McKinney November 2020

A volunteer with Habitat for Humanity of Collin County helps repair a home in McKinney.

OPERATIONS TAKE AHIT Habitat for Humanity of Collin County was severely disrupted by the coronavirus; it lost volunteers as well as revenue from ReStore sales and donations. In ! scal year 2019-20, which ended June 30, numbers came in well below what the organization projected at the outset.

NONPROFIT

Habitat for Humanity of Collin County is headquartered near the McKinney ReStore. (Photos courtesy Brandon Washington, Habitat for Humanity of Collin County)

Habitat for Humanity of Collin County Nonpro ! t navigates through coronavirus to help local families H abitat for Humanity’s McKinney ReStore funds a signi ! cant chunk of the nonpro ! t’s work on behalf of Collin County families. from early projections, according to the nonpro ! t. However, some members of the McKinney com- munity have continued to help out in a big way, said Doug Fair, the nonpro ! t’s philanthropy manager. He said around April through May, the nonpro ! t experi- enced a “noticeable increase in donated product.” BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Actual 5,756

Budgeted

Volunteers Homes built Repair program

7,750

32 people served 80 people served

21 people served 42 people served

Habitat for Humanity of Collin County 2060 Couch Drive, McKinney 972-542-5300 www.habitatcollincounty.org

The store accepts donations of furniture, applianc- es and home decor from nearby residents. Habitat for Humanity of Collin County then sells that used merchandise to fund more than a quarter of its activ- ities to help low-income residents build new homes or repair existing ones. During the coronavirus pandemic, the ReStore outlet has had to cut back on operating hours, said Celeste Cox, the charity’s Collin County CEO. Lower sales and donations meant fewer funds for Habitat’s work. Fears of the virus also meant fewer volunteers were comfortable pitching in on projects. The loss of resources led to a substantial reduction in output. New home builds over ! scal year 2019-20, which ended June 30, were a third lower than the group had budgeted, Cox said. Repair projects for the year were cut nearly in half

These donations largely stemmed from people who were stuck at home and decided to do various home repair or remodeling projects, he said, which ended up bene ! ting the ReStore. Despite adverse economic conditions, the group continues to make progress on home projects. A new house is being built in McKinney, and over the sum- mer Habitat completed four home repair projects in McKinney. The ReStore is still accepting donations and will come pick up furniture and other items for donation if so requested. “For the most part, we are back to normal as far as

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sales and tra " c is concerned,” Fair said. Additional reporting by Miranda Jaimes

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MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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