McKinney November 2020

MCKINNEY EDITION

VOLUME 6, ISSUE 8 ! NOV. 18 " DEC. 19, 2020

ONLINE AT

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IMPACTS

ELECTION RESULTS

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Study captures a changing Collin County

COVID ! 19 magnifying economic, health needs The Collin County Economic Opportunity Assessment, released in October and commissioned by nonpro # t Communities Foundation of Texas, shows a growing and changing county population. The assessment looked at economic opportunity and wellness in Collin County in four main areas: resident income; education; debt and assets; and health.

100% This is how much of the population growth in residents age 17 and under was driven by children of color between 2012-16.

2X Collin County’s population is growing twice as fast as Dallas County’s.

1 MILLION Collin County’s population surpassed 1 million in 2018.

KEY INDICATORS INCOME

EDUCATION

DEBT AND ASSETS

HEALTH

$37K

1 IN 10 children in McKinney and Plano are uninsured.

$96K

Of adults have a college degree 51.7%

The county’s median income is among the highest in the region.

Average student loan balance

Leaders of the nonpro ! t Communities Foundation of Texas said they could not have anticipated the COVID-19 crisis when they embarked last year on a comprehen- sive analysis of economic opportunity in Collin County. The resulting report, released in Octo- ber, now serves as a baseline for analyzing e " ects of the coronavirus, Chief Philan- thropy O # cer Sarah Cotton Nelson said. Report reveals growing income disparities in county BY MIRANDA JAIMES AND LIESBETH POWERS

The number of people in McKinney and Collin County without insurance is likely to increase due to the coronavirus pandemic, a new report analyzing the economic opportu- nity in Collin County shows. A new federally quali ! ed health cen- ter aims to combat this growing issue in McKinney. The Family Health Center at Virginia Parkway is preparing to open a new, larger New health clinic to serve city’s uninsured population BY MIRANDA JAIMES

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Family Health Center at Virginia Parkway is readying to open. (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)

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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ! CIPATRON . Complete 2020 by joining your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . Contribute today! Snap or visit

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MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TO ! DO LIST Local events and things to do

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Vicki Chen vchen@communityimpact.com EDITOR Miranda Jaimes SENIOR REPORTER William C. Wadsack REPORTER Francesca D’Annunzio GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea Peters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Miranda Barhydt METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in P ! ugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across " ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ! CIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 214 # 618 # 9001 PRESS RELEASES MCKnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making

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FROMVICKI: While our gatherings may be smaller, socially distanced or virtual, the holiday season is still the perfect time to reconnect with what matters most: kindness, community and quality time with the people we love. I also hope everyone has a chance to unplug from digital devices, cozy up with a cup of co ! ee and enjoy this latest issue of Community Impact Newspaper . Thank you for reading and trusting us to bring you local news all year long. Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving! Vicki Chen, GENERALMANAGER

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Phase 1 of Louisiana Street project ends CITY& COUNTY 14 Latest local news BUSINESS FEATURE 17 The Gym

FROMMIRANDA: In this issue of Community Impact Newspaper , we dive into the city of McKinney’s mission to preserve the declining monarch butter " y population. The city has commissioned oversized monarch sculptures and placed them around the downtown area. Our story provides a map (see Page 12) so you can go see the sculptures for yourself. You can also learn more about other ways the city is raising awareness for monarch butter " y preservation e ! orts. Miranda Jaimes, EDITOR

Our local teams tailor campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their # nancial goals. Our products ADVERTISEWITHUS

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CORRECTION: Volume 6, Issue 7, Page 10 A story titled “Heritage Village at Chestnut Square Facilities” should have said that The Johnson House had received renovations since it was purchased in the 1980s.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened, are coming soon, expanding or marking anniversaries

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COURTESY BACH TO ROCK

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8 The Preserve at Honey Creek neigh- borhood began development in 2019 with Lennar as the builder, and it is expected to begin o ! ering homes in early 2021 at the northwest intersection of Weston Road and County Road 229. The build-out date for the community is projected for 2027, Lennar o " cials said. The Preserve at Honey Creek will also include an amenity center, featuring a pool with a large lazy river and multiple islands; a sports court; barbecue grills; and an open-space court- yard with areas for lawn games. 866-314-4477. www.lennar.com/new- homes/texas/dallas-ft-worth/mckinney/ 9 Arti # cial intelligence and software- as-a-service startup Alanna.ai announced Oct. 27 it plans to add 3,000 square feet to its headquarters at 1700 Redbud Blvd., McKinney. The company’s arti # cial intelligence software Alanna is designed to simplify land and title transactions. With a grant from the McKinney Econom- ic Development Corp. Innovation Fund, the company is expected to add 20 new jobs over the next three years, which will bring its total number of employees to 27, with an average salary of $90,000. www.alanna.ai 10 MyTelemedicine , a virtual health technology company, announced Oct. 12 that it will be expanding and relocating its headquarters to the Cotton Mill, locat- ed at 610 Elm St., McKinney. With a grant from the McKinney Economic Develop- ment Corp. Innovation Fund, the com- pany plans to create 40 new, high-tech and executive jobs over the next three years, which will bring its total number of 5 honey-creek-classic EXPANSIONS E . L O U I S I A N A S E . V I R GI N I A S T . 5

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TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

NOWOPEN 1 Bach to Rock, a music school for stu- dents of all ages including preschoolers and toddlers, opened its newest location Oct. 24 at 3041 S. Custer Road, Ste. 200, McKinney. The school o ! ers a variety of programs, including individual and group lessons in piano, voice, guitar, drums and more. 214-396-8273. https://mckinney.bachtorock.com/ 2 Bu ! City Soap held a grand opening event Nov. 6 at 3530 W. University Drive, Ste. 302, McKinney. The plant-based soap maker o ! ers bath bombs, body butters, face creams, beard oils and more. 214-901-2859. www.bu ! citysoap.com 3 Davis Spine & Sport opened Oct. 5 at 1880 N. Stonebridge Drive, Ste. 240, McKinney. The chiropractic o " ce o ! ers personalized treatment plans that focus on injury prevention, health and wellness. Other services o ! ered at the o " ce include

CLOYD ST.

property of the new Hub 121 mixed-use development, which o ! ers shopping, dining and entertainment options. 469-314-9886. www.axiomhub121.com 6 Citychurch McKinney held a ground- breaking ceremony Nov. 11 for its new Citychurch Youth Outreach Center at 805 Rockwell St., McKinney. The center will be around 4,800 square feet and will feature # ve classrooms and a sanc- tuary area. 214-491-4173. www.citychurchmckinney.com 7 The Dawoodi Bohra Community of Collin County is in the process of building the Collin County Dawoodi Bohra Masjid at 1410 S. Tennessee St., McKinney. The two-story mosque will serve the commu- nity of more than 75 families and will be approximately 15,600 square feet with prayer areas, a children’s area and a com- munity kitchen. Construction is expected CLOYD ST. DAVIS ST.

physiotherapy, decompression, electro- therapy and cupping. 972-488-4994. www.davisspineandsport.com 4 Gloria’s Latin Cuisine opened in mid-November at 3635 W. University Drive, McKinney. The McKinney location is the 21st Gloria’s restaurant in Texas and is one of the company’s # rst freestanding restaurants. Its menu o ! ers Salvador- ian-inspired entrees, appetizers and desserts as well as signature cocktails. 469-631-0484. www.gloriascuisine.com COMING SOON 5 Axiom Hub 121 , a luxury apartment community in McKinney, has # nished construction and is now open. The de- velopment, located at 7201 Henneman Way, McKinney, was # nalized by KWA Construction, a contractor that special- izes in multifamily projects. Axiom Hub 121 features 246 residences fronting the

to be completed in May 2021. www.thedawoodibohras.com/

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Mary’s Mountain Cookies o ! ers soft, quarter-pound cookies at its new store inMcKinney.

COURTESY MARY’S MOUNTAIN COOKIES

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Mary’s Mountain Cookies opened its ! rst Texas location Oct. 23 at 107 W. Louisiana St., McKinney. The store sells fresh-baked cookies from the Colorado-based brand, which is known for its soft, quarter-pound cookies and other mountain-style treats. The menu has more than 15 " avors of cookies, all of which are made on location and baked fresh each day, co-owner Merry Moch said. Featured " avors

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include s’mores, snickerdoodles, salted caramel, turtle and traditional " avors, such as oatmeal raisin and peanut butter. The store also o # ers ice cream and various cookie sandwiches. 469-625-1784. www.marysmountaincookies.com

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WE’RE COMMITTED TO KEEPING YOU SAFE AND WELL FED! We’re social distancing, minimizing contact, using Personal Protective Equipment, frequently cleaning and disinfecting high touch surfaces and have hand sanitizer available

Davis Spine & Sport

AxiomHub 121

LOCALLY " OWNED & OPERATED

COURTESY DAVIS SPINE & SPORT

COURTESY KWA CONSTRUCTION

employees to 63, with an average salary of $70,000, per a news release. MyTele- medicine allows health care providers to employ virtual management for common acute illnesses, specialty care and chronic

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conditions. 800-611-5601. www.mytelemedicine.com ANNIVERSARIES

11 Guitars & Growlers celebrated its # rst anniversary Sept. 23 at 2741 Virginia Pkwy., Ste. 500, McKinney. The restaurant serves subs, charcuterie boards, paninis and more. The business, which is open for lunch, dinner and weekend brunch, also sells handmade guitars and craft beer. Guitars & Growl- ers has regular live music, bingo and

Guitars & Growlers

COURTESY GUITARS & GROWLERS

is open for lunch hours Tuesdays through Saturdays. It serves sandwiches, salads, soups and desserts. 469-301-6900. www.hugscafe.org 13 Pavitra Organic Day Spa celebrated its 10th anniversary in October. The spa moved to its current location, 205 W. Lou- isiana St., Ste. 101, McKinney, in December 2018. Its services include massage ther- apy, facial treatments, body treatments, waxing and tinting. 972-542-6415. www.pavitraorganicdayspa.com

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trivia nights. 469-714-0229. www.guitarsandgrowlers.com

BEDFORD

12 Hugs Cafe held a birthday celebra- tion Oct. 13 for its # fth anniversary. The nonpro # t cafe, which primarily employs adults with special needs, is located at 224 E. Virginia St., McKinney. Hugs Cafe

VIRGINIA ! PKWY.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TO ! DO LIST

November & December events

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

27 VIRTUAL TREE LIGHTING McKinney Main Street will stream the lighting of the McKinney Community Christmas tree on its Facebook page. The tree is a 35-foot Michigan Spruce. Free. 6-6:30 p.m. 972-547-2660. www.facebook.com/downtownmckinney/ DECEMBER 02 ADULT BOOK CLUB The McKinney public libraries host a monthly book club geared toward adults to discuss books of various genres, such as mystery, general " ction and non " ction or biography. The online event this month, held via Zoom, will center on “Crimson Lake” by Candice Fox. Noon- 12:40 p.m. Free. 972-547-7323. www.mckinneytexas.org/1093/ Adult-Book-Club 05 CARL REINELT READING McKinney author Carl Reinelt will celebrate the release of his book, “The Worst Hospital in Prague,” with a reading and book signing at Graphite Pencil + Paper in downtown McKinney. The reading will also be streamed on the Graphite Pencil + Paper Facebook page. Free. 10:30 a.m.-noon, 1:30-3 p.m. Graphite Pencil + Paper, 211 N. Tennessee

09 HOLIDAY TEAWITH THE MCKINNEY FLUTE CHOIR The McKinney Flute Choir will perform holiday music to accompany a tea luncheon at the Heard-Craig Center for the Arts. Tickets will be limited. $30-$35. 2-4 p.m. Heard-Craig Center for the Arts, 205 W. Hunt St., McKinney. 972-569-6909. www.heardcraig.org/events 12 SECOND SATURDAY BIRDWALK Members from the Prairie and Timbers Audubon Society will provide identi " cation techniques and bird spotting tips for beginning and intermediate birders. Free-$12. 8-9:30 a.m. Heard Natural Science Museum & Wildlife Sanctuary, 1 Nature Place, McKinney. 972-562-5566. www.heardmuseum.org/birding 13 ALL STAR CHRISTMAS CONCERT The McKinney Philharmonic Orchestra will open its third annual Holiday Concert Series with several special guest performers. The orchestra will be performing Christmas tunes arranged in jazz, rock, classical and folk styles, among others. $20-$25. 4:30-6 p.m. McKinney Performing Arts Center, 111 N. Tennessee St., McKinney. 940-594-8790. www.mckinneytexas. org/117/Performing-Arts-Center

NOV. 27 ! 29

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS HISTORIC DOWNTOWN MCKINNEY

This holiday festival will feature photos with Santa, local artist holiday shops, ornament decorating for children and a holiday carousel. While entrance to the festival is free, there will be a cost for some activities. Free. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Historic Downtown McKinney, Main Street, McKinney. 972-547-7500. www.mckinneytexas.org/677/Home-for-the-Holidays (Courtesy city of McKinney)

NOVEMBER 20 THROUGH 22

WORTH THE TRIP NOV. 11 ! JAN. 3 RADIANCE! AHOLIDAY LIGHT SPECTACULAR Visitors will drive through more than a mile of holiday light displays. Vehicles will also be able to tune into a special holiday radio signal. $30- $50. 5:30-10 p.m. daily. Dr Pepper Ballpark, 7300 Roughriders Trail, Frisco. www.radiancechristmas.com

VINTAGEMARKET DAYS This indoor-outdoor market will feature vendors selling original art, antiques, clothing, jewelry and more. The event will o ! er two entrances to help with social distancing. $7-$12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Myers Park & Event Center, 7117 Country Road 166, McKinney. https://vintagemarketdays. com/market/dallas-mckinney/

St., McKinney. 214-548-5380. www.thegraphitestore.com

Find more or submit McKinney events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

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New lighting has been added to Louisiana Street in downtown McKinney between Kentucky and Church streets. (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper) HUNT ST.

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O ! cials celebrateLouisianaStreet Phase 1 completion indowntown CLOYD ST. DAVIS ST. CLOYD ST.

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

worked to ensure people could access businesses in downtown throughout construction, Main Street Program Director Amy Rosenthal said. This will again be ensured when Phase 2 of the

Just before dusk Oct. 22, McKinney o ! cials gathered to " ip the switch and “Light Up Louisiana” with the new festoon lighting and streetlights that were recently installed on Loui- siana Street between Kentucky Street and Church Street in downtown. In addition to the lighting, the project expanded the sidewalks on both sides of the street to help improve mobility. The infrastructure of the street was improved as well, Council Member Charlie Philips said. Construction was expected to start in spring 2020, but then, the COVID-19 pandemic hit. After consideration, the city decided to move forward with the project, as there would be a reduced impact to tra ! c since most people were staying home at that time, Philips said. “We wanted to make sure that we got this completed so our businesses could have a tremendous holiday season in downtown,” he said. Each of the bulbs on the newly installed festoon lighting are indi- vidually programmable, Philips said, so that the city can create its own customized light show. The city and the contractors

project begins. Upcomingwork

Starting in January, Phase 2 of the Light Up Louisiana Street project will get underway. The project will stretch from Tennessee to Hwy. 5 and will be broken into segments to complete similar goals, Rosenthal said. Infrastructure will be improved and replaced, and string lights, streetlights and wider sidewalks will be installed along the street and carried through- out the Louisiana corridor. “As everyone enjoys driving through downtown McKinney, they’ll get to experience the beautiful lights,” Rosenthal said. Construction will continue through next September, she said. Crews will keep at least one lane open to help provide a path for tra ! c traveling along the route, Rosenthal said. “It’s very important to everyone to have that access,” she said. “This is the highest-traveled corridor in the downtown area.”

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MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

NEWS REPORT

COLLIN MCKINNEY PKWY.

Celebrate 41/#0%' This Holiday Season

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O ! cials celebrateAT&T Byron Nelson’smove toMcKinney O ! cials with the Salesmanship Club of Dallas and the McKinney Chamber of Commerce cut the ribbon on the AT&T Byron Nelson Tournament’s planned move to TPC Craig Ranch in McKinney. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

and a creative place to play. And there’s no better play than what’s exempli " ed at the Byron Nelson.” While the Byron Nelson has not conducted an o ! cial study since its 2013 tournament, an estimate from 2008 and the 2013 study showed the event’s annual economic impact was just over $40 million, Tournament Director Jon Drago said earlier this year. Lisa Hermes, president and CEO of the McKinney Chamber of Com- merce, said the region is excited to come together for the event. “There’s a sense of cooperation and partnership among our county,” Hermes said. “I think that just plays so well into the values and the orga- nization of the AT&T Byron Nelson.” Since 1968, the AT&T Byron Nelson has raised $167 million for the Momentous Institute, according to Mike McKinley, president of the Salesmanship Club of Dallas, the host organization for the tournament. Momentous Institute provides social and emotional health support for children and partners. and it has helped nearly 6,000 children and families in North Texas, McKinley said. “All the proceeds of the tourna- ment bene " t the charities and the programs of the Salesmanship Club, which is operated by the Momentous Institute,” McKinley said. He said tournament hospitality is already 77% sold, with more than 95% of customers committed to multiyear deals.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Local o ! cials welcomed the AT&T Byron Nelson Tournament to the TPC Craig Ranch golf course in McKinney on Nov. 10 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the May 2021 event. David Craig, who developed the Craig Ranch community and founded its golf club, said the course at 8000 Collin McKinney Parkway, McKinney, was built with the intention of even- tually hosting a major event, such as the AT&T Byron Nelson Tournament. “This is a dream come true for me. I believe it’s a dream come true for the city of McKinney and Collin County and the region,” Craig said. A stop on the PGA Tour, the Byron Nelson is a weeklong event with four days of competition designed to celebrate the sport of golf, o ! cials said previously. It was announced that McKinney would be the tourna- ment’s new home April 15, relocating from Trinity Forest Golf Club in Dallas. The " ve-year agreement with course operator ClubCorp will keep the tournament at TPC Craig Ranch from 2021-26, and the competition will continue to be held each May, as per tradition. As a televised event, tournament o ! cials said, the event will bring international attention, as well as visitors and business oppor- tunities, to McKinney. “In McKinney, we have a simple vision,” McKinney Mayor George Fuller said. “It’s [to] provide a tre- mendously safe environment to live, a prosperous opportunity to work

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT

Habitat forHumanitybreaksground onnewcontainer homecommunity

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

price is $385,000, and our average family income is $42,000 a year. The purchase of these homes is well out of reach for many of the families that apply to our programs.” Land at the intersection of Kings Row and Bumpas Street was purchased using a grant from the McKinney Community Development Corp., and construction began in the spring to $ atten the land and get the homes ready for placement. Cox said the homes should debut before the end of the year. The McKinney Community Development Corp. gives grants to projects that enhance the city, and it is funded with a portion of city sales tax revenue, McKinney City Council Member Charlie Philips said at the groundbreaking ceremony. “When you shop local, great things happen here in McKinney, like this project,” Philips said.

O ! cials with Habitat for Human- ity of Collin County and the city of McKinney broke ground Oct. 27 on a project to provide more a # ordable housing. The crowd in attendance braved the chilly conditions to celebrate the construction milestone for the Cotton Groves, a 2.75-acre neigh- borhood of shipping containers that will o # er 35 homes for purchase for qualifying low- to moderate-income families. The Cotton Groves project is backed by Habitat for Humanity of Collin County and aims to o # er a way for low-income residents to become homeowners and build equity, CEO and President Celeste Cox said. “The need is very great in Collin County,” Cox said in her ceremony address. “Our average home sale

Habitat for Humanity of Collin County andMcKinney o ! cials break ground on the site that will house the Cotton Groves project. (Photos byMiranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Habitat for Humanity of Collin County CEO and President Celeste Cox, left, introduced the " rst four homeowners in Cotton Groves.

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11

MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

WALKER ST.

CITY

LOGAN ST. Monarch initiative educates on the butter ! y’s plight McKinney has been on a mission to help preserve the declining monarch butter ! y population since Mayor George Fuller signed a monarch pledge nearly three years ago. Martha Cavazos Fipps, city environ- mental education and community out- reach coordinator, updatedMcKinney Community Development Corporation leaders Sept. 24 on the city’s outreach e " orts for monarch butter ! ies and their biannual migration across North America. “They are an indicator species,” Cavazos Fipps said at the meeting. “Whenmonarchs are doing well, it means we have a balanced ecosystem, and when they’re not doing well, it means we don’t.” Fuller signed the pledge in February 2018 as part of an initiative through the National Wildlife Federation to create awareness of the monarchs’ plight, Cavazos Fipps said. The monarch pop- ulation has seen about a 90% decline in the last 20 years, she said. “I wouldn’t say they’re on the verge of being extinct, but that migration is about to collapse because they are in danger,” she said. Factors contributing to the decline include urbanization and increased use of pesticides and herbicides, Cavazos Fipps said. Among the city’s e " orts are a McKinney Monarch Initiative brochure printed in English and Spanish and several educational seminars. A city website and newsletter dedicated to BY ELIZABETH UCLÉS

1

MONARCH SCULPTURES Oversized monarch sculptures by local artists are sprinkled throughout McKinney’s cultural district. Here is where you can spot them. FINDINGMCKINNEY’S SOURCE: CITY OF MCKINNEY ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LAMAR ST.

LOGAN ST.

LOGAN ST.

2

HUNT ST.

HERNDON ST.

3

5

W. VIRGINIA ST.

E . V I R G I N I A S T .

6

8

W. LOUISIANA ST.

E . L O U I S I A N A S

CLOYD ST.

To learn more about McKinney’s monarch e ! orts, visit www.mckinneytexas.org /1913/mckinney-monarch-initiative.

5

DAVIS ST.

7

ANTHONY ST.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

2

3

1

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Roy & Helen Hall Memorial Library at 101 E. Hunt St. COURTESY MEDITATIVE MANDALA

Heard-Craig Center for the Arts at 205 W. Hunt St. COURTESY CAROLYN FUNK

The Cove located at 402 N. Tennessee St. COURTESY ANNE ROYER

Central Park at 105 W. Hunt St. COURTESY MELISSA PATRELLO

7

8

5

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Heritage Village at Chestnut Square at 315 S. Chestnut St. COURTESY LYNN HUBNER

Old Settler’s Recreation Center at 1201 E. Louisiana St. COURTESY

The Chestnut Commons Parking Garage at 202 S. Chestnut St. COURTESY DENISE KENDRICK

McKinney Performing Arts Center at 111 N. Tennessee St. COURTESY KIM GUTHRIE

laboratory coordinator and adjunct lecturer at the University of North Texas’ ecology and environmental science undergraduate laboratories. “It’s an island in a sea of urbaniza- tion,” she said. “If you put enough islands together, then that creates a network that not only butter ! ies but

other wildlife can utilize.” Based on the city’s current e " orts, Cavazos Fipps said she wants to ramp up outreach through the initiative in the future. “My goal is tomake McKinney the # rst champion city in Collin County,” she said.

monarchs both provide additional resources, she said, including a check- list for planting a monarch-friendly garden. Creating areas with native plants that are healthy for monarchs will fos- ter the migration and combat threats to the butter ! y, said Jaime Baxter-Slye,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ELECTIONS

Voters recall McKinney City Council member, reject sale of parkland

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term, which expires in May 2021. Shemwell was elected to represent District 1, which stretches along the city’s east side, but the recall process in McKinney mandates that all city voters be allowed to weigh in. This process was established in 2019 after voters approved a proposition to allow all voters to participate in recall elections regardless of their address. The city canvassed the election results during a special meeting Nov. 10 to make the results o ! cial. Shemwell was absent from the council dais when this action was taken. City Council has stated they would like to appoint someone to " ll Shemwell’s seat for the duration of the term, noting that it was important for District 1 to have representation in the council’s decision. Council will bring names for the appointment to the Dec. 1 Council meeting. The position will also be up for election in May 2021. Shemwell could run again at that time to regain the seat. Land sale rejected McKinney residents also voted against a di $ erent proposition involv- ing city-owned land. When asked if the city should be authorized to sell about 55 acres of land south of Harry McKillop Boulevard and Old Mill Road near the Heard Natural Science Museum &Wildlife Sanctuary, nearly 60% of McKinney residents voted “no.” The city will not be able to enter negotiations to sell the land. Visit communityimpact.com/ voter-guide/election-results to see results from all local elections.

A majority of voters in the Nov. 3 election favored removing McKinney City Council Member La’Shadion Shemwell from o ! ce by recall. Shemwell is the " rst McKinney City Council member to be recalled in the city’s history. After the election results were announced, he released a statement, which read in part: “This is not the outcome we wanted, but one we fully expected.” Election results show the majority of McKinney voters came out against Shemwell, who, according to the peti- tion that triggered the recall election, “made in # ammatory statements about residents and sta $ .” There were 47,843 votes in favor of the recall, and 18,440 against. Shemwell could not be reached for comment, but in his statement, he pointed to his ongoing federal lawsuit against the city regarding its recall election changes. In September, Shemwell and two other registered voters in his district " led a federal lawsuit, which claimed that the recall election is unconsti- tutional because the entire city was allowed to vote in the recall election, thus diluting the votes of District 1 residents. “I have stated from the beginning I would " ght this illegal recall process in court, and that is what I will continue to do, not just for me but for every diluted voter and disenfran- chised voice in this city,” Shemwell said in his statement. The recall election comes toward the end of Shemwell’s three-year

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MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMcKinney & Collin County

County sets record for voter turnout

TURNOUT BOOM Collin County saw higher turnout in this election than in any of the past six presidential races, o " cials said. Republicans held onto their seats by narrow margins. Residents voted to re-elect incumbent President Donald J. Trump by 250,194 votes, or 51.38% of the total. Residents also voted to re-elect U.S. incumbent Republican Sen. John Cornyn by 260,790 votes, or 54.75% of the total. Results were recently made o " cial by the county clerk.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

COLLIN COUNTY Nearly 489,000 county residents voted in the Nov. 3 election, data from the county’s elections o " ce shows. Total turnout in Collin County landed at about 75%, which is higher than that of any of the last six presidential races, Elections Administrator Bruce Sherbet said. Roughly 92% of total ballots were cast during early voting. Nearly 31,000 were submitted by mail, according to the county. Key races in Collin County included commissioner races for Precincts 1 and 3. In the Precinct 1 race, incumbent Susan Fletcher defeated challenger Courtney Brooks with almost 60% of the vote. In the race for Precinct 3, incumbent Darrell Hale won another term with 61% of the vote. His opponent, Dianne C. Mayo, went home with 39%. Across Collin County, incumbent

Cities sign the amended wholesale water services contract Oct. 29 in Wylie.

WILLIAM C. WADSACK ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

13 cities agree tonewwater rate structure MCKINNEY A new agreement on the North Texas Municipal Water District’s rate structure will allow cost sharing to be phased in for its member cities over the next 13 years. BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK The contract comes after Plano, Richardson, Garland andMesquite argued that under the previous contract, they had paid a combined $275 million in recent years for water

650,134 488,905

Turnout 75%

Registered voters

Total ballot cast

Early voting ballots

Election Day ballots

Mail-in ballots

their residents did not use. The new agreement has an

That change could have a ripple e ! ect on consumer water bills in McKinney and the district’s 12 other member cities. Representatives from each of the district’s 13 member cities signed an amended contract Oct. 29 inWylie.

421,368

updated allocationmethod devel- oped by the cities. It will gradually adjust the annual water commit- ments for each city over the next eight years tomore closely align with their historical water use.

36,689

30,848

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HIGHLIGHTS COLLIN COUNTY Commissioners voted 3-2 on Nov. 9 to change the COVID-19 dashboard on the county website and remove most of the data; only the information regarding hospitalizations will be left, along with some links to state COVID-19 data. Since the data regarding hospitalizations is provided locally, commissioners decided to leave this information in place. MCKINNEY Council repealed a public health ordinance Oct. 20 that required masks in businesses. Council repealed the ordinance to avoid redundancy with Gov. Greg Abbot’s order that also requires masks to be worn when social distancing is not possible. Collin County Commissioners Court Meets Nov. 23 and Dec. 7, 14 and 21 at 1:30 p.m. www.collincountytx.gov McKinney City Council Meets Dec. 1 and 15 at 6 p.m. www.mckinneytexas.org McKinney ISD Meets Dec. 15 and Jan. 19 at 7 p.m. www.mckinneyisd.net MEETINGSWE COVER

Residents oppose new event center

Architect named to design newcity municipal complex

design,” said Patricia Jackson, the facilities construction manager for the city of McKinney, to council. “It’s been a long time coming.” The new municipal complex would be located on about 13 acres east of Hwy. 5 between Virginia Street and Lamar Street and between the railroad tracks and Throckmorton Street, per city documents. Designs for the new complex will be created and shown to City Council next year. Costs for the architectural and engineering services were approved by council for an amount not to exceed $2.6 million.

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

MCKINNEY A request to rezone about 14 acres for the development of an event venue received a negative recommenda- tion fromPlanning and Zoning Commis- sioners on Nov. 10. This request listed the event center as two stories tall and able to seat approxi- mately 800 people, according tomeeting documents. City sta ! limited the use of outdoor speakers after 9 p.m. and reduced the amount of light that would come from the event center. A gated entrance would also discourage street parking. However, concerns persisted regard- ing potential light pollution, noise, parking, disorderly guests and the build- ing size of the proposed event center. Residents packed the meeting chamber to voice their concerns and turned in letters of opposition for the project. Amotion to deny the project was passed 5-2.The development request will be sent to McKinney City Council on Dec. 1.

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

MCKINNEY City Council approved the hiring of Lake Flato + Parkhill as architect for the new McKinney Municipal Complex and City Hall during a Nov. 3 meeting. According to meeting docu- ments, the municipal complex will take up approximately 180,000 square feet. It will be the hub for the city manager’s o " ce, the city secretary’s o " ce, development services, parks and recreation, and housing and community development. Future developments could also include municipal courts and a structured parking facility. “I couldn’t be more pleased to be here tonight to ask your consider- ation for a resolution authorizing the city manager to engage and execute a contract for City Hall

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15

MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

GUIDE MCKINNEY VISIT Visit McKinney helps to bring visitors to the city by promoting McKinney as a destination for business and leisure travelers. It operates the McKinney Visitors Center and provides a number of free services to individuals planning weddings, tours, reunions and meetings.

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

FREE SERVICES The free services from Visit McKinney include:

TOURISM BENEFITS OF In ! scal year 2018-19, the city saw:

FUNDING THE SERVICES Visit McKinney is fully funded through hotel taxes collected by the city. 13% is the occupancy tax collected by McKinney hotels 6% goes to the state 7% goes to the city to help fund Visit McKinney

overnight visitors 860,280

$229M in traveler spending

• O " ering brochures, maps and calendars; • Helping secure hotel room blocks and rate negotiations; • Conducting site visits and suggesting venues to suit the needs of the visitor or event planner; • Negotiating meeting or event venue contracts; • Creating itineraries for areas of interest, including history, do-it-yourself, environmental, gardening and live entertainment; • Supplying visitors with contact information for vendors; and • Providing goody bags for out- of-town guests in hotels.

1,970 jobs related to tourism and hospitality

$712,000 Visit McKinney budget for ! scal year 2018-19

HERNDON ST.

VISIT MCKINNEY 200 W. Virginia St., McKinney www.visitmckinney.com 888-649-8499 info@visitmckinney.com

N

VIRGINIA ST.

The McKinney Visitors Center o ! ers information and a gift shop for those visiting the city. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Exercising can improve your quality of life. Here are some simple ones you can do to work major muscle groups. TRAPEZIUS Upright row KEY EXERCISES FOR STAYING STRONG

PECTORAL Push-ups

TRICEPS Tricep dips

BICEPS Chin-ups

BUSINESS FEATURE

Dan Judge, a former award-winning bodybuilder, runs and owns The Gym McKinney. (Francesca D’Annunzio/Community Impact Newspaper)

ABDOMINALS Sit-ups

The GymMcKinney McKinney ! tness studio aims to help people of all abilities ! nd their strength

QUADRICEPS Squats

D an Judge, who owns The GymMcKinney, said he used to be an award-win- ning bodybuilder. “By 1986, I was one of the biggest and strongest bodybuilders ever in the sport of bodybuilding,” said Judge, pointing to photos on the wall of his younger self. Despite that success, Judge said he has “never liked working out” but continues to do so because he loves the health bene ! ts. Judge has been employed in gyms for more than 40 years, starting out as a trainer. Over the last couple decades, he has owned 11 di " erent gyms, and at one point he owned BY FRANCESCA D’ANNUNZIO

CALF MUSCLES Jump rope

three at the same time. Many of Judge’s gyms were in southern California, but he has been operat- ing The GymMcKinney since 2014, when he and his wife Myrna moved to Texas to be closer to family. He said what sets his gym apart from others is the ambiance and culture. “[Our 300 members] are folks who love The Gym,” Judge said. “They won’t go anywhere else, [and] they want to be here because it’s the environment that they want.” Judge said that this environment is “private, personal and profes- sional” and that it creates a safe space where “people can thrive in the gym” and not feel intimidated.

One service Judge personally o " ers is rehabilitation for clients who face physical challenges or disabilities. He said about 10% of his clients face these challenges. One of those clients was a 62-year-old woman with multiple sclerosis who had been using a wheelchair for more than 30 years. According to Judge, she was unable to move or use the left side of her body when she ! rst started training with him. “After two years, she fully recov- ered. [She] still has MS, but it’s manageable. That woman is now 86 years old, and she still plays 18 holes of golf three days a week,” Judge said.

SOURCE: HEALTHLINE ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The Gym 3600 Eldorado Parkway, Ste. D1, McKinney 469-435-0369

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MCKINNEY EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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