Spring - Klein Edition | February 2021

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 11  FEB. 23MARCH 19, 2021

ONLINE AT

Springwoods Village evolves with tech giant relocation, new housing options

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

that Coventry Development Corp. began construction on nearly a decade ago. The development, which has prioritized commercial space over residential space is now home to ve corporations, retail oerings and nearly 950 multifamily units. CONTINUED ON 12

Despite setbacks induced by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, construction is moving forward in Spring- woods Village. The 2,000-acre sustainable, master-planned community, which is located along Spring’s northern border, is a project

SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE PKWY.

LAKE PLAZA DR.

99 TOLL

N Construction is underway on Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s new global headquarters in Springwoods Village. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

E. MOSSY OAKS RD.

45

County launches department focusing on economic equity

In pursuit of equity A study in Harris County released in October shows a disparity in how the county selects rms to contract with on its projects.

Nonminority or nonwomen owned*

Hispanic- owned

Black- owned

White women- owned

Asian- owned

Native American- owned

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

A new department in Harris County set to launch in March will seek to bring equity to economic opportunity countywide. The initiative comes after county ocials made equity a focus of other spending discussions, including mobility, ood control and public health. The Harris County Department of Equity and Economic Opportunity is a culmination of two years of research, community input and stakeholder meetings, said Sasha Legette, a member of the Harris County Precinct 1 policy team that helped get the CONTINUED ON 15

*INCLUDES PUBLICLY TRADED COMPANIES, EMPLOYEEOWNED COMPANIES

Disparity ratio is the utilization of minority- and women-owned businesses divided by availability.

Weighted availability for county contracts

3%

10.7% 8.4% 5.9%

0.4%

71.6%

A ratio of 80% or lower suggests discrimination.

Companies to receive county contracts (by dollar) 4.6% 3.2% 90.9%

0.5%

0.1%

0.6%

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY, COLETTE HOLT & ASSOCIATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Waivers for state title, registration come to an end

Texans struggle through ERCOT power grid strain

IMPACTS

TRANSPORTATION

WEATHER

SOUTHERNQ BBQ

7

8

9

11

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON . Join your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . S nap or visit Contribute today!

Providing Better Options for HEART & VASCULAR CARE in Northwest Houston

Through specialized programs, clinical trials and a commitment to challenging conventional thinking, our comprehensive team of cardiovascular specialists is improving outcomes and providing better options for heart and vascular care in your community.

L D

T

HOUSTON METHODIST WILLOWBROOK HOSPITAL

Our doctors specialize in treating a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases and disorders, including:

Willowbrook

• Atrial fibrillation and heart rhythm disorders • Coronary artery disease

• Heart failure • Valve disease • Vein and artery disorders

249

And, you can be confident that we are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe throughout your visit.

To find a doctor or schedule an appointment, visit houstonmethodist.org/debakey/willowbrook or call 713.DEBAKEY .

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

KLEIN ISD CONTINUES IN FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY

GFOA Certi fica te of Achieveme n t for Excelle n ce in F inan ci a l Reporti n g 24 years (Fiscal Year 2019) F inan ci a l I n tegrity R a ti n g System of Tex a s (st a te's school finan ci a l a cc ountab ility r a ti n g system) Superior rating 18 consecutive years (received October 2020) ASBO Certi fica te of Excelle n ce in F inan ci a l Reporti n g 17 years (Fiscal Year 2019) ASBO Meritorious Budget Aw a rd 16 years (Fiscal Year 2020-2021) TASBO Aw a rd of Merit for Purch as i n g Oper a tio n s 2 years (received in March 2020)

www.kleinisd.net/ finan ce

3

SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

LoneStar.edu/Start

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMKELLY: Your monthly Spring-Klein edition is arriving in your mailbox a few days later than normal—Feb. 23 versus Feb. 19. Much like the surrounding community, the lives of the Community Impact Newspaper team were also put on pause the week of Feb. 15-19 by freezing conditions, multiday power outages and ruptured water pipes caused by Winter Storm Uri. As we regained our footing—and internet—we pushed back our printing deadline. We also added a news report into this print edition looking at the storm’s eect on Texas; it includes insight from Houston-area experts on how the Electric Reliability Council of Texas’ power grid failure could have been avoided (see Page 9). However, we know the discussion and coverage of this event is far from over, as Gov. Greg Abbott called for an investigation of ERCOT in a Feb. 16 statement. Readers can expect more on the storm in our March print edition as well as on our website at communityimpact.com. Kelly Schaer, EDITOR

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITOR Kelly Schaer SENIOR REPORTER Hannah Zedaker REPORTER Andy Li GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Laurence METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

HOWWE’RE FUNDED

ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220 Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 PRESS RELEASES sklnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. Thank you to the advertisers in this edition who support our work. We would love for our readers to thank them as well.

local, reliable reporting. Become a CI Patron today with a contribution of any amount. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving.

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewsskl

35%

of Patrons opt for recurring monthly contributions

@impactnews_skl

$10 is the average minimum

Patrons have chosen to give

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

5

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

Dog & Cat Boarding • Dog Training & Agi l i ty • Dog & Cat Grooming • Doggie Daycare

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION MONTH $15 DAYCARE IN FEBRUARY $1 5 Cas h Pay On l y , $25 f o r Cr ed i t Ca r d Cha r ge s

Cage Free Dog Boarding

New Cus t ome r s On l y . No t Va l i d on Ho l i days

BOARDING or GROOMING

O P E N 7 D A Y S A WE E K , 3 6 5 D A Y S A Y E A R Mon - Sun 7am- 7pm COME ME E T OUR DOG T RA I NE R !

11105 Mahaf fey | Tombal l , TX 77375 | 832-884-6122 | Wi l l owCreekPets.com

INFANTS • TODDLERS • PRESCHOOL • PRE-K • BEFORE & AFTER CARE • SUMMER CAMP

Now Enrolling! Mention this ad and receive free registration kiddieacademy.com/klein-gleannloch

Kiddie Academy of Klein-Gleannloch 19559 Champion Forest Dr. Spring, TX 77379 346-298-7070

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD, ADRIANA REZAL, KELLY SCHAFLER & HANNAH ZEDAKER

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

January at 17045 Stuebner Airline Road, Spring. The Texas barbecue franchise oers barbecue plates and sandwiches and boasts fall-o-the-bone ribs and pit-smoked wings. Pickup, delivery and catering services are available. 281-826-3375. www.dickeys.com 5 The Fajita Hut opened Nov. 20 at 8312 Louetta Road, Ste. C, Spring. The takeout-style concept oers fajitas, tamales, quesadillas, sangria and margaritas. Delivery service is also available via DoorDash. 713-478-0003. www.thefajitahut.com 6 Algoo Buenoo opened Jan. 2 at 16314 Stuebner Airline Road, Spring. The new business oers protein doughnuts, gourmet shakes, energy teas and protein iced coee. 832-610-5198. www.facebook.com/algoo.buenoo 7 Houston Angels’ Nutrition opened Nov. 28 at 18708 Hufsmith-Kohrville Road, Ste. 500, Tomball. The business oers gourmet meal-replacement milkshakes in addition to other beverages such as the hot mocha dulce coee and Mango Tango iced tea. 832-843-7681. www.facebook.com/ houstonangelsnutrition 8 Heart & Hustle CrossFit opened Jan. 4 at 21901 Hwy. 249, Ste. 400, Houston. The facility features state-of-the-art equipment and ve dierent classes that cater to all levels of experience, incorporating high-intensity interval training, weightlifting and cardio 9 Waxing the City opened Jan. 22 at 6630 Spring Stuebner Road, Ste. 510, Spring. The studio oers a variety of waxing services for men and women as well as eyelash and eyebrow tinting. 832-761-7206. www.waxingthecity.com 10 Chipotle opened a new location Feb. 17 at 1400 Lake Plaza Drive, Ste. D, Spring. The eatery is known for its build-your-own burritos, burrito bowls, lifestyle bowls, salads and tacos. 832-948-1032. www.chipotle.com COMING SOON 11 The fth location of gourmet kolache and doughnut shop Karma Kolache is slated to open March 6 at circuits. 832-377-7153. www.hxhcrosst.com 45 OLD TOWN SPRING

1

SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE PKWY.

45

W. RAYFORD RD.

10

LAKE PLAZA DR.

9

Wunsche Brothers Cafe & Saloon rst opened in Old Town Spring in 1902. FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN After being closed for six years, Wunsche Brothers Cafe & Saloon reopened Feb. 1 in Old Town Spring at 103 Midway St., Spring. The eatery serves American fare ranging from burgers and sandwiches to chicken-fried steak and fried catsh. Beer bread—a Wunsche Brothers staple—has also made its return, and sides, such as mac and cheese and squash casserole, are also on the menu. 281-350-1902. www.facebook.com/wunschebros HANNAH ZEDAKERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

7

2920

12

99 TOLL

2

3

4

6

5

1960

8

CUTTEN RD.

BAMMEL N. HOUSTON RD.

249

N

11

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

10211 Cypresswood Drive, Ste. 100, Houston. The new location will feature a drive-thru and also boast cinnamon rolls, apple fritters, breakfast sandwiches and

NOWOPEN 1 Island Fin Poke Co. opened Jan. 30 at 24345 Gosling Road, Ste. 120, Spring. The Hawaiian-style restaurant allows patrons to create their own poke bowl by choosing from eight proteins, more than 25 toppings, housemade sauces and specialty mix-ins. 832-310-0261. www.islandnpoke.com 2 Godfather’s Pizza opened Jan. 11 at 5275 Louetta Road, Spring. The pizzeria oers create-your-own and specialty

pizzas available in six sizes ranging from mini to jumbo. The menu also features wings, salads, breadsticks and desserts. 281-257-0100. www.godfathers.com 3 Coreanos opened Jan. 9 at 6880 Louetta Road, Spring. This food truck specializes in Mexican-Korean fusion cuisine, with menu items ranging from Kimcheese fries and Korean barbecue burritos to Korean barbecue tacos and rice bowls. 281-380-1612. www.coreanostx.com 4 Dickey’s Barbecue Pit opened in mid-

coee drinks. 832-604-6670. www.karmatastesgood.com

GEARS RD.

12 Crust Pizza Co. plans to open a new location in September at 5211 FM 2920, Ste. 108, Spring. The Woodlands-based eatery will oer specialty thin-crust pizzas, pastas, hot subs, wine and beer and will feature an outdoor patio. www.crustpizzaco.com

All better.

nextlevelurgentcare.com

The Woodlands Open 9am-9pm, 7 days a week 25750 Kuykendahl Rd, Ste A Tomball, TX 77375

Champions Open 9 am-9pm, 7 days a week 15882 Champion Forest Dr Spring, TX 77379

From headaches and sore throats to x-rays, lab work , and everything in between, get the care you need quick and easy at Next Level Urgent Care.

7

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

2 Beltway 8 improvements Work continues on a project to improve intersections and trac signals along the Beltway 8 frontage road between West Gulf Bank Road and TC Jester Boulevard. Timeline: Aug. 13, 2019-March 2022 Cost: $3 million Funding sources: Precinct 4, Texas Department of Transportation 3 Hwy. 6, FM 1960 improvements Construction is underway on a project to improve intersections and modify trac signals along 3A Hwy. 6 between West Little York and West roads and on 3B FM 1960 between Fallbrook and Kenswick drives. Timeline: Aug. 13, 2019-March 2022 Cost: $2 million Funding sources: Precinct 4, TxDOT 4 Cypress Station Drive, Hollow Tree Lane intersection A new trac signal at Cypress Station Drive and Hollow Tree Lane is on hold pending the resolution of utility conicts, which Rocchi said are expected to be resolved by the third quarter of 2021. Timeline: Nov. 12, 2019-third quarter 2021 Cost: $261,343 Funding sources: Precinct 4, TxDOT

RILEY FUZZEL RD.

SPRING STUEBNER RD.

1

ELM ST.

2920

The waiver expires April 14. (Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

3B

59

1960

99 TOLL

HOW ITWORKS

State announces end date for waiver on vehicle title, registration Texans have until April 14 to renew expired vehicle registrations, ocials with the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles announced Dec. 15. The temporary waiver was rst implemented by Gov. Greg Abbott in March 2020, and while it was extended several times throughout the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, vehicle owners will need to renew vehicle registrations prior to April 14 to avoid being penalized for expired registrations. The expiring waiver covers initial vehicle registration, vehicle registration renewal and titling, renewal of permanent disabled parking placards and 30-day temporary permits. ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JAN. 29. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

CYPRESS STATION DR.

4

249

1960

HOLLOW TREE LN.

45

3B

1960

O O K D R .

2

TC JESTER BLVD.

3A

6

W. GULF BANK RD.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Riley Fuzzel Road expansion A project is under construction to expand Riley Fuzzel Road to ve lanes with improved drainage between Elm Street and the Hardy Toll Road. The project will also realign the road at West Hardy to incorporate a four-way intersection and close the railroad crossing at

Caroline Street to accommodate a new crossing north of Riley Fuzzel. According to Pamela Rocchi, the director of Harris County Precinct 4’s Capital Improvement Projects Division, a utility conict has delayed construction by one month. Timeline: April 13, 2020-mid-April 2021 Cost: $5.02 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4

Registering for the 2021 Semester!

GAMING ALL DAY YMCA Camp Cullen

Imagine Early Education and Childcare

• Serving 6wk - 12 years • Infants and Toddlers

• School Age Programs • Academic Assessments

Register your child, ages 7-17, for a premier summer overnight camp experience at YMCA Camp Cullen. From water sports and zip lining to horseback riding and science experiments, all in a safe and healthy environment without sacrificing any of the fun!

• Preschool & Pre-Kindergarten

20% OFF YOUR FIRST MONTH EXPIRES 3.19.21 • CODE: 5874

Located along the shores of Lake Livingston, just north of Houston State-of-the-art facilities Week-long summer sessions & school-year weekend family escapes Money-back registration guarantee

Gleannloch • 8901 Spring Cypress Rd • Spring, TX 77379 • Call Today 833-742-4453 www.imaginechild.com Schedule your tour today!

Register today at YMCACampCullen.org!

YMCA Mission: To put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all. Everyone is welcome.

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WEATHER Winter conditions bring outages to isolated Texas power grid

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas manages an electric grid that covers most of Texas and is disconnected from larger interconnections covering the rest of the U.S.

1

2

Winter collapse A Feb. 11 press release from ERCOT stated the agency issued notices from Feb. 8-11 about the cold weather expected to hit Texas and that generators were asked to prepare for it. ERCOT followed with a Feb. 14 notice asking customers to reduce electricity through Feb. 16. The next day, ERCOT announced the council had begun rotating outages at 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15. More than 4.3 million Texans were without power the morning of Feb. 16, according to poweroutage.us. Despite early warnings, Ramanan Krishnamoorti, a chemical engineering professor and chief energy ocer at the University of Houston, said he believes the state’s reliance on market conditions to manage supply and demand is partially responsible for outages given providers’ lack of incentive to produce in advance of the supply shortage. He and Cohan also cited a low supply of natural gas. “The shortfall in natural gas supply is about 20 times as large as the shortfall in wind supply compared to expectations for a winter peak cold event,” Cohan said. Planningahead The statewide outages were the fourth such event in ERCOT’s history. One result of the most recent event in February 2011—also caused by winter weather—was a federal report outlining past failures of power generators and recommending ERCOT and other authorities make winterization eorts a top concern.

BY BEN THOMPSON

WESTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes El Paso and far West Texas 1 EASTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes portions of East Texas and the panhandle region 2 3

Widespread power outages prompted by severe weather across Texas in February led to increased focus on the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, which manages statewide electric power ow. The failure of portions of the state’s power grid left millions of Texans without electric service the week of Feb. 15-19. As blackouts and power restoration eorts continued, public ocials, including Gov. Greg Abbott, called for an investigation of ERCOT. ERCOT did not respond to phone calls or email requests for comment. An independent system Texas’ power grid has long been controlled within the state, separate from eastern and western North American interconnects. Founded in 1970, ERCOT is supervised by the Public Utility Commission of Texas and the Texas Legislature and manages most of the state’s electric system and retail market. ERCOT ocials have highlighted benets of the insular system in the past, although its disconnect from the continent’s larger grids has left it prone to isolation issues during high- demand events, such as February’s winter storms, experts said. “Staying independent keeps the management of our power systems within Texas. But it means that we can barely import any power when we need it most,” Daniel Cohan, a Rice University civil and environmental engineering professor, said via email.

3

ERCOT INTERCONNECTION

ERCOT’s grid provides electric

ERCOT manages 90% of the Texas electrical load.

ERCOT provides for 26 million customers.

ERCOT’s grid includes 46,500 miles of transmission.

power to the majority of Texans.

Real-time data varies, but more than half of ERCOT’s generation capacity comes from natural gas. Experts cited a natural gas shortage in February’s power outages.

POWER BREAKDOWN

2021 ERCOT grid power generating capacity 51% Natural gas 4.9% Nuclear

24.8% Wind 3.8% Solar

13.4% Coal 1.9% Other

0.2% Storage

TRACKING THE OUTAGES Millions of Texans lost power during winter storms Feb. 15-19. from the grid due to forced outages Feb. 15

• At 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15 , ERCOT began rotating outages from customers statewide • As much as 16,500 megawatts removed

• 4.3million Texans were without power at 9 a.m. Feb. 16 • At least 1.4million

• 1 megawatt can power about 200 households during peak demand

CenterPoint Energy customers were without power Feb. 15.

SOURCES: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS, POWEROUTAGE.US COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Beyond just following previous recommendations, the state

could have planned,” he said. Cohan said he hopes the state will take a broader range of issues into consideration for potential updates to its energy systems. “We need to look beyond the electricity system and realize that this is an energy systems crisis,” he said.

and power suppliers could have further incentivized preparation for the record-breaking conditions experienced, Krishnamoorti said. “We knew that this polar vortex was coming at least a week ahead. We

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20 TH OVER $375,000 IN PURSES!

281-807-8700 or visit shrp.com

POST TIME: 6:45PM

9

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

SCHOOL & COUNTY

News from Houston, Harris County, Spring & Klein ISDs

Harris County, Houston partner on $159Mrental relief program

HARRIS COUNTY The city of Houston and Harris County are partnering on a $159 million rental relief program to allow residents to apply for funds to pay overdue rent from as far back as April. The new program is mostly funded with money from the U.S. Treasury Emergency Rental Assistance Program, approved as part of a federal stimulus package passed by Congress in December. Officials expected to begin accepting applications from landlords Feb. 18 and residents Feb. 25, according to the Catholic Charities Archdiocese of Galveston- Houston, which is running the program with BakerRipley. BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & EMMA WHALEN

The program also allows applicants to seek help for up to two months into the future and apply for some past-due utility bills, including electricity, gas and water. The rental relief program run by Harris County in 2020 required tenants and landlords to work together on an application to be approved. Officials said they still encourage landlord participation, but funding in the new program can also be awarded directly to tenants if Commissioners Court, Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia said helping people pay rent for two months will be a “game changer” for landlords and tenants alike. landlords refuse to sign on. At the Feb. 9 Harris County

SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS KLEIN ISD Klein ISD was recognized as The National District of The Year at the 2021 District Administration Future of Education Technology National Conference, district officials announced Jan. 29. The award specifically recognizes innovation in instruction and curriculum. SPRING ISD The Spring ISD board of trustees selected Option B as the district’s 2021-22 instructional calendar on Feb. 9, which runs Aug. 11-May 26. The approved option begins and ends earlier than proposed Option A, which would have run Aug. 16-June 2. HOWTOAPPLY Both Harris County and the city of Houston will operate the rental program under the same guidelines. Funding will be open to residents living in the city and county. • Applicants must have an income lower than 80% of the average family median income. • Applicants must be able prove the COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative effect on their economic situation and housing stability. Priority applicants • Those who have an income lower than 50% of the average family median income • Those who have been unemployed for 90 days or more SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COURT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

REAL . LOCAL . SAVINGS .

See how much you could save on car insurance today.

County purchases 12,000newvotingmachines

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

Klein-area races on the May ballot, voters can use the new system in November. Trustee seats in Klein, Spring and Cy-Fair ISDs will be up for election Nov. 8. According to Harris County Elections Administrator Isabel Longoria, the newmachines feature a digital touch screen and a paper copy of the voter’s selections the voter can verify before submitting. They will also feature Americans with Disabilities Act-accessible controls and new screen toggling features. The first 2,300 machines will be delivered to the county by March 1.

HARRIS COUNTY Harris County residents who vote in the upcoming May 1 elections will be the first to use the county’s new voting machines, known as Hart InterCivic Inc. Verity Voting Systems. On Jan. 26, with an expenditure of $54 million, the Harris County Commissioners Court unanimously authorized the purchase of 12,000 newmachines and entered into a one-year contract agreement with Hart InterCivic Inc. that will be in effect until Jan. 25, 2022. While there are not many Spring- or

713-224-3426 1403 Spring Cypress Rd Spring

MEETINGSWE COVER

Cy-Fair ISD board of trustees will meet at 6 p.m. March 11 at 10300 Jones Road, Houston. 281-897-4000. www.cfisd.net Klein ISD board of trustees will meet at 6 p.m. March 8 at 7200 Spring Cypress Road, Spring. 832-249-4000. www.kleinisd.net Spring ISD board of trustees will meet at 6 p.m. March 4 and 7 p.m. March 9 at 16717 Ella Blvd., Houston. 281-891-6000. www.springisd.org Harris County Commissioners Court will meet virtually at 10 a.m. Feb. 23 and March 9. 713-274-1111. www.harriscountytx.gov Meetings will be recorded or livestreamed.

Water plant expansion on track for 2025 finish

Saving people money on more than just car insurance. ®

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

Klein area—into compliance with impending groundwater subsidence regulations. According to Kaleyatodi, 60% of water in 2025 and 80% in 2035 will need to come from surface water. Phase 1, on which construction began in July 2019, will add a capacity of 80 million gallons per day by January 2023, while Phase 2 will add 240 million gallons per day by July 2025. The entire project will wrap up by September 2025 and is a venture by the city of Houston and the north, central and west Harris County regional water authorities.

HOUSTON The Northeast Water Purification Plant expansion project, which will increase the plant’s water treatment capacity by 320 million gallons per day, is on track for its 2025 finish, said Ravi Kaleyatodi, Houston Public Works project director. During a North Houston Association Environment & Water Committee meeting Feb. 4, Kaleyatodi provided an update on the $1.4 billion project, which he said is necessary to get the region—including the Spring and

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not availableinallstates, inallGEICOcompanies,orinallsituations.Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICO Marine Insurance Company. Homeowners, renters and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image © 1999-2019. © 2019 GEICO

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOWTOORDER SouthernQ BBQ and Catering pivoted during the coronavirus pandemic to allow customers to order food safely. Order through the website for pickup Dine in To go Get food delivered through DoorDash, Grubhub or UberEats

Chicken

Beans

Cajun rice

Barbecue sauce

The Big Poppa ($19.95) is a baked potato topped with sausage, brisket and a rib. (Courtesy SouthernQ BBQ and Catering)

Turkey

Potato salad

Sausage

Ribs

Brisket

DINING FEATURE

The sample platter ($29.95) features ribs, sausage, brisket and turkey along with several sides. (Andy Li/Community Impact Newspaper)

SouthernQBBQand Catering Couple serves East Texas barbecue, adapts to endure COVID19 pandemic F or more than 10 years, SouthernQ BBQ and Catering has served East Texas barbecue to the Spring community, blending classic dishes that are Garner family recipes, such as baked potatoes, mac and cheese, and potato salad. “We’re sharing our family’s passion with all of the public. It’s really awesome,” Sherice said. BY ANDY LI

The chopped beef sandwich ($9.95) is one of several sandwiches oered at the eatery. (Courtesy SouthernQ BBQ and Catering)

avors with Cajun concepts and family recipes. Married couple Sherice and Steve Garner rst began cooking barbecue as a ministry of The Daily Bread Church, but after being encouraged by their pastor, the Garners turned their hobby into a business. They opened a food truck in 2008 and eventually opened two storefronts: one on Kuykendahl Road in February 2015 and the other on Richey Road in March 2019. “We started under a tent. We would set up our barbecue pit and put a couple of chairs out, and people would come and just try our food out,” Sherice said. “When we were able to get that trailer, ... [it] had our name on it, and that was really amazing.” Sherice said SouthernQ specializes in East Texas barbecue, known for smoking meats for a long period of time over indirect heat. Steve said he smokes meat, such as brisket, ribs and sausage, for at least 15 hours. Sherice said the restaurant also blends the East Texas style with Cajun avors while serving side

Last year was supposed to be a big year for growth for SouthernQ as the new location became protable, Sherice said. However, when the coronavirus pandemic caused temporary shutdowns beginning in March, business came to a halt, and many catering events were canceled, she said. The pandemic also caused the couple to close their original Kuykendahl location in April after business almost dried up entirely. “It was a devastating start of the year, but because we were a small business and because we can change things quickly, ... we were able to implement the curbside service,” Sherice said. SouthernQ now also oers pickup and delivery through third-party apps such as DoorDash and Grubhub. As 2021 begins, Sherice said they are hopeful for customers to return and more assistance to be given to help them survive. “We want to build our team; we want more business,” Sherice said. “We just want to see this area thrive.”

SouthernQBBQand Catering 411 W. Richey Road, Houston 281-919-1238 www.southernqbbqcatering.com Hours: Wed.-Sat. 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., closed Mon.-Tue. Steve and Sherice Garner originally opened SouthernQ BBQ and Catering as a food truck in 2008. (Andy Li/Community Impact Newspaper)

45

D .

N

If your child doesn’t love school, they deserve to.

ActonAcademy Champions

WE BELIEVE EACH CHILD IS A GENIUS ON A HERO’S JOURNEY TO CHANGE THE WORLD.

4820 Strack Rd. Houston, TX ENROLLING YEAR ROUND

CYPRESSWOOD DR.

A global network of the most innovative K-12 schools on the planet.

STRACK RD.

FREEDOM TO BE YOU. SPACE TO GROW. COMMUNITY TO THRIVE.

WWW.ACTONACADEMYCHAMPIONS.ORG

11

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

DEVELOPMENT Nearing a decade of Since 2013, Coventry Development Corp. has made progress on Springwoods Village, a 2,000-acre master-planned community located near the intersection of I-45 and the Grand Parkway in Spring.

Sullivan Brothers Builders breaks

ExxonMobil opens Springwoods Village campus.

ground on Harper Woods, which comprises 88 single-family homes.

Southwestern Energy opens new headquarters in

Initial parks, trails and a 150-acre nature

TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT

Springwoods Village.

preserve are unveiled.

Corporate

Residential

Environmental

2013

2014

2015

2016

Health care and public safety

Retail

Hospitality

Taylor Morrison breaks ground on Audubon Grove, which comprises 51 single-family homes.

The Belvedere, a 342-unit,

CHI St. Luke’s Health opens

Spring Fire Department Station 70 and Cypress

multifamily community, opens.

Springwoods Village Hospital.

Creek EMS Station 513 open on Springwoods Village Parkway.

SOURCE: COVENTRY DEVELOPMENT CORP.COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER PHOTOS BY HANNAH ZEDAKERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED FROM 1

Giammalva, assistant project manager with CDC Houston, a subsidiary of Coventry Development Corp. “The oce occupancy is really what feeds our retail right now. It’s been a struggle, but we’re optimistic,” Giammalva said. “Hopefully, oce occupancy will pick up as we move along in 2021 now that the vaccine is being rolled out.” Despite this slowdown, Springwoods Village continued to expand its retail oerings in 2020. Focus Optical, Island Grill and Common Bond Bistro & Bakery opened last summer in CityPlace, the community’s 60-acre mixed-use urban center. “Since we are surrounded by so many businesses thatmost employees are working from home, we are seeing less foot trac,” Common Bond CEO George Joseph said. Chipotle opened in February, while Sushi Rebel, Edward Jones and Bread Zeppelin—a sandwich and salad eatery—will open in CityPlace later this year. Giammalva said First Tech Federal Credit Union is also planning to open in CityPlace, but an opening date has not been announced. Also opening in 2021 is Beard

began in February 2020 and will wrap up in spring 2022. “Houston has always been HPE’s largest employment hub in the U.S., and we decided to relocate corporate headquarters to the region due to our business needs, opportunities for long-term cost savings, and our team members’ preferences about the future of work moving beyond the pandemic,” said Adam Bauer, the director of issues management and policy communications for HPE. WhileBauer saidhecouldnot release site-specic gures or information on potential employee relocations from the company’s current headquarters in California, he said HPE has about 2,600 employees in the Greater Houston area—the majority of which will likely use the new campus. Lieb said he hoped the move would prompt other tech companies to follow. “It puts Houston on the map to be a destination for tech,” he said. Retail ramps up Retail business has slowed in Springwoods Village as the occupancy of on-site oces has diminished throughout thepandemic, saidAndrew

Papa’s, a cream pu bakery that will be in The Market at Springwoods Village. As Phase 1 of the shopping center continues to edge toward full occupancy with four remaining spaces available,Wilsonsaid the retail center’s leasing company, Regency Centers, is continuing to recruit retailers for Phase 2. However, a timeline for construction has not been announced. Westward expansion While the pandemic may have slowed business for retailers, Giammalva said he believes the global health crisis has made Springwoods Village a more attractive community to potential residents who are looking for more green space. Currently home to more than 1,000 residential units between multifamily and single-family housing, at build- out, Wilson said the goal is for Springwoods Village to house 15,000 residents across 4,500-5,000 units. “It’s been a great commercial market, [and] so now, to be a complete community, we’re going to start accelerating residential,” Wilson said. Most recently, residents began moving into The Canopy at

However, the community has fewer than 100 single-family homes, according to Warren Wilson, executive vice president of Coventry Development Corp. “Springwoods Village is the most important development asset in north Harris County,” said Bobby Lieb, president and CEO of the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce. “With the thought that’s gone into the spaces they’ve created and the businesses they’ve been able to attract, I would argue that compared to the other large commercial master-planned developments in Houston, it would be at the top.” Wilson said the company is now focusing on residential build-out with the Dec. 1 announcement that Hewlett Packard Enterprise would be relocating its global headquarters from Silicon Valley to Springwoods Village. Techmoves in Originally pitched as a regional campus to replace HPE’s existing ood-prone campus at Compaq Center Drive, construction on the tech giant’s new global headquarters

214 MAIN STREET IN OLD TOWN SPRING 281-288-0005 WWW.SHOPATGGS.COM Get 15% Off one item

Female Owned, Family Operated Complete auto repair and body shop 19226 KUYKENDAHL RD., STE. A, SPRING, TX 77379 MON-FRI: 8AM-5PM (281)353-6500

R-1234YF CERTIFIED $20 OFF any repair order $100+ Find additional specials and coupons on *Excluding Oil Changes and State Inspections

Kuykendahl Rd.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

The Mark at CityPlace, a

Houston CityPlace Marriott opens a 337-room,

Star Cinema Grill and 24 Hour Fitness

Hewlett Packard Enterprise breaks ground on a new corporate campus and announces the campus will be the new global headquarters.

Chipotle opened in February, while Sushi Rebel, Bread Zeppelin and Edward Jones will open in CityPlace at Springwoods Village later this year.

268-unit multifamily community, opens.

full-service hotel.

open in CityPlace at Springwoods Village.

Hewlett Packard Inc. moves into new 12-acre oce campus for 2,400 employees.

The Canopy at Springwoods Village, a 332-unit, multifamily community, opens.

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Kroger and more than 15 retailers

American Bureau of Shopping

Construction on Audubon Grove

Focus Optical, Island Grill and Common

Beard Papa’s will open in The Market at Springwoods Village.

Construction will be completed at HPE’s new global headquarters.

open in The Market at Springwoods Village.

occupies new global headquarters in CityPlace at Springwoods Village.

is completed; the neighborhood is sold out.

Bond Bistro & Bakery open in CityPlace at Springwoods Village.

Springwoods Village in December. The 332-unit complex is the third multifamily community in Springwoods Village by Martin Fein Interests Ltd.—joining The Belvedere and The Mark, which opened in 2014 and 2017, respectively. As of Feb. 18, The Mark and The Belvedere had occupancy rates of 89% and 94%, respectively, while the Canopy—70% of which is still under construction—had 24 units available, according to Apartments.com. “Leasinghasgottenotoaverygood

start [at The Canopy],” said Rebecca Luks, vice president of development with Martin Fein Interests Ltd. In terms of single-family residential, the community is still in its rst phase, which began in 2013 with the construction of two neighborhoods: Audubon Grove and Harper Woods. Construction nished in 2019 on the sold-out 51-home Audubon Grove community, developed by Taylor Morrison. However, build-out continues in the 88-home Harper Woods, developedbySullivanBrothers

Builders. Per the neighborhood website, 52 homes have been sold with seven available and 29 coming soon. The remainder of residential development in Springwoods Village will take place on undeveloped land located along East Mossy Oaks Road west of Springwoods Village Parkway. Wilson said developers will be undertaking some infrastructure improvements this year to open up that part of the project for build-out. “We’ve been working extensively in 2020 on the master plan for

residential—we’re not ready to announce those [plans] yet but [will be] soon,” he said. While details about the remainder of the community’s residential plans have not yet beenmade public,Wilson said development will continue for many years to come. “We’ll be here building for a long time into the future,” he said.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

WORTHWHILE CONVERSATIONS SIMPLIFYING AND ORGANIZING IN THE NEW YEAR

HOW DO YOU HELP PEOPLE FULFILL THOSE PREDICTABLE RESOLUTIONS ABOUT BETTER ORGANIZING THEIR FINANCES? “Predictable” is correct. In our 50-year history, we consistently hear this goal from clients. It is logical because complicated and disorganized financial planning leads to stress and procrastination over important decisions. The good news: Just a few simple steps can result in significant improvement in your planning. For most people, it starts with preparing an up-to-date Balance Sheet that lists all of your financial accounts and assets, along with all debts owed. Update this yearly as a financial discipline. AN UPDATED BALANCE SHEET MAKES SENSE. WHERE’S THE SIMPLIFYING? Find opportunities to simplify by consolidating assets and liabilities into fewer accounts that are easier to track and manage. Over time, many families “proliferate” financial accounts which no longer make sense as a whole. Consolidating accounts makes it easier to properly manage personal finances, reducing costs and account fees. Do the same with credit cards and liability accounts. Imagine the feeling of efficiency as it becomes easier and quicker to manage accounts (auto-payments, paperless files, etc.). Also, don’t forget to protect these accounts from cyber-fraud. Use a Password Manager to organize and easily recall complex passwords.

WHAT ABOUT A BUDGET? Our Wealth Planning Committee, a multi- disciplinary group of professionals (CPAs, JDs, and other credentialed firm members), meets to brainstorm such topics and has developed a client-centered approach. Committee Chair, Phillip Hamman, CFP ® , CFA, commented about budgets: “We should re-invent budgeting since ‘Budgeting in Reverse’ is sufficient for most – simply identify the required savings and accumulation targets, and make sure you hit those numbers.” WHERE CAN YOU GET HELP? Slaying the “Organization Dragon” is more than a weekend exercise. If you need help getting things in order, talk with your financial advisor since they may have expertise. We advise people to be careful in seeking help. Choose an advisor 100% committed to the Fiduciary business model, with a legal duty to put their clients’ best interests first. This is the model we follow at Linscomb & Williams. Contact us if you would like to sit down and create an organized financial plan at our office in the Houston Galleria area. For more information, or a copy of our Form ADV, Part II, with all of our disclosures, call Grant Williams at 281 841 0707, or visit www.linscomb-williams.com.

J. Harold Williams and Nick Ibanez discuss the importance of developing hassle-free and organized financial lives. (Left to right: Nick Ibanez, CFP ® ; J. Harold Williams, CPA/PFS, CFP ® )

1400 Post Oak Boulevard, Ste. 1000 Houston, Texas 77056 713.840.1000 www.linscomb-williams.com Linscomb & Williams is not an accounting firm.

13

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

Powered by my heart. Imagine, just for a minute, all those things in life you treasure: expressing love for family, those daily interactions at work, and the one-of-a-kind moments of absolute happiness you really can’t describe. Now, imagine life without them. That’s how important your heart is. We know it too. And we want to help your heart to keep powering what you treasure most. Whatever those moments might be.

Learn more at StLukesHealth.org/Heart .

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Economic health means physical health

businesses operate across the Spring and Klein area’s nine ZIP codes. The data, which comes from a city of Houston directory, includes rms that could benet from the new county initiative, including construction, engineering and consulting. Bobby Lieb, president and CEO of the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce, urged business owners to learn how to properly bid on government projects through the U.S. Small Business Administration to avoid getting in over their heads. “Bidding on government contracts is a whole dierent animal, and if a business is not in the practice of doing work for the government, if not executed properly [it] could negatively impact their regular business operations,” he said. Economic health, physical health Eorts to improve economic opportunity in disadvantaged communities can have direct eects on physical health as well, said Heidi McPherson, the senior community health director with the American Heart Association inHouston. McPherson said raising incomes and promoting career development align with the AHA mission of ending chronic disease, as better jobs mean better access to health care. Life expectancies across Harris County vary, with more socially vulnerable areas in the 65-69 range and wealthier areas in the 85 and older range, according to a 2020 study by the Harris County Public Health Department. Central areas of Spring and Klein, where social vulnerability is lower, have a life expectancy of 80-84 years, while the areas near FM 1960 and I-45 have a life expectancy of 75-79 years. Dr. Esmaeil Porsa, the CEO of Harris Health System, said an updated report will be provided to Harris County commissioners inMarch. County ocials also want to expand services in high-need areas, he said. “Arewe in the right places? Are there opportunities in some of the geographies where we should be but currently are not?” he said. McPherson said communities have dierent needs, ranging from healthy food to access to puried drinking water and hike and bike trails. “It feels like collectively across the Greater Houston area, we really do have the opportunity to lead the nation,” she said. Hannah Zedaker contributed to this report.

Ocials involved in the launch of the Harris County Department of Equity and Economic Opportunity said an unhealthy economy can lead to a decline in physical health within a community.

Social vulnerability

Average life expectancy

Rated based on various factors, including poverty, lack of access to transportation and crowded housing

The average age at which people are expected to live within each U.S. Census Bureau tract in Harris County

Least vulnerable

Most vulnerable

Least healthy

Most healthy

0-0.25 0.26-0.5 0.51-0.75 0.76-1

70-74

75-79

80-84

85+

SPRING AND KLEIN AREA

SPRING AND KLEIN AREA

99 TOLL

99 TOLL

45

45

1960

1960

249

249

N

N

NOTE: SOME PORTIONS OF THE MAP ARE EMPTY BECAUSE DATA WAS UNAVAILABLE, ACCORDING TO THE REPORT. SOURCE: HARRIS CARES 2020COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED FROM 1

$1.26 billion, including 1,433 subcontracts worth about $280.49 million, the county approved between 2015 and the rst quarter of 2019. Although about 71.6%of businesses in themarket for county contracts are “non-M/WBEs”—a term referring to businesses not owned by a minority or woman—about 90.9% of contracting dollars went to those rms. Only 9.1% of county dollars went to minority and women businesses, including only 0.5% to Black- owned businesses, the study found. This yielded a disparity ratio—which measures how often the county contracts with those businesses divided by their availability—of 32%, according to the study. “A very lower ratio suggests entrenched discriminatory barriers,” lead researcher Colette Holt said. “Thirty-two percent is very, very low.” Linda Morales, an organizing coordinator with the Texas Gulf Coast AFLCIO, said the group wants to ensure these communities are prospects for good jobs that oer upward mobility and fair pay. The group was a stakeholder in creating the department. An estimated 64 disadvantaged businesses, 152 minority-owned businesses and 81 women-owned

project o the ground. Long term, ocials said they hope to develop policies and programs to help business owners, workers and job seekers. In its rst year, the focus will fall on the county’s own contracting process. “We’re hoping to see a more proactive engagement and innovative policies and programs to address economic disparities and cure historic disinvestment,” Legette said. Two additional studies are also underway this year—one in transportation and one in public health—that are meant to further guide on how equity can be incorporated into those areas. Entrenched discrimination In 2018, Harris County Commissioners Court approved a study into disparities in how the county selects rms to contract with on projects. Conducted by the consulting rm Colette Holt & Associates, the study showed the county could be passive in marketplace discrimination. The study examined 478 contracts worth about

Like, share & follow us at facebook.com/impactnewsskl .

15

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24

communityimpact.com

Powered by