Community Impact Bay Area Edition July 2020

BAY AREA EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 12  JULY 10 AUG. 6, 2020

ONLINE AT

2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

Coronavirus pandemic spurs shift towardBayArea suburbandevelopment

buyer might back out based on fac- tors they could not see virtually, from the drive into the neighbor- hood and appearance of area homes to local road conditions, he said. “They feel at home when they have found the home, and you don’t get that benet from doing it via video,” he said. While Spicer said the virtual aspect of selling homes during a pandemic has been useful in some ways, it has complicated the process in others. Some buyers will tour only vacant homes, and many photogra- phers or other support team mem- bers will not go into a property if the seller is still in the house. “When I walk into a house, or any agent walks into a house, they don’t know who’s been there and how careful they’ve been or not been,” he said.

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

The coronavirus pandemic has ipped the residential and commer- cial real estate industries on their heads in the Bay Area as agents and experts attempt to navigate the development and sale process with virtual tools. City ocials said the dynamics of League City in particu- lar could change for good as a result of the new routines brought about by coronavirus-adapted lifestyles. Real estate agents have experi- enced a new hurdle amid the pan- demic: buyers making a decision after a virtual tour, then backing out once they see it in person. Potential homeowners can look at homes via video tour or FaceTime, but the experience of walking inside a home cannot be replaced virtually, said Steve Spicer, a Houston-area Realtor who manages a team of agents in the Clear Lake area. A

The Bay Area on May 15 received over 5 inches of rain, putting local drainage projects and ood mitigation eorts back on residents' radars.

COURTESY SHELLY STEUBING VILLARREAL

Bay Area prepares for busy hurricane season during COVID19

ood-prone subdivisions showed up at League City City Council’s May 26meet- ing to voice concerns. “Every time we have a hard rain … [we’re] just waiting for our houses to ood. It doesn’t take a hurricane any- more,” The Meadows resident Ruth Thompson told City Council. “We have become the dam, and it’s like a swim- ming pool.” Now, the entire Bay Area is facing what meteorologists expect will be a more active hurricane season, all during COVID-19, which adds new wrinkles to preparation and response, ocials said. “We can do all the planning in the

BY JAKE MAGEE

With a multimillion-dollar bond vote for drainage projects in the rearview mirror and a more active hurricane sea- son in the midst of a global pandemic ahead, many Bay Area residents are still living in fear of potential ooding. On May 15, some areas of League City received over 5 inches of rain in about one hour, making it one of the heaviest rainfalls the city has seen since voters in May 2019 approved a $73 million bond for numerous drainage projects around the city. The ooding residents endured was worrisome. Several residents from

CONTINUED ON 20

Before the pandemic, 85% of League City residents who work full time commuted to work outside the city.

CONTINUED ON 22

SOURCE: CITY OF LEAGUE CITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

SNAPSHOT

13

COMMUNITY

10

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

communityimpact.com

Powered by