Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth Edition | June 2021

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORTWORTH EDITION

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2  JUNE 24JULY 21, 2021

Local districts invest in health care education

IMPACTS

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P R O G R A M G R OWT H Northwest ISD and Keller ISD have introduced new career and technical education programs in health care as demand has increased and employers have begun to expect more specialized skills.

TODO LIST 2021

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Number of students completing health science programs:

KELLER ISD

Instructor Debby Schneemann, left, demonstrates how to conduct an electrocardiogram, or EKG, test in a classroom at Keller Collegiate Academy. (Kira Lovell/Community Impact Newspaper) Keller and Northwest ISDs plan to expand students’ access to career-centric education

HEALTHCARE EDITION

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SPONSORED BY • Baylor Scott &White Medical Center - Grapevine

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MARKET SNAPSHOT

BY KIRA LOVELL

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through dual credit classes. A smaller group of students will complete selective admission pathways that provide an accel- erated track to becoming a regis- tered nurse, a licensed vocational nurse or a surgical technician, Keller Collegiate Academy Princi- pal Tracy Arsenault said. Keller ISD students are also given the opportunity to experi- ment within medical disciplines CONTINUED ON 20

With health care workers in high demand, Keller and Northwest ISDs are helping to bridge the gap between students and the indus- try with innovative programs. This fall, the Keller Collegiate Academy will welcome its rst class. The academy is a standalone high school campus that provides two options for students, includ- ing the opportunity to earn an associate degree in health science

NORTHWEST ISD

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2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21

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SOURCE: NORTHWEST ISD, KELLER ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMANA: I learned so much about health care education and the dierent medical career pathways oered at Keller ISD and Northwest ISD by reading Kira Lovell’s story in this issue (see Pages 20-21). I invite you to read this story and the rest of our annual Health Care Edition, beginning on Page 15. Next month, we’ll be focusing on real estate. If you have any suggestions or feedback, you know where to nd me. Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMSTEVEN: Hi there—I’m Steven, and I’d like to introduce myself as your new editor. After nine years working in community journalism in Florida, I’m excited to be here and immerse myself in the Keller, Roanoke and Northeast Fort Worth communities. If you have a tip or any feedback, I’d love to hear from you at sryzewski@communityimpact.com. Steven Ryzewski, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding 1171

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Gonzalez-Bryson Speech Therapy PLLC

Coco Shrimp

COURTESY GONZALEZBRYSON SPEECH THERAPY PLLC

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4 Gonzalez-Bryson Speech Thera- py PLLC launched June 1 at 349 Keller Parkway, Keller. Jessica Bryson holds degrees in early childhood education and communication disorders, and she has worked with children as a speech language pathologist since 2012. Gon- zalez-Bryson Speech Therapy specializes in serving bilingual children who speak Spanish or English as a second lan- guage. Services include speech therapy, language therapy and the correction of muscle issues in the face and mouth that can aect speech. 682-593-1659. www.gonzalez-brysonspeechtherapy.com 5 Medicare Foundations opened a standalone location in March at 109 W. Vine St., Keller. The team of independent brokers specializes in matching clients with Medicare plans from a variety of insurance companies, including United Healthcare, Humana and Aetna. 817-455-9373. www.medicarefoundations.com 6 Coco Shrimp opened a new restau- rant June 7 at 2401 Heritage Trace Parkway, Ste. 101. The Fort Worth-based company started as a food truck in 2016 and also has a restaurant at 318 Bryan Ave. The Heritage Trace location also has a drive-thru. The menu features Hawai- ian-style coconut shrimp as well as other avors of shrimp that can be incorporat- ed into tacos or salads. 817-862-7463. www.cocoshrimp.com 7 Sleep Number opened a new Fort Worth store in May at 2800 N. Tarrant Parkway. Sleep Number stores sell beds and bedding that are tailored to individu- als’ sleep needs. 682-268-5068. www.sleepnumber.com

8 Towne Grill opened in Alliance Town Center June 14 at 9365 Rain Lily Trail, Fort Worth, the former site of Houlihan’s. The restaurant is operated by Felipe Armenta and will feature a menu similar to The Tavern, another of his Fort Worth restaurants. While The Tavern serves elevated pub fare, Towne Grill features healthier, lighter options. 817-916-0390. www.townegrilltx.com 9 Hawaiian Bros. opened a Fort Worth location at 2301 N. Tarrant Parkway on June 22. The restaurant serves plate lunch- es, a Hawaiian tradition, with marinated and grilled teriyaki chicken, macaroni salad, tropical soft serve and more. 817-345-6957. www.hawaiianbros.com COMING SOON 10 Glam Bam Paws , a dog groomer, will open in Keller at 2041 Rufe Snow Drive, Ste. 317. Pet stylist Vanessa Lock- ett will see dogs by appointment Tuesday through Saturday. The business was approved March 16 by Keller City Council and is now accepting clients. 817-479-7703. www.glambampaws.com 11 Sephora will open a new store in Presidio Towne Crossing at 2345 Porter Creek Drive, Fort Worth, in the fall. The cosmetics company was founded in France in 1970 and opened its rst U.S. store in 1998. Stores carry makeup, fra- grances, skincare products and more, and the company oers in-store and virtual beauty classes and a customer loyalty program. 877-737-4672. www.sephora.com 12 Blue Line Winery plans to open its rst retail location at 136 E. Hill St., Keller, in July. The winery was founded in

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WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

NOWOPEN 1 State Farm agent Natalie Burkhault- er opened an insurance oce May 1 at 391 W. Byron Nelson Blvd., Ste. 100, Roanoke. Burkhaulter has 25 years of experience in the insurance industry, and the agency oers home insurance, life insurance, small business insurance and more. Insurance evaluations and quotes are free. 682-237-5168. www.texasinsagent.com 2 Taqueria Las Mulas opened at 201 N. Main St., Keller, in early May. The 820

family-owned restaurant serves tacos, burritos, tortas and other authentic Mex- ican fare with dine-in and to-go services. The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 682-593-0088. https://taqueria-las-mulas-mexican- restaurants.business.site 3 Gri’s Gifts , a family-owned boutique toy and gift shop, opened in Keller on May 28 at 101 Town Center Lane, Ste. A109. Oerings include Lego minig- ures and playsets, Harry Potter puppets, bulk candy, candles and soaps. Gift-wrap- ping services are available. 682-593-0717. www.grisgiftshop.com

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Colleyville in 2017 by Chris and Lyn Gil- liam, who import grapes from around the country to make their wines. Proceeds help support rst-responder charities. www.bluelinewinery.com 13 Labcorp will open a new Fort Worth location in the fall at 3424 N. Tarrant Parkway. Labcorp provides routine speci- men collection and lab work for patients, as well as specialized services such as children’s blood collection and employee wellness screenings. The company has other patient service centers throughout North Texas, including in Keller. 817-337-2905. www.labcorp.com RELOCATIONS 14 Los Molcajetes opened the doors to its new dining room May 17 at 113 N. Oak St., Roanoke. The restaurant was previ- ously located at 1106 N. US 377, Roanoke. Los Molcajetes serves traditional Mexican food at three locations in Roanoke, Fort Worth and Manseld. 817-491-4600. FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Keller will soon get its own 151 Coee, featuring a drive-thru, a children’s activity and game area, and roll-up doors for an indoor/outdoor feel. The location will open at 1510 Keller Parkway, in the former site of Taco Bueno. Founded in the Dallas-Fort Worth area in 2017, six 151 Coee locations serve a variety of coee drinks, teas, sodas and shakes.

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development program to help performers start their careers. Ketos Creative also oers a full suite of services for events, including audio systems, photography and videography, and website design. It is located at 5500 N. Tarrant Parkway, Ste. 128, Fort Worth. 817-514-3858. www.ketoscreative.com 16 Hampton Inn & Suites celebrated its rst anniversary as Keller’s rst and only hotel in May. The hotel at 200 Town Center Lane, Keller, features 110 rooms, a tness center and event space that can accommodate up to 80 people, among other amenities. 817-741-8536. www.hilton.com NEWOWNERSHIP 17 The Poppin Shop , at 900 S. Main St., Ste. 335, Keller, is now owned by Luana Costa. The store reopened in April after Costa purchased it from previous owner Beth Redfern. The Poppin Shop sells more than 35 avors of popcorn and 15 avors of gourmet fudge. Costa has added Luana’s Sweet Shop, a section of the store dedicated to a variety of can- dies and brigadeiro, a traditional Brazilian dessert. The Poppin Shop will celebrate its 15th anniversary in October. It moved to the Keller location from Watauga eight

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years ago. 682-593-0032. www.thepoppinshop.com

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JUNE 2021

TODO LIST

June & July events

COMPILED BY KIRA LOVELL

FOURTHOF JULY EVENTS

JUNE 25 MUSEUMOF SCIENCE ANDHISTORY REOPENING The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History reopens to the public with new experiences. The new Current Science Studio features a globe display by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Cattle Raisers Museum presents the exhibit “Rural Women.” 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (June 25). Free (members), $12-16 (nonmembers). 1600 Gendy St., Fort Worth. 817-255-9300. www.fwmuseum.org 25 CONNOR’S CAR SHOW Visit Keller Town Hall for this annual event supporting Down Syndrome Partnership of North Texas, Cook Children’s Medical Center, and other charities. Featuring silent and live auctions, food trucks, vendors from a variety of industries, live music, monster truck and helicopter visits and 160 custom trophies made from aviation parts. Squeezebox Bandits will play a free concert at 3 p.m., immediately following the car show. Free for spectators, $20 entry fee for vehicles. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller. Free public parking and a shuttle service is available at Life.Church, 1075 Keller Parkway, Keller. 682-277-9252. www.connorscarshow.com 26 PAINT A PET PORTRAIT Bring a photo of your pet to Fort Worth Public Library’s Golden Triangle Branch and create a masterpiece to take home. Non-pet owners are also welcome. All ages. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. 4264 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. 817-392-7210. www.fortworthtexas.gov/ departments/library 28 KELLER CHAMBER JOB FEST A variety of industries will be represented at the Bowden Event Center, including retail, food service, hospitality, medical and education. Explore full- or part-time opportunities and speak with hiring directors. Participants are asked to register ahead of time and come prepared with resumes. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. 1775 Keller Parkway, Keller. 817-431-2169. www.kellerchamber.com

JULY 02 INFINITE JOURNEY See the Dallas-based Journey tribute band at ChopShop Live. Innite Journey oers an immersive experience, playing live with no backing tracks. Age 21 and older. 7 p.m. (doors open), 9 p.m. (show begins). $12 (online), $15 (at the door). ChopShop Live, 309 S. Oak St., Roanoke. 817-402-8677. www.chopshoplive.com 10 COMEDY TOE JAM ProZach Productions features an evening of stand-up and improv comedy, featuring comics Quentin J, Phillip Garcia, Tom Murphy, Zachary Hollin and the Frisco Improv Players. All ages. 8 p.m. $10. Chandon Arbors, 121 South Elm St., Keller. www.eventbrite.com/e/ comedy-toe-jam-tickets-156440330239 17 KELLER CHAMBER HOME LAWN&GARDEN EXPO Vendors will oer a one-stop shop for attendees interested in revamping their home or outdoor living areas. Other events include educational workshops and presentations by master gardeners. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. KCAL Campus, 201 Bursey Road, Keller. 817-431-2169. www.kellerchamber.com 20 INTO THE SPIDERVERSE POPCORN BAR Visit Keller Public Library for a screening of the 2018 lm Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, and build your own treat to go with it. The library will oer a DIY popcorn bar for snacking during the movie. 2:30 p.m. Free. 640 Johnson Road, Keller. 817-743-4800. www.cityoeller.com/services/library 31 CHRISTMAS IN JULY CRAFT FAIR Start planning for Christmas gift- giving with a trip to Rock-N-R Designs’ summer craft fair. Find clothing, food, decor and much more from a variety of vendors. Noon-8 p.m. Free. The Roundhouse, 107 W. Vine St., Keller. 610-888-5664. www.facebook.com/ events/495875858277481

Fireworks will light up the sky over Roanoke Community Park July 3. (Courtesy city of Roanoke)

03 ALL AMERICAN FIREWORKS & FESTIVAL Visit Roanoke Community Park to enjoy food from local vendors, see live performances and test your appetite in the apple pie-eating contest. The event begins at 5 p.m. with performances by Vocal Trash at 5:30 p.m., Invasion Dance Team at 7 p.m. and Memphis Soul at 7:45 p.m. A reworks display will be held around 9:15 p.m. Free. 201 Park Drive, Roanoke 817-491-2411 www.roanoketexas.com

Tanger Outlets will celebrate with family-friendly activities. (Courtesy Tanger Outlets Fort Worth) 02 STARS & STRIPES BLOCK PARTY Tanger Outlets’ annual block party celebrating Independence Day will feature fun activities for the whole family, from karaoke and a dance party to face painters and glitter tattoo artists. 5-8 p.m. Free. 15853 North Freeway, Fort Worth 817-464-5400 www.tangeroutlet.com/fortworth 03 KELLER LIGHTS The Keller Farmers Market, city of Keller and Greater Keller Chamber of Commerce have teamed to present a night of food, music and celebration. The event begins at 4 p.m. and will feature a glowing lantern launch at 7:45 p.m. on Keller Town Center Lake, with additional lanterns available for purchase at the event. The night will conclude with a reworks display. Free. 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller 682-593-3931 www.keller-lights.com

The annual Fort Worth’s Fourth celebration will conclude with a reworks display. (Courtesy Tarrant Regional Water District)

04 FORTWORTH’S FOURTH Gather along Trinity River to see live music by Ray Johnson Band and Party Machine before the reworks show at 9:30 p.m. Local vendors will provide food and beverages, and the reworks display will be livestreamed on Fox 4 News. No outside coolers allowed. Gates open at 6 p.m. Free. 395 Purcey St., Fort Worth 817-698-0700 www.fortworthsfourth.com

Find more or submit Keller, Roanoke, or Fort Worth events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY KIRA LOVELL & SANDRA SADEK

ONGOING PROJECT

TIMBERLAND BLVD.

KELLER HICKS RD.

377

114

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NorthRiverside Drive expansion to begin this summer North Riverside Drive in North- east Fort Worth, between Golden Triangle Boulevard and Keller Hicks Road, will be expanded from a two-lane to a four-lane divided roadway. Signs will also be added to the intersection of North Riverside Drive and Keller Hicks Road. The project is expected to last until winter 2023. Timeline: August 2021-February 2023 Cost: $5.1 million Funding source: 2018 City of Fort Worth Bond, impact fees

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 3. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Some intersections will now have blinking yellow left-turn arrows. Timeline: fall 2020-fall 2021 Cost: $750,000 Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation Signal improvements underway on Keller Parkway Work began near the end of May at the intersection of Cindy Street and Keller Parkway to upgrade wiring and trac signals. The project will require temporary lane closures while improvements are made at each inter- section between US 377 and Hwy. 114, according to TxDOT. Work will move eastbound through Keller and South- lake, according to the city of Keller.

Work to widen the railroad crossings at Kroger Drive and Basswood Boulevard near U.S. 377 will begin next year. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

FortWorth towiden railroad crossings Improvements are anticipated to begin May 2022 to widen the roadway at U.S. 377’s crossing with Basswood Boulevard and Kroger Drive. There will also be the construction of additional turn lanes, median sidewalks, trac signals and railroad gate and signals. Construction is expected to HIGHTOWER DR. BASSWOOD BLVD. 377 N

be completed in October 2022. Timeline: May 2022-October 2022 Cost: $6 million Funding source: 2018 City of Fort Worth Bond

KROGER DR.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JUNE 2021

CITY& SCHOOL

News from Keller, Roanoke, Tarrant County, Northwest ISD & Keller ISD

Keller City Council raises homestead exemption to statemaximum

MARKETVS. TAXABLE HOME VALUE The market value of Keller homes has increased since 2012, but the taxable value of those homes has increased more slowly because of the city’s homestead exemption.

BY KIRA LOVELL

property’s value from being taxed, according to the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. The homestead exemption only applies to a person’s primary residence. According to city documents, Keller approved a 1% homestead exemption rate in 1986. The 1% exemption rate was in place until 2016, when it was raised to 4%. The rate was raised every year after that, up to 14% in 2020. The city tax accounts for about 17% of each resident’s property tax bill, according to a June 15 presentation by Keller Director of Finance Aaron Rector. However, the new exemption will reduce the average appraisal value for a Keller home from $373,725, with the 14% exemption, to $347,651, with the 20% exemption. City Manager Mark Hafner said this move will provide relief to residents as home values increase.

KELLER City Council voted June 15 to raise the city’s homestead exemp- tion from 14% to 20%, the state maximum. The move will reduce a portion of what Keller residents must pay in property taxes to the city. Mayor Armin Mizani said it is part of an eort to shift the city’s nancial burden away from residents and toward sales tax revenue. “With the appraisal values, as they continue to rise, literally people are being priced out of their homes,” Mizani said. “We, as a City Council, have the responsibility to do what we can.” A homestead exemption is a discount that taxing entities, such as the city of Keller, can oer for property owners. Homeowners can apply to their appraisal district for a residence homestead exemp- tion to remove a percent of their

Market Value

Taxable Value

+ 63%

$450K

$400K

+ 31.6%

$350K

$300K

$250K

$200K

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0

FY 2012-13

FY 2014-15

FY 2016-17

FY 2018-19

FY 2020-21

FY 2013-14

FY 2015-16

FY 2017-18

FY 2019-20

FY 2021-22

SOURCE: CITY OF KELLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Betsy Price to run for Tarrant County judge

Northwest ISDon track for smaller decit, eyes balanced budget for 202122 scal year

“MYDECADES OF BUSINESS ANDPUBLIC SERVANT EXPERIENCE BOTHAS TARRANT COUNTY TAXASSESSOR ANDMAYOROF FORT WORTHMAKE ME AN IDEAL ANDQUALIFIED CANDIDATE FOR THIS POSITION.” BETSY PRICE,

BY SANDRA SADEK

BY KIRA LOVELL

and approve the scal year 2021-22 budget. Chief Financial Ocer Brian Carter said NISD’s ongoing goal is to nd a way to cut $17.5 million from the FY 2020-21 budget and adopt a balanced budget for next year. Stang and program reductions are still in the works, he said. The proposed budget for next year, as of June 14, plans for $240 million in revenue and $241.7 million in expenses, with a $1.7 million decit.

TARRANT COUNTY Former Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price announced June 10 she will be running for Tarrant County Judge in 2022. The announcement came days after Judge Glen Whitley said he will not be seeking re-election. As of June 21, one other candi- date— Tim O’Hare, former Farmers Branch mayor—has announced his candidacy for the race.

NORTHWEST ISD Recent forecasts suggest Northwest ISD is on track to end scal year 2020-21 with a smaller general fund decit than anticipated. The district expected a $25.1 mil- lion decit last summer, but updated projections forecast the actual decit as closer to $15 million. The board of trustees plans to meet June 28 to amend the FY 2020-21 budget to reect actual outcomes

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NUMBER TOKNOW its share of low-income families. Superintendent Dr. Rick Westfall said the district fell under a 5% threshold for next year, restricting access to funding allocations it previously qualied for. $1.28M Keller ISD sta say the district stands to lose $1,286,599 in federal Title I funding due to a decline in Fort Worth City Council Meets at 7 p.m. three times each month on Tuesdays. www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Tuesdays of each month. Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.roanoketexas.com Keller ISD Meets monthly; dates, times and locations may vary. www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets monthly at 6:30 p.m.; dates may vary. www.nisdtx.org www.cityoeller.com Roanoke City Council MEETINGSWE COVER

The new re safety house can recreate various re scenarios thanks to its smoke machine. (Courtesy Atmos Energy)

The Roanoke Fire Department purchased an inatable re safety house, thanks to a donation from Atmos Energy. (Courtesy Atmos Energy)

Roanoke FireDepartment buys newsafety house to educate youth ROANOKE The Roanoke Fire Department purchased a new BY SANDRA SADEK

occupants have to escape a re, mak- ing preparedness pivotal—especially for children. Doug Parks, deputy chief and re marshal, said the house will ocially debut at the re department’s Octo- ber open house. The unit is portable, so the department is hoping to bring the house to schools and community events in the future.

messages and smoke detectors. A theatrical smoke pump is also part of the house and can simulate various situations to teach children how to evacuate and respond to a re. According to the National Fire Protection Association, a re depart- ment responds to a re in the United States every 24 seconds. The NFPA cites three minutes as the target time

inatable re safety house to add to its youth education program on re safety. Using a $10,000 donation from Atmos Energy, the re department set up its inatable rehouse like a regular home with re safety

9

KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JUNE 2021

CITY

$1,234,880.14 June 2018

June 2019

June 2020

June 2021

S A L E S TA X ROANOKE

$1,513,490.34

$1,347,010.75

$1,945,162.84

$2M

Roanoke’s 2021 sales tax numbers have already surpassed revenue from 2018, 2019 and 2020. The city attributes the increases to its diverse economy and tax base. SALES TAX REVENUE IS GENERALLY REPORTED ON A THREEMONTH DELAY. JUNE NUMBERS REFLECT SALES MADE IN APRIL. SOURCE: TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$1.5M

$1M

$.5M

0

Year:

January-December 2018

January-December 2019

January-December 2020 January-June 2021

Roanoke, Keller 2021 sales tax revenue up compared to past years As cities have reopened their businesses to full capacity and local economies have demon- strated an ability to regain momen- tum, the cities of Roanoke and Glenn Hegar announced that $907.6 million in monthly sales tax reve- nue had been distributed to local governments statewide. This was a BY KIRA LOVELL & SANDRA SADEK April 2020 was the rst full month impacted by COVID-19 restrictions. For June 2021, Roanoke reported still seeing an upward trend in our sales tax where we’re not really losing any ground. Even during the pandemic, we haven’t really lost any ground.”

$1.9 million in sales tax revenue compared to $1.3 million in 2020. This latest number also surpasses revenue from 2018 and 2019—$1.2 million was collected in 2018 and $1.5 million in 2019. “We are actually currently ahead of where we were at the same point last year,” said Vicki Rodriquez, Roanoke director of scal and administrative services. “We’re

31.5% increase from June 2020. In June 2020, the comptroller’s oce distributed $690.4 million statewide, which the oce said in a press release represented the steepest year-over-year decline since September 2009. Sales tax revenue is generally reported on a three-month delay, so allocations made in June are based on sales made in April.

Rodriquez attributes Roanoke’s success to the city’s diverse tax base, which allowed the city to not be reliant upon a sole source of revenue. “You’ve got your Walmarts and your Home Depots and places like that that were able to continue their business as usual,” she said.

Keller have both reported encour- aging sales tax revenue in recent months in comparison to previous years. It is a trend that other munici- palities across the state are expe- riencing, also. On June 9, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

$894,848.03 June 2018

June 2019

June 2020

June 2021

S A L E S T A X KELLER

$876,039.81

$1,022,568.37

$1,191,973.56

$2M

Keller saw a sharp increase in sales tax revenue year over year in May and June 2021, beyond normal revenue growth. The city attributes this to online sales, home improvement projects and restaurants bouncing back.

$1.5M

$1M

$.5M

0

SOURCE: TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Year:

January-December 2018

January-December 2019

January-December 2020 January-June 2021

While the trend of increasing revenue seen in Roanoke is positive for the city, Rodriquez said it is still too early to determine how this increased revenue will aect the budget. “The thing about sales tax is, although we’ve been exceeding our budget and staying on track with sales taxes, because of the pandemic, we saw declines in other revenue sources—particularly in our parks and recreation and municipal court, and in some of those other areas, [such as] building permits,” Rodriquez said. “The sales tax kind of just helped to oset those

losses.” In neighboring Keller, for June 2021, the city reported $1.2 million in sales tax revenue, up from $1 million in 2020. This latest number also surpasses revenue from 2018 and 2019: $895,000 was collected in 2018 and $876,000 in 2019. The numbers for May were even more stark: Keller was allocated more than $1.4 million in 2021 by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, almost $400,000 more than the same period over the last three years. “When we see big spikes like this, big increases, it’s just a question of,

‘How sustainable is that?’” Keller Finance Director Aaron Rector said. Rector said the city recognizes that this spike is likely to taper o in the future. “We want to treat this growth as sustainable, and what we’re seeing ... I don’t think it’s actually sustain- able, but it’s creating a new base, which is a very positive thing,” he said. Rector attributed the sales tax success to the growth of online sales and home improvement projects that began last year, and he said restaurants are now bouncing back.

“It looks like the restaurants have generally come back from this time last year,” he said. “Their numbers are kind of matching to this time in 2019, which would have been a time when they were fully open. So it’s good to see them getting back to that activity.” Rector said Keller’s sales tax growth will help the city deliver on one of its goals: providing property tax relief for citizens. “When we’re planning out the 2022 budget, the growth in sales tax helped us kind of minimize and hopefully provide some relief to the citizens on property tax,” he said.

11

KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JUNE 2021

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY Roanoke commission to reviewcity’s charter, boundaries for wards

W A T C H I N G T H E W A R D S

BY SANDRA SADEK

process to evolve.” According to the charter, each ward is expected to have a population within 10% of each other to maintain a balanced ratio. The commission will use the latest census numbers to determine whether redistricting will be necessary, Gierisch said. “It would just simply change whom [the residents are] represented by in the specific ward if an adjustment is made—and there quite possibly may not be an adjustment, because we could very well be within the 10% with the new numbers that have come out,” he said. The first 2020 census data sets are expected to be released this fall. The last review of the charter was in 2014, and no changes to the wards were called for. The charter states any major amendments or any redistricting will have to be presented before voters in the form of an election. If an election is deemed necessary, it would take place in 2022.

The city of Roanoke will be reviewing its charter and ward district boundaries beginning this summer, with recommendations to be presented to City Council by the end of the year. As part of its home rule charter, the city is required to review the charter at least every six years. The first charter was adopted in 2008. Home Rule Charter Review Commission members, consisting of one council member from each ward and one community member from each ward, were to have been appointed by City Council on June 22. City Manager Scott Campbell said the process began prior to the pandemic but had to be halted. “[The commission] will go over that with a fine-tooth comb, basically,” Roanoke Mayor Scooter Gierisch said. “And then once that is done, the council can act on [the recommendations]. But until then, we have to sit back and wait for that

According to the city of Roanoke's charter, each ward is expected to have a population within 10% of each other. This fall, the latest census numbers will help determine whether redistricting will be necessary.

WHAT IS

As Roanoke’s population grows, the city has to adjust ward boundary lines to maintain balance. If redistricting is determined as necessary, it could result in a change in council member representation. REDISTRICTING? SOURCE: CITY OF ROANOKE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *BASED ON RESIDENTIAL PARCELS

Ward 3 2018 population*: 3 , 0 6 7

114

ROANOKE

Ward 2 2018 population*: 3 , 0 1 0

Ward 1 2018 population*: 2 , 9 3 4

377

114

DENTON COUNTY TARRANT COUNTY

170

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ANNUAL COMMUNITY  HEALTH CARE REAL ESTATE  EDUCATION COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. VISIT

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH

be vaccinated. Data is accurate as of June 17. COMBATING COVID19

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors included that are not listed.

Children age 12-15 were recently added as individuals able to

TARRANT COUNTY DENTON COUNTY

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

VACCINATION DEMOGRAPHICS 7.96% 10.99% 17.37% 50.06% Asian Black White Hispanic

COUNTYVACCINATIONS

• LENGTHOF LIFE • QUALITYOF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

12.47% 7.23% 14.94% 52.03% 9.04% 4.29% 1.60% 52.68% 27.14% 15.15% 3.40%

PEOPLE AGE 12+ WITH AT LEAST ONE DOSE

52.31% 58.65%

2021 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 243 COUNTIES

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICAL CARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

8.61% 5.02%

Other

55.67%

HEALTH OUTCOMES

Unknown

State average

26 36 98

4 4 6

Length of life Overall Quality of life

AGE BREAKDOWN

PEOPLE AGE 12+ WHO ARE FULLY VACCINATED

1.49% 46.90% 28.32% 18.52% 4.73%

12-15 16-49 65-79 50-64

44.93% 50.03%

HEALTH FACTORS

14 32 33 45

6 5

Overall

46.50%

Health behaviors Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

80+

State average

11

4

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

220

145

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JUNE 2021

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16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Medical CityAlliance expansion of 75-acre campus continues

BY SANDRA SADEK

and space has always been there as the area around the campus has seen tremendous growth. Medical City Alliance rst opened as a freestand- ing ER in 2012. In 2015, it expanded into a 55-bed hospital. “We built the original hospital in 13 months,” Eiserloh said. “That was the fastest HCA had ever built a hospital. ... We knew the need was here.” The hospital also expanded its ER, adding a second trauma room and more exam and X-ray rooms. Space was added for a second cardiac catheterization (CAT) lab and the laboratory has been relocated and expanded. According to Eiserloh, the hospital is expecting to see over 45,000 patient encounters in the ER in the 12-month period following the expansion. While changes have been made inside the hospital, additional proj- ects are in the works. A new ambu- latory surgery center is expected to open in August 2021 to accommodate day-surgery patients. This would allow the current ER to prioritize overnight and long-term patients. Eiserloh said adding a sixth oor to the existing hospital and building a connecting seven-story tower are on the list. Future projects include an oncol- ogy center, additional oce space and working with individual provid- ers to open physician oces on the campus. “We’re really happy to be in this community. It’s just been a wildly successful ride,” Eiserloh said.

A $51.4 million construction project at Medical City Alliance is the latest phase in the expansion plans for the 75-acre hospital campus as it continues to evolve into a regional medical hub. On April 28, the hospital began welcoming patients to its newly built oors and expanded emergency room. “This expansion allows Medical City Alliance to provide expert care to even more patients in the north Fort Worth and Alliance community,” Medical City Alliance CEO Glenn Wallace said in a press release. Matt Eiserloh, director of commu- nity and public relations at Medical City Alliance, said the need for growth was made clear by the COVID- 19 pandemic. He said during that time occupancy levels often reached near, and even above, 85%. “One of the things that we learned is that we were undersized,” Eiserloh said. “Quite honestly, that was a problem not just for us—it was really for all the hospitals in the area.” Right now, half of the fth oor is open. The second half of the fth oor and the fourth oor are expected to be completed in 2022. Once completed, the expansion is estimated to bring the total number of licensed beds at the facility from 99 to 159. Eiserloh said Medical City Alliance hopes to have between 650 and 700 beds in the future. He also said demand for more beds

A second cardiac catheterization lab was added to the hospital. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper) MEETING A

Emergency Department

GROWING NEED The $51.4 million addition to the Medical City Alliance campus has added 254,557 square feet of space for care services.

expansion $ 7.7M Lab relocation & expansion: $ 4.3M Vertical expansion: $ 39.4M

Total expansion cost: $ 51.4M

Medical City Alliance’s latest expansion includes an additional:

SOURCE: MEDICAL CITY ALLIANCE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

medical/ surgical beds 24

ER beds 15

trauma room

CAT lab

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N. TARRANT PKWY.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • JUNE 2021

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES

Information on local hospitals, ERs, urgent care & retail clinics

Trauma level

NICU level

• Trauma level: I • NICU level: III • Total number of employees: 7,200 • Number of beds: 578 • Telemedicine oerings: oered through MyChart for regularly scheduled or urgent care visits ERS, URGENT CARE & RETAIL CLINICS

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Level I • Well nursery

HOSPITALS

Level I • Highest level of care • Full range of specialists, equipment in-house 24/7 • Oer teaching, research components

1 Medical City Alliance 3101 N. Tarrant Parkway, Fort Worth 8176391000 www.medicalcityhealthcare.com • Trauma level: III • NICU level: III • Total number of employees: 500 • Number of beds: 99 • Telemedicine oerings: available through Medical City Virtual Care clinic 2 Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Alliance 10864 Texas Health Trail, Fort Worth 6822122000 www.texashealth.org • Trauma level: III • NICU level: II • Total number of employees: 760 • Number of beds: 151 • Telemedicine oerings: available through Texas Health Physicians Group and the Hospital2Home app for emergency visit follow-ups

• Can care for mothers, infants at 35-plus weeks of gestation with routine perinatal problems • Anesthesiology, lab, radiology, ultrasonography, blood bank services and pharmacist available Level II • Specialty care nursery • Can care for mothers, infants at 32-plus weeks of gestation with problems to be resolved rapidly • In addition to Level I requirements, dietician, and physical and respiratory therapists available Level III • Neonatal intensive care unit • Can care for mothers, infants of all gestational ages with mild to critical illnesses • Can provide consultation for pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists; can perform major pediatric surgery on-site Level IV • Advanced NICU • Can care for mothers, infants of all gestational ages as well as the most complex, critically ill infants • Comprehensive pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists on-site; can perform major surgeries, including repair of complex conditions

Level II • Oer specialists on call 24/7 • Can transfer to Level I facilities • No research component required

KEY Retail clinic R

Emergency room E

COVID19 testing

COVID19 vaccines

T

V

Urgent care clinic U

Flu vaccines F

Level IV • Provide initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities • Will likely have to transfer to higher-level trauma center Level III • Oer resources for emergency surgery, intensive care • May have to transfer to Level I and II centers SOURCES: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

4 Baylor Scott & White Emergency Hospital-Keller E 620 S. Main St., Keller 2142946100 www.bsweh.org 5 CareNow Urgent Care-Keller U T F 104 S. Main St., Keller 2142959385 www.carenow.com 6 CareNow Urgent Care-Keller Main Bear Creek U T F

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