McKinney September 2020

COMPILED BY MIRANDA JAIMES & DESIGNED BY CHELSEA PETERS

east side’s older industrial properties will help address that. “The idea was really to give [the east side] a shot in the armwith some activity,” Shelton said. “If we locate our City Hall where we have some- thing like Tupps next to Local Yocal [restaurant], then it becomes a dis- trict where people go to hang out.” However, some residents are con- cerned about what redevelopment of the east side might do to their property values. A virtual town hall in early August, hosted by Flour- ish Community-Based Initiatives and attended by council member La’Shadion Shemwell, discussed the east side, with some residents voic- ing concerns that they would not be able to a # ord higher property taxes that come with rising values. “I’d love to be a city that, for the ! rst time, watches existing owners be able to ride that wave of economic growth and development and not be a victim of it,” Mayor George Fuller told the McKinney Community Devel- opment Corp. board at its May 28 meeting in response to the expected development Tupps will bring. Fuller said the city is actively investigating how to ensure residents are not priced out of their homes. “Our job as a city is [to ! gure out] how [to] protect the residents that currently live there when those things happen—because they will happen,” Fuller said. “It’s going to happen, whether Tupps is there or not.” Making a multimillion dollar deal When Tupps presented its expan- sion project to the MCDC board, it ticked a lot of the board’s usual boxes, President Cindy Schneible said. The board identi ! es its strategic planning goals and sets them annu- ally, she said. “Two of the priorities on that list are [the] Downtown Historic Cultural District and [the] East McKinney redevelopment and then also proj- ects that create a destination—so,

A CRAFT C OMMUN I T Y The expanded Tupps Brewery will rest on 4.5 acres. The owners have proposed several ideas for the space so that it becomes a hub for the community. Proposed layout and ideas are subject to change. DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT Tupps is the biggest project to come to the east side of McKinney to date, and it is meant to complement other projects in the area.

Areas highlighted in yellow could be designated community spaces 1 2,000-square-foot o ! ce space 2 Parking 3A Outdoor beer garden, dining area and 3B water feature 4 10,000-square-foot tap room 5 Culinary school and restaurant incubator 6 Garden for beer making and culinary school 7 Greenhouse 8 Shop and barrel aging room 9 Kids zone 10 Loading dock 11 20,000-square-foot brewery and packing space with rooftop bar 12 Adult/kids play zone 13 Restrooms 14 Outdoor bar 15 Silo shops 16 Outdoor stage I D E AS PROPOSED

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MILL DISTRICT GROWTH

CURRENT DOWNTOWN

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VIRGINIA ST.

LOUISIANA PKWY.

TUPPS PROJECT LOCATION

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SOURCES: CITY OF MCKINNEY, TUPPS BREWERY " COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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grain site, located at the cor- ner of Greenville Road and Dungan Street. This will create some much- needed room for the brewery to expand, but it will also bene ! t other projects planned for the area known as The Mill District, o " cials said. Tupps intends to create a “world- class cultural and entertainment destination” that will serve as a “cat- alyst for economic development east of Highway 5 in McKinney,” Tupps President Keith Lewis told the McK- inney Economic Development Corp. board in May. He said he expects to open the new location by early 2022. In June, the McKinney Community Development Corp. agreed to award an $11.3 million grant for Tupps to renovate the grain site. Tupps also received a separate grant of about $600,000 from the McKinney Eco- nomic Development Corp. for the expansion of production at the new site. With the relocation, Tupps Brew- ery would be one of the ! rst major developments on the east side of downtown. “We thought something like [Tupps] would bring that activity and would really jump-start the district over there,” Assistant City Manager

Barry Shelton said. “Hopefully, it will lead to other restaurants and retail and users that could ! ll in some of our historic buildings.” Mill District development Long before Tupps, McKinney City Council and sta # said they knew they needed to head east for develop- ment. A plan for a new City Hall on the east side of McKinney has been in the works since about 2006, Shelton said. Placing that project east of High- way 5 should add more infrastructure and investment in this area, rather than placing it near current city o " ces on Tennessee Street, Shelton said. “We accomplish a lot more with the same dollars than we would have if we built it right here, next to where we are,” he said. Besides City Hall and Tupps, some additional projects are in the works. Across from the former McKinney grain site is the Flour Mill wedding venue, which has some o " ces leased on the ground $ oor, Shelton said. Eventually, the upper $ oors would be renovated and could become o " ce space or loft apartments, he said.

“I know [the owners] have some big plans for that. I don’t know exactly which direction they’re going to go, but I know as the district takes o # , they’re more likely to get those investment dollars,” Shelton said. The former owners of Patina Green restaurant have also purchased some buildings near the upcoming Tupps location, which are being turned into antique stores, o " cials said. Some residents on the city’s east side have told City Council they feel pushed aside or forgotten as much of the growth has occurred to the west over the past few decades, according to Shelton. He said rejuvenating the CATALYST AND TO MAKE IT REALLY COOL ANDBE A POSITIVE ASSET TO THE EAST SIDE.” KEITH LEWIS, TUPPS BREWERY PRESIDENT “WE HAVE TO TRULY BE A

Keith Lewis, left, and his son Chris Lewis stand at the new Tupps site. (Courtesy Tupps Brewery)

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