flower Mound, TX 75022

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • MAY 2021

In dangerous situations, the re department’s dive teamis called in. For the worst case scenarios they’re armed with sonar that pierces the cloudy lake water and helps them search for the bodies of those who fall victim to the dangers of Lewisville Lake. “Every time we come out here, it’s a dierent situation. It’s never the same,” Fire Capt. Jeremy Seese said. “Last year we went out on ve storm events where we were pulling people o the shoreline or looking for kay- akers that got caught up in it, [as well as] jon boats [smaller shing boats] that were out there in [the storm]. ” That hasn’t dissuaded boaters with crafts of all kinds from hitting the water: pontoon boats, at-bottomed single-motor boats, jon boats, luxury watercraft and Sea-Doos. “In the summertime, you’re talking about potentially hundreds of boats that are all tied up together with hundreds of people that are just like that,” Seese said,

7,495 in 2018-19. The number of visitors can vary greatly year-to-year as a result of heavy rains and droughts, which can close boat ramps and ood camp- grounds. In fact, while numbers were up in 2019-20, they still don’t reach those in 2016-17, which saw nearly 19% more annual passes sold. But, Moore is condent that the trend will continue. “I think it’s denitely going to continue into this year,” Moore said. “It remains to be seen how long this trend will last, but I think when you see an increase and you see a lot of people taking opportunities to go out to the lake, it kind of refreshes their opinion that this is a great activity. Residents say, ‘We’ve got this right here by our house, so why aren’t we

mass. “This one is not that big. You might see 40 to 50 boats, that’s not that bad. They’re more subdued.” Wear a life jacket A large boat comes speeding by in the opposite direction. It is carry- ing more than two dozen people in bathing suits. Music blares from the boat’s speakers. There is not a life jacket in sight. “See that right there?” Seese said, pointing out the overloaded boat. “That’s a hazard for us.” If game wardens, the law enforce- ment arm of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, were to inspect the boat and nd that there was not a life jacket available for each person, the boaters might face a ne ranging from $25 to $500 a boat, he said. “That’s the biggest thing, you know,” Seese said. “You need to have a life jacket for every person on board.

CONTINUED FROM 1

we believe that to be a result of COVID- 19 and travel restrictions in general,” said Jason Moore, the director of eco- nomic development for Lewisville. “People were wanting to stay closer to home, and the lake is one of the big- gest assets we have here.” The lake is known as the “Urban Bass Fishing Capital of Texas” due to the variety and number of sh, according to the city. It also attracts boaters, swimmers and others to parks and camp sites along its shores. In the scal year 2019-20, the Lew- isville Parks and Recreation Depart- ment sold 1,499 annual passes to the 622-acre Lewisville Lake Park and Tower Bay park at $60 apiece, up from 1,227 passes the year before. The passes waive the $10 daily entry fee for boats and vehicles. In total, residents and visitors brought 11,954 boats to Lake Park in scal year 2019-20, an increase from

using it more?’” Crowdedwaters

Lewisville Lake is not without risk for partygoers, swimmers, and boaters.

referencing a large cluster of boats lashed together into one big

Traffic on lewisville lake In 2020 Lewisville Lake saw 14

From scal year 2018-19 to 2019-20, passes sold for Lewisville parks increased 22.2% and the number of boats entering their parks increased 59.5%.

accidents. Four resulted in death, and, in one instance, as many as four injuries were related to a single accident. Accident Fatality

1

11

Oak Point

2018-19

1,227

Eldorado Pkwy.

January February

2

2019-20

Lewisville Lake Toll Bridge

12

1,499

March

Annual passes sold in scal years 2018-19 and 2019-20

May June July April

13

35E

14

2018-19

2019-20 Boats entered Lewisville parks in scal years 2018-19 and 2019-2020 11,954 7,495

Lake Dallas

August

Lewisville Lake

3

6

September

5 5

16

7

October

4

8

November December

15

Highland Village

9

17

SOURCE: TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: LEWISVILLE PARKS AND REC DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

10

The Colony

Lewisville

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

Mapping the Amenities Points on the map indicate the locations of the parks listed below. Various amenities available at parks are specied next to park names. Boat ramp Fee Required $ Free F Open all year

Lewisville City Park 10

Hidden Cove Park 14

$

$

Crescent Oaks 1

Sycamore Bend Park 5 Pilot Knoll 4 $ Point Vista 6 $

Arrowhead Park 7

Doe Branch 11

Stewart’s Creek Park 15

$

$

F

$

Big Sandy Ramp 2 Westlake Park 3

Copperas Branch Park 8 Tower Bay 9 $

Little Elm Park 12

East Hill Park 17 Eastvale Park 16

F

$

$

$

$

Cottonwood Park 13

$

F

$

SOURCE: TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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