Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth Edition | March 2021

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORTWORTH EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 11  MARCH 25APRIL 21, 2021

ONLINE AT

LOCAL VOTER GUIDE 2021 MAYORAL Q&A SAMPLE BALLOT

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IMPACTS

DESIGN A SOFA

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L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E

Northwest ISD’s $745million question

$ 99M The overhaul of SH 170 will cost

School district attempts to keep pace with rapid growth, aging facilities

ON THE BALLOT

The bond has been reduced by $240 million since November 2020 after the NISD Long Range Planning Committee reprioritized

Prop. C: 0.8%

Prop. B: 1.1%

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BY KIRA LOVELL

May 1 Election day: Propositions: projects. Voters will be able to vote for each proposition individually.

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Prop. D: 2.6%

The Northwest ISD bond election on May 1 will let voters decide on four separate measures, after the previ- ous bond election failed. In Novem- ber 2020, only 28.71% to 44.08% of voters said “Yes” on the four bond propositions. “At this point, being a year behind on our schedule, it really becomes something that is going to have a major eect on our community,” NISD Assis- tant Superintendent for Facilities Tim McClure said. When the Northwest ISD board of trustees called a bond election in early 2020, ocials had no idea that election would be pushed from May to November by the COVID-19 pan- demic, where it was forced to com- pete for attention with a presidential election and voters’ nancial con- cerns. Still, growth and development

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Total: million $ 745.7

Roadwork along SH 170will last three years and is being funded by TxDOT. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

Prop. A: 95.5%

$ 712.4 million Growth, renovations and other capital improvements $8.2 million Stadium refurbishment

A B C D

SH 170 roadwork tomeet booming region’s needs

BY SANDRA SADEK

Continuous growth near the Alliance corridor has created the need for more lanes along six miles of SH 170 at a total cost of almost $100 million. The expansion of SH 170 began in October 2020 and is projected to be completed by 2023. Once n- ished, this section of SH 170 will have 10 lanes and seven bridges, according to Val Lopez, Texas Depart- ment of Transportation public information ocer for the Fort Worth District. Crews are currently excavating from I-35W to US

$5.7 million Separate athletic facilities $19.4 million Technology replacements

SOURCE: NORTHWEST ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMANA: A 6-mile section of SH 170 stretching from SH 114 to I-35W is undergoing a transformation. If you drive on it as much as I do, you’ve probably noticed the construction surrounding it and are wondering when it will be nished and what it will look like when it’s all said and done. In this issue, we give you a detailed look at just that (see Pages 14-15). Got any other road construction questions? Please email us at krnnews@communityimpact.com. Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM IAN: Our goal each month is to provide comprehensive, useful information for our readers. That’s why our lead story this month (see Pages 12-13) focuses on a $700 million-plus bond election for Northwest ISD. This issue also features our Voter Guide (see Pages 10-11), which includes a list of candidates and other useful election information. And remember, Election Day is May 1. Ian Pribanic, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MARCH 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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CHAMPIONSHIP PKWY.

Hawaiian Bros

Jersey Mike’s Subs

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COURTESY HAWAIIAN BROS

COURTESY JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS

COMING SOON 6 Hawaiian Bros , a fast-casual restau- rant company with locations throughout the Midwest, will open its first brick-and- mortar Texas restaurants this year. Four- teen restaurants are planned for North Texas, according to a company statement. Two Fort Worth locations in Alliance and Hulen are expected to open in May, and a Frisco location will follow in the summer. Further locations are planned for later in the year, including one in Richardson, with details to come. Hawaiian Bros, which was founded by brothers Cameron and Tyler McNie in 2018, focuses on the plate lunch, a Hawaiian staple. According to the statement, the traditional meals feature a main protein, such as marinated teriyaki chicken or slow-roasted Kalua pork, with sides of jasmine rice and maca- roni salad. 2301 N. Tarrant Parkway, Fort Worth. www.hawaiianbros.com 7 A business park developed by Hopewell Development, Champions Circle , is expected to break ground in April on Championship Parkway in Fort Worth. The project will likely be complete late this year. Justin Lemaster, Hopewell’s U.S. industrial vice president, said the Class A industrial park is designed to be compat- ible with a wide variety of tenants, from retail showrooms to manufacturing and distribution. Leasing will be handled by Lee & Associates. 972-934-4000. www.lee-associates.com/dallas-fort-worth 8 A new PPG Health primary care clinic location will open in the Alliance area at 3848 N. Tarrant Parkway, Fort Worth, in mid-2021. PPG Health, which was founded in Fort Worth, has primary care and specialty clinics throughout the

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KELLER HASLET RD.

Bear Creek Running Company

TIMBERLAND BLVD.

COURTESY BEAR CREEK RUNNING COMPANY

E. BLUE MOUND RD.

GOLDEN TRIANGLE BLVD.

adults and kids, including mani-pedi spa packages, and offers waxing and eyelash extensions. Complimentary cocktails and other beverages are provided with services. 817-562-8884. www.majesticnailkeller.com 3 Concept Therapy and Wellness opened March 1 at 130 E. Hill St., Keller. The clinic, run by Dr. Stefanie Long, focus- es on women’s health, particularly pelvic pain, pregnancy and postpartum care, and high-impact activities. 817-393-7020. www.concept-wellness.com 4 Taco Bueno is now open at 1321 N. US 377, Roanoke. The Tex-Mex restaurant, which has a drive-thru lane, offers a menu that includes tacos, burritos, quesadillas and salads. 817-854-9955. www.tacobueno.com 5 Pressure Nutrition , a smoothie, tea and juice bar, opened in December at 1108 N. US 377 in Roanoke. The menu includes seasonal and daily specials, such as an Arnold Palmer tea and a Boston cream pie milkshake. 281-785-3012. www.facebook.com/pressurenutrition

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WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

NOWOPEN 1 A new Great Harvest Bread Co. loca- tion opened Feb. 27 at 9409 Sage Mead- ow Trail, Ste. 101, Fort Worth, in Alliance Town Center. The store is under the same ownership as the Great Harvest Bread 820

Co. Southlake location, and it serves the same menu, including breakfast items, sandwiches and desserts. 817-741-2005. www.ghsouthlake.com 2 Majestic Nail Salon opened Feb. 5 at 101 Town Center Lane, Ste. 103, in Keller. The salon does nail services for

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Dallas-Fort Worth area. 817-725-7900. www.ppghealthcare.com 9 Chipotle Mexican Grill is in the early stages of opening a new Fort Worth location at 5252 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. The restaurant is expect- ed to be complete this summer or fall. Chipotle, a fast-casual restaurant chain, is known for its build-your-own burritos and bowls, and it offers in-app ordering. There is an additional Chipotle location in the Alliance area at 2901 Heritage Trace Parkway, Ste. 101, Fort Worth. 817-741-6480. www.chipotle.com 10 Key-Whitman Eye Center will open a new Fort Worth location in June or July at 3400 N. Tarrant Parkway, Fort Worth. Key-Whitman, which has seven office lo- cations throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth area, performs eye exams and provides LASIK surgery, cosmetic procedures and other services. 214-225-2577. www.keywhitman.com 11 A new Starbucks will open this fall at 8520 N. Beach St., Fort Worth. The Se- attle-based coffee company is known for its espresso drinks, such as its blended Frappuccinos, and also serves pastries, snacks and sandwiches. The new Fort Worth location will feature a drive-thru. There are additional Starbucks locations in the north Fort Worth area at 12600 N. Beach St., Fort Worth, and 3300 Heritage Trace Parkway, Fort Worth. 817-750-0588. www.starbucks.com 12 Jersey Mike’s Subs plans to open a new location this fall in a new devel- opment at 5252 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. The fast-casual sandwich Bazooka Charlie’s Barber Co. will expand from Roanoke to Keller with its second location, which is expected to open early this summer. Another location is expected to open in North Richland Hills around the same time. The company, which opened in Roanoke in 2018 as Gri’s Ace Grooming, provides haircuts for adults and kids at a moderate price point with amenities, such as free beverages and lounge seating in the waiting area. Subscription options are

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restaurant specializes in hot and cold sub sandwiches, and it also offers catering. www.jerseymikes.com RELOCATIONS 13 Bear Creek Running Company , a shoe and apparel store for runners, has moved to 121 Rufe Snow Drive, Ste. 103, Keller, in Keller Town Center. The new location officially opened March 1, and grand opening events will run through May 5. 817-337-0950. www.bearcreekrunningco.com 14 The Red Wing Shoes Keller store is moving to 9013 Tehama Ridge Parkway, Fort Worth, likely in April. The footwear retailer specializes in work and hunting shoes, and it also sells shoe care items and leather accessories. 817-431-5333. www.redwingshoes.com 15 Keller’s Keystone Church will open a new location this summer at 1939 Keller Parkway, Keller. The new, larger building will have a sanctuary with space to seat 918 people, according to documents filed with the state, and will include class- rooms and gathering spaces for children. 817-431-8800. www.keystonechurch.com 16 DFW Truck & Auto Accessories will move its Fort Worth location to 11008 North Freeway, Fort Worth, in 2022. 817-222-0800. www.dfwcamper.com 17 Glacier Commercial Realty is pre- paring to move from Southlake to a new office in the Altus Group development at 1807 Keller Parkway, Keller. The company expects to make the move June 1. 214-637-4300. www.glaciercommercial.com

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MARCH 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

TxDOT proposes $467million project to improve I35W

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BY IAN PRIBANIC

Ocials with the Texas Department of Transportation are seeking public input on a proposed $467 million project to improve a portion of I-35W in north Fort Worth. The project would stretch from the city limits and the Tarrant County line to the I-35W and I-35E interchange in Denton County. The scope of the proposed improve- ments includes widening I-35Wmain lanes from four lanes, with two in each direction, to six lanes, with three in each direction. Main lanes would also be separated by a median for the 17-mile portion of I-35W, according to a city news release. Other design criteria will be updates

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to allow a 70 mph speed limit for main lanes and a 50 mph speed limit is planned for on- and o-ramps. The project will not include any need to acquire additional land for right of way usage, the release said. Timeline: TBD Cost: $467 million Funding source: TxDOT

Repaving project begins on JohnsonRoad

BY KIRA LOVELL

reconstruction and drainage improve- ments on Johnson Road to the west of Rhonda Road. According to city ocials, no changes will be made to the road conguration beyond improving the pavement. The project is expected to be complete April 16, and drivers should plan for temporary detours and delays Mon.-Fri. from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. while crews are working. Timeline: March 1-April 16 Cost: $250,000 Funding sources: city of Keller, Tarrant County

The city of Keller and Tarrant County will begin repaving Johnson Road east of Rhonda Road the week of March 1. The project, which will extend to the city limit at Pearson Lane, is not related to ongoing

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Road closures underway in downtown Roanoke New construction began March 1 in the downtown Roanoke area. The projects include the reconstruc- tion of Rusk Street, Austin Street and the alleyway between the two roadways. Work along Rusk will take place between Walnut Street and Oak Street, and the scope of the Austin reconstruction will stretch from Pine Street to Oak. The rst road closure began March 1 due to demolition work.

Timeline: March-October Cost: $1.7 million Funding source: city of Roanoke

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 15. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

Council deniesmulti-family development

BY IAN PRIBANIC

FORTWORTH At a Feb. 23 meet- ing, Fort Worth City Council denied a zoning change for a multifamily development near Tehama Ridge Parkway in far north Fort Worth. The proposed development, which would have been located in the 9200-9400 block of Tehama Ridge Parkway, included 340 multifamily apartment units along with roughly 40 single-family townhomes and cottages. Located adjacent to the ongoing Citadel development, the space could have also included oce space and retail. “Multifamily is not the answer here,” District 7 Council Member Dennis Shingleton said. “Commer- cial is the answer.” Shingleton added that he has worked closely with the devel- oper, Zale Properties, and with other interested parties but said he remains hesitant to approve a high-density apartment complex in

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CITY HIGHLIGHT ROANOKE Hawaiian Falls will be able to sell alcoholic beverages when it reopens this summer after Roanoke City Council amended a city ordinance during a March 9 meeting. Hawaiian Falls Managing Director Ryan Forson said the park will have a designated area for alcohol purchases and a two-drink limit for customers. Moon seconded Shingleton’s motion to deny the request. Moon pointed to the success of commercial properties in the area, such as Costco, Target and Main Event, as indicative of the right path forward. “We need to … maximize our master plan,” Moon said. close proximity to the Tehama Ridge neighborhood. District 4 Council Member Cary

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Tax reinvestment zone planned alongUS 377

BY KIRA LOVELL

KELLER The city of Keller is set to create a tax increment reinvestment zone, or TIRZ, along US 377. The proposed zone would fund capital improvement projects in the area over the next 30 years, including road improvements, public art and economic development grants. Improvement projects in the proposed area are estimated to cost roughly $129 million, according to Trent Petty of Petty & Associates, who presented the plan at a Feb. 24 City Council work session. The high price of the developments comes from the fact that the projects will be parceled out over three decades, Petty said. The proposed zone would gain revenue from 795.19 acres, focused around US 377 and Old Town Keller and the Center Stage development. Most tax-exempt entities, such as churches and schools, would be excluded.

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Fort Worth City Council Meets at 7 p.m. three times each month on Tuesdays. www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Tuesdays of each month. Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.roanoketexas.com Keller ISD Meets monthly; dates, times and locations may vary. www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets monthly at 6:30 p.m.; dates may vary. www.nisdtx.org www.cityoeller.com Roanoke City Council MEETINGSWE COVER

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MARCH 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Keller ISDexpands CTE program, adds nursing certication option

Providing a pathway

The Keller ISD Career and Technical Education program provides multiple pathways for students to begin their post-secondary education.

Business

Visual arts

Human and animal science

BY IAN PRIBANIC

associate degree in applied science in nursing or in surgical technology. Degrees will enable students to pursue a career in registered nursing and other elds. Other pathways include an Associate of Arts degree or a Level 2 certication in licensed Vocational Nursing, he said. Dierent from the Keller Center for Advanced Learning, the Keller Collegiate Academy will be a stand- alone campus where students attend full-time. The academy will occupy the former building of Chisholm Trail Intermediate. The district expects roughly 100 students per grade level will attend. “Teachers will be ready to support our students who are taking on the challenge of starting college while in high school,” he said. “We will … ensure our students [are] successful.”

Public service

In the fall of 2021, the Keller ISD Career and Technical Education Department will increase the number of pathways for students looking to acquire eld-based career experience, technical certications, associate degrees and other post-sec- ondary qualications. With the opening of Keller Col- legiate Academy, an early college high school campus, the district will emphasize health care. “Students who attend will … [be] self-motivated, have a strong work ethic and aspirations to pursue a career [possibly] in health care,” KISD CTE Director Robert Wright said. The program is currently open to incoming KISD eighth- and ninth- grade students, Wright said. Stu- dents who are accepted will have an opportunity to earn up to 60 college credit hours and graduate with an

Engineering

Current paths:

New paths coming fall 2021:

Seeing growth

Licensed vocational nursing

Registered nursing

Surgical technology

From 2013-20, the KISD CTE program saw a 61% increase in students.

+61%

First of its kind Keller Collegiate Academy is the rst standalone campus in Keller ISD dedicated to post-secondary education and career opportunities. 3901 Summerelds Blvd., Fort Worth 817-744-3800 | www.kellerisd.net

SOURCE: KELLER ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SUMMERFIELDS BLVD.

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2013 2020

RE-ELECT

• Seasoned Community Leader • Fighter for reduced taxes • Promoter of High Quality Development

Early Voting APRIL 19TH-APRIL 27TH Election day MAY 1, 2021

PAID FOR BY SEAN HICKS FOR CITY COUNCIL

www.sean4keller.com (817) 913.7015 “As a small business owner I understand budgets, capital investments, and how to listen to my customers. As your city councilman I will look after your tax dollars just like I do the funds used in running my own company”. sean@newleafsc.net

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MARCH 2021

GUIDE L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E 2021 COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC

D A T E S T O K N O W

Tarrant County voters are eligible to cast a ballot at any voting location in the county during early voting and on election day. Denton County voters can cast a ballot at any location during early voting but must vote at their assigned precinct on election day. W H E R E T O V O T E

April 27 Last day of early voting

April 1 Last day to register to vote in the May 2021 elections April 19 First day of early voting April 20 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked)

May 1 Election day; last day to receive ballot by mail (unless late-arriving deadline applies)

*Incumbent

S A M P L E B A L L O T

For information on the NISD bond propositions on the ballot, see pages 12-13.

Read full Q&A’s for all of your local races at www.communityimpact.com/krn-2021-candidate-QAs.

FORT WORTH CITY COUNCIL MAYOR Mike Haynes Steve Penate Cedric C. Kanyinda Chris Rector Mattie Parker W. Brian Byrd Ann Zadeh Daniel “DC” Caldwell, I Mylene George Deborah Peoples District 4 Max J. Striker Cary Moon*

KELLER CITY COUNCIL Place 1 Mitch Holmes* Shannon Dubberly Place 2 Josh Bunch Sean M. Hicks* ROANOKE CITY COUNCIL Mayor Moueed Rajabi Carl “Scooter” Gierisch Ward 1 Hogan Page Angie Grimm Ward 2 Bryan Moyers Michael J. Callaway Ward 3 David Thompson* Ward 3 (unexpired term) Paul Laymon Michelle Davidson David Brundage

KELLER ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES Place 6 Shalunda Corzine Yohannes A. Mengsteab Charles Randklev Place 7 Jacqueline Reagan Ruthie Keyes* NORTHWEST ISD BOARD OF TRUSTEES Place 1 DeAnne Hateld* Place 2 Mark C. Schluter* Kevin Lebanik TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE DISTRICT District 1 Teresa M. Ayala* Jeremy Sixtos District 2 Conrad C. Heede* Shannon Wood

M A Y O R A L Q & A

Roanoke

Incumbent

Q: Why are you running for oce?

CARL ‘SCOOTER’ GIERISCH

A: My desire to oer strong leadership … is vital as we continue to grow. I have always worked hard to stay in communica- tion with our citizens, businesses and sta. I want to continue to serve my hometown that I have [served] 32 years, and I look forward to continuing my work as mayor.

Jorge L. Chavez Kristie Hanhart Tara M. Wilson

MOUEED RAJABI

District 7 Zeb Pent

A: I’ve watched from the sidelines …and I’ve become very concerned about the direction the city is going in. I’m unhappy with …trac problems, [a] slow increase in crime rate [and] declining school rat- ings. I intend to improve the quality of life for all our residents.

Cornelia (Connie) Cottrell Michele Stephens McNill Leonard Firestone

Lee Henderson Miguel Zamora Jake Wurman

Irvin (Tee) Thomas Joseph Lockhart Jr. Morris Curlee Jr

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com .

SOURCES: TARRANT COUNTY ELECTIONS, CITY OF FORT WORTH, CITY OF ROANOKE, NORTHWEST ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEBORAH PEOPLES

MIKE HAYNES

A: I feel strongly that our City should be One. By this, I mean that our citizens deserve the best the City of Fort Worth has to oer: great city services; quick response times by rst responders; and continued quality economic development.

A: [I’m running] so that I can get more of the youth involved in politics [and] make changes to some of the hurdles I experienced being an adolescent growing up in Fort Worth. I want to make those changes … to create a more positive and safer environment.

M A Y O R A L Q & A

FortWorth

Q: Why are you running for oce?

CEDRIC C. KANYINDA

W. BRIAN BYRD

CHRIS RECTOR

A: As a resident of this great city, it is my duty to make it a better place for all of us, for all our children, and our family. I am running for Mayor to con- tinue the great work of Betsy Price and to position our city to be among the top places to raise a family.

A: Being a City Council member has been one of the greatest honors of my life, and I’ve enjoyed it more than anything I’ve done professionally. I have the business and public service experience to serve beginning on day one.

A: Our city needs full transparency, integrity and positive change. I will focus on revitalizing our economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, absolute priority will be given to public safety, as well as lower and fair tax rates.

MATTIE PARKER

DANIEL “DC” CALDWELL, I

A: I will lead with a listening ear and a united voice that speaks for neighborhoods in every part of our city. I believe in innovation. I believe in unity. I believe in listening to everyone. I believe the future will be bright.

A: I believe that our elected ocials should be individuals who strive to serve; who seek to continually improve ourselves and the commu- nities around us; and who dedicate ourselves to diligently fullling our duties.

Mylene George, Steve Penate, and Ann Zadeh were unable to be reached for comment.

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com .

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MARCH 2021

CONTINUED FROM 1

Northwest ISD is tracking more than 90 new home development projects within district boundaries that will bring more families with children who will need to be educated. A N E E D GROWING

kind of what school districts do.” Essentially, when Texas school dis- tricts issue bonds, they take out loans from investors to pay for targeted proj- ects, such as building new schools or updating old facilities. Over time, the districts pay o those projects using money from the interest and sinking, or I&S, property tax rate, one of two such taxes that support schools. The other, themaintenance and operations, or M&O, tax rate, functions more like a general fund, according to Gonzalez. It pays for teacher salaries, utilities, and other daily expenses. Regardless of whether any of the 2021 bond propositions pass, the dis- trict tax rate will remain the same at $1.3363 per $100. Although there is no proposed change to the tax rate on the May ballot, Texas state law requires that bond propositions include the phrase, “This is a property tax increase.” Assistant Superintendent Tim McClure said that is because new developments, such as neighbor- hoods or retail centers, turn farmland that was exempt from property taxes for agricultural reasons into taxable property. Development makes the area more valuable as well, which increases overall property value. “Just because they’re not raising their tax rate doesn’t mean [taxes] won’t go up because taxes are tied to value,” Gonzalez said. “You might have the same rate, but because the value goes up, you’re going to get a higher tax bill.” Districtwide impact The 2021 bond proposition includes items that would impact the entire district, but schools in the high- est-growth parts of the district are under the most pressure.

[The district] normally yield[s] 0.5 kids per house. In the south, we’re yielding one child per house. SARAH STEWART, NORTHWEST ISD EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PLANNING

69% since 2010. New home sales within NISD have increased by

2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

in the district did not slow down in response to the pandemic, and the dis- trict needs space for new students. “Independent school districts just don’t have the ability to turn kids away,” said Dax Gonzalez, division director of intergovernmental rela- tions for the Texas Association of School Boards. “We want appropriate class sizes, … and it takes money to build the buildings. Some buildings haven’t been updated in 20 years.” Dollars and cents The November bond election was up against several obstacles. NISD Place 7 trustee and NISD parent Jen- nifer Murphy said she heard from voters who were confused by the nature of school nancing in Texas. Compounding the problem, COVID- 19 precautions moved the election from May to November, and the voter education campaign to address that confusion had to compete with the presidential election cycle, Assistant Superintendent Tim McClure said. NISD Executive Director of Commu- nications Lesley Weaver compared a bond to a loan that a family takes out for home renovations. “There might be some families that can aord to [pay] … out of pocket [for repairs],” she said. “A lot of families need to take out a loan, … and that’s

500

0

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

A R E A O F EFFECT NISD’s seventh middle school will be built in the Eaton High School feeder pattern to relieve Adams Middle School, changing boundaries for Adams and the elementary schools that feed into it. SOURCE: NORTHWEST ISDTEMPLETON DEMOGRAPHICSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Lizzie Curtis Elementary School 9640 Belle Prairie Trail, Fort Worth Sonny & Allegra Nance Elementary 701 Tierra Vista Way, Fort Worth Carl E. Schluter Elementary School 1220 Mesa Crest Drive, Haslet

O.A. Peterson Elementary 2000 Winter Hawk Drive, Fort Worth

1

4

Leo Adams Middle School 1069 Eagle Blvd., Haslet V.R. Eaton High School 1350 Eagle Blvd., Haslet

2

5

3

6

A

The proposed bond package

BLUE MOUND RD.

NORTHEAST FORTWORTH

includes a middle school in the Eaton High School feeder area to respond to growth in the local communities. One of the planned elementary schools will also be in the area, timing and site to be determined by future growth.

287

AVONDALE HASLET RD.

EATON HIGH SCHOOL FEEDER AREA

170

A

BLUE MOUND RD. E

WINTER HAWK DR.

BONDS RANCH RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

4

BLUE MOUND RD.

2

EAGLE BLVD.

3

35W

6

5

TIERRA VISTA WAY

SOURCE: NORTHWEST ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

81

1

BELLE PRAIRIE TRL.

MESA CREST DR.

R ODNEY E I LAND R EALTOR . COM

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E

P R O P O S I T I O N DEEP DIVE Proposition A Primary purpose: Keeping up with growth and age Two new elementary schools One new middle school Upgrades and expansions for Renovations and expansions of aging administration facilities Improvements to and standardization of programs and facilities Upgrades to security and technology Proposition D Primary purpose: Technology upgrades Purchase of new devices to keep up with growth and replace old ones Replacement of aging lights at 16-year-old NISD Stadium with longer-lasting LEDs Proposition C Primary purpose: Other athletic facilities upgrades* Standardization of current middle school recreational facilities Building athletic elds at the new middle school *DUE TO STATE LAW, THESE ARE SEPARATE FROM PROPS A AND B. Northwest High School Replacements for aging infrastructure and schools Proposition B Primary purpose: Stadium upgrades Renovations to 71-year-old Texan Stadium In compliance with state law, the proposed projects have been split into four separate propositions.

“We normally yield 0.5 kids per house. In the south [of the district], we’re yielding one child per house,” Executive Director of Planning Sarah Stewart said. Adams Middle School, which serves portions of north Fort Worth, is already almost 200 students over capacity, which Principal Matrice Raven said makes it hard toupholdNISDstandards. “When we are so big and over capacity, … we are operating under constraints that … cause us to be cre- ative,” she said. For example, some classes are held in temporary, portable buildings, and to prevent lunchroom crowding, the school’s rst lunch period begins at 10:30 a.m. Some students also eat outside, she said. If the bond does pass, the district’s seventh middle school would be built in nearby Haslet, which would relieve some of the pressure on Adams. According to Gonzalez, the school bonds issued by Texas districts to fund new learning facilities over- whelmingly passed in 2020, despite the pandemic and the economic fall- out it caused.

“There’s almost a 70% pass rate for bonds. It’s really shocking all of [NISD’s] bonds failed,” he said. When vital bond propositions do fail, Gonzalez said, it is often because of miscommunication. This time around, NISD has made clarity and communication a priority by rolling out a new website about the bond and providing social media updates. Murphy and Weaver both said dis- trict residents have been far more engaged with the current bond and that people are asking more questions to educate themselves. “We’ve received triple the amount of questions we received in the fall. To me, that’s a good thing,” Weaver said. Though ocials are unsure as to whether increased engagement will mean a more favorable outcome for the bond in May, they said they remain optimistic. “It’s a million-dollar question— maybe a trillion-dollar question,” McClure said. “I think there’s hope.”

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

SOURCE: NORTHWEST ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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287

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MARCH 2021

“IT’S SORT OF S H O R T - T E R M PA I N F O R L O N G - T E R M G A I N ... SO AS THE GROWTH CONTINUES, THEN ROADS WILL HAVE TO BE ADDRESSED.” SALLY ALDRIDGE, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF METROPORT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

completed before construction on the SH 170 expansion can begin in the area, Petree said. So far, the city of Roanoke has completed its section of Parish Lane, which was expanded into a four-lane, divided roadway. However, another section of Parish outside of Roanoke city limits that connects US 377 and SH 170 still must be addressed. Petree said the land, which is a part of the Town of West- lake, is currently owned by Hillwood Properties. Aldridge said the overall expan- sion of SH 170 is a crucial measure to ensure smoother and faster commut- ing in the Alliance corridor. “With growth comes road construc- tion,” she said. “It’s a process that happens [and] takes time. Thankfully, through private and public contribu- tions, Texas has been [at] the fore- front of being able to get a lot of these road projects completed a lot sooner than later.” Petree said TxDOT’s efforts to accelerate the completion of the SH 170 expansion to accommodate area growth are appreciated.

CONTINUED FROM 1

377 to begin main lane construction. Drivers can expect daily single-lane closures in that area as well as contin- uous closures of left-turn lanes at the corner of SH 170 and US 377, Lopez said. “We are continuing to place drill shafts for the new U-turn bridges at US 377, and we are also constructing both east- and westbound bridges at Henrietta Creek,” Lopez said. Overall, four mainlanes—two in each direction—and ramps will be added at various locations. A por- tion of the road will be completely restriped and converted from a one- lane road on each side into a two- lane road. Lopez said no changes are expected to be made to speed limits in the area. Although the coronavirus pan- demic forced many developments to halt, the Alliance area generated more than $8.24 billion in economic impact in 2020. It has generated an estimated $91.98 billion in regional economic impact since 1990, accord- ing to AllianceTexas’ annual eco- nomic impact report to Fort Worth City Council. Over $2.82 billion in total taxes were paid to local public

entities during that time period, as well. Roanoke Assistant City Manager Cody Petree said the SH 170 project, once completed, will “ensure unim- peded mobility throughout the area for residents, commuters and busi- nesses” as the area continues to grow. “SH 170 has provided the transpor- tation infrastructure to support mas- sive industrial, residential and real estate expansion throughout north- east Tarrant and southeast Denton counties,” he said. “It is an essential highway for motorists and indus- trial traffic needing east and west access across the north end of the metroplex.” Sally Aldridge, president and CEO of the Metroport Chamber of Com- merce, which oversees seven commu- nities in Tarrant and Denton counties, said SH 170 has always been needed as an additional link to SH 114. “For our chamber, SH 170 is a vital transportation corridor that directly

impacts not only the two commu- nities of Roanoke and Westlake, but it indirectly affects the remaining five communities of Argyle, Haslet, Justin, Northlake and Trophy Club,” Aldridge said. “It’s important for sus- taining the local, regional and state economy.” The section of SH 170 currently undergoing reconstruction is not near any retail shops—just an industrial park and residences—which Aldridge said will help to alleviate any poten- tial economic effects on local busi- nesses due to road closures. The need for roadwork on SH 170 has led to concerns being raised about other area road projects that need to be completed beforehand. Petree said one of the city of Roanoke’s major concerns is the proposal for a closure of Roanoke Road, which would limit accessibility in an area that already suffers from traffic congestion. An extension to Parish Lane in downtown Roanoke also needs to be

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

E X P A N D I N G

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK DESIGNED BY ELLEN JACKSON

BYRON NELSON BLVD.

ROANOKE

TO MEET DEMAND

Work to improve roughly 6 miles of SH 170 from I-35W to SH 114 began fall 2020 and is expected to be completed fall 2023. The scope of

114

New U-turn bridges at the intersection of US 377 and SH 170 will help traffic.

HENRIETTA CREEK RD.

New paving will be striped into four lanes with modified ramps between the Denton County line and SH 114.

the project includes the construction of mainlanes, ramps, added bridges, U-turn

FORT WORTH

35W

Removal of Haslet-Roanoke Road crossing

INDEPENDENCE PKWY.

170

lanes and partial restriping of the highway.

HASLET ROANOKE RD.

Removal of Alta Vista Road crossing

Removal of Roanoke Road crossing

KEY

377

New bridges Restriped lanes New lanes Removed bridges

WESTPORT PKWY,

Two mainlanes will be added in each direction to the current six lanes. Once complete, SH 170 will have 10 lanes.

Eastbound and westbound bridges are being added to SH 170 at its intersection with Henrietta Creek.

170

Future road project

MT. GILEAD RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

PHOTOS BY SANDRA SADEK/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

35W

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MAKE YOUR MOVE . FORTWORTH TODFWAIRPORT

PLANYOURTRIPAT: RIDE TRINITYMETRO .org

15

KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • MARCH 2021

M I X & M A T C H Design a Sofa takes customers through a four-step customization process.

1. Choose your style The store oers more than 200 styles of sofas.

2. Choose your conguration Sofas can be customized by length, width and number of pieces.

BUSINESS FEATURE

Stephanie Gringas started her business, Design a Sofa, in 2019. (Photos by Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

Design a Sofa North Fort Worth furniture store focuses on customer satisfaction A fter two decades of working in the big-box furniture industry, Stephanie Gringas had an epiphany. She said she knew she could provide the same service, but better. “I saw their successes, and I saw their failures,” Gringas said. to purchase on the spot, she said. All sofas, chairs, ottomans and other furniture items are handmade in the U.S. and tailored to the exact style and build a customer wants, Gringas said. The mate- rials used by the company come with a lifetime warranty against defects and are sourced region- ally by a California factory. “I’m not just trying to make a BY IAN PRIBANIC WHENPIECES COME IN, THE CLIENT IS OVERJOYEDBECAUSE THEY FOUND EXACTLY WHAT THEYWANT.

Design a Sofa 3529 Heritage Trace Parkway, Ste. 167, Fort Worth 817-501-6658 https://designasofadfw.com Hours: Mon. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Tue.-Wed. by appointment only, Thu.-Sat. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m. 4. Choose your options Customizable options include cushion rmness, leg color, accent pillows, sofa bed options and more. 3. Choose your fabric Design a Sofa features more than 1,000 fabric options to choose from.

“My job … is to give the cus- tomer information so they can make the decision, and that’s where I excel over other stores.” Gringas opened her own furniture store, Design a Sofa, in mid-2019 and moved it to a larger location on Heritage

sale,” Gringas said. “When pieces come in, the client is overjoyed because they found exactly what they want.” Gringas also has more than a decade of interior design

STEPHANIE GRINGAS, DESIGN A SOFA OWNER

Trace Parkway in Fort Worth in 2020. The business oers more than 200 styles of sofas and more than 1,500 material options, she said. Design a Sofa also has a user-friendly website, Gringas said, and its name is literal. Customers will nd a wide variety of upholstered pieces, a personalized experience and no pressure

experience and oers free in-home or virtual design consultations. The store is open to walk-ins and consultations are available, she said. “I have been so successful in the furniture industry because I have always treated it like my own business, even when I worked for [big-box] stores,” Gringas said.

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