Richardson December 2020

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4  DEC. 10, 2020JAN. 28, 2021

ONLINE AT

2020 Senior Living Guide

SENIOR POPULATIONON THE RISE Since 2014, the number of Richardson residents age 65 and older has steadily grown, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

0 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000 22,000

+14.9%

455%% of RISD’s nearly 38,000 students learned virtually for the second half of the fall semester. SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Renovated Senior Center on track to debut inApril 2016 2017 2018 2019 SOURCE: 201419 U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 1YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 2015 2014

Ella Claire Bennett, an 11-year-old RISD student, participates in virtual school. (Courtesy Alissa Raymond Bennett)

Lessons fromthe fall prepare RISD for spring The ability to learn from home was a godsend for Mercedi Hale’s fth-grade son after he was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year, she said. On the other hand, her older son, a sixth-grader attending school in person, had a hard time deal- ing with the COVID-19 precautions in place. have experienced before. “This has been a really hard school year,” Hale said. Students and their parents are not the only ones who have made big adjustments this year. Rich- ardson ISD ocials have had to gure out how to keep schools open while keeping the virus out, Deputy Superintendent Tabitha Branum said. Over the summer, school leaders were forced to CONTINUED ON 16 BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK Education experts say Hale’s story is not uncom- mon. Many families across the state have strug- gled to navigate a semester unlike anything they

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Richardson seniors are mere months away from gaining access to an updated recreation center that is more than ve years in the making. Voters approved nearly $5 million in renovations to the Richardson Senior Center as part of the city’s 2015 bond package. Construction began early in the spring of 2020, just days before county-mandated shut- downs brought many city services to a grinding halt. Despite the coronavirus pandemic, the project has progressed without interruptions and is on schedule CONTINUED ON 12

S eenior LIVING GUIDE SNAPSHOT 10 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com SENIOR EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTERS Makenzie Plusnick, Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel

FROMLEANNE: While our gatherings may be smaller, socially distanced or held virtually, the holiday season is the perfect time to reconnect with what matters most: kindness, community and quality time with the people we love. I also hope everyone has a chance to unplug from digital devices, cozy up with a cup of coee and enjoy this latest issue of Community Impact Newspaper . Thank you for reading and for trusting us to bring you local news all year long. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMOLIVIA: The COVID-19 pandemic has put the best laid plans on the back burner for many, but fortunately, plenty of city projects are going full steam ahead. Renovations to the Richardson Senior Center, for example, are still on track for an April completion (see Page 12). Planning for the spring semester in Richardson ISD is also in full swing. Read more about how the unprecedented fall semester went in our cover story. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do

2020 Senior Living Guide 0 n 7 Construction set to begin on Silver Line GOVERNMENT 8 Council debates future of Richardson Civic Center TRANSPORTATION SNAPSHOT 10

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 22

New businesses 7

Holiday events 7

Senior living facilities 18

Senior demographics

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RICHARDSON EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

PLANO PKWY.

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TELECOM PKWY.

CAMPBELL RD.

Bagel Cafe 21

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Blaze Pizza

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Richardson. The 10,000-square-foot fa- cility includes 10 classrooms with indoor and outdoor play areas for students ages six weeks to six years. 972-707-0862. www.thelearningexperience.com 4 Monkey King Noodle Company opened Dec. 7 at 520 Lockwood Drive, Ste. 100. The restaurant hails from its original location in Deep Ellum and is known for its authentic Northern Chinese street food, including hand- pulled, made-to-order noodle dishes and soup dumplings. 469-372-1334. www.monkeykingnoodlecompany.com 5 Salon Lace Me opened in early November at 300 N. Coit Road, Ste. 176, Richardson. The business oers a full range of hair extension installation and maintenance services, including tradi- tional extensions, micro-link extensions and wig extensions. 214-613-2903. www.salonlaceme.com 6 Trucker’s Cafe opened in late September at 580 W. Arapaho Road,

Ste. 406, Richardson. The soul food restaurant serves buet-style, home-cooked meals, including burg- ers, turkey legs, wings, sh bas- kets, pork chops and other southern entrees and sides. 972-234-1500. www.facebook.com/truckerscafetx COMING SOON 7 Bagel Cafe 21 will open in January at 1920 N. Coit Road, Richardson. The bagel shop will oer 21 varieties of New York-style bagels, including breakfast and lunch options, and 12 cream cheese choices as well as muns and iced beverages. The business’s owners, Lisa and Kyriakos Kouzoukas, previously owned Bagel Fresh Deli in The Colony. A phone number and website are not yet available. 8 Blaze Pizza will open next summer at 1450 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson.

NOWOPEN 1 Chipotle Mexican Grill opened anoth- er Richardson location Nov. 25 at 1420 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson. This location is the rst in the city to have a drive-thru lane, according to a news release. The fast-casual chain serves burritos, tacos, burrito bowls, salads, chips and queso. 214-453-8249. www.chipotle.com 2 CMIT Solutions opened a new oce Oct. 29 at 3400 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 110-254, Richardson. The company oers around-the-clock technology maintenance and monitoring solutions at a at rate for businesses in Richardson and surrounding areas. 469-453-6010. www.cmitsolutions.com/richardson 3 The Learning Experience , a national academy of early education, opened in late October at 524 Centennial Blvd., COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER & MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

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The fast-casual restaurant allows guests to customize signature pizzas or create their own. It also oers gluten-free and keto-friendly crusts as well as vegan cheese. www.blazepizza.com 9 Diesel Barbershop is expected to open in the spring at CityLine. The business, located at 1150 State St., Ste. 170, Richardson, was described by franchise owner Garrett Watkins as “the modern-day version of the vintage corner barbershop.” Watkins said Diesel is part barbershop, part salon and part arcade. It will oer an array of

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Happy Holidays from all of us at Primrose Schools of Richardson

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COURTESY BACKYARD WORKROOM

Most counties in the U.S. allow sheds of less than 120 square feet to be installed without a permit; however, customers interested in purchasing the kits are encouraged to check with their cities and homeowners associations about rules and regulations, according to the release. 469-400-9500 www.backyardworkroom.com

services for men, such as haircuts, scalp massages and beard trims. It will also house vintage arcade games and oer locally brewed beer for clients to enjoy. www.dieselbarbershop.com/location/ cityline 10 Jersey Mike’s Subs is set to open in the spring at 205 S. Plano Road, Richard- son. The fast-casual restaurant oers an array of hot and cold sandwiches in addi- tion to sides and desserts. This will be the restaurant’s fourth Richardson location. www.jerseymikes.com 11 Monster Bodybuilding Sports & Fitness is expected to open by mid-to- late January at 235 N. Central Express- way, Richardson. The business will oer group classes and personal training as well as mixed martial arts training for a range of ages. The 14,000-square- foot facility will be divided into three sections for bodybuilding, tness and mixed martial arts. The business is oering memberships now; prospective members can sign up on the web- site or on Facebook. 469-487-6119. www.monstertnessclub.com RELOCATIONS 12 Sway Dance Center relocated in FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Backyard Workroom opened an assembly plant in the Richardson Innovation Quarter at 715 N. Glenville Drive, Ste. 430, Richardson, on Nov. 18. The startup was founded by builder and entrepreneur Eric Benavides, who created a prefabricated workroom kit that allows users to build their own modular shed in just a few hours. “Most prefab studio rooms are complicated, expensive and require an expert to install,” Benavides said in a news release. “I wanted to oer a simple turnkey solution that homeowners could assemble in a few hours.” The kits include three styles, four color schemes and six door colors from which customers can choose. The 10-foot-by- 10-foot sheds are made from plywood and steel and require no carpentry or electrical skills for assembly.

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early October from its location at 2701 Custer Parkway, Richardson, to 401 W. George Bush Freeway, Ste. 125, Rich- ardson. The business provides high quality dance education for various age and skill levels. 469-930-5080. www.swaydancecenter.com 13 Take Me Home Pet Rescue has moved its adoption center to 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 433, Richardson. The nonprot fosters dogs and cats and helps match animals with the right owners. The center, previously located at 561 W. Campbell Road, Richardson, is a space where people can meet potential pets prior to adoption. 972-238-7988. www.tmhpr.com EXPANSIONS 14 Bocal Majority opened an event space a few doors down from its music store at 420 N. Coit Road, Ste. 2017, Rich- ardson, in early November. In addition to events, the space will be used for lessons for students and music educators. The store sells a variety of music products for woodwind instruments as well as new and used instruments. 214-377-8278. www.bocalmajoritystore.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

REGIONALHOLIDAYEVENTS

I N M A I L B O X E S T H I S J A N U A R Y

DEC. 18

‘THE HIP HOP NUTCRACKER’ VIRTUAL EISEMANN CENTER EVENT

The Eisemann Center presents a virtual viewing of “The Hip Hop Nutcracker,” which follows the same storyline and is set to the original music as “The Nutcracker” but features contemporary dances by the New Jersey Performing Arts Center. Digital grati and visuals create an updated New York City background for the hip-hop performance. The show, originally recorded in 2016 at the Eisemann Center, will be available to stream Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. Tickets include a limited on-demand viewing after the show and are available through the Eisemann Center events webpage. $20. 972- 744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com (Courtesy Tim Norris)

27 THROUGH JAN. 3 HOLIDAY LIGHTS SPECTACULAR Visitors can drive or walk through the lights display at Vitruvian Park in Addison, Texas, beginning Nov. 27. Outside food and beverages are permitted, with the exception of glass containers, and the trail is accessible to strollers, children’s wagons and wheelchairs. The park made the decision not to host any of its annual special events in conjunction with the lights due to the pandemic. 5-11 p.m. Free. Vitruvian Park, 3966 Vitruvian Way, Addison. www.udr.com/vitruvian-park DECEMBER 1 THROUGH 30 DEERFIELDHOLIDAY LIGHTS The Plano neighborhood turns on its holiday lights from 7-10 p.m. Mon.- Fri. and 7-11 p.m. Sat.-Sun. from Dec. 1-30. Guests can walk or drive through Deereld in Northwest Plano. Carriage rides starting at $165 are also available from North Star Carriages, which recommends a reservation. Free. Deereld neighborhood, Plano. www.deereldplano.org 12 VIRTUAL & SOCIALLY DISTANCED CITY OF RICHARDSON EVENTS In lieu of the traditional Santa’s Village and Richardson Christmas Parade, the city of Richardson is hosting a virtual parade with resident-submitted and -decorated shoe boxes as oats. The event will be held 9 a.m. Dec. 12 on the city’s website. The city also invites residents to stroll the fountain plaza outside City Hall and view the lighted trees and building beginning Dec. 5. The city’s two annual Christmas events were canceled due to the pandemic. Free. Online; Richardson City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. 972-744-4100. www.cor.net/santa

COMPILED BY LIESBETH POWERS NOVEMBER 11 THROUGH JAN. 3 RADIANCE! FRISCO The roughly 1.5-mile-long drive-thru lights experience at the Dr Pepper Ballpark is paired with a radio soundtrack for a socially distanced Christmas experience. The trail takes roughly 25 minutes to complete, not including wait times. Hot chocolate, cookies and Rice Krispie treats will be available for purchase, as will light-up items. Times vary on dierent nights. Tickets start at $30 per vehicle. Dr Pepper Ballpark, 7300 Roughriders Trail, Frisco. www.radiancechristmas.com 20 THROUGH JAN. 3 DALLAS ZOO LIGHTS Visitors can cruise along a newly constructed pathway through parts of the Dallas Zoo surrounded by more than a million lights set up in elaborate displays. Gates open at 6 p.m. and the event is open until 9 p.m. on select nights from Nov. 20-Jan. 3. $65 per car (nonmembers), $50 per car (members). Dallas Zoo, 650 SRL Thornton Freeway, Dallas. 469-554-7500. www.dallaszoo.com/zoolights 23 THROUGH JAN. 10 HISTORIC GRAPEVINE CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR Grapevine, the designated “Christmas Capital of Texas,” is decking out more of its downtown Main Street this year than it ever has before, according to the city. In addition to the thousands of lights and decorations, there will be daily performances with animated snowmen, a Whoville adventure in the Town Square Gazebo, and a 40- foot animated singing Christmas tree and light show at City Hall. Free. Main Street, Grapevine. 877-410-7572. www.grapevinetexasusa.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

Construction set to begin onDART Silver Line

SILVER LINE LIGHTRAIL

In order to prevent congestion, the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Silver Line will include a number of bridges over major roadways.

BY IAN PRIBANIC

station at The University of Texas at Dallas, and the second will be the existing station at CityLine. “Patience is a virtue, and this proj- ect proves that,” Mayor Paul Voelker said at the groundbreaking of the UT Dallas station. “This Silver Line will pay dividends for our residents, our businesses and this university.” The line also includes two stops at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport. The DFW North station will include a center-type platform, 362 parking spaces and four bus bays, Huerta said. DART ocials are projecting daily ridership of 800 passengers when the North Station rst opens in 2023 and daily ridership of about 1,300 passengers by 2040. Among the benets for the DFW North station will be shared parking opportunities, mixed-use developments near the airport and an additional transfer option for TEXRail passengers, Huerta said.

In November, Dallas Area Rapid Transit provided details on a number of aspects of its Silver Line rail. The $1.266 billion project aims to connect seven cities and four counties in the North Dallas area, including the city of Richardson. Expected to be in service by March 2023, the Silver Line includes 10 new rail stations along a 26-mile align- ment from Grapevine to Plano. “The next few months will see a lot more construction for this project,” said Carlos Huerta, DART representative for community aairs. “Up until now, we’ve seen a lot of utility and infrastructure work for the project.” Once complete, the project will include four rail connections to the DART Green, Orange and Red Lines as well as a TEXRail connection in Grapevine. Among the stations included in the project are two in Richardson—the rst will be a new

counties Rail line spans

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Silver Line Other lines Stations

The DART Silver Line will include 12- to 15-foot separation walls adjacent to homes. (Renderings courtesy Dallas Area Rapid Transit)

PARKER ROAD

NORTH CARROLLTONFRANKFORD

PLANO

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GRAPEVINE

DOWNTOWN PLANO

SHILOH ROAD

TRINITY MILLS

12TH STREET

KNOLL TRAIL

DFW AIRPORT NORTH

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON

CITYLINE BUSH

UT DALLAS

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DFW AIRPORT TERMINALS

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RICHARDSON EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

GOVERNMENT Council debates fate of Civic Center ahead of possible bond

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

accordingly but should still aim to charge less than the private sector. “I don’t want to compete with the event centers, the hotels or even, quite candidly, a house of faith,” Mayor Paul Voelker said. “That’s revenue for them.” In the two scal years preceding the COVID-19 pandemic, revenue brought in by events came in below the cost of running the center. In scal year 2018- 19, the city spent more than $1 million on center operations but brought in only $354,884, Smeby said. That same year, only about 68% of available booking units, or times when rooms in the center were available for rent, were reserved, Smeby said. Despite these challenges, the Civic Center is benecial to the city in some ways. For one, City Manager Dan Johnson said, the availability of the center prevents the city from having to spend money on renting pri- vate-sector space for its own events, such as the Corporate Challenge or the National Night Out kicko event. “We have to be eyes open about—if we were to displace them and have to go to the general market for that, what would be the new expense?” he said. Sta asked council to consider four potential options for the future of the center. The rst option would be to continue operations as they are, which would serve to maintain client rela- tions and could provide some leasing revenue for the city, Sims-Bradish said. The second option would be to keep the center in the building but to relegate operations to the north

The future of Richardson’s Civic Center is under discussion by mem- bers of City Council as a potential November bond election looms. The center is used to host city events and is also available for private rentals. At 13,750 square feet, it takes up about 23% of City Hall, Assistant City Manager Shanna Sims-Bradish told council Nov. 16. Room rates have not been adjusted for at least six years, said Lori Smeby, director of the Richardson Parks and Recreation Department. Five areas within the center are available to rent for between $300 and $1,800. The Civic Center’s rates are far lower than a hotel’s average rental rate for rooms of comparable size. A room equal in size to the Civic Center’s 2,300-square-foot Grand Hall, for example, would cost, on average, more than $8,000 to rent, Smeby said. “You see a big dierence there, and understandably so,” Smeby said. “Our hotel partners do have a dierent agenda or dierent goals when they rent.” Council Member Kyle Kepner said rates should be adjusted so that the city could at least break even on operational costs. “I understand [charging] less than everyone because we are a govern- ment [building], but a quarter of what everyone else is charging is perhaps way too low,” Kepner said. Mayor Paul Voelker agreed the city should take a closer look at the cost of operating the center and adjust rates

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The Civic Center makes up roughly a quarter of City Hall. (Courtesy city of Richardson)

OPTIONS FOR THE CIVIC CENTER

FACILITY FAST FACTS The Richardson Civic Center, located within City Hall, is used for public and private events. 13,750 square feet 23% of City Hall $1 MILLION to operate $354,884 68% of available slots were It cost in revenue in scal year 2018-19 and brought in booked in FY 2018-19. m 2

1. Continue operations as they are. 2. Keep the center at City Hall but relocate its operations. 3. Move the center to a location outside City Hall. 4. Discontinue Civic Center services. Four possible options for the fate of the Civic Center are under consideration by City Council. Sta will return with a more thorough cost analysis in January.

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

or west side of City Hall. This would help address safety concerns posed by having private events held near city oces, Sims-Bradish said. The third option would be to move the Civic Center to a location outside City Hall. If council were to pursue this option, it is likely that center operations would have to be paused until the ideal location is found, Sims-Bradish said. Voelker said he would support moving the center to another loca- tion because of security reasons as well as because of limits to opera- tional funding imposed by Senate

Bill 2, which reduced the amount of property tax revenue available to municipalities. “We probably have the money to build it, but do we have the money to operate it?” he asked. The fourth option would be to discontinue Civic Center operations. The loss of rental revenue from events would have an estimated annual impact of $135,000. No one on council was prepared to abandon the Civic Center alto- gether. Sta will return with a more thorough cost analysis and potential design strategies in January.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from the city of Richardson, Richardson ISD & more

NUMBER TOKNOW $2 MILLION Collin County commissioners voted Nov. 23 to allocate an additional $2 million in federal funding to the Collin CARES program to continue reimbursements for local food pantries. Collin CARES funding comes from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, which sent more than $171 million in federal aid to Collin County earlier this year. A document prepared for commissioners by county sta shows that more than $8.3 million in federal funds has been distributed to local food pantries. HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON ISD Trustees voted at a Nov. 16 meeting to approve emergency repairs at Audelia Creek Elementary School following a vehicle accident that occurred Nov. 15. A car struck the side of the building, causing substantial damage to a classroom, Superintendent Jeannie Stone said at the meeting. Students and sta who occupy the room have been moved to a separate space where they will remain while repairs are underway. TEXAS Gov. Greg Abbott announced Dec. 2 that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has allotted 1.4 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines to the state of Texas. The vaccines are anticipated to begin arriving the week of Dec. 14, according to a news release, and will be distributed to qualifying providers, which will administer the immunizations on a voluntary basis. On Nov. 23, the governor’s distribution plan for the vaccines was announced; it gives priority to health care workers, front-line workers and citizens who are at risk of contracting the virus. Additional allotments of the Richardson City Council Meets Dec. 14 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. As of press time, January meeting dates had not been adopted by council. Richardson ISD Meets Dec. 14 and Jan. 11 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD Meets Jan. 12 and 21 at 7 p.m. at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER vaccines may be made as soon as later this month.

Newapartments coming nearWest SpringValley Road

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BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON A new apartment property will be built following unanimous approval by City Council. The complex will include 186 one- and two-bedroom units wrapped around a 358-car parking garage. Amenities include a landscaped courtyard as well as a pool and a spa. Applicant Marc Tolson of Arrive Architectural Group appeared before council to request modications to the city’s zoning ordinance. Among the requests was an increase in the maximum building height from two to four stories as well as a reduction in the minimum unit size. The property is currently home to Huntington Townhomes, a 73-unit rental development built in 1963, according to council documents. The property owner, Huntington Drown

A rendering shows how the property may look. (Courtesy Arrive Architecture Group)

or oce uses in the future, according to the plans. Mayor Paul Voelker said the proj- ect could have the eect of bringing more investment to the area. “It will not only show other poten- tial multifamily developers what could happen, but it could drive other retail aspects because of the density and the customers that will be embedded in the community,” Voelker said. The developer plans to give notice of eviction next spring or early summer. Construction is set to begin around November 2021 and take 18 months.

LP, plans to demolish the existing units to make way for a new apart- ment complex. During the planning commission approval phase, four members of the public wrote letters in favor, and three wrote letters opposing the proj- ect. Tolson said his team has worked to address their concerns. “They are thrilled that this eyesore—that’s not getting any better, that’s older than I am ... is nally going,” Tolson said of those in support. Three of the ground-oor units fac- ing West Spring Valley Road have the potential to be converted into retail

Incumbent legislators score narrowvictories

Nonprot launches action plan targeting area homelessness

MAPPING A STRATEGIC PLAN An action plan created by the Collin County Homelessness Coalition includes the group’s ve areas of focus.

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

TEXAS Republican state representa- tives in Collin and Dallas counties held onto their seats in the Nov. 3 election by slimmargins. Incumbent state Rep. Matt Sha- heen, RPlano, drew two challengers for his House District 66 seat, which covers parts of Plano and north Dallas. Shaheen won the race with 49.68% of votes, but Democrat Sharon Hirsch was not far behind with 48.47%. Libertarian Shawn Jones nished with 1.86% of votes. State Rep. Je Leach, RPlano, held onto his District 67 seat with 51.8% of the vote, according to Collin County Elections. Democratic opponent Lorenzo Sanchez nished with 48.2%. In the race for House District 112, Rep. Angie Chen Button, RRichard- son, won with 48.92% of votes, while Democrat Brandy Chambers trailed behind with 48.59%. Libertarian Shane D. Newsom nished with 2.49% of votes.

Housing

BY LIESBETH POWERS

COLLIN COUNTY A nonprot that works to combat homeless- ness in the area has drafted a plan that outlines its short- and long-term eorts and goals, ocials said Nov. 18 during a livestream for the Annual Summit on Homelessness. The need for this step has been exacerbated by the pandemic, said Terry Hockenbrough, Collin County Homeless Coalition presi- dent and the director of business and community outreach at Collin College. At the summit, the coalition presented its action plan, dubbed the CPlan. The ve areas of focus are hous- ing, data, coordination, support and resources. These mirror the vision points of the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance’s DOne Plan,

Data

Resources

CPLAN

Coordination

Support

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY HOMELESS COALITION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

which was released in 2019. By having this approach in two large counties, there is additional supporting data for important requests, such as U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Develop- ment funds, he said. Next steps for the organization include creating committees for each of the ve areas.

9

RICHARDSON EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

2020 Senior Living Guide 2 ni i n

DESIGNED BY MICHELLE DEGARD COMPILED BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

RICHARDSON | COLLIN COUNTY | DALLAS COUNTY U Y A O

The number of seniors in Richardson has continued to rise over the past several years. There are more seniors per capita in Richardson than in Dallas or Collin counties.

ELIGIBLE TAX EXEMPTIONS Texas residents age 65 and older or those who are disabled qualify for an additional homestead exemption on school district taxes. Other taxing entities may also offer a senior exemption.

DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

Richardson has more senior residents per capita than Dallas and Collin counties.

Richardson has a higher percentage of seniors with a bachelor’s degree or higher than do Dallas County and Collin County.

Richardson

Richardson Age 65 and older

Percentage of seniors who have a high school education

Taxing entity

$100,000 Exemption

Senior population 14.3%

City of Richardson

89.9% 50.6%

17,354

Richardson ISD

$10,000

Plano ISD $10,000 Dallas County varies based on home value at time of tax freeze

Total population

Percentage of seniors who have a bachelor’s degree or higher Collin County Percentage of seniors who have a high school education Percentage of seniors who have a bachelor’s degree or higher Dallas County Percentage of seniors who have a high school education

121,331

Collin County

$30,000

Collin County 116,575 1,034,730 Age 65 and older Total population Dallas County 291,774 2,635,516 Age 65 and older Total population

Senior population 11.3%

LIFE EXPECTANCY

91.2% 43.3%

The average U.S. life expectancy rose from

68 years in 1950

to

79 years in 2018.

Senior population 11.1%

80.4% 31.0%

SOURCES: 2014-2019 U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 1-YEAR ESTIMATES, CITY OF RICHARDSON, RICHARDSON ISD, DALLAS COUNTY, COLLIN COUNTY, TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Percentage of seniors who have a bachelor’s degree or higher

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

As the numbers of senior adults nationwide and in the Richardson area continue to grow, so does demand for residential options. The following list is not comprehensive. Senior Living

PLANO PKWY.

CAMPBELL RD.

BARCLAY DR.

PGBT TOLL

13

RENNER RD.

7

8

LONGMONT PL.

Denitions / Key

GREENFIELD DR.

5 Independent - living communities cater to older adults with limited care needs. Most include amenities, such as tness programs, housekeeping, communal meals and more. 5 Assisted-living communities specialize in providing care and supervision. These facilities frequently oer a full range of amenities as well as limited medical assistance. 5 Memory care facilities specialize in providing care to seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive issues. Sta members are trained to help residents manage these diseases. Richardson 1 Appletree Court 870 W. Arapaho Court 972-889-2300 www.appletreecourt.com 2 Arden Courts of Richardson 410 Buckingham Road 972-235-1200 www.arden-courts.com/richardson 3 Cottonwood Creek Healthcare Community 1111 West Shore Drive 972-783-8000 www.cottonwoodcreekhealthcare.com 4 Dignied Living A. 2206 Blue Cypress Drive B. 3304 Blue Bell Place 972-978-1656 www.digniedlivingforseniors.com 5 Faith Comfort Care 525 Birch Lane 214-607-8763 www.faithresidentialcarehome.net

5 Hospice care is intended to relieve symptoms and suering associated with a terminal illness in those who have been given six months or less to live. The patient must choose to forgo further curative treatment. 5 Nursing home/skilled nursing facilities provide care to those with illnesses or mental conditions that require full-time monitoring and medical care. 5 Mixed-use facilities oer some or all of these services.

RICHARDSON DR.

CAMPBELL RD.

RENNER RD.

15

3

17

12

10

COLLINS BLVD.

BLUE BELL PL.

4B

18

1

9

11

14

BLUEBONNET DR. MORNING GLORY DR.

ARAPAHO RD.

6

ROCKINGHAM DR.

BLUE CYPRESS DR.

4A

BELT LINE RD.

75

16

SOURCES: TEXAS HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, WWW.AARP.ORGCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BUCKINGHAM RD.

2

5

BUCKINGHAM RD.

6 The Family’s Choice 2212 Bluebonnet Drive 214-272-9755 www.thefamilyschoice.com 7 Glorious Residential Place 1800 Longmont Place 972-400-0148 www.gloriousseniorliving.com 8 Heritage House of Richardson 2997 Greeneld Drive 214-632-2382 www.theheritagehouses.com 9 Nursing Center 1510 N. Plano Road, Richardson 972-234-4786 www.lindanparkhealth.com 10 1493 Richardson Drive 972-846-8009 www.themonarchrichardson.com 11 The Plaza at Richardson 1301 Richardson Drive | 972-759-2180 www.theplazacare.com

BIRCH LN.

N

MAP NOT TO SCALE

Independent-living

Assisted-living

Memory care

Hospice care

Nursing home/skilled nursing

Mixed-use

12 The Reserve at Richardson 1610 Richardson Drive 469-906-5375 www.thereserveatrichardson.com 13 San Remo 3550 N. Shiloh Road 972-235-8838 www.cantexcc.com/skilled-nursing/ locations/san-remo/san-remo 14 Sunray Community 2129 E. Arapaho Road 972-235-8838 http://sunraycommunityapts.com 15 1720 N. Plano Road 972-979-4333 www.twinriversassistedliving.com

16 Twin Rivers Senior Living 201 S. Glenville Drive 972-705-9955 www.twinriversseniorliving.com 17 The Village at Richardson 1111 Rockingham Drive 972-231-8833 www.villagerichardson.com 18

Lindan Park Rehabilitation &

The Wellington at Arapaho

600 W. Arapaho Road 469-330-2800 www.capitalsenior.com/ thewellingtonatarapaho

The Monarch at Richardson

Twin Rivers Assisted Living

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Call today for a quote: 972-889-1833 www.weknowinsurance.com 3400 North Central Expressway #101-221 • Richardson

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11

RICHARDSON EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

AMENITIES INCLUDE:

ANEWLOOK FOR THE RICHARDSON SENIOR CENTER While the new center will grow only slightly in square footage, the updated layout will improve services, safety and efficiency, according to Richardson Parks and Recreation Department staff.

today as we thought it was going to go back in 2015,” he said. Engineering staff presented a num- ber of bid alternates that would have brought down the cost of the reno- vation, but Richardson City Council ultimately voted to approve supple- mental funding to cover the full proj- ect scope. Appealing toayounger demographic Nearly 1,600 seniors were mem- bers of the center prior to COVID-19. One of the goals of the project is to attract seniors who fall into the lower age bracket. The average age of mem- bers is 75, Smeby said. Richardsonresidentspayaone-time membership fee of $5 and have access to special events, trips, programs, classes, and health and wellness services. The city has formed focus groups to come up with programming ideas for younger members. “Part of our interest as we have moved along in this renovation effort is to really make this facility and the programming ... something that is highly desirable to all ages in the 50-plus market,” Smeby said. Encouraging seniors ages 55-65 • Bigger fitness room • Bigger dining and kitchen area • Two large multipurpose rooms with movable walls • Bigger classrooms • Covered drive-up entrance • Enclosed lobby with improved check-in • New outdoor courtyard SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

W. ARAPAHO RD.

N

A dedicated reception area will serve as a welcoming environment for visitors and members. (Rendering courtesy PGAL Architects)

for completion in April 2021. “The contractors are really doing a great job staying on task and keep- ing things moving along,” said Lori Smeby, director of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department. “It’s looking good out there.” The center, located at the corner of Arapaho Road and West Shore Drive, has served Richardson residents age 50 and older since 1993. Updates to the building will improve services, safety and efficiency in the aging building, which opened as a bank in 1965. “We want this project to be a jewel for our seniors and to really reflect the needs of what the senior community deserves in a facility,” Smeby said. It is unknownwhat the newyear will bring in terms of the virus. Smeby said it’s entirely possible the center will have to remain closed once renova- tions are complete in the spring. “We still don’t have any plans to reopen,” she said. “We’re just going to watch [the virus] carefully and hope

better accommodate the city’s grow- ing senior population, Smeby said. “There is going to be a lot more activity space than there was previ- ously,” she said. Among the upgrades are a bigger fitness room, an enlarged kitchen and dining area, two large multipur- pose rooms with movable walls, big- ger classrooms, a drive-up covered entrance and a newoutdoor courtyard. Originally budgeted at just under $5 million, the renovation project now costs closer to $8 million, said Jim Dulac, the city’s assistant direc- tor of engineering. This is because the budget did not include the replacement of mechanical systems, exterior site improvements or street upgrades, such as those made to the section of Arapaho Road outside of the center. The cost increase was further exac- erbated by the region’s rapid growth of inflation, Dulac said. “That $5 million does not go as far

that come spring, when we have this facility ready to go, that we can open in some type of modified fashion.” Over the past eight months, Sme- by’s staff has remained dedicated to not only providing essential services for seniors but also keeping them engaged socially through virtual pro- grams and events. This dedication will continue for as long as the pan- demic prevents in-person gatherings, she said. Details of the design Richardson’s senior population has slowly but steadily increased over the past six years. Single-year population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show the share of res- idents age 65 and older totaled 17,354 in 2019, or an increase of about 15% since 2014. Square footage of the center will grow only slightly as a result of the renovations, but the updated layout is more efficient and can

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

S enior Living Guide Resources RECREATION Richardson Senior Center is open to residents age 55 and older and offers services, such as recreational programs and health screenings. Programs and services are virtual for the time being. 972-744-7800 www.cor.net/our-city/city-facilities/ senior-center

to use the center will also ensure that certain traditions—such as cro- cheting blankets for veterans and infants in nearby neonatal inten- sive care units—are carried on for years to come, Yvonne Falgout, the city’s assistant director of recreation and events, told Community Impact Newspaper in a previous interview. “We want to make sure those things get passed onto the next group coming through,” she said. Some younger residents have been hesitant to use the center because of the word “senior” in its name, Smeby told council during an October 2019 briefing. As a result, a focus group met earlier this year to study the pos- sibility of renaming the center. Support through COVID-19 In absence of in-person gatherings, Senior Center staff have turned to virtual events, such as online book club and Zoom hangouts, to keep members engaged. It is now more crucial than ever to protect the older adult community, said Stacy Malcolmson, president and CEO of The Senior Source, a non- profit serving seniors in the Greater Dallas area. Many seniors have lost their jobs or volunteer opportunities, which results in a dampened sense of purpose, she added. “Social isolation has been really debilitating—it affects your mental well-being, which then impacts your physical well-being,”Malcolmson said. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, one in four older adults has reported anxiety or depression during most weeks since the onset of the pandemic, which is an increase from the one in 10 older adults who reported the same issues in 2018. The shift to virtual platforms has been challenging for some seniors, especially those who are low-in- come, Malcolmson said. As a result, The Senior Source has invested in technology training so its volunteers can help seniors connect with the outside world. Comfort with technology is likely one of the reasons keeping more seniors from participating in virtual Senior Center events, Smeby said. “While we would always love to have more participation, it’s been what we have expected,” she said. “The seniors that have been able to participate have enjoyed it and appreciated it.”

In themeantime, staffhas launched drive-thru events so that seniors can have at least some face-to-face inter- action with their friends. The center hosted a Nov. 24 drive-thru Thanks- giving event that served pre-boxed dinners to 120 seniors. “They’re tired of looking at some- one through a computer monitor,” Smeby said of Senior Center mem- bers. “They would rather just be in person, even if you can’t touch each other.” TRANSPORTATION City of Richardson van service is offered to residents age 55 and older. It operates Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Rides cost $0.25 each way or $0.50 round-trip. Due to the pandemic, the van service is available for essential ride needs only and to limited destinations. Reservations are required. 972-744-7805 www.cor.net/our-city/city-facilities/ senior-center SUPPORT Methodist Generations offers monthly seminars on senior health issues as well as classes, workshops, social activities, information and resources. In-person events are on hold, but online classes are available. 214-947-4628 www.methodisthealthsystem.org/ about/community-involvement/ generations-senior-services The Senior Source offers financial assistance, help with fraud, employment services, family caregiver support, nursing home resources and senior volunteer programs to older adults in the Greater Dallas area. 214-823-5700 www.theseniorsource.org SOURCES: CITY OF RICHARDSON, METHODIST HEALTH SYSTEM, THE SENIOR SOURCE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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13

RICHARDSON EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

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