Southwest Nashville Edition - May 2020

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2  MAY 23JUNE 20, 2020

ONLINE AT

““ “THEWHOLE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE IS A LOT DIFFERENT, BUTWE’RE TRYING TONAVIGATE IT INAWAY

ReopeningNashville

THISWILL BE THE GREATEST FINANCIAL CHALLENGE THAT THIS CITY, OR ANYOTHERAMERICAN CITY, FOR THAT MATTER, HAS FACED INOUR LIFETIME.” MAYOR JOHN COOPER ON HIS BUDGET

THAT’S HOSPITABLE, WELCOMINGAND FRIENDLY, JUST LIKEWE’VE ALWAYS

PRESENTATION FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020 21 ON APRIL 28

BEEN, BUT IT IS A CHALLENGE.” BRITTANY HARTWELL, OWNER OF MOLLY GREEN

The Mall at Green Hills reopened to the public on May 13 with social distancing guidelines and other safety measures in place. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

(Courtesy Metro Nashville)

Mayor John Cooper: Raise property taxes or prepare for ‘mass layos’

Businesses slowly reopen according to Metro guidelines

two weeks after the majority of Tennessee’s 95 counties began a state-guided plan April 27. “It’s important to bear in mind that several unique features of Nashville make our reopening process dierent from other areas across the state, and it’s important to get it right the rst time,” Cooper said May 7. “The number of businesses that operate here and our global tourism industry all make Nashville’s safe reopening critical to the region.” When Cooper announced the plan April 23 without an ocial start date, he said Nashville’s strategy to reopen would be contingent on several factors, including a rate of transmission of less than one, meaning each COVID-19 patient does

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

After 53 days of being closed down, city ocials allowed restaurants and retail businesses in Nashville to reopen May 11 at half capacity, initi- ating the phased reopening of the state’s largest economic area. The reopening of select businesses at partial capacities is part of the city’s four-part reopening plan, each part of which ocials said relies on the downward trend or attening of new reported cases for 14 days before advancing to the next phase. Nashville’s gradual reopening comes Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

Nashville Mayor John Cooper has rolled out his $2.44 billion scal year 2020-21 operating budget; it includes a 31.7% property tax rate increase and vari- ous cuts, which he said were necessary steps to take in order to avoid mass layos. In his April 28 presentation, Cooper said the pro- posed rate increase will generate $332 million in new CONTINUED ON 18

CONTINUED ON 16

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Open for appointments

Fully prepared for your safety in our care At Ascension Saint Thomas, the care you need is available today. From routine visits and health screenings to surgical procedures and specialty care, our caregivers are fully prepared for your arrival. As we all embrace a new care experience, Ascension Saint Thomas will continue to maintain strict precautions for your safety in our care including screenings, social distancing and protective equipment. Yet our compassionate, personalized care remains unchanged. When you enter our open doors, you’ll be greeted by the Ascension Saint Thomas caregivers you know and trust. We are now open to schedule appointments for your heart screenings, mammograms, colorectal screenings, back surgery, joint surgery, bariatric surgery and more. And as always, our emergency rooms and care centers are here for your urgent and primary care needs.

Schedule now. Ask about virtual visits. GetSTHealthcare.com

Your care is our calling. TM

© Ascension 2020. All rights reserved.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more BUSINESS INNOVATIONS

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERNASHVILLE METRO Lacy Klasel GENERAL MANAGER Mary Ella Hazelwood, mhazelwood@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth EDITOR Wendy Sturges REPORTER Dylan Skye Aycock COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea King STAFF DESIGNER Lindsay Scott BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 3401 Mallory Lane, Ste. 112 Franklin, TN 37067 • 6159742060 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES swnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

5 Stories about how local businesses are adapting to the pandemic

FROMMARY ELLA: As the city works to slowly open after several weeks of being closed to limit the spread of coronavirus, many of our local businesses have had to adapt to stay aoat and will need continued support to stay open. Our issue this month is lled with local shops and eateries that have adapted and fought against one of the biggest economic challenges of our time. We hope their stories will help you feel connected and inspire you to shop local.

Mary Ella Hazelwood, GENERALMANAGER

FROMWENDY: For residents who have not left their homes in the past couple of months, the outside world will likely look very dierent than it did at the beginning of the year. From face masks to social distancing markers, it can be confusing to know what you should do in certain public settings. Take a look at our breakdown of Mayor John Cooper’s Roadmap to Reopen Nashville (see Pages 16-17) to learn more about what you, and businesses, should be doing. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

TODO LIST

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Rescheduled and canceled events TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Lime scooters resume limited operations in Nashville, plus local road projects CITY& COUNTY 9 Latest local news

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MAY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE

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Jack Brown’s Beer and Burger Joint is now open in Edgehill. (Courtesy Jack Brown’s Beer & Burger Joint)

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Gigi’s Cupcakes founder Gigi Butler launched a meal delivery service in April. (Courtesy Meals by Gigi)

MAP NOT TO SCALE

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NOWOPEN 1 Jack Brown’s Beer and Burger Joint , a chain oering burgers, craft beer and more, opened March 6 in Edgehill at 1201 Villa Place, Ste. 102, Nashville. The restaurant has a second Nashville location in Germantown. 615-739-6429. www.jackbrownsjoint.com 2 Oscar’s Taco Shop opened in late March in Midtown at 2323 Elliston Place, Nashville. The restaurant oers nachos, breakfast burritos, rolled tacos and more. Oscar’s Taco Shop has several locations in the Middle Tennessee area, according to Meals by Gigi , a meal delivery service by Gigi’s Cupcakes founder Gigi Butler, launched in April. The business oers various meals and desserts, such as casseroles, muns, pies, quiches, scones and more. Delivery is available in Brent- wood, Franklin and areas of Southwest Nashville. In addition to her meal delivery service, Butler plans to open Pies by Gigi in Brentwood later this year, according to her website. Along with various pies, the shop will stock items available through Meals by Gigi. 615-354-3973. www.gigibutler.com 3 Black Dynasty Ramen opened in mid-March inside Bar Sovereign at 514 5th Ave. S., Nashville, according to a social media post. The ramen restau- rant, which had previously operated as a its website. 629-702-5811. www.oscarstacoshop.com

10 Milestone Design Center , a tile store, closed its showroom on April 30 at 514 Fontana Drive, Nashville, according to a social media post from the business. The company's location in Clarksville will re- main open. www.orimdesigncenter.com IN THE NEWS 11 Ascension Saint Thomas announced May 4 an agreement with Cigna to provide the health insurance company’s LocalPlus customers with care at its facilities and physician practices. The new multiyear agreement will take eect June 1, according to a news release. Ascension Saint Thomas will join existing hospi- tals in the LocalPlus network, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Williamson Medical Center and others. www.healthcare.ascension.org The U.S. Department of Education announced in April several colleges and universities in Southwest Nashville will receive grant funding to help cover expenses as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. Aquinas College, Belmont University, Lipscomb University, Nashville State Community College and Vanderbilt University will receive a combined $18.7 million, according to the department. Colleges are required to dedicate at least 50% of funding received toward provid- ing nancial aid grants to assist students with expenses related to early school closures. The aid is funded through the CARES Act approved by Congress in March. www.ed.gov.

pop-up business, posts its daily menu on Instagram. www.instagram.com /blackdynastyramen 4 The Mall at Green Hills reopened at partial capacity May 13 after Mayor John Cooper announced retailers and restau- rants could reopen at half capacity. As part of its reopening plan, the mall will implement frequent cleanings and post signage to help visitors practice social distancing. The mall will also provide hand sanitizer at designated areas and turn o drinking fountains. Modied mall hours will be from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. on Mon- day through Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. on Sundays. A list of store open- ings can be found on the mall's website. www.shopgreenhills.com 5 Del Frisco's Grille , an American bar and restaurant in Southwest Nashville at 1201 Demonbreun St., Ste. 104, Nashville, has reopened after temporarily halting in-person dining in March because of coronavirus-related closures. The restau- rant reopened May 12 and is limiting dine- in service to 25% capacity, according to a press release. Del Frisco's Grille will oer disposable menus and other no-touch options for customers. 615-742-5503. www.delfriscosgrille.com 6 Seasonal farmers markets St. George’s Episcopal Church in Belle Meade at 4715 Harding Pike, Nashville, and 12 South Farmers Market in Sevier Park, 3000 Granny White Pike, Nashville, opened in May as planned. Customers are asked to wear masks and maintain social distancing practices.

www.stgeorgesnashville.org/nashville www.12southfarmersmarket.com COMING SOON 7 Tommy John , a retail company spe- cializing in lounge wear and other cloth- ing, will open inside The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Nashville, according to its website. An opening date has not yet been announced. www.tommyjohn.com NAME CHANGES 8 Cafe Coco is closing after 25 years in Midtown at 210 Louise Ave., Nashville, and will reopen as an Italian market, according to a social media post from the owners, who also operate Coco’s Italian Market and Restaurant, Coco’s West Ital- ian Restaurant and other locations. The new restaurant will operate under a new name with a focus on takeout, delivery and catering trays, according to the post. 615-321-2626. www.italianmarket.biz CLOSINGS 9 Freebirds World Burrito has perma- nently closed its location in Green Hills at 3800 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville, according to the company’s website. The Austin, Texas-based chain served burritos, tacos, quesadillas, nachos, bowls and salads. The Green Hills location was the only one in Tennessee, according to the company’s website. www.freebirds.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESSINNOVATIONS

How businesses are adapting

COMPILED BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

Utilizing technology

KEEPMOVING

900 Rosa L. Parks Blvd., Nashville 615-880-2001 www.nashvillefarmersmarket.org 1 Preorder items or create shopping lists in advance. 2 Be mindful of payment methods and social distancing.

W ith restaurants all over the city now able to operate, Stay Golden reopened its location in Berry Hill on May 13 and is now imple- menting technology to introduce contactless ordering in its restau- rant. Diners will nd QR codes that can be scanned with phones to pull up a digital menu. This is not the rst innovation for the coee roaster during the coronavirus outbreak. Stay Golden also partnered with People Loving Nashville and COVID Help Nashville while restaurants were closed to pro- vide meals to Nashville residents. “The best thing about these meals is they not only put food on the tables of those who need it, but they also help Stay Golden continue to employ our sta through this time,” Stay Golden Director of Operations Jamie Cunningham said in a post on social media. F rist Art Museum is bringing the art gallery experience to visitors in the comfort of their homes with “We Count: First-Time Voters,” the museum’s rst online exhibition. The exhibit, which opened May 1, features the work of ve local artists inspired by the 100th anniversary of the ratication of the 19th Amendment. To prepare for the exhibition, artists Beizar Aradini, M Kelley,

(CourtesyNashville FarmersMarket)

Supporting local farms

(Courtesy Stay Golden)

T he Nashville Farmers reopening its facility May 15 as part of Phase I of Mayor John Cooper’s plan to reopen businesses. While some vendors at the market will remain closed until further notice, Executive Director Tasha Kennard said the market has been working to create contactless shopping for customers and vendors and create guidelines for social distancing. “Everyone is adjusting the way Market has moved from its weekly drive-thru service to

NOWOPEN Stay Golden reopened its dining room on May 13 with contactless ordering. 1 Sit down at a table. 2 Scan QR code on table with phone to pull up menu. 3 Wait for order.

they do business, and we remain committed to operating in a manner that protects merchants, employees and customers,” Ken- nard said in an announcement to customers. The farm shed and the Gar- dens of Babylon areas are now open daily from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., however the Market House will remain closed until further notice. Curbside service and pre-order options will continue in designated areas.

2934 Sidco Drive, Ste. 130, Nashville 615-241-5105 www.stay-golden.com

Going digital Jerry Bedor Phillips, Thaxton Waters II and Donna Woodley

spoke with Nashville residents and community groups to learn about their experiences. “Though we are disappointed to not be able to display the work in our physical building because of unforeseen scheduling challenges related to COVID-19 closures, we are excited to present our rst- ever completely digital exhibition experience,” said Shaun Giles, assistant director for community engagement.

MEET THE ARTISTS (Courtesy Frist Art Museum)

From left to right: Thaxton Waters II, Beizar Aradini, Jerry Bedor Phillips, Donna Woodley and M Kelley all contributed to the digital exhibit.

919 Broadway, Nashville | 615-244-3340 | www.fristartmuseum.org

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MAY 2020

TODO LIST

Rescheduled events

COMPILED BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

American Artisan Festival scheduled for June 19-21 at Centennial Park has been canceled, according to an April 22 update from event organizers. The event will return June 18-20, 2021. www.americanartisanfestival.com

for April 21-25, has been postponed. The new dates are July 7-11. www.nashvillecocktailfestival.com The 2020 CMT Music Awards , originally set for June 3, has been rescheduled for Oct. 14, the network announced April 2. www.cmaawards.com Nashville Pride Festival announced April 27 that the annual event scheduled for June 27-28 has been postponed to the fall. www.nashvillepride.org The 45th annual Harding Art Show , previously set for April 30-May 2, will be postponed to later this year, according to a statement. www.thehardingartshow.com CANCELED EVENTS The 79th annual Iroquois Steeplechase has been canceled for 2020, according to an April 27 announcement. The event, beneting Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, was originally scheduled for May 9 and later postponed to June 27. 800-619-4802. www.iroquoissteeplechase.org Ocials with the Country Music Association announced March 31 its annual CMA Fest , originally scheduled for June 4-7, will not be held this year. www.cmafest.com

As the state works to reopen during the ongoing coronavirus crisis, many event organizers have announced new dates for previously canceled events in the Southwest Nashville area. While all event dates were accurate as of press time, they are subject to change as state and local leaders make decisions regarding when and how events can be held. This list is not comprehensive. RESCHEDULED EVENTS Tin Pan South , previously set for March 24-28, has been postponed. The new dates are Oct. 20-24. 800-321-6008. tinpansouth.com Nashville Fashion Week , scheduled for March 31-April 4, has been postponed to Aug. 4-8. www.nashvillefashionweek.com St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon set for April 25-26 will be rescheduled for later in 2020, according to a March 18 statement. An exact date has not been announced. www.runrocknroll.com Chihuly at Cheekwood , an annual indoor and outdoor art exhibition, will now run July 18-Jan. 10, 2021. The exhibit was originally set to open April 25. 615-356-8000. www.cheekwood.org Nashville Cocktail Festival , originally set

FEATURED EVENT THE ACADEMY OF COUNTRY MUSIC AWARDS The Academy of Country Music Awards will move its annual awards show to Nashville in September for the rst time in the show’s 55-year history, according to an announcement by ACM CEO Damon Whiteside at Metro Nashville’s coronavirus press brieng April 27. This year’s awards show, originally scheduled for April 5 in Las Vegas, will now be broadcast Sept. 16 from three music venues in Nashville: the Grand Ole Opry House, the Ryman Auditorium and The Bluebird Cafe in Green Hills. www.acmcountry.com The ACM Awards will feature live and prerecorded footage from three Nashville music venues. (Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Iroquois Steeplechase will not be held this year at Percy Warner Park. (Courtesy Iroquois Steeplechase)

Find more or submit Southwest Nashville-area events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECTS

Maryland, Denver, Colorado and Nashville. The company will also oer free 30-minute rides for public health ocials and law enforcement ocers. The company previously announced in March that it would suspend service in some cities to limit the spread of the virus. “Lime is proud to partner with cities to provide scooters as an essen- tial transportation option to reliably get frontline workers and residents where they need to go,” Lime Chief Policy Ocer David Spielfogel said in a statement. “We remain committed to the cities we love and serve, and we recognize the critical role of micromobility in serving transpor- tation needs now and as we emerge from this crisis.” To help limit the spread of corona- virus for those that choose to utilize scooters, Lime ocials recommend riders wash their hands after their ride and maintain a distance of at least 6 feet from other riders. The company also said it is increasing the frequency of cleaning and disinfect- ing scooters.

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Lime deploys scooter eets inNashville to aid essential workers In an eort to help essential work- ers still traveling around Nashville during the coronavirus pandemic, scooter company Lime announced it is working to reactivate scooters over the coming weeks. Lime ocials announced April 15 small eets of scooters will be reacti- vated in select cities across the U.S., such as Austin, Texas, Baltimore,

1 I-440 reconstruction Work is beginning to wrap up on I-440 improvements, which will reconstruct the roadway from I-40 to I-24, create three lanes of trac in each direction, repair noise walls and complete other safety improvements. As of late April, the majority of temporary barriers have been removed from along the roadway, with the exception of those near the bridge at I-65, which are expected to be removed over the next few weeks, according to TDOT. Timeline: fall 2018-August 2020 Cost: $152.9 million Funding source: TDOT

2 Belle Meade Boulevard signage The city of Belle Meade announced in April it will use signage as needed to indicate that left lanes on Belle Meade Boulevard are for passing or turning only as a reminder to residents. A project to install pavement markings at the inter- section is expected to be included in the city’s transportation master plan. Timeline: TBD Cost: $220 Funding source: city of Belle Meade

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 1. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SWNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MAY 2020

We passed the test. We passed th test. outherland Place Senior Living Community, we limited orsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined re quarantines were required; we deep cleaned before deep ning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful pletion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. h newways to communicate, new activities and new clinical ations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community brates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy tyles and connected community. At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitorsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined before quarantines were required; we deep cleaned before deep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. With newways to communicate, new activities and new clinical operations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy lifestyles and connected community. At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitorsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined before quarantines w re r quired; we deep cl an d before eep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. With newways to communicate, new activities a new clinical operations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy lifestyles and connected community. 615-221-9001

We passed the test. Southerland Place Senior Living Community We passed the test. lifestyles and connected community. At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitorsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined before quarantines were required; we deep cleaned before deep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. Southerland Place Senior Living Community At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitorsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined before quarantine were required; we deep cleaned before deep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. With newways to communicate, new activities and new clinical operations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy lifestyles and connected community. At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitorsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined before quarantines were required; we deep cleaned before deep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. With newways to communicate, new activities and new clinical operations, Southerland Plac Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and s cure resident , he lthy lifestyles and connected community. With newways to communicate, new activities and new clinical operations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy lifestyles and connected community.

At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitorsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined before quarantines were required; we deep cleaned before deep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. With newways to communicate, new activities and new clinical operations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy lifestyles and connected community.

Celebrating our staff – You are our Heroes Dilveen Abdulrahman Jessica Anderson Carla Atwell, Executive Director Joann Mireku Rana Morris Stephanie Morris Brenda Gilliam Sharon Glenn Christal Henning 615-221-9001

At Southerland Place Senior Living Community, we limited visitorsbefore limitedvisitationwasmandated;wequarantined before quarantines were required; we deep cleaned before deep cleaning was recommended. Now, we celebrate the successful completion of testing residents and staff for the coronavirus. With newways to communicate, new activities and new clinical operations, Southerland Place Senior Living Community celebrates a future of safe and secure residents, healthy lifestyles and connected community. Susan Higgins Katrice Hudson Alexis Landers Eunice Leal Janice Manassa Celebrating our staff – You are our Heroes Dilveen Abdulrahman Jessica Anderson Carla Atwell, Executive Director Betty Davis Joann Mireku Rana Morris Stephanie Morris Angela Stinson Chantee Taylor 615-221-9001 Southerland Place Senior Living Community 200Winners Circle S | Brentwood, TN 37027 | 615-221-9001 | southernlandplace.com Celebrating our staff – You are our Heroes 615-221-9001 Tewana Tolbert Gertrude Vereen NaqushiaWilkerson Celebrating our staff – You are our Heroes Dilveen Abdulrahman Jessica Anderson Carla Atwell, Executive Director Celebrating our staff – You are our Heroes Dilveen Abdulrahman Jessica Anderson Carla Atwell, Executive Director Joann Mireku Rana Morris Stephanie Morris Brenda Gilliam Sharon Glenn Christal Henning Tewana Tolbert Gertrude Ve en NaqushiaWilkerson Janice Man ssa Dianna McGee Betty Davis Johny Dodd Charles Drennon Karol Francisco-Osorio Carolyn Garrett Susan Higgins Katr ce Hudso Alexis Landers Eunice Leal Janice Manassa Dianna McGee Angela Stinson Chantee Taylor Eunice Tetteh Tewana Tolbert Gertrude Vereen 615-221-9001 Betty Davis Johny Dodd Charles Drennon Karol Francisco-Osorio Carolyn Garr tt 615-221-9001 Angela Stinson Cha tee Taylor Eunice Tetteh Brenda Gilliam Sharon Glenn Christal Henning Susan Higgins Katrice Hudson Alexis Landers Eunice Leal Joann Mireku Rana Morris Stephanie Morris Angela Stinson Chantee Taylor Eunice Tetteh

Brenda Gilliam Sh ron Gle n Christal Henning Susan Higgins Katrice Hudson ebrating our staff – You are our Heroes veen Abdulrahman Joann Mireku Brenda Gilliam

Betty Davis Johny Dodd Charles Drennon Karol Francisco-Osorio Carolyn Garrett

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMetro Nashville

QUOTEOFNOTE “THE SAFETYOF OUR CUSTOMERS AND OUR CREWS ARE OUR TOP PRIORITY, AND WEWILL BE TAKING SAFETY PRECAUTIONS RELATED TO COVID-19 TOMAKE SURE THAT, EVENWHEN RESTORING POWER, WE ARE PRACTICING SOCIAL DISTANCING.”

MetroNashville Council renews curbside recycling program

City officials urge residents towear masks in public

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

each additional monthly collection, city officials said. Metro Nashville Public Works, which was originally slated to increase recycling from once per month to every two weeks beginning in February, announced in January that it would “temporarily delay” the expanded program. City officials cited budget concerns as a cause. “This contract only pays for [curbside pickup] once a month,” said At-Large Council Member Bob Mendes, who sponsored the ordi- nance. “The game plan had originally been to go to twice a month, but that’s not happening. It’s not in the cards.”

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

METRONASHVILLE Metro Nash- ville Council approved an ordinance May 5 to renew the city’s curbside recycling program for five years. As part of the new agreement, an extension of the 10-year contract with Waste Management approved by Metro Council in 2015, the city will pay an immediate one-time fee of $1 million. The city will also pay higher fees for the processing and transportation of recyclables, accord- ing to the ordinance’s fiscal notes. The city’s curbside recycling program costs $2.2 million a year and would increase by $50,000 for

METRONASHVILLE Mayor John Cooper called on the Metro Nashville Public Health Depart- ment in late April to issue an order urging all residents to wear masks or cloth face coverings in public. The order, issued May 1 by the health department, follows guide- lines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to limit the spread of coronavirus. “Just as all Nashvillians and their passengers should use seat belts and child seats in moving vehicles, a global pandemic calls on each one of us to take personal safety pre- cautions in our daily lives,” Cooper said. “The use of homemade face coverings will safeguard your health and help ensure the well-being of those around you to reduce our overall infection rate and reduce the spread of the disease.” According to the order, busi- nesses should require employees to wear masks or face coverings and post signage at all public entrances encouraging customers to wear masks while inside. The order is set to expire at mid- night May 31 but may be extended, according to city officials. Busi- nesses can download free signs to post next to all entrances at www.asafenashville.org.

NES PRESIDENT DECOSTA JENKINS REGARDING MAY 3 STORM THAT LEFT 130,000 RESIDENTS WITHOUT POWER

Per an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, local municipalities may continue to host meetings virtually through at least June 30. Metro Nashville Council Meets June 2 and June 16 at 6:30 p.m. 615-862-6780. www.nashville.gov/metro-council Metro Nashville Public Schools Meets May 26 and June 9 at 5 p.m. 615-259-4636. www.mnps.org Belle Meade Board of Commissioners Meets June 17 at 4 p.m. 615-297-6041. www.citybellemeade.org Berry Hill Board of Commissioners Meets June 8 at 7 p.m. 615-292-5531. www.berryhilltn.org Forest Hills Board of Commissioners Meets June 18 at 5 p.m. 615-372-8677. www.cityofforesthills.com Oak Hill Board of Commissioners Meets June 22 at 5 p.m. 615-371-8291. www.oakhilltn.us MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS METRONASHVILLE In early May, the Metro Public Health Department began giving away cloth face masks from the state at three locations: Lentz Public Health Center, Woodbine Health Center and East Nashville Health Center. Residents are advised to wear cloth face coverings when out in public or in any scenario in which social distancing is not possible. METRONASHVILLE Metro Nashville Council passed a resolution recognizing May 5 in honor of the 10th anniversary of the May 2010 flood. Eleven people died in the flood.

HOWNASHVILLE RESIDENTS RECYCLE In addition to curbside recycling, which is available to residents in the Urban Services District, residents can recycle at the city’s drop-off sites and convenience centers.

Key

Curbside recycling

Drop-off recycling

Convenience centers

1,800 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000

800 600 400 200 0

SOURCE: METRO NASHVILLE PUBLIC WORKS/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MetroNashville Public Schools announces plans for 2020graduations

DATES TOKNOW Metro Nashville Public Schools has outlined a plan for ceremonies.

BY WENDY STURGES

release. “The plans we’ve put forward will see that the achievements of our graduates are recognized and appreci- ated by each school and the Nashville community as a whole.” The Tennessee Department of Education released guidelines April 23 for districts planning to hold virtual or in-person graduation ceremonies. Processionals will be held on the same dates that were originally scheduled for each school. It is not yet clear if limits on the number of people allowed to gather will still be in effect.

METRONASHVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS District officials with Metro Nashville Public Schools announced May 1 a four-part plan for holding ceremonies for high school seniors set to graduate this school year. “This year has been hard on us all, but most especially our senior class, who have worked their whole lives to get to this moment only to have many of the traditions and celebrations taken away due to COVID-19,” Director of Schools Adrienne Battle said in a news

May 16-20 High schools hosted drive-thru processional graduation with students in their cars. June MNPS will hold a virtual celebration to livestream a districtwide graduation ceremony. July Provided that social distancing guidelines are lifted, the district will host a community graduation event.

9

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MAY 2020

TIPS FROMAHOME ORGANIZER WITH HOLLY TREPKA

GUIDE

with advice from local businesses

HOME 2020 SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE MAINTENANCE & IMPROVEMENT

3

WITH TRACY PARISH

Homeowners have spent more time at home than ever in recent weeks and may have seen areas that need improvement. From making repairs to getting organized, this guide is intended to help residents in Southwest Nashville make home upgrades.

2

4

SIMPLEHOME PROJECTS Honey Do Services owner Tracy Parish said taking on a few small projects can improve a home’s overall value.

1

1

PAINT CABINETS Painting kitchen

cabinets and adding new hardware can refresh the look of a kitchen or bathroom. UPDATE LIGHTS Make sure lighting fixtures match to help achieve a consistent look throughout the home. PAINTWALLS Applying a fresh coat of paint is an inexpensive way to change the look of a room. MAKE REPAIRS RIGHT AWAY Ignoring plumbing problems, like a leaky sink or toilet, can lead to more expensive problems, like rot or mold, if left unchecked.

SOURCE: HONEY DO SERVICES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Caring for a home can be a year-round job; however, organizing chores by season can help homeowners keep up with projects to avoid expensive repairs later on. ANNUAL MAINTENANCE CHECKLIST

2

Wash windows and repair screens Check home exterior for rotting wood

Check grout in bathrooms and kitchen

Check weatherstripping

WINTER

FALL

Test electrical outlets Inspect plumbing for leaks Repair interior wall damage and touch up paint as needed Check function of all locks and deadbolts Check caulking on showers and bathtubs Check for icicles that can cause damage to gutters

Have chimney cleaned Get heating system ready for winter Turn off and flush outdoor faucets Repair any cracks in pavement Clean and seal decks and fences

SUMMER

SPRING

Wash exterior walls of home Check all pavement for cracks Clean dryer vent to avoid housefires Look for signs of termites and carpenter ants

3 4

Clean gutters Check air conditioning before summer Check for tree interference with power lines

MAKE A GARDEN

TIPS FOR CHOOSING YOUR CONTAINER

The bigger the better: Larger containers allow for larger root systems and larger plants, and they hold more water for hot days. Containers can vary widely by material, including metal, plastic and wood.

POPULAR VEGETABLES TO GROW

Peppers Tomatoes

Zucchini squash

Cabbage

Carrots

Bush beans

Radishes

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Q A Tracy Parish, owner of Honey Do Service in Spring Hill, answered some questions about home repair. Her company services areas of

For residents who have been at home over the past several weeks, it is not uncommon to feel the urge to clean and organize their living space. For those who may need some help getting started, Holly Trepka, owner of Neat Method in Nashville, said there are many ways for people to get organized, either on their own or with the help of a professional. Neat Method, which serves the Greater Nashville area, offers virtual and in-home services to help clients who want to create more functional spaces in their homes. Trepka said the company offers start-to-finish service, including everything from sorting and donating unwanted items to buying products and creating custom labels. “What we do is try to create a system that is maintainable,” she said. “We don’t want to come in

and organize the space and then we leave and it goes back to the way it was. [We want to] make sure it’s a personalized system for whatever the client needs.” However, Trepka said people feeling pressure to be organized while working from home during the coronavirus should also recognize that it is okay not to have everything in order. “We’re all at home, and we feel like, ‘Well, I’m at home, and I have this time, I should be getting so much accomplished.’ But we’re also working from home, teaching our children from home and maintaining the house more than we ever have,” she said. “It’s okay that you don’t come out of this having reorganized everything in your life. It’s okay that we want to feel productive, but if you can only get to what you can, that’s okay, too.”

GETTING STARTED

START SMALL Trepka said for first-time organizers, it can be tempting to try to take on a whole room at once. However, she cautioned that people who take this route can often get overwhelmed or frustrated and end up with a worse mess. To help clients start organizing in a more attainable way, she recommends picking a drawer to start with and then moving slowly to other parts of a room . “In the kitchen, it can be as simple as just [starting] with your junk drawer, and if that feels good and if you got through that, then, make time to move onto all of your utensil drawers or your linen drawers,” she said. “If that feels good, move on and do the pantry. I think that chewing little bites is a good idea during this time.”

For those looking to finally tackle that messy corner of their living space, Trepka offered some tips on how to work over time and maintain the work once it is finished.

Williamson and Davidson counties. WHAT ARE SOME COMMONLY OVERLOOKED ISSUES YOU SEE WITH HOUSES? “One thing that I would point out is that people should look at roof leaks and chimney repair. We have seen a lot of people [who] have neglected roof leaks or a leaky chimney, and it’s actually caused a lot more structural damage to the house because of the amount of rot that happens as that leak occurs. One of the other things that people don’t look at that they should is the crawl space. You really should be looking at encapsulating the crawl space or at least getting it sealed up better to keep critters out.” WHAT ARE PROJECTS HOMEOWNERS SHOULD NOT ATTEMPT TO DO THEMSELVES? “One of the things that I [avoid] is the stuff that you have to get up on a ladder for, such as the roof or the chimney, gutters—things that are a little more dangerous that you might need to tie off and make sure that you have some security there. Let a professional come in and fix your roof or fix your gutters. I would also say windows and doors; a lot of times, there’s a degree of difficulty to making sure that you’re getting your windows and doors level and placed properly. If you don’t feel comfortable with it, just don’t do it. Have a professional come and take care of it. ” WHAT SHOULD HOMEOWNERS LOOK FOR BEFORE HIRING A REPAIR COMPANY OR CONTRACTOR? “The very first thing I would definitely look at is that they are licensed as a general contractor like we are and that they’re insured. Also, I think you need to do your due diligence and make sure the company that you’re hiring is a reputable company and that they have all of the qualifications that you’re looking for. We provide clear project start and finish dates, and we communicate when additional repairs are necessary to ensure top-quality work. The other thing I would also say: Please, whatever you do, do not pay the full amount up front. We ask for half down and half at the end, but I’ve been in people’s houses where they’ve given the full amount, and the person’s come in and [done] a quarter of the work and just left. Whatever you do, don’t give that person all of your money up front.”

FIND INSPIRATION Neat Method offers ideas and tips via their social media platforms on Instagram and Pinterest. Trepka recommends looking for photos of various space to find what styles and products you like . “Pinterest has really picked up lately as people are sitting at home thinking of projects, so we have a lot of great images and ideas and steps you can take,” Trepka said.

KEEP IT CLEAN Trepka said after finding a system that works for them, people should make sure they keep up with it to ensure the space does not become messy again . “The most important tip is to label,” she said. “We see a lot of clients that do things on their own and just sometimes think, ‘Oh, I’ll know what’s in that basket. It doesn’t need a tag on it.’ But putting the label on it is that last, fail-proof way that everyone in the house will maintain a system. It’s harder to stick something in a bin when you can read it and you know it’s not supposed to go in there.”

SCHEDULE TIME Rather than devoting a whole weekend to

organizing a space, Trepka recommends making a

schedule to work on a project over time to avoid getting interrupted or burnt out. “One good idea, if you have a large project, is to schedule that time specifically and actually pencil it in,” Trepka said. “If you’re working, write it in the calendar that you have this coming up, then, that makes it easier to not make excuses and give yourself plenty of time to get it done. A larger project will take longer than most people anticipate.”

PHOTOS COURTESY ELVIN PHOTOGRAPHY

CONTAINER TYPES: • half-wooden barrels

PLANTING TIPS

• hanging baskets: a good use of extra space; can be used for herbs, cherry tomatoes, strawberries and more • must have drainage holes in the bottom

Plants with similar needs for sun and water can be planted together. Mix quickly maturing plants with longer- growing plants. Use high-quality soil. Plant shorter plants in the front of a bed and climbing plants that can be supported by a trellis or other support in the back.

• buckets • baskets • old bathtubs,

galvanized metal tubs, or other tubs or troughs

• wooden planters

SOURCE: THE OLD FARMER’S ALMANAC/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MAY 2020

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Home & Design

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

REMODELING Broderick Builders 6594 Hwy. 100, Nashville 615-385-3210 www.broderickbuilders.com Shaffer Homes 615-642-6187 www.shafferhomesllc.com

INTERIOR DESIGN Annali Interiors 6518 Hwy. 100, Nashville 615-352-7616 www.annaliinteriors.com G&G Interiors 6033 Hwy. 100, Nashville 615-457-2275 www.gg-interiors.com Margi’s Chair and Chair Alike 2205 Bandywood Drive, Nashville 615-237-8491 www.furniturestoreinnashville.com MarketPlace Interiors 2225 Bandywood Drive, Nashville 615-942-6055 www.marketplaceinteriorsnashville.com Vernich Interiors 2929 Sidco Drive, Ste. 207, Nashville 615-730-6846 www.vernichinteriors.com HVAC AND PLUMBING Air Comfort 1024 3rd Ave. S., Nashville 615-259-4111 www.nashvilleaircomfort.com Maynard 617 Norris Ave., Nashville 615-546-0063

with advice from local businesses

HOME 2020 SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE MAINTENANCE & IMPROVEMENT FENCING AND DECKS A1 Fence and Deck Nashville 615-256-1884 www.a1fenceanddeck.net Archadeck Outdoor Living 2969 Armory Drive, Ste. 400, Nashville 615-547-2333 www.archadeck.com CABINETS

From interior design and remodeling to landscaping and fencing, there are a number of businesses in the Southwest Nashville area that can help with home improvement needs. This list is not comprehensive. COMPILED BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

ROOFING Pinaire Roofing 1720 West End Ave., Ste. 530, Nashville 615-766-3464 www.pinaireroofing.com WINDOWS Drapery House II 4316 Sidco Drive, Nashville 615-837-2841 www.nashvilleblindsandshades.com HANDYMAN Allbrite Cleaning Systems 615-474-4921 www.allbritecleaningsys.com The Nashville Handyman 1921 19th Ave. S., Nashville www.thenashvillehandyman.com FLOORING Blue Ridge Floors 4004 Hillsboro Pike, Ste. 120R, Nashville 629-401-0444 www.floorsnc.com

Hartert-Russell 2221 Bransford Ave., Nashville 615-386-0020 www.hartert-russell.com GUTTERS All Phase Guttering 4320 Kenilwood Drive, Ste. 101, Nashville 615-285-8070 www.nashvilletngutters.com LANDSCAPING Daigh Rick Landscape Architects 900 South St., Ste. 104, Nashville 615-454-4100 www.daighrick.com Darren Bishop Landscape & Design 615-945-4224 www.dblandscapedesign.com

Cliff’s Cabinet Company 1920 Warner St., Nashville 615-329-9140 www.cliffscabinets.com Gaertner Cabinet Company 2604 Westwood Drive, Nashville 615-297-1612 www.gaertnercc.com

www.themaynardman.com Parthenon Plumbing & HVAC 4751 Trousdale Drive, Ste. 201, Nashville 615-298-2995 www.parthenonplumbing.com

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MAY 2020

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