Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | July 2021

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N Low inventory, interest rates catalyze ‘unprecedented’ market Mirroring state trends, area homebuyers outnumber sellers

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 8, ISSUE 11  JULY 7AUG. 11, 2021

DEMAND DRIVES HOME PRICES Both Sugar Land and Missouri City saw the average sales price for homes increase in 2021. Realtors said that as the demand outpaces the supply, the price will go up.

BY LAURA AEBI & CLAIRE SHOOP

always been a desirable place to live due to high-quality public schools, amenity-rich communities and a pro-business attitude. “In good economic conditions or bad, Fort Bend [County] will be a magnet for growth as long as we keep our competitive and comparative advantage nationally and regionally,” he said in an email. Lowhousing inventory InWiley’s 17 years at the FBEDC, Fort Bend County has never seen housing inventory levels this low, he said. Fort Bend County has had less than six months of housing inventory since October 2011, according to data from the Texas A&M University Texas Real Estate Research Center. The center describes six months of inventory as a stable market. However, in March and April—the most recent data available—housing inventory reached 0.9 months with

Housing and real estate experts in the Sugar Land and Missouri City area said in their decades-long careers they have never experienced any market conditions quite like these. Described as frenzied, brisk and unprecedented, the current real estate market is being driven by historically low inventory, record-low interest rates, and skyrocketing lumber and building material costs, Realtors and homebuilders said. “I have been selling real estate for 30 years,” Keller Williams Realtor Pam Shockey said. “I was around when Sept. 11 happened; I was around for dot com, Fannie Mae and the subprime lending explosion. This is not a market frenzy or a bubble like that. This is a compilation of multiple things all happening at once.” While this conuence of conditions is aecting the real estate market across the country, Je Wiley, CEO of the Fort Bend Economic Development Council, said Fort Bend County has

I PUT A HOUSE ON THE MARKET IN THE SUGAR LAND AREA, AND THERE WERE 66 FAMILIES THAT CAME TO THE OPEN HOUSE. ... WITHIN TWO DAYS , I’D GOTTEN 11 OFFERSALL OVER THE ASKING PRICE . SAPANA PATEL, KELLER WILLIAMS REALTOR

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TxDOTmakes changes to controversial FM1092 project

REAL ESTATE EDITION

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: Sugar Land and Missouri City’s real estate market has grown for years. Great schools, amenity-rich communities and downtown access have long attracted buyers. Mirroring trends across Texas, the market has recently exploded with home prices reaching new heights and buyers competing for limited inventory. In this year’s guide, we ask local experts about the state of the market and what the future holds. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMLAURA: For our July Real Estate Edition, we worked hard to collect some telling data about the real estate market in Sugar Land and Missouri City—looking into rising home prices and home improvement projects. Additionally, we have included some updates on Texas Department of Transportation’s controversial FM 1092—also known as Murphy Road—median project in Missouri City. Laura Aebi, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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5 Mobility City opened a location in Missouri City on July 6. Owned by AJ Gibson, the medical equipment business is located at 7746 Hwy. 6, Ste. H, Missouri City. Mobility City oers repair, rental, sales and cleaning services for mobility equipment, including wheelchairs, power chairs, scooters, walkers and hospital beds. 832-539-6881. www.mobilitycity.com/ location/sugarland-tx 6 Little Joy Snacks, Sweets & Gifts opened in Sugar Land Town Square on May 20. Located in a kiosk on the plaza at 16121 City Walk, Sugar Land, the business is owned by Sugar Land resident Noor Hermani and oers a variety of treats and trinkets, according to a news release. Little Joy is open from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. and does not yet have a website or phone number. COMING SOON 7 B.B. Italia Kitchen & Bar will open at 16250 City Walk, Sugar Land. Coming to the space formerly occupied by Charming Charlie at Sugar Land Town Square, B.B. Italia serves upscale, made-from-scratch Italian food. The restaurant announced in February that it was closing its Memorial Drive location to move to a new location. A public relations representative for B.B. Italia said the restaurant could not yet conrm an opening date. 713-804-3317. www.bbitaliakitchen.com 8 Dave’s Hot Chicken , a hot-chicken restaurant chain based in Los Angeles, is coming to the former location of Bernie’s Burger Bus at 6324 Hwy. 6, Missouri City. Scheduled to open in late 2021, Dave’s Hot Chicken serves tenders and sliders alongside a choice of sides at seven spice levels ranging from no spice to reaper.

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NOWOPEN 1 Sozo Japanese Steakhouse opened at the corner of Hwy. 6 and Hwy. 90A on June 17. Patrons at the restaurant, located at 222 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Sugar Land, can build their own entree by selecting one protein—such as chicken, sh, steak or shrimp—and three vegetables. All plates include fried rice, vegetables, and a choice of soup or salad. In addition to a drive-thru with two lanes, Sozo Japanese Steakhouse also oers takeout and dine-in services. 281-201-8851. www.letssozo.com

2 Blue Door Antiques held a grand opening June 1 at 2883 Dulles Ave., Missouri City. The store sells a variety of antique furniture, unique home goods, art and jewelry. 832-654-2485. www.facebook.com/bluedoorantiquestx 3 Karachi Ice Cream Parlor opened its doors at 11315 S. Hwy. 6, Ste. H, Sugar Land, on July 1. The ice cream parlor, which shares owners with Karachi Restaurant, serves a variety of Pakistani desserts— such as falooda, a cold dessert made with noodles; lassi, a yogurt-based drink; and kul, a frozen treat—as well as ice cream

and milkshakes. 281-207-9591. www. karachirestaurantandicecreamparlor.com 4 Sea Lion Swim School opened its doors on June 7 at 6158 Sienna Ranch Road, Ste. 503, Missouri City. Located at Luka Sienna Plaza near Hwy. 6 and the Fort Bend Tollway, the swim school oers classes for students age 6 months and older. The school’s indoor pool is heated to allow for comfortable swimming throughout the year. The swimming pool also features disability access and a ltration system. 281-969-5445. www.sealionswimschool.com

    

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The upcoming Missouri City location does not yet have a phone number. www.daveshotchicken.com 9 Wingology plans to open a second eatery at 18732 University Blvd., Sugar Land, in the Marcel District by early fall. Its menu, which includes wings, chicken tenders and Bualo shrimp alongside sides, features 17 unique sauces, such as Wingology Inferno, mango habanero and ghost pepper. Wingology currently has one other location in Fulshear. https://wingologyrestaurant.com 10 Candy Shack Daiquiris is opening a location at 6850 Hwy. 6, Ste. 700, Missouri City. With 13 classic avors and a wide selection of mixes, Candy Shack’s daiquiris are topped with an assortment of candies. In addition to drinks, Candy Shack also serves catsh, shrimp and chicken baskets as well as french fries and other sides. The new location does not yet have a phone number, and a timeline for opening could not be conrmed. www.candyshackdaiquiris.com 11 Gyro Republic , a Sugar Land-based halal street food restaurant, is planning to expand this summer, according to a news release. Its two new locations will be at the 11A Waterview Town Center in Richmond at 4808 Waterview Town Center Drive, Ste. 100, and 11B the Pillars at Houston Baptist University campus at 7549 Hwy. 59, Ste. 300. The fast-casual restaurant opened its rst location in 2019 at 19920 Southwest Freeway, Sugar Land. 832-847-4736. www.gyrorepublic.com 12 Biotics Research Corp. will open its new corporate headquarters, research facility, warehouse and distribution site in the Rosenberg Business Park at 3155 FM 2218, Rosenberg, according to a news release. The nutritional supplement com- pany’s new $9 million facility is expected to be complete by 2023 and to retain 160 jobs while adding 25 new jobs over ve years. 800-231-5777. www.bioticsresearch.com RELOCATIONS 13 Micheaux’s Diner & Catering will relocate and undergo a name change in late 2021, according to owners George and Janice Micheaux. The restaurant, now located at 2447 FM 1092, Missouri

City, will change its name to Micheaux’s Southern Dining. It will also move to a larger location at 6850 Hwy. 6, Ste. 200, Missouri City, in October. The restaurant will host a grand opening in November. Micheaux’s oers a diverse menu of homestyle, made-from-scratch options. 832-987-1916.

www.micheauxcatering.com ANNIVERSARIES

14 Houston Community College celebrated its 50th anniversary in May. Established in 1971, HCC oers 271 certications and 100 instruction programs. The HCC Missouri City campus, located at 1600 Texas Parkway, opened in 2017 and is one of 20 campuses across the Greater Houston area. 713-718-2000. www.hccs.edu NAME CHANGE 15 Horizon Baptist Church , formally known as Heritage Baptist Church, nished a rebranding process in mid-April in an eort to better serve a new generation of parishioners. The church, which is located at 2223 FM 1092, Missouri City, was also recently repainted. 281-403-4994. www.horizonbaptistchurch.org IN THE NEWS 16 As of June 9, all Fort Bend County Libraries locations have reopened to the public following an extended closure due to the coronavirus pandemic. Recently reopened locations include the 16A First Colony Branch Library at 2121 Austin Parkway, Sugar Land; 16B the Missouri City Branch Library at 1530 Texas Parkway, Missouri City; 16C the Sienna Branch Library at 8411 Sienna Springs Blvd., Missouri City; 16D the Sugar Land Branch Library at 550 Eldridge Road, Sugar Land; and 16E the University Branch Library at 14010 University Blvd., Sugar Land. Library patrons will not be required to wear a mask, per the governor’s recent executive order prohibiting mask mandates in public buildings. The Books and More Curbside Pick-Up service will continue to be oered at all Fort Bend Library locations. www.fortbend.lib.tx.us

The nonprot in June announced its plans to reopen eight centers.

COURTESY FORT BEND SENIORS MEALS ON WHEELS

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Fort Bend Seniors Meals on Wheels is reopening its congregate centers after closing due to the pandemic. The nonprot, which serves seniors in Fort Bend and Waller counties, said it will reopen eight centers in a June release. On June 21, the nonprot opened Landmark Community Center—a new congregate center—at 100 Louisiana St., Missouri City.

The Huntington at Sienna, 4522 Trammel Fresno Road, Missouri City; and Fort Bend Family YMCA, 4433 Cartwright Road, Missouri City opened June 28. The organization also opened Rosenberg and Beasley locations. It has plans to open more locations this summer, including the Four Corners Recreation Center, 15700 Old Richmond Road, Sugar Land in August. 281-633-7049. www.fortbendseniors.org

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

TODO LIST

July & August events

COMPILED BY SAVANNAH KUCHAR

JULY 10&31

AUG. 7

TAILS AND TALES FROMAROUND THEWORLD FORT BEND COUNTY LIBRARIES

BACK TO SCHOOL SPLASH BASH SUGAR LAND TOWN SQUARE

Fort Bend County Libraries present outdoor storytelling. The Missouri City Branch Library sta leads the July 10 event, which features ve drawings to win Folkmanis puppets. Storyteller Toni Simmons comes to the George Memorial Library July 31. 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Missouri City Branch Library, 1530 Texas Parkway, Missouri City; George Memorial Library, 1001 Golfview Drive, Richmond. 281-238-2111 (Missouri City Branch), 281-342-4455 (George Memorial). www.fortbend.lib.tx.us/events

Sugar Land Town Square hosts an end to summer vacation celebration for kids and families, featuring a DJ, hula hoop contest and other activities. Donations of backpacks and school supplies—such as markers, pens, hand sanitizer, glue and paper—for the Fort Bend Rainbow Room are accepted at the event. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Sugar Land Town Square, 2711 Plaza Drive, Sugar Land. 281-242-2000. www.sugarlandtownsquare.com/events

16 ’NOBODY DOES THIS’ TOUR Comedian Sebastian Maniscalco comes to the Smart Financial Centre for his comedy tour. 7 p.m. $49.75-$99.75 (admission). Smart Financial Center, 18111 Lexington Blvd., Sugar Land. 281-207- 6278. http://smartnancialcentre.net

JULY 10 SUPER FIT FUN RUN Missouri City hosts a 2K run and obstacle course through Bualo Run Park, where runners dress in superhero attire. Registration is required. All ages

may participate. $5 (age 15 and under), $10 (adults). Bualo Run Park, 1122 Bualo Run Blvd., Missouri City. 281-403-8637. www.missouricitytx.gov/calendar 10 MOVIE UNDER THE MOON Sponsored by First Colony Church

of Christ, the Sugar Land Town Square hosts a showing of “The Lion King,” the live action version in the Sugar Land Town Square Plaza. 8:15-10 p.m. Free. Sugar Land Town Square, 2711 Plaza Drive, Sugar Land. 281-242-2000. www.sugarlandtownsquare.com/events

Find more or submit Sugar Land and Missouri City events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES TxDOT updates schematics for FM1092median project The Texas Department of

COMPILED BY SAVANNAH KUCHAR & CLAIRE SHOOP

UPCOMING PROJECTS

ACACIA DR.

work very diligently with TxDOT to address some of the major concerns.” The majority of attendees at the March hearing were residents of the Quail Valley Thunderbird West subdivision, where the only entrance and exit is Palm Grove Drive. Under the first plan, residents would not have been able to make a left turn in or out of the neighborhood. The updated schematic leaves the Palm Grove Drive entrance as is, something residents advocated for. While TxDOT officials were able to address several access points, residents and council members were still concerned about traffic on FM 1092 and the feasibility of U-turns on the four-lane road. At a June 21 meeting, Maroulis and Council Member Floyd Emery called for the project to be reconsidered. “I am ready to partner with TxDOT to do a great project to make [FM] 1092 a more functional interchange for us,” Maroulis said.

UPDATED PLANS

Transportation has agreed to several proposed changes on the project to install medians along FM 1092 after Missouri City residents, business owners and elected officials expressed concerns about the project. Missouri City shared the updated schematics during a public meeting June 9. A previous town hall in March drew dozens of residents who spoke largely against the project. “I’m glad they’ve made adjustments,” Council Member Anthony Maroulis said at the June meeting. “Hopefully people feel like their voices have been heard.” TxDOT is leading the $4 million project to install medians along 5.8 miles of FM 1092—also known as Murphy Road—from Hwy. 59 to Hwy. 6. Construction is expected to begin this winter and last seven months. “We got a lot of feedback, a lot of complaints and concerns,” said Shashi Kumar, the city’s public works director. “We’ve been able to

The Texas Department of Transpor- tation project will install medians along 5.8 miles of FM 1092.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. driveway access. Most construction will occur on Commonwealth Boulevard and Acacia Drive. Timeline: November 2022-early 2025 Cost: $1.5 million Funding sources: city of Sugar Land, Texas Water Development Board loan Austin Park and Chimneystone drainage improvements Sugar Land officials approved a design contract for drainage improvements in the Austin Park and Chimneystone subdivisions in May. Sugar Land City Engineer Jessie Li said the construction—which officials say is needed to mitigate structure flooding and road pooling—will be “intrusive,” cause closures, and could affect

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Feedback: Residents can submit feedback about the project to engineering@missouricitytx.gov Timeline: winter 2021-mid-2022 Cost: $4 million Funding source: TxDOT

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

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CITY& COUNTY

News from Sugar Land, Missouri City & Fort Bend County

Sugar Land City Council meets at 5:30 p.m. July 20 at 2700 Town Center Blvd. N., Sugar Land. Meetings are livestreamed and in MEETINGSWE COVER COUNTY HIGHLIGHTS FORTBENDCOUNTY On June 22, county commissioners approved an amended budget for $157.42 million in American Rescue Plan Act relief funds. Commissioners approved a preliminary budget in May. Counties must spend the funds before 2025. meets at 7 p.m. July 19 at 1522 Texas Parkway, Missouri City. Meetings are livestreamed and in person. 281-403-8500. www.missouricitytx.gov Fort Bend County Commissioners Court meets at 401 Jackson St., Richmond July 13 at 1 p.m. Meetings are livestreamed and in person. 281-342-3411. www.fortbendcountytx.gov Fort Bend ISD board of trustees meets at 16431 Lexington Blvd., Sugar Land July 12 at 5:30 p.m. Meetings are livestreamed and in person. 281-634-1000. www.fortbendisd.com person. 281-275-2900. www.sugarlandtx.gov Missouri City City Council

Sugar Land City Council appoints rst South Asian associate judge tomunicipal court

Missouri City renames ConfederateDrive to ProsperityDrive

BY SAVANNAH KUCHAR

SUGAR LAND On June 22, Sugar Land City Council conrmed three new associate judges, appointing James Connelly; Shawn McDonald; and Erum Jivani, the city municipal court’s rst South Asian judge. “I am honored to be serving the city of Sugar Land constituents and also to be the rst South Asian judge to be appointed in this diverse city and county,” Jivani said in a phone interview after the meeting. A Sugar Land resident and Clements High School alumna, Jivani has been practicing law since 2003 after earning her law degree from South Texas College of Law. Since 2017, she has served as an associate judge in the Pearland Municipal Court. Jivani, Connelly and McDonald will join four other associate judges under the city’s presiding judge, Craig Landin.

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

MISSOURI CITY Confederate Drive ocially became Prosperity Drive when Missouri City City Council approved an ordinance renaming the street during a June 21 meeting. Prosperity Drive is bordered by Confederate Court and Confederate South Drive. Residents can submit a petition with the signatures of 70% of property owners on the street to apply for a street name change. City Council members can also submit requests to change street names.

Erum Jivani (center) will help address a backlog in Sugar Land’s court cases. (Courtesy Erum Jivani)

For over a year, the court has been unable to hold in-person jury trials and is now facing a backlog of over 600 cases, according to city documents. Landin said the court plans to change the court schedule to meet the increased need. From a candidate pool of 32, the three were unanimously approved by the council to serve as associate judges. With this addition to court sta, Landin said the city will be better able to handle the increased trial schedule.

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

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Welcome one of the largest and most celebrated communities in Texas: Sienna. The agship Johnson Development community is famous for its all-inclusive lifestyle, which features seven FBISD schools K-12, ve waterparks and pools, and 30+ neighborhood parks connected by miles of trails. Residents enjoy two professional tness centers and three recreation complexes, including 160-acre Camp Sienna, Club Sienna, and the newest: Sawmill Lake Club, a lakeside retreat featuring a tiered pool, adventure fort, zipline playground, and club house with a tness center, boutique hotel-sized lobby and ballroom, and relaxing patio and re pit. Sienna Golf Club, Sienna Tennis Center and Sienna Stables are also part of the signature lifestyle, as are year-round resident events and sports leagues, plus convenient on-site shopping, restaurants and retail. Residents enjoy direct access to Loop 610 via Fort Bend Parkway. Homes in Sienna range from townhomes to custom and semi- custom homes. Learn more at siennatx.com.

MARKET AT AGLANCE

COMPILED BY LAURA AEBI

Most of the Sugar Land and Missouri City area has seen lower housing inventory this year compared to last year with the exception of 77498. Of the ve area ZIP codes, 77479 was the only one to see lower average home sales prices this year. The ZIP codes that saw the most homes sold were 77459 and 77479.

77478

77498

99 TOLL

90

77489

59

6

SUGAR LAND

77479

MISSOURI CITY

77459

N

SOURCE: ALINA RODGERS, SPARROW REALTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATUREDNEIGHBORHOOD

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 AVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET 77459

MEADOWCREEK, 77459

XXXXXXXXX XXXX XXX.

77478 -19.8%

The Meadowcreek neighborhood in Missouri City is close to a variety of shopping and entertainment options as well as medical facilities. The neighborhood is 0.309 square miles in size. The average price per square foot for homes in Meadowcreek has been steadily increasing since 2013 with the exception of 2019. Schools: Quail Valley Elementary School, Quail Valley Middle School, Elkins High School

-36.6%

112

71

101

81

000

77479 -54%

77489 +43.5%

N

189

87

46

26

Amenities: The Meadowcreek neighborhood is conveniently located next to Quail Valley’s golf courses, the El Dorado and the La Quinta.

77498 +15.8%

76

88

AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021

TOTAL HOMES SOLDOVER TIME

77459

77478

77479

77489

77498

$326,376

77459 SOLD

200

+25.9%

$410,973

$371,209

77478 SOLD

150

+6%

$393,532

$557,628

100

77479 SOLD

-14.7%

$475,387

50

$175,483

77489 SOLD

+6.8%

$187,489

0

$269,223

77498 SOLD

+69.1%

$455,146

*AS OF JUNE 16

13

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Local businesses oer home improvement tips

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

HOME IMPROVEMENT COMPILED BY SAVANNAH KUCHAR

TIPS FROMA PAINTER

Homeowners face a variety of decisions when painting a room: color, nish, mood and more. The right painter can help ensure a homeowner’s project is completed correctly. WHAT SHOULD HOMEOWNERS CONSIDER WHEN DECIDING WHAT COLOR TO PAINT A ROOM? Because colors are so integral to a paint job well done, homeowners should

ASKAN INTERIOR DESIGNER

When making design decisions for a space, many homeowners do not know where or how to start. Interior designers can oer insight to make their client’s vision a reality.

WHAT SHOULD HOMEOWNERS CONSIDER WHEN REDESIGNING A SPACE IN THEIR HOME? They should think about what they love about the room, think about how they use the space and keep in mind their favorite pieces. Sometimes, it is really about feel and touch for people. For example, a sofa with a tight back cushion is less comfortable than one with a separate cushion. So if they are watching TV everyday in that room, you do not want to put a tight back sofa. You want something comfortable for them to use. They may like the look of a tight back cushion versus a pillow cushion. But it’s going to be less comfortable, so you really have to think about how they are going to use the space. WHAT ARE SOME SIMPLE CHANGES PEOPLE CAN MAKE TO IMPROVE THE LOOK OF THEIR SPACE? Declutter. Make one focal point in the room, not many, and get rid of all the little stu. Large things make more of an impact and make a better focal point than a lot of small things. Paint is an easy way to update a house and really brighten the area. People like light and bright houses versus dark and gloomy houses. People don’t add a lot of softness to their room. Adding a rug with a little bit of color in a dining room can add a lot to a room, or adding drapery panels on a window helps soften and create a more comfortable look, really elongating the

consider their favorite color, colors that are currently trending or the color that will best match their furniture. They should also take the amount of natural light in a room into consideration. It is something really personal. I usually never choose a color for my clients because they are going to live in the house. I can help a little bit, but I never make the last decision. WHAT SHOULD HOMEOWNERS CONSIDER BEFORE CHOOSING A PAINTER? Nowadays homeowners can look at the painter’s reviews on dierent websites. It will be smart to check them out before hiring a painter. Also, recommendations from past clients is always a good way to go. WHY SHOULD PEOPLE HIRE A PROFESSIONAL PAINTER INSTEAD OF DOING THE JOB THEMSELVES? Hiring a professional could save them time and money. We have the knowledge, the experience and the equipment necessary to do a great job with great quality. I have had clients try to do it themselves, and after they waste money in paint and their time, they call me to nish the job, which most of the time, I end up doing all over again. Sometimes they tried to do something simple, just painting the walls. But a lot of homeowners do not have the practice. They paint and go under the

COURTESY RUDY NUNEZ CUETO

tape, they get paint on the ceiling, and then they have to hire me. We have to buy more product, and they have to pay for an expert. So, in the end, it is going to be more expensive. Another thing homeowners should consider is how dicult the project is going to be because if it is a room with an 8-foot, 7-foot ceiling, it is not much of a danger. However, if you are going to do those houses that have the entry with 20-feet-high ceilings, you do not want to be on that ladder all the way up there if Homeowners should consider how they use the room that they will be painting. For example, the paint used for a kitchen and the paint used for a bedroom should be dierent. For the kitchen and bathroom, I recommend using a washable paint that will be able to handle a lot of humidity. It is not really a good idea to go with something cheap in a kitchen or bathroom—especially if you enjoy taking really hot showers. you do not have the experience. WHAT SHOULD HOMEOWNERS CONSIDER BEFORE SELECTING A TYPE OF PAINT?

COURTESY THE DESIGN SOURCE

room and making it look taller than what it is. In Texas, we like big things and high ceilings, and one way to accent that is to just have long skinny things going up and

down versus everything short. HOW CAN HOMEOWNERS KEEP THE STYLE OF THEIR HOMES LOOKING TIMELESS?

Create a base palette where you can add colors in and out through pictures and pillows that can easily be changed when they go out of style. Make those accents exchangeable from season to season or from style to style. DO PEOPLE NEED TO SPEND A LOT WHEN DESIGNING THEIR HOME? Just be honest with the designer. Most designers are willing to work with lots of dierent budgets. It is important to know your budget up front rather than someone not really knowing how much they can spend. It is harder to help those types of clients in the long run.

Lindsay Rolph, owner The Design Source 3644 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land 281-242-3336 www.dessource.com

Rudy Nunez Cueto, owner Rudy Professional Painting LLC 914-309-7545 https://rudyprofessionalpainting.webs.com

6

N

MAINTAINING YOUR HOME

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

The National Association of Home Builders oers routine home maintenance tips for homeowners looking to maintain their homes’ value and ensure their

1 Roofs should be inspected by a qualied roofer every three years, and skylights should be inspected so leaks do not develop. 2 Ensure downspouts and gutters do not get clogged with leaves and other debris. 3 Inspect siding each year to see if it needs repainting, and trim shrubs away so they do not touch the siding. 4 Check for split or cracked caulking on windows and doors annually, and replace the caulk as necessary. 5 Moving parts of garage doors need to be oiled once every three months.

6 Air lters require regular replacement, generally once every three months.

1

safety. Find other useful home ownership tips at www.nahb.org.

7 Safety and security : Regularly check security alarms and circuit breakers. Check batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors twice a year. 8 Clean each faucet’s aerator every three to four months. Maintain garbage disposals by running cold water through them. 9 Masonry walls can develop a white powder that can be scrubbed o with water and a sti brush. 10 Hardwood oors without polyurethane need to be waxed with a liquid or paste “spirit” wax. Use emulsion wax on vinyl.

2

6

9

7

4

8

10

5

3

SOURCE: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CONSTRUCTION

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

Demand for buildingmaterials delays construction Due to a rise in demand for construction materials, 71% of contractors said they faced a shortage of sup- plies needed to complete projects, and 82% said cost uctuations have aected their business, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s quarterly Com- mercial Construction Index report released March 18. accept a 25% increase in the cost of homes.” Kadie Sellers lives in a Willowbrook-area apart- ment with her husband of nearly two years and said they pursued buying their rst home early this year as she was wrapping up graduate school. The young couple had reserved a lot and chosen a oor plan by February with plans to build a BY DANICA LLOYD

IN SHORT SUPPLY Contractors across the U.S. are facing material shortages in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a U.S. Chamber of Commerce survey.

2020

2021

Contractors who expect their revenue to increase in the next year

47% 36%

Rising costs and a short supply of lumber, steel, copper, paint, plastics, sheet metal, windows, home appliances and other products have caused construc- tion delays locally and beyond, said Mike Dishberger, CEO of Houston-based Sandcastle Homes and a for- mer Greater Houston Builders Association president. “A lot of companies thought last year when COVID[-19] hit in the spring that business would drop in homebuilding,” he said. “Instead, the opposite happened. People had nothing better to do, I think, than stay at home and decide they want to buy a new house or remodel. So, demand has exceeded supply, and when that happens, prices rise.” For example, Dishberger said plywood cost $7 per sheet in April 2020 and was up to $50 per sheet this June. A recent copper shortage increased the price of his electrical materials by 25%, he said. Dishberger said he has seen costs go up in the past but never quite to this extent. An uptick in lumber prices began last summer, but other products started to be in short supply in late 2020, and the trend continued into the new year as supply channels could not keep up with demand. Homebuyers aected In addition to delaying the construction process, Dishberger said some homebuilders include esca- lation clauses in their contracts, giving them the exibility to bump costs up as materials become more expensive. However, builders do not want to raise their costs to the point where consumers can no longer aord their products. “Builders normally work on a margin like a lot of businesses, so you would think they’re making a lot more money this year,” he said. “Well, they probably aren’t because the costs are rising faster than they can raise prices. The buying public is not going to

home near Hwy. 290 and the Grand Parkway later this year. Sellers said the cost of the home had escalated by $60,000 due to a shortage of building materials by May, when they ultimately agreed this was not the right time to build. “I don’t want to lose equity in a home,” she said. “We wanted to invest in something that will grow, and since we’re seeing this spike we don’t want it to all of a sudden drop again. Then you paid all this money for a house that’s not worth what you paid.” Builders told the couple that materials from lumber to shingles, joists and appliances were all backordered. They looked at other less expensive homes but decided they did not want to settle when making such a signicant purchase, she said. Future outlook The demand is also exceeding the supply in the market of existing homes. Sellers said many homes are selling as soon as they are listed. “I’m hoping that we’ll see a change because it’s becoming kind of unattainable for a lot of people to buy a home right now—especially people who are my age who are looking into buying their rst home,” Sellers said. Dishberger said he expects to see elevated costs for several more months, and he does not antici- pate costs ever declining to prepandemic levels. “Until they get supply channels worked out where they have materials going across the country in rail, trucks, ship—however they get here—and get employees to work to do that, the issues are going to continue,” he said. “If the price gets too high, some [builders] are going to say, ‘I’m not going to start any more houses [because] I can’t make the money I need to make.’”

Contractors whose businesses were aected by material cost uctuations

65% 82%

Contractors facing or aected by material shortages

37% 71%

THE COST OF COVID19 Survey responses for the rst quarter of the year revealed 80% of contractors were experiencing project delays due to COVID-19.

Their top concerns at the time were:

PROJECT SHUTDOWNS OR DELAYS

WORKER HEALTH AND SAFETY

50%

58%

LESS BUILDING PRODUCTS

FEWER PROJECTS

35% 33%

The top reported material shortages were: • Lumber (22%) • Steel (14%) • PVC pipe (10%)

WORKER SHORTAGES

31%

SOURCE: U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION INDEX Q1 2021COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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17

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • JULY 2021

INSIDE INFO UNDERSTANDING REVERSE MORTGAGES With low rates in place due to the coronavirus pandemic, Ray Daniel, reverse mortgage specialist with Fairway Independent Mortgage Corp., said he believes now is an especially good time for senior homeowners to look at reverse mortgage options. Reverse mortgages allow homeowners to convert part of the equity in their homes into cash without having to sell the house or pay additional monthly bills, according to the Federal Trade Commission website. With this loan, if the balance is more than the home is worth, heirs do not have to pay the dierence. But if heirs sell the home, the lender will take the proceeds from the sale as payment on the loan, and the Federal Housing Administration insurance will cover any remaining loan balance, it said. Daniel said there are several misconceptions when it comes to reverse mortgages with the biggest being who owns the home. He said even with the mortgage, the senior continues to own the house throughout their lifetime, and it continues to be in their name. “[Homeowners] can do with it what they want, after they close on the reverse mortgage,” Daniel said. “If ve years later they decide they need to move and be closer to one of their children or grandchildren, they can sell it.” In addition, qualication requirements include age, credit and income, among others. However, there are some cons that come with reverse mortgages including added fees for closing costs and the potential for a reduced equity on the home over time, something to consider for those planning to leave the home for their children and grandchildren. In the case that heirs want to keep the home instead of selling it, the loan must be paid o with another source of funds, but heirs will never have to pay more than the full loan balance or 95% of the home’s appraised value, whichever is less, according to the FTC website. Even so, Daniel said only about 1.5% of adult children inherit a parent’s house and move into it. “If you get a reverse mortgage, that’s going to reduce that amount [of equity], but that amount that an owner took out to live their life they didn’t have to take it out of their savings account or stocks or bonds or investment account,” Daniel said. “So, their investment accounts are larger by the same amount they took cash out of their house.”

COMPILED BY ALI LINAN  DESIGNED BY MICHELLE DEGARD

WHAT IS A REVERSEMORTGAGE?

Reverse mortgages allow homeowners, who are often near retirement, to convert part of the equity in their homes into cash without having to sell the house or pay additional monthly bills. Most but not all reverse mortgages are federally insured through the Federal Housing Administration’s Home Equity Conversion Mortgage Program.

PROS AND CONS

Reverse mortgages are not recommended for everyone. Here is a look at some of the pros and cons of this program.

Loan repayments will not be required until: REPAYMENT REQUIREMENTS Last living borrower dies; Last living borrower no longer lives in the home as their principal residence including moving to a nursing home or assisted- living care facility; or Borrower chooses to sell the property. The equity of the home decreases Fees associated with the loan generally higher than with other nancial products; ask lenders about options available Balance of the loan increases over time as does the interest on the loan and the fees associated

Maintain ownership of the home More cash on hand to live in retirement

No mortgage payment during the life of the loan Neither the homeowner nor the heir are liable for any amount of the mortgage that transcends the value of the home

WHOQUALIFIES?

Qualications for borrowers to apply for a reverse mortgage include:

Must be age 62 or older. For those in a couple, both must be at least 62 years old; Must live in home as a primary residence for more than 6 months out of the year; Must own the home outright; Must not be a delinquent on any federal debt; Meet basic credit and income qualications; and Never miss a monthly payment as owners are still responsible for maintenance, taxes and insurance as long as they occupy their home.

SOURCES: CONSUMER FINANCE PROTECTION BUREAU, WWW.REVERSEMORTGAGEALERT.ORG, FAIRWAY INDEPENDENT MORTGAGE CORP., FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION, U.S DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRACKING REVERSEMORTGAGE RATES

*LATEST DATA AVAILABLE AS OF MAY 18

Texas reverse mortgage rates from the HECM program are reported each month. Below is the average rate for xed and adjustable rate loans over time.*

Fixed rate

Adjustable rate

0 1% 2% 3% 4% 5%

March 2015 March 2016

March 2017

March 2019 March 2020 March 2021

March 2018

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