New Braunfels Edition | May 2020

NEWBRAUNFELS EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 6 | MAY 11 - JUNE 7, 2020

ONLINE AT

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

“WE WILL BE HERE TO CONTINUE TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY, WHETHER THAT’S THROUGH PUTTING FOOD IN YOUR CAR OR BRINGING YOU IN AND LETTING YOU VOLUNTEER WITH US. I THINK MOST IMPORTANTLY WE ARE IN THIS TOGETHER, AND WE’RE GOING TO GET THROUGH THIS.” MONICA BORREGO, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NEW BRAUNFELS FOOD BANK

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM / PATRON

LAUREN CANTERBERRY / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NewBraunfels nonpro fi ts unite to serve community Between the week ending March 14 and the week ending April 24, more than 1.6 million Texans fi led for unemploy- ment, according to the Texas Workforce Commission. health support. “These are families who have had jobs and regular pay- checks,” said Alice Jewell, CEO of the McKenna Foundation, a leading local nonpro fi t. “[They] really haven’t navigated the social services system before.” In response to the growing need for access to social CONTINUED ON 20 BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY Many New Braunfels residents have found themselves needing help to put food on their tables, pay their rent or mortgage, pay for utilities, and fi nd physical and mental

IMPACTS

6

NewBraunfels faces unprecedented economic crunch fromcoronavirus Nearly every sector of the local economy a ff ected

Based on unemployment insurance claims made March 18-April 27, Comal County’s unemployment rate has approached levels last seen during the Great Recession. 9% COMAL COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

DINING

17

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

BY WARREN BROWN

impact-wise,” Meek wrote in a blog post for the chamber. Manyquanti fi cations of the virus have failed to capture the true scope of its impact. Whereas New Braunfels has so far been spared from the soaring death counts associated with larger cities, live- lihoods have been a major casualty.

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up to date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit • • • • • • ••• •• • • • ••• • • and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

Michael Meek, New Braunfels Cham- ber of Commerce CEO, recently o ff ered a chilling bit of context to the economic toll of the coronavirus. “Yes, we have in years past had eco- nomic downturns caused by fl oods, droughts, 9/11 and more, but this cur- rent one is the granddaddy of them all

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSION / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 22

$ 2,000 O ff New AC & No Payments for 6 months! *

SAVINGS Reduces energy use and helps homeowners save up to 23%* on heating and cooling costs.

COMFORT Includes a SmartSensor to keep important rooms comfortable by adjusting your thermostat based on occupancy and temperature.

ADVANCED CONTROL With Alexa built-in, you can ask to play music, hear the news, check weather, control smart home devices, and more. Plus you can control from anywhere with any iOS or Android device.

*Compared to a hold of 72°F. Learn more at ecobee.com/savings

Plus, a FREE ecobee SmartThermostat with voice control & SmartSensor! N E I G H B O R S H E L P I N G N E I G H B O R S Even during these uncertain times, we know life at home doesn’t slow down. Having an e ffi cient, operational AC/heating system as the hot temperatures of the Texas summer approach is still important, even a necessity for some. We’re here to help. With no payments for 6 months, GVEC Home can help keep your home comfortable with peace of mind knowing we are in this together.

P

LIMITED TIME OFFER!

24/7

$2,000 Off New AC & No Payments for 6 months! * Plus, a FREE ecobee SmartThermostat with voice control! Hurry—Offer Ends June 30!

m with installation and not payments for 6 months, plus a free ecobee SmartThermostat ed credit. O ff er may not be combined with any other GVEC Home® o ff er. Coupon must be ct to change without notice. O ff er expires 6/30/20. TACLA96600E | TECL32802

AC/HEATING SOLAR ELECTRICIANS SALES MAINTENANCE REPAIR

833.682.3800 | gvecACservice.com

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

• 800 acres of dedicated open space and park land • Close proximity to Texas State University, business, shopping and entertainment • 45-acre Central Park recreation space • Desirable location off IH-35 between Austin and San Antonio • Resort-caliber amenities and playgrounds • 10+ miles of trails NEW HOMES FROM THE $280’S

1/4-ACRE SITES AVAILABLE NOW! LACIMATX.COM

512-337-6093

512-834-9294

512-569-0095

3

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

Walk or bicycle along a beautiful, 4.5-mile paved path with a s tory to tell. Located near the 45SW Toll Road VRXWKZHVWRIGRZQWRZQWKHIRRWZLGH6:7UDLOLVȴOOHG with captivating signs that detail the history, environmental importance and natural wonders of the Hill Country.

The Trail Explorer by CTRMA app make s learning fun. Experience wonders like watching a prehistoric sea creature come to life on the 45SW Trail, with the app’s augmented reality features. Download for free today!

Visit MobilityAuthority.com/45SWTrail to learn more!

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

6 - 7

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Upcoming construction projects

FROMHEATHER: This month we explore how the coronavirus has a ff ected local businesses, restaurants and even the way local nonpro fi t organizations are working together. Gov. Greg Abbott continues to issue executive orders that change the state’s policies and procedures, and as we slowly reopen the economy it is important to continue to follow health and safety protocols. We certainly don’t want to take one step forward and two steps back. Heather Demere, GENERALMANAGER

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHER - AUSTINMETRO Travis Baker GENERAL MANAGER Heather Demere, hdemere@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL

The cost of

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Joe Warner ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney EDITOR Warren Brown REPORTER Lauren Canterberry COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kayla Brooks DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace Rachal Russell BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US GRAPHIC DESIGNER Monica Romo STAFF DESIGNERS Chance Flowers, John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in P fl ugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1 P fl ugerville, TX 78660 • 512 - 989 - 6808 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES nbfnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

FROMWARREN: Despite New Braunfels maintaining a lower case count than most of the region, lives and livelihoods have been lost to the coronavirus. Our community isn’t out of the woods yet, and the recovery process will be long, but we’ll be here to report both the good and the bad with local context. This month we examined how nonpro fi ts banned together to support the community and how New Braunfels’ economy was a ff ected by closures. Warren Brown, EDITOR

ECONOMY

11

Are we ready to reopen?

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 20

New businesses 8

Local government meetings attended 19

Cups of co ff ee consumed 126

WHAT’S NEWAT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ? CUSTOMDIGITAL CAMPAIGNS FOR ADVERTISERS Our online partnership includes more value with record-breaking content and readership and fl exible weekly ad schedules. communityimpact.com/advertise

EDUCATION BRIEFS Wi-Fi access and adopting seniors

13

CITY& COUNTY The latest local news DINING FEATURE Adjusting to the new norm NONPROFITS UNITE

15

DAILY LOCAL NEWSLETTER Sign up to receive daily headlines directly to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

E - EDITIONS Explore over 100 new interactive digital editions at communityimpact.com .

17

20 - 21

Demand for nonpro fi ts increases THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK 22 - 23 Unemployment claims soar IMPACT DEALS 24 Great local coupons

Proudly printed by

communityimpact.com

@impactnews_nbf

facebook.com/impactnewsnbf

FINANCING AVAILABLE Call today for a free estimate

808 W County Line Rd,New Braunfels, TX 78130 | (830) 627-7663 _ZZZ)HOOHU5RRȴQJ1%FRP

5

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

5

2673

1102

306

13

35

7

CREEKSIDE CROSSING

337

Bluebonnet Pediatrics

CENTRAL PLAZA

16

PHOTOS BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

3

46

9

Braunfels. The clinic was opened by longtime New Braunfels pediatrician Dr. Melissa Garcia and is accepting new patients. 830-333-9533. www.bluebonnetpediatrics.com 6 Guadalupe Regional Medical Center Urgent Care and Primary Care opened in April at 1761 Hwy. 46 S., Ste. 104, New Braunfels. The clinic is part of the Guada- lupe Regional Medical Group and o ff ers treatment for minor injuries, infectious diseases, acute allergies and more. 830-433-7816. www.grmedgroup.com 7 Kentucky Fried Chicken opened a new restaurant at 240 FM 306, New Braunfels, in April. Headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky, the restaurant is famous for its fried chicken and has more than 23,000 locations around the world. 830-632-3503. www.kfc.com 8 Everyday Carry Texas opened at 965 N. Walnut Ave., Ste. 100, New Braunfels, in February. The shop specializes in everyday carry items, such as concealable pistols and knives, but is also a full gun store with products such as ri fl es, shot- guns and more. 830-632-5116. www.edctx.com COMING SOON 9 A new Postal Annex originally scheduled to open in late March at 2055 Central Plaza, Ste. 110, New Braunfels, will be opening in June. The business will o ff er shipping, copy services, mailbox rentals, notary services and more. 432-553-5604. www.postalannex.com 10 The Pillars Christian Learning Cen- ter will open a new location at 2144 Ga-

15

11

5

CENTRAL PKWY.

4

10

12

OAK RUN PWKY.

GABRIELS PL.

19

8

MAIN PLAZA

1101

17

46

2

18

6

14

1044

35

1

725

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Bill Miller BBQ opened a second location in New Braunfels at 3209 N. I-35 in March. The chain operates 78 restau- rants in Texas and o ff ers breakfast, lunch and dinner for curbside, delivery and drive-thru. 210-659-5514. www.billmillerbbq.com 2 In April, Newman & Co. completed renovations on its new location at 125 S. Elliott Knox Blvd., New Braunfels. The spa

4 In February, Medical Center Oph- thalmology Associates moved into its permanent New Braunfels location at 790 Generations Drive, Ste. 210. The eye care clinic o ff ers eye exams, cataract sur- gery, dry eye treatment, cataract surgery, LASIK surgery and more. 210-697-2020. www.mcoaeyecare.com 5 Bluebonnet Pediatrics began accepting patient registration April 15 and opened for appointments April 22 at 790 Generations Drive, Ste. 215, New

relocated from its previous location on Common Street and o ff ers lash treatments, microblading, cryo treatments and more. 830-620-8444. www.newmancmpy.com 3 Almouie Pediatrics opened a new of- fi ce in the Oak Run Point shopping center at 2188 Hwy. 46, Ste. 105, New Braunfels, in March. The practice serves infants, children and teenagers and is currently o ff ering telemedicine appointments as well as in-person immunizations. 830-327-7002. www.almouiepediatrics.com

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY & WARREN BROWN

18

16

River Ho fb rau

Fresh-Healthy Cafe

ANNIVERSARIES 15 Herb Haus will celebrate one year of business in May. The full-service apothecary, candle and curio shop is open by appointment only at 2090 N. I-35, Ste. 4117, New Braunfels, and o ff ers herbal remedies, handmade jewelry and more. 830-214-0144 www.facebook.com/herbhausnb 16 Fresh-Healthy Cafe will celebrate fi ve years of business in New Braunfels at 601 Creekside Crossing, Ste. 110, in June. The cafe o ff ers smoothies, juices, paninis and more and is closed due to coronavirus concerns. 830-264-2845. www.freshcafenb.com 17 Bring Your Own Parts celebrated one year of business at 619 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels, in March. The auto repair shop started in San Antonio and does not charge markups for parts or 18 Opened in 2014, the River Ho fb rau announced in April that it is closed inde fi - nitely. Located at 1515 Kuehler Ave., New Braunfels, the restaurant was one of three Ho fb rau locations in San Antonio and New Braunfels. 830-626-2200. www.riverho fb rau.com 19 Hanna’s Kitchen closed in April after 36 years in business at 1101 N. Walnut Ave., New Braunfels. The family-owned restaurant served homemade Mexican fare, such as carne guisada, enchiladas and breakfast tacos. 830-625-8030. www.hannaskitchennb.com installation. 210-682-2967. www.bringyourownparts.com CLOSINGS

briels Place, New Braunfels, in January. The preschool was founded in San Anto- nio and operates 11 locations through- out Central Texas where children ages 6 weeks to 4 years can participate in daily teaching and older children are able to participate in before and after-school 11 Marco’s Pizza is coming soon to Frei- heit Village at 2084 Central Plaza, Ste. 101, New Braunfels. Founded in Ohio in 1978, the pizza chain has more than 100 locations nationwide and serves pizza, subs, salads and more. 830-302-4850. www.marcos.com programs. 210-941-4153 www.thepillarsclc.com 12 Hill Country Medical Associates will open a new o ffi ce at 2967 Oak Run Parkway, Ste. 101, New Braunfels, on July 1. The family medical practice will be the third HCMA location in New Braunfels and will o ff er a variety of ser- vices for all ages with a focus on disease prevention and health promotion. 830-625-0305. www.hcma-nb.com 13 A Valvoline Instant Oil Change is under construction at 240 FM 306, New Braunfels. The service station will be the third location in New Braunfels and will o ff er oil changes, radiator services, air fi lter replacements and more. 830-626-0404. www.vioc.com 14 A new Water Works Auto Spa is coming soon to 1756 S. Seguin Ave., New Braunfels. The company opperates two other locations in Kyle and Wylie and o ff ers interior and exterior car cleaning and detailing services. 512-504-3796. www.waterworksautospa.com

The Gristmill River Restaurant & Bar opened in 1977 in historic Gruene.

FEATURED IMPACT Recent fi lings from local restaurants began to show the economic toll the coronavirus has had in New Braunfels. Instead of celebrating Gruene Hall’s 45-year anniversary this month, area restaurants were instead grappling with furloughs, layo ff s and decreased hours. A Worker Adjustment and Retraining Noti fi cation fi led with the Texas Workforce Commission on April 9 stated that 305 employees were laid o ff in March by the Patrick S Molak Corp. and Gruene Texas Partnership 90, co-owned by Pat Molak and Mary Jane Nalley. Nalley declined to be interviewed for this story, and Molak did not respond. Together, the two entrepreneurs own Gruene Hall, Gristmill River Restaurant & Bar, Mozie’s, Gruene General Store, the Grapevine and Cantina Del Rio. The WARN notice marked the date of the layo ff s as March 19. The fi ling also listed the Gristmill River Restaurant & Bar as the source of the layo ff s. Typically, the WARN Act requires employers to provide notice at least 60 days ahead of mass layo ff s so that employees have time to seek new jobs.

But according to the Employment and Training Administration, businesses can forgo early noti fi cation when layo ff s are due to unforeseeable circumstances—a pandemic in this case. An announcement from Gruene Historic District on April 30 did note that the Gristmill would attempt to open by May 5 with the allowed 25% occupation limit. Gruene Hall was Molak and Nalley’s fi rst local business, which they opened together in May 1975. They went on to purchase additional local properties. Molak and Nalley also own Josephine St. and Down on Grayson in San Antonio.

830-625-0684. www. gristmillrestaurant.com

N

2020 LOOKS GREAT! COMALTEX is committed to being YOUR insurance agency Celebrating 70+ years as an independent insurance agency in New Braunfels

Personalized Service and Personalized Coverage by licensed professionals with over 240 years of experience. Personal Insurance • Business Insurance • Life/Health Insurance 1110 Eikel Street | New Braunfels,TX 78130 830-625-7511 | www.comaltex.com

7

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

Call or Text Now, the Service is Completely FREE! ƑƐƏ҃Ɠƕƒ҃ƓƐƑƏ

)om|u-1ঞm]b1;mv;7 ];m|v | ;‰o1-ঞom 1423 N. Walnut Suite 103, New Braunfels, TX 78130

HealthMarkets Insurance Agency Health | Medicare | Small Group | Life | Supplemental

Robert Brooker Licensed Insurance Agent Agents may be compensated based on enrollment.

Award-winning roo fi ng company

ROOF DAMAGE?

LET’S REMEDY IT! SAFETY IS OUR TOP PRIORITY We are o ff ering phone & email quotes

888 - HAIL - PRO 24h Customer Call Center www.remedyroo fi ng.com

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Fatality numbers still high despite 11%-15% fewer crashes in 2020 Tra ffi c fatalities on roads through- out Texas have continued at roughly the same pace in 2020 despite major Texas metros seeing a drop in the number of reported crashes and tra ffi c volumes.

BY AMY DENNEY AND WARREN BROWN

ONGOING PROJECTS

CENTRAL TEXAS CRASHES These are the number of crashes reported to the Texas Department of Transportation from Jan. 1-April 15 each year by local law enforcement agencies. The numbers do not include crashes currently under investigation.

LANDA ST.

35

N

2018 2019 2020

• •• • •• • • •• • • • • • •• • •• •• ••• • • The $4.6 million project raised North Live Oak out of a fl oodway, built a bridge at Dry Comal Creek Crossing and improved drainage. • •• • ••• • •• November 2018-May 2020

Between Jan. 1 and April 15, the number of tra ffi c crashes dropped between 11% and 15% in 2020 compared to the same time period in 2019 in the Austin, Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston metros, according to an April 21 analysis of Texas Department of Transportation data by Community Impact Newspaper . However, data from TxDOT shows the number of tra ffi c fatalities has dropped by 3.35% in the same time period in 2020 compared to 2019. TxDOT’s Crash Records Informa- tion System denotes the number of tra ffi c fatalities between Jan. 1 and

• •••••• •• • • • • • ••

• • • ••• • • • ••

• • •• ••• • •• • • • ••

• •••• • • • ••

••••••• • • • ••

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CRASH RECORDS INFORMATION SYSTEM / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

roadways is achievable,” she said. “Unfortunately, we’re not there yet. Despite the drop in tra ffi c and despite the drop in crashes in certain areas across the state, we are still seeing tra ffi c deaths.” Beyer said analysis of the contrib- uting factors showed many accidents were preventable, caused by texting while driving or drunken driving.

April 15 declined from 865 deaths in 2019 to 836 during the same time period in 2020. Veronica Beyer, director of media relations for TxDOT, said the agency reported 12 fatalities Feb. 22 and 11 fatalities on March 22 when the state was under stay-at-home orders. “We’ve always believed that ending the streak of daily deaths on Texas

337

35

N

• • • •• • •• • •• •• ••• • •• • • • ••• ••• • •••• •• •• • • • ••• • • • • •

Funded by New Braunfels’ 2019 bond, a full reconstruction will begin once utility work is completed. • •• • ••• • •• summer 2020-winter 2021

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NBFNEWS @ COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

SAVING TEXAS BBQs ONE TINY PEST AT A TIME.

KID & BEE-FRIENDLY MOSQUITO CONTROL

INVISIBLE & ODORLESS FLY REDUCTION

FLEA & TICK CONTROL WITH 4X POWER

Plus tax. Up to 5,000 sq. ft. Additional charges apply for larger areas. New Customers Only. Valid with purchase of 6+ applications. Expires 6/30/20. Promo: CP-1 1st Fertilization $29.99 with Weed Control

New Customers Only. Valid with 5+ mosquito applications. Expires 6/30/20. Promo: CP-1 with 1st Mosquito Control Application Fly Treatment FREE

EmeraldLawns.com | 210.664.4930

9

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

The Simple Life

COMMUNITY GREEN OPENING SOON!

NEW SPRING ARRIVALS: CHAT NOW WITH US LIVE AT MEYERRANCH.COM!

< CRANES MILL RD.

New Homes from the $200s

Follow us @ MeyerRanchNB

830-213-7397

46

337

Graphics, photographs and maps shown are representational only and should not be relied upon as depictions of existing or proposed community improvements. Final development may differ from these representations. Subject to change without notice. ASHTON WOODS HOMES • BELLA VISTA HOMES • GEHAN HOMES • HIGHLAND HOMES JUELL HOMES • PRINCETON CLASSIC HOMES • TRENDMAKER HOMES

NEW BRAUNFELS

35

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ECONOMY

The cost of No matter the type of business, owners and managers have to take each of these expenses into account when they weigh the prospect of reopening their doors.

Rent or mortgage

Product stock

Cleaning supplies

Utilities

Payroll

Taxes

Employee training

Health insurance

The Downtowner’s owner says the economics do not make sense to open yet. (Warren Brown/Community Impact Newspaper)

Reopening will be its own challenge Local business owner faces backlash over delayed reopening

BY WARREN BROWN

of this reality, he believes as much as a quarter of locally owned restaurants will close due to measures put in place to contain COVID-19. “I don’t think many places could function at 25% for very long,” Niland said. The Payroll Protection Plan o ff ers a reprieve to businesses that were approved for and received funds, but Niland noted that the $120,000 he accepted from the PPP will not go as far as it would if he had more freedom in its usage. “We have to spend it in this eight-week period, and I would have liked to save that money to use it on the reopening costs of labor,” Niland said. The Downtowner is lucky in the sense that Niland owns the building his restaurant is in. That decreased his expenses while it sits idle, but not every business is as fortunate. Another of Niland’s concerns is public percep- tion. He’s already received negative comments about his choice to not reopen right away. “I really just want customers to be super under- standing right now of what restaurants are going through,” Niland said. “They gotta understand, we’re kind of treading water here in a really unknown area. Just be patient and be nice.”

Many of New Braunfels restaurant and retail businesses have stayed open for limited to-go and pickup operations during closure and stay-at- home orders, but some have elected not to open at all. Some businesses, such as The Downtowner restaurant, have been closed for weeks. They did not open May 1 when Gov. Greg Abbott’s executive orders permitted businesses to allow customers inside their buildings with a 25% cap on occupancy. The Downtowner’s owner, Chad Niland, said that the numbers do not work for him to reopen until he is allowed to operate at a greater capac- ity. The Downtowner, and other businesses like his, would lose money at the 25% occupancy cap, he said. “Just to open up again, it’s gonna be about 20 grand right out of my pocket,” Niland said. “We got to order all the food; we got to get a whole two- week payroll—that’s $15,000 with tax.” Niland pointed out that many restaurants work on cash fl ow, which is the day’s revenue being used to pay the same day’s expenses. Because

NEW T ECHNOLOG I E S CL AS S I C CUS TOMER CARE FREE service calls FREE estimates 830-358-1499 ClassicAirConditioningAndHeating.com TACLB27092E

11

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from New Braunfels and Comal ISDs

Facebook page celebrates the class of 2020with senior adoptions

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

under the “Special thank you’s” tag. “A lot of parents have not told their kids [that they’ve been posted],” Horton said. “It’s not about how many times they can get adopted as we say; it’s the fact that a complete stranger showed them some love.” According to Horton, local busi- nesses and residents have found creative ways to congratulate seniors by giving them gifts and support unique to their interests. When one parent posted that their son was planning to attend culinary school after graduation, a local chef gifted him a set of culinary knives. The purchase of gifts has been a boost for local businesses such as bakeries and sign makers. “We support local only,” Horton said. “It’s easing that fear that people have of, ‘What’s going to happen next?’ or, ‘Am I going to be able to make it with my business being closed?’”

small graduation gifts. “It has brought the community together by leaps and bounds,” Hor- ton said. “We’ve taken a negative and we’ve turned it into a huge positive.” Through the group, more than 1,000 students in the district have been adopted at least once, and the page has nearly 6,000 members, Horton said. When a parent or family member joins the group, they are able to create a post about their senior that details their achievements, post-graduation plans and photos. To adopt a senior, a group member can direct message the original poster and collaborate with them to choose gifts for their senior and arrange a time to drop o ff the treats. The senior is then tagged as “adopted” and family members are encouraged to share photos and stories about the gifts their senior received

NEWBRAUNFELS&COMAL ISD Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the senior class of 2020 has missed many of the celebrations that accompany the fi nal semester of high school, such as prom and graduation parties. Roughly 2,167 seniors attended New Braunfels and Comal ISDs in 2020, according to the Texas Educa- tion Agency “[The students] don’t get to cross that fi nish line,” said Virginia Horton, mother of Memorial Early College High School senior Cheyenne Horton. “There’s not that satisfac- tion, and there’s not that feeling of accomplishment.” On April 16, Horton created the “Adopt a 2020 Class Senior in NBISD & CISD” Facebook page as a way for parents to share about their gradu- ating seniors and invite community members to “adopt” them and send

For parents, seeing other posts and the overwhelming support from the community has encouraged them to continue to celebrate the graduating class, Horton said. “We all care about these kids,” Horton said. “Somebody that maybe they don’t even know said, ‘Hey you know what, congratulations; the community is proud of you.’” Canyon High School senior Nathan Luera was adopted through Horton's Facebook page. (Courtesy Margie Luera)

NewBraunfels ISD board approves remote learning grading policy

course credit,” Moczygemba said at the meeting. “At the end of the day, we feel like this is the fairest and most equal system we can come up with.” Class rank and GPA calculations will exclude the spring semester for students currently taking courses.

accuracy of grades during the closures is di ffi cult. The district initially decided to track daily grades as a benchmark for student comprehension. “We believe that grades are important for now as a tool to assess student understanding so that we can provide support to parents and students that need them,” Moczygemba wrote in a letter to parents April 6. While the school district will not collect any major grades—such as tests or exams—during the fourth quarter, an average of student’s daily grades will be included on quarterly report cards. First- and second-semester grades will be averaged to determine grade promotion and the awarding of course credit, Moczygemba said. “Our goal is working with all students to make sure that they are promoted and that they do get

Comal ISD Meets May 21 and June 25 at 6 p.m. at CISD District O ce, 1404 N. I-35, New Braunfels 830-221-2000 • www.comalisd.org New Braunfels ISD Meets May 18 and June 29 at MEETINGSWE COVER

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

NEWBRAUNFELS ISD At a school board meeting April 20, the New Braunfels ISD board of trustees approved a plan for how grades collected during remote schooling will be weighted and how students’ class rankings and GPAs will be impacted for the fourth quarter. According to NBISD Superintendent Randy Moczygemba, monitoring the integrity and

7 p.m. NBISD Admin Center, 1040 N. Walnut Ave., New Braunfels • 830-643-5705 • www.nbisd.org

Target 7% Returns Texas Real Estate Backed Investments

6WDOOLRQ&DSLWDO0DQDJHPHQWLVDSULYDWHLQYHVWPHQW¾UPIRUDFFUHGLWHGLQYHVWRUV

Learn more: Live Webinar Sign-Up at Stallioninfo.com 100% SECURED by Texas Real Estate A Dedicated

Regular CASH FLOW option

and Seasoned TEAM

LQYHVW#VWDOOLRQFDSFRP__VWDOOLRQFDSFRP

13

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

PEACE OF MIND

FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING

FUN ENVIRONMENT

T 2810 OAK RUN PARKWAY, SUITE 300, NEW BRAUNFELS, TX 78132 (830) 515-5365 • INFO@TREETOPDENTAL.COM

46

OAK RUN PKWY.

The Grove at Vintage Oaks

The Grove at Vintage Oaks & Veramendi From the $300’s

Veramendi

46

337

1863

35

Carefully Crafted For You

Mon – Sat 10am – 6pm, Sunday 12pm - 6pm • 210.807.8244 • Scottfelderhomes.com

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from New Braunfels, Comal County & Guadalupe County

All meetings may be viewed online. New Braunfels City Council Meets second and fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. • 830-221-4000 www.nbtexas.org Comal County Commissioners Court Meets Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. 830-221-1100 • www.co.comal.tx.us Guadalupe County Commissioners Court Meets Tuesdays at 10 a.m. 830-303-8869 www.co.guadalupe.us MEETINGSWE COVER NUMBER TOKNOW The Guadalupe County Commissioners Court approved an expenditure in this amount to be paid to BryComm for data cabling, access control equipment, and video surveillance in the county’s Adult Detention and Law Enforcement Center Addition. County Judge Kyle Kutscher stated that it made sense fi nancially to use a contractor over in-house workers. The court approved a $300,000 expense in March to replace two aging control computers in the county’s jail. $178,687 CITY HIGHLIGHTS NewBraunfels City Council approved contracts with law fi rm Terrill & Waldrop for two lawsuits the city is facing. The fi rst lawsuit was fi led by a property owner working with a Love’s Truck Stop that was denied an exception to an ordinance, which required truck stops to be at least 2 miles from each other within city limits. In the second lawsuit, fi ve plainti ff s are claiming their constitutional rights have been violated because they could not use their properties for short-term rentals under the city’s former short-term rental ordinance, city documents stated.

Second epidemiologist hired to tackle coronavirus COMAL COUNTY The Commis- sioners Court approved $135,812 in funding for a second epidemiologist, a mass noti fi cation system and other and our employees, and everything that we do on a day to day basis.” The expenditure—voted on at the Commissioners Court meeting on Thursday, April 23— includes $64,540 for a mass noti fi cation system, BY WARREN BROWN

Agreement for Emergency Response. This funding mechanism is activated during public health emergency’s, according to the agency’s website. The mass noti fi cation system will be used for communication with physicians, fi rst responders and health care professionals. The system will also be used for client tracking and noti fi cation, according to documentation fi led by the county. A county o ffi cial also noted that the system will assist in internal communications.

items to combat the coronavirus. “These two [epidemiologists] will shoulder the entire responsibility of the COVID work,” said Cheryl Fraser, Comal County O ffi ce of Public Health Director. “That will allow my sta ff to go back to the other important things such as immunizations and our taking care of our fi rst responders

$43,210 for wages, $9,547 for supplies and technology equipment, $2,291 for travel and conferences, and $1,100 for phone plans and a WiFi hotspot. The money would be provided by the federal government through a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Cooperative 2012 bond—$18,965,000—is due to be refunded by July 1, along with $74.75 million in commercial paper notes—money-market securities. The North and South Kuehler Wasterwater Treatment Plants were renovated as part of the 2012 bond, which also funded the $3.8million Mornhinweg substation.

NewBraunfels postpones election

$386.6million bond series approved

BY WARREN BROWN

BY WARREN BROWN

NEWBRAUNFELS New Braunfels Utilities will issue $386.6 million in bonds over the next fi ve years, beginning with a $140,276,000 bond for 2020. “The bond won’t a ff ect [utility] rates,” NBU CEO Ian Taylor said. Rates could still be a ff ected by other factors such as the coronavi- rus, according to Taylor. “The capital program really has been, and continues to be, what’s driving the rates,” Taylor said. “To what degree COVID impacts reve- nue and the capital program really will be what determines rates.” Capital projects funded by the 2020 bond series include Gruene Wastewater Treatment Plant and expansion, and the Aquifer Storage and Recovery program. The remaining balance of the

NEWBRAUNFELS City Council approved an ordinance at its meeting April 13 to reschedule the special election on 18 proposed amendments to the city charter fromMay 2 to the general election Nov. 3. Gov. Greg Abbott issued an edict in March allowing political subdivisions to do so due to the coronavirus. Proposed amendments speci fi c to City Council include changes to term limits, how council vacancies are handled and punitive measures against council members who may attempt to circumvent term limits through resignation. Other notable propositions on the November ballot are related to discrimination, campaign regulation, public information, municipal court judges, competitive bidding and mayoral powers.

YEARLY BOND BREAKDOWN New Braunfels Utilities will issue $386,635,000 in long-term debt over the next fi ve years to largely fund capital programs.

2020 2021

2022

2023

2024

Telehealth was created to keep patients healthy and out of the hospitals, helping Dr’s stay in touch with their patients, no matter where they are. We can bring loved ones into the visits keeping everyone in the conversations! B e seen where you want to be seen, in the comfort of your own home. &DOO3DN0HGLFDO*URXSWRGD\DWWRƓQGRXWPRUH

www.pakmedicalgroup.com 1762 Common St., New Braunfels (830) 730-8580

15

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed lives across the world, including many here in Central Texas. 9TMJQU^TZWSJNLMGTWXJ]UJWNJSHNSL ܪ SFSHNFQ hardships due to COVID-19, you can donate to provide electric bill assistance. You can help a fellow member! Donate to the PEC COVID-19 Relief Fund

Learn how you can donate at pec.coop/covid-19-resources.

Pedernales Electric Cooperative

Family owned and operated in New Braunfels since 2013. Servi ce You Can Re ly On

830-837-5663

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY LAUREN CANTERBERRY

NewBraunfels restaurants rely on community support

As restaurants have altered their services, local support is more important than ever. Here are some ways to support New Braunfels eateries: How to support local restaurants

R estaurants have laid o ff or furloughed more than 688,000 employees in Texas since March, according to the Texas Restaurant Association. Retail, hospitality, entertainment and food service are among the most common sources of employment in New Braunfels, with more than 8,800 jobs in these industries, according to 2018 census data. On March 19, the city of New Braunfels issued a closure order, which required local restaurants and businesses to implement social distancing measures in response to the coronavirus outbreak. April Ryan, co-owner of 2tarts Bak- ery, said restaurants had to adapt by o ff ering carryout or pickup in place of sit-down dining, and many had to lay o ff or furlough sta ff for health and economic reasons. “To go from [35] sta ff to now it’s three of us, we’re making every

dough and we’re washing every dish—it’s like back to where our busi- ness was 10 years ago,” Ryan said. Though Ryan wants to rehire her sta ff soon, public safety and health take priority when considering how to reopen. “I would love to bring my sta ff back, but I want to make sure I can do that responsibly,” Ryan said. “The risk has to be lower across the board—nationally, statewide and locally—for me to feel like it’s really safe to bring people back.” For locally owned restaurants and businesses that have been able to avoid layo ff s or furloughs, the economic impact of closing dining rooms has caused owners to look for innovative ways to save money and continue working. “Over 70% to 80% of our business was in-house eating, so that has de fi nitely taken its toll,” said Terence Green, co-owner of Stave Beer and

Order takeout or delivery

Buy a gift card

Like and share social media posts

Leave a helpful review

Stave Beer andWineHouse opened inNovember. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

Make a donation

Wine House. “The main thing that we recommend for businesses to do is scale back.” In addition to cutting down extra costs by canceling music subscriptions and turning o ff utilities that aren’t necessary, restaurants have adjusted menu o ff erings to avoid food waste and provide options that are more conducive to pick-up and delivery. Stave now o ff ers alcohol by the case or by the bottle rather than by the glass, while 2tarts has incorporated take-and-bake options for customers.

“We’re going to just take it week by week, day by day and adjust our menus to what people want,” Ryan said. As New Braunfels seeks a return to normalcy and businesses gradually reopen, Ryan and Green expressed the importance of continued patience and support on the part of the community. “Continue to help support us and small businesses. That’s huge, because the economy works from the ground up,” Green said. “It takes a community to survive.”

7Monk’s Café provides donatedmeals to local residents

I n response to the coronavirus pandemic, New Braunfels restaurants have had to make changes to the way food is served in the community. After closing for several weeks, 7 Monk’s Café reopened March 30 with an adjusted pickup and delivery menu and partnered with Valeo Chiro- practic to provide free meals for those in need. Valeo donated 65 meals through the cafe to community members who have lost their jobs as

a result of the coronavirus. “I think it’s our responsibility to be able to feed people,” said Rashmi Bhat, co-owner of 7 Monk’s Café. According to Bhat, the restaurant has distributed 45 meals to residents through Valero Chiropractic’s donations and is accepting donations to provide meals for local children and families through their partnership with Connections Individual and Family Services.

“If we can get donors to purchase meals through a local restaurant for us to pick up, then it’s one donation that helps both a small business and a nonpro fi t,” said Megan Dupree, outreach andmarketing coordinator with Connections. Various restaurants and businesses in New Braunfels have reached out to residents needing resources in similar ways, Bhat said, and she appreciates the support for local businesses and the community as restaurants adjust. To make a donation to Connections, visit www.connec- tionsifs.org/donate.

/RYLQJ*RGDQGORYLQJ1HZ%UDXQIHOVVLQFH

17

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

SERVICES WE OFFER

OPENS THIS JUNE 2055 Central Plaza #110 Located in Freiheit Village between Lonestar Lounge and Double Schotts (432) 553-5604

• Shipping: FedEx/ UPS/USPS/DHL • Passport Photos • Copy Services • Freight Shipping • Mailbox Rental • Notary Public

• Packaging Supplies • Printing • File Upload • Scanning and Shredding • Package Receiving

Jaime Simmons, DDS Board Certified Pediatric Dentist ACCEPTING NEW PATI ENTS 830-302-2044

2163 Stephens Place, Suite 106 New Braunfels, TX 78130

www.texastykespediatricdentistry.com

LIFETIME WARRANTY

nXz(³ٚ³R(0³ٚ³RÈÁÁ0«³ٚÈÁ…xÁX…zٚn0J0z(«ç³0«àX!0ٚXzz0á «ÈzI0n³³Xz!0׏ בזח

MICHAEL HERNANDEZ michael.hernandez@hodell.com 830-606-6215 For more info contact:

ORDER 3 OR MORE Powerview shades, get FREE programming and your choice of Amazon Echo Flex or HD Pebble remote

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

YOUR LOVED ONE’S CARE IS IN GOOD HANDS

We work around the clock to tailor our services to our residents’ needs and make safety our top priority.

LOCAL. HONEST. DEPENDABLE.

Independent Living Assisted Living Memory Care Nursing and Rehabilitation

Call for more information: 830-625-6291

C: 830-285-1233 O: 830-643-0111 144 S. Clemens New Braunfels, TX 78130

631 Lakeview Blvd, New Braunfels www.EdenHill.org

Dr. Earnest is a board-certified Primary Care Physician who has been caring for families in the New Braunfels community since 2012. He earned his medical degree from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and completed his residency at The University of Colorado with training in women’s health and obstetrics. Dr. Earnest went on to receive his Family Medicine Obstetrics Fel lowship through UT Southwestern in Austin. Dr. Earnest aims to del iver effective, efficient, and personal ized care that acknowledges each patient as an individual. He enjoys caring for the whole family, from newborns to senior care. Brett Earnest, MD GRMC WELCOMES FAMILY CARE PHYSICIAN ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS | SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS

1761 S. State Hwy 46, Suite 104 • New Braunfels, TX 78130 • 830-433-7815

19

NEW BRAUNFELS EDITION • MAY 2020

PARTICIPATE in a phone screening interview STEP 4:

The path to assistance The Mult-Agency Resource Center , which is housed in the McKenna Events Center, offers residents access to mental health care, financial assistance, direct food assistance, help acquiring Pandemic-SNAP benefits and spiritual support. TheMARC includes Comal County Habitat for

STEP 2:

FILL OUT FORMS

DOWNLOAD the Multi-Agency Resource Center application and checklist STEP 1:

STEP 5:

Humanity, Family Life Center, The Salvation Army, New Braunfels Food Bank, Community Resource and Recreation Center of Canyon Lake (United Way) and Hill Country Mental Health & Developmental Disabilities Center.

STEP 3:

Have an in-person APPOINTMENT if necessary or receive support immediately

EMAIL completed forms to info@comalcountycares.com or call 830 - 606 - 9512

Forms available online: www.comalcountycares.com

SOURCES: COMAL COUNTY CARES, MCKENNA FOUNDATION / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

unique needs. In order to apply for support, applicants can either download documents from the Comal County Cares website and email their com- pleted forms to the center, or call the MERC for assistance. Applicants are then screened over the phone to further deter- mine their needs before either being given an in-person appointment or being directed to alternative steps to obtain support. “I think people are getting more comfortable with the idea of hav- ing to utilize resources that they’ve never thought they would have to use before,” said NBFB Executive Director Monica Borrego. Since the beginning of the pan- demic, the food bank has seen a 35% increase in families served in Comal and Guadalupe counties per month. The facility typically serves approximately 2,500 families each month, but it served more than 3,375 in March, according to Borrego. In addition to daily food dis- tributions at its facilities in New Braunfels, the NBFB also partnered with the Family Life Center, Tree of Life Church and the Westside Com- munity Center to host a larger distri- bution on April 16. “[The MARC] makes it easier for

people that might abuse them,” said Trendy Sharp, executive director of the Children’s Advocacy Center of Comal County (CAC). In Texas, 175 children are the vic- tims of abuse every day, and 1 in 3 Texans will be a victim of domestic violence in their lifetime, according to the Children’s Advocacy Centers of Texas and the Texas Council on Family Violence. However, local agencies expect a decrease in reports due to a lack of interaction between children and adults such as teachers and coaches, who are the primary reporters of child abuse, Sharp said. According to Sharp, CAC received 102 reports of abuse in April 2020—a 41.38% decrease compared to April 2019, when 174 reports were made. “Domestic abuse is expected to go up during this time as well,” said Megan Dupree, outreach and market- ing coordinator for Connections Indi- vidual and Family Services. “We’ve got to think about the adults that are stuck in homes with abusive partners.” Thoughmany facilities have closed their doors, emergency hotlines are still operational and emergency shel- ters are still an option. Those facing abuse—or who know someone who may be in a dangerous situation—are encouraged to reach

that person who has never needed to utilize these kinds of services to maneuver through them,” Borrego said. “It’s helped them wrap their heads around the paperwork and all of the things associated with asking for assistance.” Caring for mind and body In addition to fi nancial and food assistance, the MARC also works to connect residents with mental health professionals. “We’re used to being connected to people on a regular basis, and we have all of a sudden—as a complete society—taken that away from peo- ple,” said Dr. Heather Ingram from InMindOut Emotional Wellness Cen- ter in New Braunfels. More than 40 people in Comal County have been connected to mental health services through the MARC, according to Jewell. Experts are concerned that increas- ing fi nancial and emotional stress could lead to decreases in mental health, and rising rates of unreported child and domestic abuse. “While the stay-at-home recom- mendations from the CDC and from Gov. Abbott are essential and neces- sary to preserve life and safety, this also means that many children are locked into a home with the very

CONTINUED FROM 1

services in Comal County, the McK- enna Foundation—along with several other service organizations—cre- ated the Comal Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) and the Multi-Agency Resource Center (MARC). The MARC serves as a single con- venient point of contact for residents seeking help from the Comal County Habitat for Humanity, the New Braunfels Food Bank (NBFB), The Salvation Army, the Family Life Cen- ter, the Community Resource and Recreation Center, and Hill Country Mental Health & Developmental Dis- abilities Center. “We wanted to come together around responding to people in cri- sis because while people feel alone right now, the community really is here to help,” Jewell said. “We’ve got one group, one place for them to call and help them with what they need to weather the crisis.” McKenna contributed $50,000 in seed funding to create the CERF and over $220,000 has been donated. As of April 21, $80,000 has been used to help more than 180 local families, Jewell said. Funds donated to the CERF are dis- tributed through participating non- pro fi ts to applicants based on their

Meet New Braunfels' Lela Matthes-Matos 3HGLDWULF'HQWLVW%RDUG&HUWLƓHG The Breathe Institute Ambassador "Tooth Fairy" Pediatric Dentistry • Tongue and Lip Ties

385 Landa Street, New Braunfels, TX smilepediatricdentalcare.com 830-327-7007

Your kids will love it here!

20

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28

communityimpact.com

Powered by