Spring - Klein Edition | September 2022

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

VOLUME 9, ISSUE 6  SEPT. 17 OCT. 14, 2022

ONLINE AT

The cost of college nationwide has increased over the past decade, including locally at four-year public universities, such as the University of Houston, and at community colleges, such as Lone Star College System. COST OF COLLEGE

State, local election o cials target mail-in ballot rejections

BY WESLEY GARDNER & EMILY LINCKE

Ahead of the Nov. 8 midterm election, state oŒcials and Harris County election leaders are hoping to lower the rates of rejected mail-in bal- lots, which spiked compared to previous years during primary elections held in March and May. CONTINUED ON 18 Following the passage of Senate Bill 1, roughly 12.4% of mail-in ballots statewide and 19.2% of mail-in ballots in Harris County were rejected during the March 1 primary election. MAIL-IN BALLOT

LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEM Tuition for 24 credit hours

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON Average annual tuition cost for rst-year students

$2,400

$12,000

$2,160

$10,856

$2,200

$11,000

$1,756

$8,970

$2,000

$10,000

$1,800

$9,000

Overall change: +23.01%

Overall change: +21.03%

$1,600

$8,000

0

0

Percentage of mail-in ballots rejected

Harris County Statewide

SOURCES: LONE STAR COLLEGE SYSTEM, UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

5% 10% 15% 20% 0

Short-term relief on the horizon for federal student loan borrowers as tuition costs rise

BY WESLEY GARDNER & HANNAH ZEDAKER

attending a four-year college full time—including tuition, fees, room and board—in the U.S. has risen from $10,231 in 1980 to $28,775 in the 2019-20 school year, a roughly 180% increase, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. “We’ve been telling everybody for decades, ‘You have to go to college,’ so the demand has shifted

As the cost of higher education continues to rise with more students relying on federal loans to pay for their degrees, short-term relief may be on the way for former college students struggling to get out of debt, while questions remain surrounding a long-term solution. Adjusted for ination, the average annual cost of

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATOR’S OFFICE, TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE, U.S. ELECTIONS ASSISTANCE COMMISSION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *INCLUDES ALL ELECTIONS HELD THAT YEAR **FIRST ELECTION HELD FOLLOWING THE PASSAGE OF SENATE BILL 1

CONTINUED ON 16

FALL TO DO LIST 2022

Work underway on community center in Spring

GERONIMO ADVENTURE PARK

GUIDE

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IMPACTS

6 DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

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SPRING KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the ‚rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and P“ugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with a circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM KIM: Summer may not be over just yet, but the anticipation of cooler temperatures, football games and local coee shops serving up pumpkin spice lattes are all signs that autumn is right around the corner. As you begin planning your fall activities, check out our Fall To-Do List (see Pages 14-15), where you can ‚nd local pumpkin patches, ghost tours and haunted houses for the whole family to enjoy. Kim Giannetti, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM HANNAH: Relief may be on the way for borrowers who are struggling to pay back their student loan debt, following a plan announced by President Joe Biden on Aug. 24. While the plan would enable nearly 43 million Americans to have up to $20,000 in federal student loans forgiven, many say it fails to address the root cause of the problem: the rising cost of tuition. To learn more about this plan, see our front-page story. Hannah Zedaker, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti EDITOR Hannah Zedaker REPORTERS Wesley Gardner, Emily Lincke GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lydia Lee METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens COPY EDITOR Kasey Salisbury ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Ethan Pham CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES & MARKETING Tess Coverman CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220, Houston, TX 77064 • 281‘469‘6181 PRESS RELEASES sklnews@communityimpact.com ADVERTISING sklads@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

BUSINESS & DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION & DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

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SPRING ‘ KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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CITY PLACE

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Cava

COURTESY CAVA

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Tomball, on June 25, according to owner Ivan Aguado. The restaurant serves traditional Tex-Mex dishes, including fajitas, enchiladas, burritos, nachos and queso. 346-236-6990. Facebook: Pichurro’s Mexican Grill 4 Cordovan Art School will host a grand opening celebration this fall for its new studio at 8905 Louetta Road, Ste. A, Spring. While the business o¡- cially opened May 9, the grand opening celebration will take place Oct. 1 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and feature free art classes, 50% o pottery, painting, demonstrations, prizes and refreshments. Those interested in attending can preregister for art classes online. 281-547-8484. www.cordovanartschool.com 5 Mattison Avenue Salon Suites & Spa celebrated the grand opening of its new Champion Forest location in mid- June. Located at 5634 FM 1960 W., Houston, the upscale salon leases space to independent beauty and wellness professionals, such as hair stylists, estheticians, massage therapists, makeup artists and nail technicians. 281-907-3294. www.mattisonsalonsuites.com 6 Gold’s Gym celebrated the grand opening of its new location Aug. 27 at 4425 FM 1960 W., Houston, in Northchase Plaza. The opening marked Gold’s Gym return to Houston after a two-year hiatus, according to an Aug. 23 news release from SPM Communications. Membership is $25 per month at the Northchase Plaza location, and members are not required to sign up for a contract, according to the news release. Gold’s Gym oers equipment for members to work out

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NOW OPEN 1 Owners Yannis and Christina Karagiannis opened Sweet Greek , on Aug. 25 at 8320 Louetta Road, Ste. 100, Spring. The bakery oers traditional Greek pastries, crepes, homemade gelato, pitas and panini as well as Illy Espresso Coee. 832-592-7777. Facebook: sweet_greek_

grains and pitas. Dishes can be further customized with dips and spreads, such as red pepper hummus and roasted eggplant; protein such as harissa honey chicken and spicy lamb meatballs; and a variety of toppings and dressings. 346-246-2561. www.cava.com 3 Pichurro’s Mexican Grill opened at 24026 Kuykendahl Road, Ste. 100,

2 Cava opened a new location at 10850 Louetta Road, Ste. 100, Houston—the former location of Zoes Kitchen—in late August. Cava acquired Zoes Kitchen in 2018 and is in the process of converting Zoes Kitchen locations into Cava restaurants. The Mediterranean fast- casual restaurant allows patrons to create their own dishes with bases such as salad,

Find one in your neighborhood.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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ANNIVERSARIES 12 Janie’s Bar in Spring is set to celebrate its 20th anniversary Sept. 24. Located at 19620 Kuykendahl Road, the bar and eatery is owned by Janie Parker and regularly gives back to the community though donations to various charities. Janie’s Bar also hosts an annual chili cook-o, the proceeds from which bene©t St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. 281-350-1700. Facebook: Janie’s Prestigious Movers , which is based out of the Spring area, celebrated its 10-year anniversary July 11. The company specializes in long-distance moving services but also provides moving and packing services across the Greater Houston area. Owner Martin H. A. Wallen founded Prestigious Movers in 2012. 832-290-3109. www.prestigiousmovers.com NAME CHANGES 13 The Klein ISD board of trustees unanimously voted Aug. 8 to rename the Klein High School College and Career Center as the Laminack-Grove College and Career Center . According to district o¡cials, the new name honors Jim Laminack and Bob Grove, who both served as Klein High School principals and went on to serve as directors of school administration. Laminack and Grove each also received the Donald R. Collins Distinguished Educator Award in KISD. Klein High School is located at 16715 Stuebner Airline Road, Spring. 832-484-4095 or 832-484-4154. www.kleinisd.net CLOSINGS 14 Woodall’s Bar-B-Que will be switching to a mobile-only business model with the restaurant’s last day of operation at its brick-and-mortar location slated for Sept. 30, o¡cials announced Sept. 1. Located at 22920 Kuykendahl Road, Ste. 500, Spring, Woodall’s Bar-B-Que serves Texas-style barbecue, such as brisket and pulled pork, with sides that include mac and cheese, coleslaw and baked potatoes. After Sept. 30, the restaurant will be focusing on catering and pop-up events. 281-205-7717. www.woodallsbbq.com

on their own, under the instruction of a personal trainer or as part of a group class. 281-301-0907. www.goldsgym.com 7 On Aug. 5, BeeHive Homes of Spring opened at 3207 Cypresswood Drive, Spring. The assisted-living community oers 24-hour sta¡ng, housekeeping and laundry services, and community activities. Facilities such as a hair and nail salon, utilities and a secured outdoor courtyard are also available. BeeHive Homes of Spring is accepting residents and reservations. 346-372-5755. www.beehivehomes.com/locations/spring 8 At the end of July, Planet Pu opened at 4420 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. 350, Spring. The store sells smoking supplies such as pipes and vapes, CBD products and cigars. Planet Pu is owned by Adil Ahmed. 832-427-6750. www.planetpu.com COMING SOON 9 Indoor and outdoor sports complex Fieldhouse announced it is planning a late 2023 opening at 2007 Riley Fuzzel Road, Spring. According to Fieldhouse Programming Director Susanne McLeod, the project has been delayed from its original early 2023 opening date due to permit approvals taking longer than anticipated. Upon opening, the venue will oer indoor and outdoor ©elds and courts for a variety of athletic activities, a patio 10 Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers is planning to open a new location in December at 140 Airtex Drive, Houston, o¡cials announced in an Aug. 23 news release. Raising Cane’s oers a menu of 100% premium white meat chicken tenders, crinkle-cut fries, coleslaw, Texas toast and its signature Cane’s sauce as well as freshly brewed sweet tea and freshly squeezed lemonade. www.raisingcanes.com 11 Lighthouse Shopping Center is under construction near the intersection of FM 2920 and Falvel Road in Spring. According to developer VM+Partners, construction began in January, and the center is slated to open this fall. Possible tenants include a coee shop, a beauty salon and a deli. 805-705-8925. Facebook: VM + Partners and a full casual restaurant. www.©eldhousehouston.com

LOCAL HOT SPOT

Willowbrook Mall

COURTESY WILLOWBROOK MALL

Located at 2000 Willowbrook Mall, Houston, Willowbrook Mall is managed by Brookeld Properties and features more than 160 stores and restaurants. 281-890-8001. www.shopwillowbrookmall.com NOW OPEN 1 Miniso , a global lifestyle brand, celebrated the grand opening of its new store inside Willowbrook Mall on Aug. 6. Located on Level 1 near Macy’s Men’s in Suite 1408, Miniso is a Japanese- inspired retailer that o†ers low-cost household and consumer goods, such as kitchenware, toys, stationary and cosmetics. www.minisousaonline.com 2 Game World opened inside Willow- brook Mall on Level 1 near Macy’s in mid-August, according to mall manage- ment. The store sells video games and video game-themed collectibles, o†ers cash or store credit for game trade-ins, and provides game console and comput- er repair services. www.gameworldhouston.com 3 Located inside the Willowbrook Mall Macy’s store, a new Toys ‘R’ Us opened in late August, according to mall man- agement. The store sells toys and games for children of all ages, including a vari- ety of movie and video game characters. www.macys.com/s/toys-r-us 4 Violet K-pop opened a new location in Willowbrook Mall on June 22. Located in Suite 1282 near Zara, the store o†ers Korean pop music and merchandise,

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authentic Japanese plush dolls, and anime-based stationary and accessories. 832-438-4112. www.violetgift.com COMING SOON 5 Akira , a Chicago-based women’s clothing store, will open a new location inside Willowbrook Mall this fall, accord- ing to mall management. The retailer sells women’s clothing, accessories, shoes and plus-size clothing. www.shopakira.com 6 JD Sports is projecting to open its new location in Willowbrook Mall in the rst quarter of 2023. The store will o†er sports apparel and accessories for men, women and children, including jerseys, workout clothes, shoes, backpacks and tness gear. JD Sports o†ers products from a number of sports brands, includ- ing Nike, Reebok, Adidas, New Balance and Vans. www.jdsports.com

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SPRING KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES METRO makes weekend use of high-occupancy vehicle, toll lanes permanent

COMPILED BY RENEE FARMER & EMILY LINCKE

ONGOING PROJECTS

Following a pilot program this summer that opened the Metro- politan Transit Authority of Harris County’s high-occupancy vehicle, or HOV, and high-occupancy toll, or HOT, lanes for use on weekends, the board voted Aug. 25 to make the program permanent. Under the program, the lanes will be operational seven days a week on a permanent basis. The addition will cost the agency up to $3.3 million, according to Nader Mirjamali, METRO HOV/HOT lane project manager, adding $644,500 to the agency’s contract with TransCore ITS to operate the lanes. “This is part of an eŽort to say that, yes, our job is to connect people to jobs, but it is also to connect people to recreational opportunities, weekend trips, leisure trips, trips to schools, universities, you name it,” METRO board Chair Sanjay Ramabhadran said at the Aug. 25 meeting. The plan includes METRO’s ’ve HOV and HOT lanes along I-45 North, I-45 South, I-69 North/Hwy. 59

High-occupancy vehicle and high-occupancy toll lanes are now permanently open seven days a week to Harris County commuters. EASING THE DAILY COMMUTE

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INBOUND LANES Open Mon.-Sun. from: • 6:30-8 a.m. to vehicles with at least two people • 5-6:30 a.m. and 8-11 a.m. to all vehicles OUTBOUND LANES Open Mon.-Sun. from: • 4:30-6 p.m. to vehicles with at least two people • 1-4:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. to all vehicles

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 30. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. West Riley Fuzzel Road expansion Harris County Precinct 3 is studying a project that would expand West Riley Fuzzel Road from a two-lane roadway to a four-lane concrete boulevard between I-45 to 200 feet west of West Hardy Road. According to Precinct 3 o‚cials, construction is slated to begin in the „rst quarter of 2024 and wrap up by the „rst quarter of 2025. Timeline: „rst quarter 2024- †irst quarter 2025 Cost: $7.8 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 3

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SOURCE: THE METROPOLITAN TRANSIT AUTHORITY OF HARRIS COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

North, I-69 South/Hwy. 59 South and Hwy. 290. The summer pilot ended Sept. 5 with the permanent program commencing Sept. 10. By seven weeks into the pilot period Aug. 13-14, use of the lanes had increased 82% to 6,379 vehicles on

Saturdays and 70% to 3,419 vehicles on Sundays, according to Mirjamali. The lanes see 70%-80% more use on Saturdays than Sundays. Mirjamali identi’ed I-69 South/Hwy. 59 South and I-45 North as the corridors that saw the most weekend use.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in the Spring and Klein area

COMPILED BY EMILY LINCKE

PHOTOS BY EMILY LINCKEžCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

GEORGE H.W. BUSH COMMUNITY CENTER

LONE STAR COLLEGE UNIVERSITY PARK VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Precinct 3 ocials hope to wrap up construction on the George H. W. Bush Community Center—located in the Cypress Creek Cultural District at 6823 Cypresswood Drive, Spring—in the rst quarter of 2023. Construction began on the $4.5 million project in November 2021, and upon completion, the 24,500-square-foot community center will feature a grand hall, a kitchen, classrooms and multiple gathering spaces for the community. Construction timeline: November 2021-

Construction on Lone Star College- University Park’s Visual and Performing Arts Center began May 31 and is slated for completion by late 2023. The project was originally announced in 2019, however construction was delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The 30,000-square- foot facility will house an art gallery, a band hall, a 338-seat main stage theater, a 100-seat black box theater and classrooms. Construction timeline: May 31, 2022- December 2023 Cost: $21.67 million

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE

ESD 11 Mobile Healthcare ocials look back on 1 year of service

EMERGENCY RESPONSES From November 2021 to July 2022, ESD 11 Mobile Healthcare conducted 26,810 transports with an average emergency response time of 7 minutes, 24 seconds .

In 2020, Cypress Creek EMS had an average response time of 7 minutes, 43 seconds .

Average emergency response time

6 0 7 9 8

BY WESLEY GARDNER

the district to procure common items such as rain gear, coats and uniforms, although he said o‹cials are catching up on those items. Additionally, inŽation has increased the cost of almost every- thing the district purchases and has doubled the cost of fuel, Hooten said. However, the district’s decision to purchase hybrid ambulances that run oŠ gasoline as opposed to diesel fuel has saved hundreds of thou- sands of dollars, Hooten said. Construction is also underway on ESD 11’s new 43-acre campus, which entails remodeling the district’s old facility to include its main admin- istrative building, 911 call center, billing center, and Žeet maintenance and deployment facilities. Hooten said the ”rst phase of construction, which wrapped up in August, was projected to cost around $18 million, but inŽation pushed that

Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11 Mobile Healthcare— which provides emergency medical services for 177 square miles in north Harris County, including Spring and Klein—reached the one-year anniver- sary of its launch Sept. 1. The launch of the EMS provider came following decades of emer- gency services provided by Cypress Creek EMS after ESD 11 commission- ers voted in September 2020 to form its own ambulance service. “Things have gone really well,” ESD 11 Mobile Healthcare CEO Doug Hooten said. “We’re on track to prob- ably do close to 65,000 responses this year, which was a little bit more than we had anticipated, but because we had staŠed the way that we have, we have been able to handle that.” Hooten noted, however, supply chain issues have made it di‹cult for

In 2020, Cypress Creek EMS conducted 50,821 transports.

Number of Transports

2,000 0 3,000 4,000

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY EMERGENCY SERVICES DISTRICT NO. 11, CYPRESS CREEK EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

”gure to around $23.7 million. Hooten also said rot and termite damage found in the walls of existing facilities required a more extensive rebuild than initially expected.

Depending on weather and the availability of supplies, the second phase of construction, which will cost an estimated $11.7 million, is slated to be completed by early 2023.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

LEARNING TO FLY Geronimo Adventure Park has three zip-lining sky trails participants can choose from. GO FLY SKYTRAIL All zip liners must begin with this course. Geronimo Adventure Park o‰ers zip lining, ax throwing and rock climbing, among other activities.

BUSINESS FEATURE

Charity Adams (middle row, far left) and Monica Snideman (bottom row, far right) own and operate Geronimo Adventure Park.

PHOTOS COURTESY GERONIMO ADVENTURE PARK

Geronimo Adventure Park Spring-area business boasts zip lining, ax throwing, rock climbing T ucked away o a dirt road that diverts from the bustling lanes of FM 2920, Spring residents may be surprised to nd a largely cannot nd this much property with this many trees here; you normally have to go to Magnolia or Conroe for that,” Snideman said. “We just felt like it was a hidden jewel.” Named for the leap of faith Snideman said she BY KATIE GERBASICH & HANNAH ZEDAKER

Highest platform: 21 feet Longest zip line: 195 feet Bridges: 3 | Zip lines: 5 GO HIGH SKYTRAIL

Zip liners on this course can choose between the exhilarating rush of a simulated free fall experience with PowerFan or a slow, controlled rappel descent.

Highest platform: 42 feet Longest zip line: 200 feet Bridges: 3 | Zip lines: 5 GO LONG SKYTRAIL

untouched 13-acre forest where participants can zip line through the trees at up to 30 miles per hour. Known as Geronimo Adventure Park, the secluded green space is owned and operated by friends and business partners Monica Snideman and Charity Adams, who opened the business in October 2020. “We both have four kids, and we really wanted to do something that gets us outside, involves our kids, is good for the community and gets people o their devices. So we started brainstorming,” Snideman said. With the help of their children, the pair narrowed down their search to the aerial park industry and attended an industrywide conference where they learned of a similar concept—Texas TreeVentures— that had just opened in The Woodlands. “We were devastated,” Snideman said. “But then another person was like, ‘You should really focus on zip lines because that’s where it’s at.’ So we pivoted.” After looking at roughly 30 properties, Adams and Snideman said they found the one. “It’s right in the heart of Spring, which you

and Adams took when pursuing their new business venture, Geronimo Adventure Park oers three zip-lining sky trails, ax throwing, rock climbing and a ninja course, among other outdoor amenities. “[Geronimo] just kind of embodies that whole feeling of exhilaration when you take that step into the void, so it kind of captures the spirit of [the business] for us,” Snideman said. While the park is open year-round and hosts individuals as well as groups—including birthday parties and team-building events—it also hosted its rst summer camp this year with plans to expand the program next summer. Most recently, the park added electricity, which Snideman said gives patrons access to an air- conditioned welcome center and gift shop as well as restrooms with running water. The duo is also hoping to add more ax-throwing cages in the future. In the two years since Geronimo Adventure Park opened, Snideman said the one thing that never gets old is witnessing the joy of patrons as they conquer their fears. “It just lls me up,” Snideman said.

This course features an optional detour with nine aerial challenges and a side-by-side Žnal zip line where participants can race.

Average height: 28 feet Longest zip line: 555 feet Bridges: 3 | Zip lines: 6

Geronimo Adventure Park 6749 FM 2920, Spring 830-365-5867 www.geronimoadventurepark.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-8 p.m.

2920

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY EMILY LINCKE

Beverage breakdown Moo House Cafe sells a variety of drinks, including co ees, teas and milkshakes, which can be customized with add-ins, such as boba, whipped cream and drizzles.

Sky Diving ($5.50)

Mozzarella dog ($4.60): Gooey cheese is the star of this fried snack.

Whipped cream

Ice

Italian soda Yogurt

Blue syrup Yogurt popping boba

Korean fries ($6): Crispy french fries are piled high with kimchi, sriracha and spicy mayo in this customer favorite. (Photos by Emily Lincke/Community Impact Newspaper)

Owner Joan Tong opened Moo House Cafe in Spring in 2017.

Black sugar milk tea ($5.54)

Ice

Moo House Cafe Cafe marks 5 years of serving multicultural treats in Spring S potted cow prints, bovine gurines and trails of hoof tracks adorn Moo House years ago, and decided to pursue her dream of opening her own tea shop after her two children started attending Klein ISD.

Black milk tea

Brown sugar drizzle

go [to] one stop to get the whole family’s favorites,” Tong said. “So that’s one of the ideas for me over here is one family comes in here, [and] they can get what they [all] want.” A menu of savory and sweet eats is also oered at the cafe with items such as Korean fries, mozzarella dogs and Japanese popcorn chicken being customer favorites, Tong said. Over the past ve years, Tong said her favorite part of running Moo House Cafe has been seeing her customers grow up. “Like 65-75% of business right now is our loyal customers,” Tong said. “But also, I really hope there [will be] some new customers coming in too to try us out.”

Original tapioca boba

Cafe—a theme owner Joan Tong said she chose not only for her daughter’s love of cows, but also because the animal makes many of her recipes possible. “We use milk to do milk tea and stu like that,” Tong said. “So I feel that is a pretty good theme.” Moo House Cafe has been operating since 2017 and celebrated its ve-year anniversary June 17. Tong said the cafe’s menu features recipes inspired by dierent cultures around the world, including her homeland of Hong Kong. Tong moved to the U.S. about 20

“At that time, we [didn’t] see a lot of boba tea shops around this area. ... It [was] my dream to open one in this area, introduce our country [and] dierent countries’ food to this community,” Tong said. Moo House Cafe serves dierent Œavors of milkshakes—which Tong said are made in a Hong Kong style— as well as teas, smoothies, coee, sodas, yogurt drinks and frappes. Each of the cafe’s beverages can be customized with add-ins, such as boba, jellies, puddings, candy and whipped cream. “It’s hard for [my family] to just

Moo House Cafe 7310 Louetta Road, Ste. A120, Spring 346-808-7182

www.moohousecafe.com Hours: Noon-9 p.m. daily

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Nation’s First Women-focused University System

twu.edu

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

FALL TODO LIST

October events

COMPILED BY EMILY LINCKE

2022 FALL GUIDE

01 AND 0708 ATTEND A TAROT TEA PARTY Learn to read tea leaves and receive a tarot reading at a Tarot Tea Party hosted by Houston Ghost Tours. Tickets include a selection of tea, scones, cream and jam for attendees to enjoy. Advanced registration is required, and the event is recommended for age 13 and older. 5-8 p.m. $40. The Tea Kettle Cafe, 123 Midway St., Spring. 281-770-1324. www.houstonghosttour.com FOOD & DRINK 01 THROUGH 31 EXPLORE A HAUNTED MUSEUM The National Museum of Funeral History is hosting its annual haunted house, which will feature spooky rooms for visitors to traverse. Recommended for children age 7 and older, parents can take a look at the haunted house for free before letting their children walk through. Tickets are half price if purchased with a museum ticket. Noon- 5 p.m. (Sun.), 10 a.m.-4 p.m. (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Sat.). $3 (ages 7-11), $5 (age 12 and older). National Museum of Funeral History, 415 Barren Springs Drive, Houston. 281-876-3063. www.nm¢.org KID

15 PLAY FESTIVAL GAMES Christ the Good Shepherd Catholic Community will be hosting its annual fall festival featuring games and activities, craft booths, a rae, a silent auction, refreshments and a bake sale. Rae tickets are $10, and proceeds benet the church’s parish. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Christ the Good Shepherd Catholic Community, 18511 Klein Church Road, Spring. 281-376-6831. www.cgsccdogh.org St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church will be holding its 51st annual Street of Shoppes craft fair, where attendees can shop from local vendors; take photos; and enjoy food, music and yard games. Children’s fall-themed activities will also be available as well as a prayer booth for those interested in participating. 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. Free. St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church, 14301 Stuebner Airline Road, FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 28 THROUGH 29 SHOP FOR AUTUMN CRAFTS Houston. 281-440-1600. www.saintdunstans.org FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 29 COMPETE IN A COSTUME CONTEST St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic Church will be hosting a trunk-or-treat event

OCTOBER 01 THROUGH 02

for elementary school-age children or younger and their families. Children age 10 and younger can also compete in a costume contest. 2-4:30 p.m. Free. St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic Church, 7810 Cypresswood Drive, Spring. 281-370-3401. www.ignatiusloyola.org FREE KID 29 GO TRICKORTREATING Bring the family to Old Town Spring for a bonus day of trick-or-treating before Halloween. Participating shops will be giving out candy to children who stop by in festive costumes. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Old Town Spring, 315 Gentry St., Spring. 832-674-3284. www.facebook.com/oldtownspring shopevents FREE KID 30 TEST SPOOKY KNOWLEDGE Crave Hot Dogs & Barbecue will be hosting a Halloween trivia night open to customers of all ages with questions covering Halloween topics, including movies and music. The purchase of an entree is required for trivia participation. 5-8 p.m. Crave Hot Dogs & Barbecue, 6633 Spring Stuebner Road, Ste. 330,

There are a number of ways to enjoy fall in Spring and Klein, whether checking out a family-friendly festival, facing fears at a spooky haunted house or getting out into nature to enjoy the weather. The information for each event is accurate as of press time and is subject to change.

3

ENJOY FALL FESTIVITIES Games, music and shopping will be abundant at St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic Church’s annual fall festival. The event will also feature bingo, a live auction, a silent auction and raes. Noon-9 p.m. (Oct. 1), 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. (Oct. 2). Free. St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic Church, 7810 Cypresswood Drive, Spring. 281-370-3401.

FREE Free KID Kid friendly FOOD & DRINK Food and drink are for sale

www.ignatiusloyola.org FREE KID FOOD & DRINK 01 SUPPORT KLEIN SCHOLARSHIPS

Hunt for ghosts while exploring Old Town Spring at night during a ghost tour hosted by Old Town Spring Ghost Walk. GHOST TOURS

A fall craft fair will be held by the Klein Association for School Nutrition and will feature booths from local small businesses, raes and food for purchase. A kids corner will also be set up where children can play games, get their faces painted and win prizes. Proceeds from the event’s concession stand and raes will fund scholarships for Klein ISD students. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Klein Multipurpose Center Arena, 7500 FM

1 Guiding Spirit Ghost Tours 211 Midway St., Spring 832-579-6282 www.guidingspiritghosttours.com Hours: 6-11:30 p.m. 2 Houston Ghost Tour 311 Main St., Spring 281-770-1324 www.houstonghosttour.com Hours: 7-10 p.m.

3 Old Town Spring Ghost Walk Trilogy Brew, 417 Gentry St., Spring 281-410-1300 www.oldtownspringghostwalk.com Hours: 7:30-9 p.m.

OCT. 29

PICK OUT PUMPKINS PLYMOUTH UNITED CHURCH

4 Spirits of Spring 202 Noble St., Spring 832-795-3191 www.spiritsofspring.com Hours: vary

Pumpkins, pets and autumn-themed photo opportunities will be key features at Plymouth United Church’s Fall Fest. Attendees can also shop for unique items from local vendors. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Plymouth United Church, 5927 Louetta Road, Spring. 281-251-8147. www.plymouthunited.org FREE KID

2920, Spring. 832-249-4610. https://kasn4klein.square.site FREE KID FOOD & DRINK

Spring. 832-698-4932. www.iwantcrave.com KID FOOD & DRINK

Find more or submit Spring and Klein events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

SKL

SPRING STUEBNER 6603 Spring Stuebner Rd • 281-288-0239 NORTH LOUETTA 1614 Louetta • 281-350-1198 LOUETTA 7314 Louetta • 281-370-1986 KUYKENDAHL 13313 Kuykendahl • 281-873-5220 STUEBNER AIRLINE 14110 Stuebner Airline • 281-440-8895 WILLOWBROOK 6927 FM 1960 W • 281-580-1734

STRUGGLING TO KEEP UP Since 1980, the total cost of both four-year public and private colleges has nearly tripled. Meanwhile, although Pell Grants once covered nearly 80% of the cost of four-year public college degrees for students from working families, they now only cover one-third.

tuition rates. According to Vollrath, rich econo- mies such as the U.S. tend to see faster rates of inflation for services such as education and health care when com- pared to manufactured goods because the cost of producing those goods diminishes over time. Vollrath said the second factor con- tributing to rising tuition costs has been a decrease in financial support from state governments. Between 2008-18, state spending for higher education in Texas dropped from $9,256 per student to $7,107—a 23.3% decrease, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. “We’re getting around half the money we thought we might have been getting 20-30 years ago, and you have to account for it, so that ends up getting unloaded on the students usu- ally,” Vollrath said. During that same time frame, the average cost of tuition at four-year public colleges in Texas increased by $2,302, or 30.4%, CBPP data shows. “State schools are really like the anchor price of colleges and univer- sities, so if your anchor-price product is going up, it means that the private, more elite schools can raise their prices and still pass the laugh test,” Mayotte said. “But if you lower the cost of your state institutions, that hypothetically would force these pri- vate universities to lower [their cost] just to be competitive.” However, Vollrath said he did not think the blame should be directed solely at declining state contributions to higher education. “I think there are definitely things you can talk about on the university side,” he said, speaking generally about public colleges. “Why are uni- versities paying for things that seem to drive up tuition that don’t seem to contribute towards the baseline of educating students?” Plan basics As outlined in an Aug. 24 news release from the White House, Biden’s three-part plan will provide up to $20,000 in debt cancellation to Pell grant recipients with loans held by the Department of Education and up to $10,000 in debt cancellation to non- Pell Grant recipients. Individuals will be eligible for this relief if their income is less than $125,000 or $250,000 for married couples. Current students with loans will also be eligible for debt relief, however, borrowers who are dependents will be eligible based on

Public four-year university cost*

Maximum Pell Grant value**

$26,000 $20,000 $22,000 $24,000 $16,000 $18,000 $12,000 $14,000 $10,000 $2,000 $4,000 $6,000 $8,000

In 1980-81, Pell Grants covered nearly 80% of the cost of four-year public college degrees

In 2020-21, Pell Grants covered one-third of the cost of four-year public college degrees.

0

1980-81

1990-91

2000-01

2010-11

2020-21

*INCLUDES TUITION, REQUIRED FEES, BOOKS AND SUPPLIES, AND AVERAGE COST FOR ROOM, BOARD AND OTHER EXPENSES **TYPICALLY ONLY AWARDED TO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS WHO DISPLAY EXCEPTIONAL FINANCIAL NEED AND HAVE NOT EARNED A BACHELOR’S, GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL DEGREE; DO NOT HAVE TO BE REPAID EXPECT UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES

SOURCES: COLLEGE BOARD, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FILING FOR FORGIVENESS The U.S. Department of Education is planning to launch an application for student loan forgiveness in early October. Those interested can sign up to be notified of application availability at www.ed.gov/subscriptions .

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

WHO NEEDS TO APPLY?

• Students who filed a 2021-22 Free Application for Federal Student Aid do not need to take any action. • Students who did not file a 2021-22 FASFA will need to complete a short application by Dec. 31 . Once a borrower competes the application, relief can be expected within 4-6 weeks .

• Individuals whose annual income falls below $125,000 • Married couples whose annual income falls below $250,000

HOW MUCH ARE THEY ELIGIBLE FOR?

• Pell Grant recipients who meet the income threshold are eligible for up to $20,000 in debt cancellation. • Non-Pell Grant recipients who meet the income threshold are eligible for up to $10,000 in debt cancellation.

For more information, visit www.studentaid.gov/debt-relief-announcement.

SOURCES: FEDERAL STUDENT AID/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

In the nine ZIP codes that make up the Spring and Klein area, data shows nearly 193,400 people age 18 and older have some college experience or higher, or roughly 66.7% of the local population age 18 and older. Locally, the cost of tuition for 24 credit hours at Lone Star College has increased by roughly 23%, between the 2012-13 and 2021-22 school years, while the average annual cost of tui- tion for first-year students at the Uni- versity of Houston has increased by approximately 21% within the same time frame. In hopes of providing relief, Presi- dent Joe Biden announced Aug. 24 he would issue an executive order that will enable nearly 43 million Ameri- cans to have up to $20,000 in federal student loans forgiven.

While the plan has been hailed by borrowers, experts said they fear the loan forgiveness will only lead to further tuition inflation. Betsy Mayotte, president of The Institute of Student Loan Advisors, said while she supports the initiative, she believes it fails to address the root cause of the problem. “Everybody talks about the stu- dent loan crisis, and it exists, but it’s a symptom—not the problem,” May- otte said. “The problem is the cost of higher education, and this plan does nothing to address that.” Costly tuition Vollrath said inflation plays a role in the rising cost of attending college, but he also noted two additional fac- tors that have led to steadily rising

CONTINUED FROM 1

out like crazy, and lots of colleges aren’t functionally much bigger than they used to be, so each spot is more expensive,” said Dietrich Vollrath, a professor and chair of the Depart- ment of Economics at the University of Houston. Federal Reserve System data shows more than 45 million borrowers nationwide have contributed to a cumulative student loan debt of roughly $1.75 trillion with more than $1.6 trillion of those loans issued by the federal government. In Texas, 52% of college graduates in the 2019-20 school year had taken on student loan debt with an average debt of $26,273, according to The Institute for College Access & Success.

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