Northwest Austin Edition | May 2022

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION

VOLUME 16, ISSUE 4  MAY 21JUNE 24, 2022

ONLINE AT

DROUGHT RISK RISING Much of western Travis and Williamson counties are experiencing drought conditions, resulting in increased wildre risk.

Williamson County 60.1% of the county is seeing moderate or above drought conditions.

ABNORMALLY DRY

Producers begin supplemental feeding for livestock

Grass res increase

195

35

Planting is postponed

Surface water levels decline

183

MODERATE DROUGHT

Williamson County

Dryland crops are stunted

Stock tanks, creeks, streams low

Voluntary water restrictions requested

Round Rock

Wildre frequency increases

LAKE TRAVIS

Cedar Park

SEVERE DROUGHT

Pasture conditions are very poor

Burn bans are implemented

130 TOLL

Travis County 46.8% of the county is seeing moderate or above drought conditions.

Wildlife moves into populated areas

71

Crop yields decrease

Lakeway

Austin

Mandatory water restrictions are implemented

Wildre danger is severe

Travis County

EXTREME DROUGHT

290

Crops fail to germinate; decreased yields for irrigated crops

Supplemental feeding for livestock, herds are sold Soil has large cracks; soil moisture is very low

NOTE: AS OF MAY 10 LATEST DATA PUBLISHED SOURCE: U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

Climatologist says future megadrought could harm Lake Travis area

BY GRACE DICKENS

could be in Texas’ future. This type of drought is dif- ferent from the drought currently occurring in Travis County as well as the drought of 2008-15. By the latter half of the 21st century, worsening long-term drought conditions in Texas could put strain on Lake Travis as a natural, recreational and nancial resource for western Travis County and beyond, said Nielsen-Gammon and Jo Karr Tedder, president of the Central Texas Water Coalition.

Under these conditions, drought is the new nor- mal, Nielsen-Gammon said. Restricted water use and lower lake levels become permanent xtures in the life of Central Texans, and everyday activities such as lawn watering become a privilege. To mitigate eects of long-term drought on Central Texas, climatologists and activists are calling for Tex- ans to be vigilant of water usage and plan ahead. CONTINUED ON 22

Western Travis County faced abnormally dry to severe drought conditions throughout March, April and into May, with several “Red Flag” days indicat- ing high risk of re issued by the National Weather Service. While these conditions are cause for concern, state of Texas Climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon pre- dicts long-term drought, known as megadrought,

IMPACTS

TODO

DINING FEATURE

PEOPLE

6

8

19

21

Support local journalism by donating $120 (total or in monthly installments) and receive

Scan to give today. It's that easy!

Get one in minutes. Save for miles.

With a TxTag you’ll save 33% on every toll. You can just drive through and your tolls are automatically deducted from your prepaid account. So no more paying by mail. You can sign up in minutes—even from your phone. All you need is a license plate number and credit card.

Get started at TxTag.org or call 1-888-468-9824

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Curious what is selling in your neighborhood? Scan me *All prices shown are list price

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

realtyaustin.com/p/2318337

realtyaustin.com/p/6130042

realtyaustin.com/p/5366708

realtyaustin.com/p/9538254

$569,000

$600,000

$625,000

$724,900

4 bds

2 ba

1,332 sq ft

3 bds

2.5 ba 1,520 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,514 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,513 sq ft

12803 Arrowhead Pass, Austin, TX 78729 Marissa Holmes | 512-673-0761

4509 Smooth Oak Dr #B, Austin, TX 78759 Adam Walker | 512-554-5516

7405 Potters Trl, Austin, TX 78729 Callum Sinclair | 512-931-4271

9400 E Meadow Vale, Austin, TX 78758 Kim Fodor | 512-809-3844

ACTIVE

PENDING

PENDING

PENDING

realtyaustin.com/p/7965101

realtyaustin.com/p/2209194

realtyaustin.com/p/1577655

realtyaustin.com/p/3838658

$825,000

$565,000

$595,000

$645,000

3 bds

2.5 ba 2,052 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 1,996 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,906 sq ft

3 bds

3 ba

1,860 sq ft

6311 Colina Ln, Austin, TX 78759 Wade Wallace | 512-699-5568

13014 Muldoon Dr, Austin, TX 78729 Jeffrey and Gina Nyland Team | 512-626-8552

10510 Wagon Gap Dr, Austin, TX 78750 Amy Whitston | 512-663-6759

12208 Waxwing Cir, Austin, TX 78750 Hannah Vaughan | 512-470-6086

PENDING

SOLD OVER ASKING

SOLD OVER ASKING

SOLD OVER ASKING

realtyaustin.com/p/6576368

realtyaustin.com/p/5267990

realtyaustin.com/p/9561913

realtyaustin.com/p/1581751

$1,250,000

$485,000

$600,000

$600,000

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,669 sq ft

4 bds

2 ba

1,428 sq ft

3 bds

2.5 ba 2,197 sq ft

4 bds

3 ba

1,814 sq ft

4402 Flagstaff Dr, Austin, TX 78759 Allison Dady | 512-924-1818

8704 Clarewood Dr, Austin, TX 78758 Corazón Team | 512-843-3572

13132 Kellies Farm Ln, Austin, TX 78727 Brigitte Thompson | 512-387-7269

8431 Dulac Dr, Austin, TX 78729 Krysten Mejia | 512-619-6159

As a homeowner in Austin, you don’t want rising home values to impact how much you pay in property taxes. Protest Your Property Taxes

Scan the QR code for all the information you need to take control of these costs.

3

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2022

When you know, you know. Maybe you think it’s not in the cards for you. But when you find your Brookfield home, the future falls into place. Love is strange. One day you’re looking at all your options, and the next day you’re ready to start planning forever. There’s a reason buyers are passionate about their Brookfield homes. Maybe it’s because they’re brand new and designed for the way you live, with stylish features and thoughtful details. Or maybe it’s the amazing communities, like Addison, Easton Park, and Kissing Tree. Whether you build from scratch or go with an in-progress home, you’re sure to find the one that’s perfect for you.

View available homes

brookfieldtx.com/available-homes

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM TAYLOR: As the 2021-22 school year comes to an end this month, I want to express my deepest gratitude to the educators and support sta in our Northwest Austin community schools. I have faith that there are brighter days ahead for all of you and for students alike. On the To-do List (see Page 8), you can nd several upcoming events to kick o the summer break. And you all deserve a hard-earned break! As always, feel free to reach out to me at tstover@communityimpact.com. Taylor Caranfa Stover, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM JENNIFER: I am excited to share with you Grace Dickens’ reporting on drought in Central Texas. Her story illustrates how weather patterns aect our area and what we can do to ensure citizens have enough water for years to come. Inside (see Page 21), you will meet an artist who was commissioned to create Northwest Austin’s rst public art project as part of the Anderson Mill Regional Mobility Program. I hope you enjoy this issue. Happy reading! Jenn Schaefer, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Taylor Caranfa Stover EDITOR Jennifer Schaefer SENIOR REPORTER Claire Shoop AUSTIN METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney SENIOR ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES nwanews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2022 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

BUSINESS & DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION & DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

HOW WE’RE FUNDED

Join your neighbors today by giving any amount to the CI Patron program. Funds support our PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. We ask our readers to thank our advertisers by shopping locally.

$20 average donation choose to give monthly 35% edition newsletter called The InCIder and occasionally reach out with other opportunities to directly engage. hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. As a thank you, we’ll include you in a special Saturday

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewsnwa

@impactnews_nwa

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

5

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

3

45 TOLL

10

PECAN PARK BLVD.

7

LAKELINE MALL DR.

1

Specialized Austin

MOPAC

LAKE CREEK PKWY.

POND SPRINGS RD.

COURTESY SPECIALIZED AUSTIN

NORTHWEST AUSTIN

selection of equipment and accessories, and oers service consultations for bike repair and custom builds. A grand opening event is planned for May 28. 512-746-7201. www.specializedaustin.com 4 Vuori , an active wear brand based in Southern California, opened a storefront at Domain Northside on April 22. The 2,833-square-foot store located at 11701 Domain Blvd., Ste. 154, Austin, carries athleisure apparel for men and women, in- cluding shorts, joggers, tank tops, T-shirts and accessories. This is Vuori’s 17th brick- and-mortar store and the brand’s rst location in Texas. 512-305-3837. www.vuoriclothing.com 5 Albion held a grand opening for its Domain Northside location April 30. Located at 3200 Palm Way, Ste. 136, Albion carries a selection of swimwear and active wear as well as everyday clothing items and accessories. This is the brand’s sixth retail store and its second Texas location. 512-923-6742. www.albiont.com COMING SOON 6 Austin Emergency Center is planning to open a location at 10407 Jollyville Road, Austin, formerly an Austin Urgent Care, near The Arboretum this summer. The 24-hour freestanding emergency room is staed with board-certied ER doctors and nurses who can provide di- agnostic and laboratory services to treat conditions such as headaches and respira- tory distress, chest pain, sports injuries, and abdominal and pregnancy-related emergencies. www.austiner.com

183

620

WELLS BRANCH PKWY.

35

SPICEWOOD SPRINGS RD.

2

MOPAC

6

PARK BEND DR.

3 5

4

WALNUT CREEK PARK

GREAT HILLS TRL.

360

14

11

RUTLAND DR.

13

SPICEWOOD SPRINGS RD.

2222

15

FERGUSON LN.

9

MAP NOT TO SCALE

12

N TM; © 2022 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOW OPEN 1 Groovy Dental opened its rst loca- tion at 8701 W. Parmer Lane, Ste. 1124, Austin, on Feb. 22. The practice provides general, cosmetic, restorative and im- plant dental services as well as Invisalign. Groovy Dental is owned and operated by husband-and-wife team Drs. Trenton and

2 Baylor Scott & White Institute for Rehabilitation opened a new outpatient therapy oce April 6 at 2200 Park Bend Drive, Bldg. 1, Ste. 200, Austin. The North Austin Medical District location oers a variety of patient services including phys- ical therapy, sports injury and post-sur- gery rehabilitation, and dry needling. BSW’s outpatient therapy division has more than 100 clinics throughout North and Central Texas, and more than 30 in

the Austin area. 512-582-2905. www.bswrehab.com/outpatient 3 Specialized Austin , a bicycle and cycling shop, began serving customers at its Domain Northside brick-and-mortar store April 22. The showroom, located at 3200 Palm Way, Ste. 150, Austin, carries a small inventory of bikes and focuses on Turbo—the brand’s electric pedal-assist bike. Additionally, the store has a curated

Alyssa Dawson. 512-675-6601. www.groovydentalaustin.com

FREE HEARING EVALUATION SAVE $500 PER HEARING AID

THE MOST 5-STAR REVIEWS OF ANY HEARING CENTER IN AUSTIN

Renew your hearing and your life. Call now. 512-282-HEAR (4327) CUT – SAVE – SHARE – HEAR BETTER

Benefits of Better Hearing: Clarifies conversations Improves memory Increases confidence Reduces stress Resists dementia

North Austin 3921 Steck Ave. #A-121 Austin TX 78759

South Austin 2500 W William Cannon Dr. Suite #501 Austin TX 78745

WWW.BETTERHEARINGOFAUSTIN.COM

Saleem Assaf , Clinician – HIS. Native Texan.

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JENNIFER SCHAEFER & CLAIRE SHOOP

14

4

7

Adelbert’s Brewery

Vuori

St. David’s Surgical Hospital

GRACE DICKENSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY VUORI

COURTESY ST. DAVID’S SURGICAL HOSPITAL

RELOCATIONS 7 St. David’s Surgical Hospital an- nounced May 3 that its new inpatient rehabilitation unit at 1201 W. Louis Henna Blvd., Round Rock, is open and ready to serve area patients. The rehab unit relo- cated from St. David’s North Austin Med- ical Center earlier this year, expanding from 16 patient beds to 20 private rooms. It is part of the $145.9 million expansion of the medical center announced in Feb- ruary. 512-248-7000. www.stdavids.com ANNIVERSARIES 9 Buildingstars ATX celebrated its 10th anniversary May 1. Buildingstars provides commercial and oce building cleaning services to the Austin area. Some of their services include compre- hensive cleaning, green cleaning and healthy building, which encourages a healthier workforce. 512-358-6729. www.buildingstarsatx.com 10 Mooyah Burgers, Fries & Shakes is celebrating its 15-year anniversary in May. The fast-casual concept serves a menu that includes beef; turkey; and black bean burger options, which are fully custom- izable; and hot dogs, fries and potato chips, cookies and shakes. Founded in 2007, Mooyah has grown to have restau- rants throughout the U.S., including one Northwest Austin location at 11301 Lakeline Blvd., Ste. 200, Austin. 512-219-1600. www.mooyah.com NEW OWNERSHIP 11 Northwest Austin-based Farmhouse

Delivery acquired grocery delivery service Good Apple on April 25. Farmhouse Deliv- ery oers ranchers boxes, produce boxes, meal kits and locally sourced groceries for delivery in Austin, San Antonio, Houston, Dallas and surrounding communities. Good Apple—which also provided delivery of local, organic produce—had its last day of regular operations May 2. Farmhouse Delivery is located at 9715 Burnet Road, Bldg. 7, Ste. 400, Austin. 512-529-8569. www.farmhousedelivery.com 12 Texas Children’s Physician Group acquired Austin Perinatal Associates at the beginning of May. Located at 6500 N. MoPac, Austin, Austin Perinatal Asso- ciates will be the ninth maternal-fetal medicine provider operated by the Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women and the rst to oer women’s services in Central Texas. Texas Children’s Hospital is also building a children’s and women’s hospi- tal in Northwest Austin that is set to open in early 2024. www.austinperinatal.com, www.texaschildrens.org IN THE NEWS 13 Chabad of Austin celebrated its permanent location with a ribbon cutting April 10. Ocials with the Jewish center, which houses a synagogue and Jewish day school, purchased the land at 3500 Hyridge Drive, Austin, in August 2020. Synagogue services were held outdoors during the pandemic and then moved into a portable building on the site after buildings on the land that housed a service station and car wash bays were demolished. Rabbi Yosef Levertov said Chabad of Austin’s long-term plans include building a three-story building

to house both the synagogue and day school. 512-977-0770. www.chabadaustin.com Boys & Girls Clubs of the Austin Area announced Gordon Butler was named the next CEO of the organization ef- fective May 16. Butler began his career as a teacher before going on to serve in districts’ central oces as a school principal—including at Lake Travis High School—and most recently as the assis- tant superintendent for sta and student services in Carroll ISD. Butler will lead BGCAA’s strategic direction as well as oversee operations, nances, program- ming and more. BGCAA has locations at several schools in North Austin. 512-444-7199. www.bgcaustin.org CLOSINGS 14 Adelbert’s Brewery has announced it will close Oct. 31, according to a post on its Instagram story April 27. After 11 years in business, the iconic North Austin brewery at 2314 Rutland Drive, Ste. 100, Austin, is slated to be torn down and turned into an oce building. When reached for comment, an employee stated the business will not relocate, “because there is just not a viable loca- tion in Austin.” 512-662-1462 www.adelbertsbeer.com 15 Allandale restaurant Way South Philly Deli closed April 30. The shop, lo- cated at 5222 Burnet Road, Austin, was known for its cheesesteaks with Cheese Whiz. It also sold Italian sausage sand- wiches, subs, pizzas and other comfort foods. Owner William Pearce said he was unable to stay open because he could not nd enough sta.

The “cheek’n” auta plate is $14.50 at Nissi VegMex.

JENNIFER SCHAEFERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NOW OPEN Nissi VegMex Mexican Cuisine held a grand opening for its rst brick-and-mortar location April 30. Located at 9012 Research Blvd., Ste. C-6, Austin, the authentic Mexican restaurant serves an entirely vegan menu featuring items such as tacos, burritos, chalupas and autas. The dishes all feature Nissi’s house- made soy proteins such as grilled carne asada, ground soy picadillo, “cheek’n,” fajita, pastor and chicharron. The restaurant’s food truck, at 1106 E. 11th St., Austin, will be temporarily closed while the new restaurant gets established. 512-293-2597 www.facebook.com/nissivegmexatx

183

METRIC BLVD

N

3D MAMMOGRAPHY IN 30 MINUTES At ARA, we believe that taking care of your health should be convenient, quick, and absolutely accurate. That’s why we offer 3D mammography in 13 of our locations. We’ll get you in and out in a flash. Then, one of our more than 115 expert radiologists will evaluate the images and issue a detailed report so you can get a clear picture of your health. What are you waiting for?

7

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2022

TODO LIST

May & June events

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

MAY 28

SPICE IT UP AT A LATIN FOOD FESTIVAL ANI'S DAY AND NIGHT

JUNE 02

MAKE MARGARITAFED MEMORIES SAND BEACH PARK

JUNE 12

CELEBRATE THE SALSA SHALOM AUSTIN JCC

Sazon Latin Food Festival will take place at Ani's Day and Night in East Austin. The outdoor event will feature curated food vendors from numerous Latin American countries and Latin tunes. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free entrance with RSVP. 7107 E. Riverside Drive, Austin. www.ourlatincity.com/tickets

Maudie’s Moonlight Margarita Run is back for its 19th year. Cost includes entry into the 5K race, a T-shirt, two margaritas and Maudie’s Tex-Mex at the post-race party. 8 p.m. $35 (party only), $50 (race and party). Sand Beach Park, 111 Sandra Muraida Way, Austin. 855-448-7245. thetrailfoundation.org/mmr

The Puerto Rican Cultural Center is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a salsa and heritage festival. The event will include artisan vendors and food. 3-8 p.m. Free (age 2 and under), $5 (ages 3-12), $30 (adults). Shalom Austin JCC, 7300 Hart Lane, Austin. 512-251-8122. www.prfdance.org/perform.htm

MAY 30 SWIM, BIKE AND RUN FOR THE WIN The annual Memorial Day weekend Ascension Seton CapTex Tri, presented by Life Time, will begin with a swim in Lady Bird Lake followed by a bike ride through the heart of downtown Austin and a run through Butler Park. The post- race party will be near the nish line at Auditorium Shores. Dierent distance courses—Olympic, sprint and rookie—are available for registration. 5:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $70 (virtual), $169-$289 (depending on distance). 900 W. Riverside Drive, Austin. www.captextri.com JUNE 09 THROUGH 12 MEET UP WITH MOTORCYCLISTS The 2022 Republic of Texas Motorcycle Rally will feature live music—including headliners Ray Wylie Hubbard, X and Foghat—a builder show, stunt shows and wheelie demonstrations as well

as vendors and local food trucks. A number of rides throughout the area will take place, and tent and RV camping is available. $25 (Sun. day pass), $45 (Thu.-Sat. day pass), $119 (four-day pass). Mere’s Reserve, 1141 FM 969, Bastrop. www.republicoftexasmotorcyclerally.com 10 WATCH A SUMMER FLICK POOLSIDE Anderson Mill Limited District will host a summer Float Flix series in which guests can catch a movie from the pool. On June 10, the organization will screen “Shark Tale.” Additional summer movie dates include June 24 and July 14, when attendees will watch “The Little Mermaid” and “Finding Nemo,” respectively. 8 p.m. (gates open), movie starts at dusk. $5 (per person, no registration required). El Salido Pool, 11500 El Salido Parkway, Austin. 512-258-4104. www.amld.org 18 RECOGNIZE JUNETEENTH The 2022 Central Texas Juneteenth Celebration will include a parade followed by a festival with live entertainment, vendors and a 9:30 p.m. reworks show. Juneteenth commemorates the

announcement of the abolition of slavery in Texas on June 19, 1865. 10 a.m.-noon (parade), noon-10 p.m. (festival). Parade registration cost varies. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Salina Street (parade start); Rosewood and Boggy Creek Park, 2300 Rosewood Ave., Austin (festival). www.juneteenthcentraltexas.com 18 CATCH CEDAR PARK MARKET DAYS Do not miss the nal spring Cedar Park market day. Attendees can shop goods from 50-60 vendors selling products such as soaps, dog goods, apparel, antiques and food. A full list of participating vendors is available online. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Near Lakeline Mall and Pluckers Wing Bar, 11066 Pecan Park Blvd., Cedar Park. 512-750-9315. www.cedarparkmarketdays.com 18 PLAY CHESS Participants at the Spicewood Springs Branch Library are invited to learn how to play chess or to practice their game. The event is recommended for ages 5 and up, and children under 10 years old must be accompanied by an adult. 12:30- 2:30 p.m. Free. 8637 Spicewood Springs

Road, Austin. 512-974-7400. www.library.austintexas.gov 24 THROUGH 26 SHOP VINTAGE STYLES For three days, Vintage Market Days of Greater Austin will take over the H-E-B Center in Cedar Park. The upscale, vintage-inspired market features vendors selling original art, antiques, clothing, jewelry, handmade items, home decor, treats and more. Daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; June 24 is an early buying event. $10 (Sat.-Sun.), $15 (Fri.-Sun.). 2100 Avenue of the Stars, Cedar Park. www.hebcenter.com/events/ detail/vintage-market-days-2022 25 DANCE TO THE MUSIC The Austin LGBT Chamber of Commerce will host the third annual Pride in Local Music festival to close out National Pride Month. The outdoor music and creative festival will feature a host of local LGBT artists and celebrate Austin’s music scene. Noon-midnight. $23 (students), $34 (general admission),

$129 (VIP). The Long Center, 701 W. Riverside Drive, Austin. www.prideinlocalmusic.com

Find more or submit Northwest Austin events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

  



Weekend  M emorial  



SCAN TO SHOP OUR CURRENT SPECIALS

TWINLIQUORS.COM

 

    

     €€‚ ƒ „

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES Resurfacing

ONGOING PROJECTS

183 NORTH MOBILITY PROJECT The $612 million project will see 9 miles of roadway on US 183 resurfaced in 2-mile segments from RM 620 to MoPac. The project is expected to last about four years.

45 TOLL

290

on US 183 has begun

620

35

130 TOLL

183

MOPAC

183

71

BY JENNIFER SCHAEFER

The Central Texas Regional Mobil- ity Authority began staging rolling lane closures on US 183 between RM 620 and MoPac in late April. The closures should last through the next several months, according to a release from the authority. The closures will facilitate pave- ment grinding to prepare for roadway resurfacing as part of the 183 North Mobility Project. According to the release, closures will occur nightly from 9 p.m.-5 a.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 9 p.m.-8 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. The work will begin southbound on US 183 and continue in 2-mile seg- ments, according to the release. Night lighting will be used to keep workers safe, and the noise level is anticipated

N

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 10. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NWANEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. the start date will depend on when the new equipment will be available. According to TxDOT, similar changes are planned for US 183, SH 45 N and the tolled section of MoPac called Loop 1. Timeline: TBD Cost: $981,485.57 for all three roads Funding source: TxDOT Toll road lights upgrade The Texas Department of Transpor- tation will switch to energy-efficient lighting on the SH 130 toll road. This change is expected to save money, but

to stay within Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and to be comparable to the sound of a garbage truck, according to the release. This first step of the resurfacing project is called Next Generation Surface Grinding and is a texture treatment that “can be utilized for both new construction and rehabilitation of existing surfaces,” according to a report by the Texas Department of Transportation. This process improves skid resis- tance, promotes better drainage, and makes the roadway more consistent

and level for a safer and more com- fortable ride, according to the release. Also, through May 31, the US 183 northbound-to-southbound U-turn at RM 620 will be closed 24 hours a day. Traffic will continue through to the traffic signal to turn left, accord- ing to the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority. Variable message signs will be placed in advance of closures to notify drivers of anticipated delays, according to the release. Drivers are encouraged to exercise caution and consider alternate routes for nighttime travel.

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

The hills are alive

MUSIC BY RICHARD RODGERS LYRICS BY OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN DIRECTED BY DAVE STEAKLEY MUSIC DIRECTION BY ALLEN ROBERTSON

with the sound of music!

Unmatched Academic Results Come tour a campus and see for yourself!

Challenger School offers uniquely fun and academic programs for preschool to eighth grade students. Our students learn to think for themselves and to value independence.

Avery Ranch (PS–8) (512) 341-8000 15101 Avery Ranch Boulevard, Austin Round Rock (PS–K) (512) 255-8844 1521 Joyce Lane, Round Rock Spicewood Springs (PS–K) (512) 258-1299 13015 Pond Springs Road, Austin

tickets.zachtheatre.org T H E A T R E

ON STAGE BEGINNING JUNE 15

© 2022, Challenger Schools Challenger School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. An independent private school offering preschool through eighth grade

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Texas Commission on the Arts, and the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department.

9

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2022

TRANSPORTATION Shoal Creek Conservancy, soccer fans advocate for expanded trail

Once completed, the Shoal Creek Trail will be the 13-mile western arm of a more than 30-mile trail system around the city. Transportation advocates and officials are working to connect the northern section of the Shoal Creek Trail to the Northern Walnut Creek Trail. CONNECTING the big loop

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

involved in the project, depending on whether a given section of the trail meets the definition for an urban trail, runs through existing parkland or is in a street’s right of way. Both Rinaldi and officials with the city said there are a couple projects in the works to connect Shoal Creek Trail to Northern Walnut Creek Trail. First, the urban trails and corridor program office is working to widen the shared-use path proposed on Burnet Road to 12 feet between Longhorn Boulevard and Rutland Drive. Work on this segment of Burnet is expected to begin in 2023 and is part of a larger $45 million-$55 million program to improve safety and mobility on Burnet from Koenig Lane to MoPac, a spokesperson from the corridor program office said in an email. Katie Wettick, Urban Trails Program manager in the public works depart- ment, said in an email that future on-street trails would connect to Q2 stadium and the existing Red Line Trail nearby. Additionally, Wettick said using 2018 and 2020 mobility bond funding, the urban trails program is also in the design phase for a 1.7-mile project that would extend the Red Line Trail from Braker Lane to the Northern Walnut Creek Trail, connecting Q2 Stadium to the trail system. “As far as getting to the stadium is concerned, I think we have some really great immediate opportunities with the corridor improvements and with the Red Line Trail to be able to make that connection,” Rinaldi said.

Potential "Big Loop" pathway

Existing Shoal Creek Trail

With fans flocking to the Q2 Stadium in North Austin for Austin FC games, the Shoal Creek Conservancy and other transportation activists have renewed calls for the completion of Shoal Creek Trail in the area. The Shoal Creek Trail, which cur- rently runs parallel to the creek from Lady Bird Lake to Braker Lane north of US 183, will be a 13-mile western arm of the Big Loop—a more than 30-mile trail system around the city. Nina Rinaldi, a project and policy manager with Shoal Creek Conser- vancy, manages the implementation of the community-guided vision plan for the trail, which was devel- oped about five years ago. She said residents expressed the desire for a seamless, connected pathway throughout the entire Shoal Creek corridor that connects to other urban trails and green spaces. Currently, the biggest gap in the Shoal Creek Trail is its northernmost section, which would connect it to the Northern Walnut Creek Trail. Rinaldi said Q2 stadium sits about a mile and a half away from the future nexus of these two trails. “Connecting all of these trails to Q2 stadium is a really, really exciting opportunity because of just the sheer number of people that are going to these soccer matches,” Rinaldi said. Several departments—including the Austin Public Works Department, Corridor Program Office, Transpor- tation Department, and Parks and Recreation Department—have been

Future Red Line Trail Future Shoal Creek Trail

Existing Northern Walnut Creek Trail Existing Southern Walnut Creek Trail Existing Ann & Roy Butler Trail

Under construction Northern Walnut Creek Trail phase 2

WALNUT CREEK METROPOLITAN PARK

THE DOMAIN

Q2 STADIUM

35

COLORADO RIVER

MOPAC

290

1

24TH ST.

2

183

PEASE PARK

3

N

SHOAL CREEK TRAIL TRAVELERS The city of Austin tracks pedestrian and bicycle usage of the trail at a few locations. Here is the number average daily users the trail saw over the past 30 days.*

Shoal Creek Boulevard at 38th Street:

147

1

351

Shoal Creek Trail at 24th Street:

2

492

Shoal Creek Trail at Ninth Street:

3

SOURCE: CITY OF AUSTIN, RED LINE PARKWAY INITIATIVE, SHOAL CREEK CONSERVANCY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *AS OF MAY 13

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

News the Austin area

Capital Metro head to leave for position in D.C.

Advocates urge area leaders to take action on county drug deaths

“ALL ALONG MY DESIRE HAS BEEN TO SEE MORE COMMUNITIES SERVED THROUGH PROVIDING BETTER ACCESS TO HIGHQUALITY TRANSIT, AND IT’S BEEN AN HONOR TO HAVE SERVED THE PEOPLE OF AUSTIN AND CENTRAL TEXAS.” RANDY CLARKE, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF CAPITAL METRO, IN MARCH 2018

BY CARSON GANONG

$7.1 billion transit plan. Clarke will begin his new job in late summer. “I’m proud of the work that we’ve accom- plished under Randy’s leadership over these last four years,” said Jeery Travillion, Travis County commissioner and Capi- tal Metro board chair, in a release. “He’s brought us together in so many ways, from building the community’s trust to

BY DARCY SPRAGUE

Capital Metro Pres- ident and CEO Randy Clarke announced May 10 he accepted a position as general manager and CEO of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority in Washington, D.C. Since joining Capital Metro in 2018, Clarke has overseen eorts that include securing funds for Project Connect, a

The Texas Harm Reduction Alliance hosted a two-hour town hall May 3 on the rising number of drug-related deaths in Travis County. Activists, people with a history of substance abuse and emergency med- ics spoke during the town hall, urging elected leaders to do more to address overdoses and focus on community work—rather than policing. The THRA and other speakers focused on the need for harm reduction. Through their harm reduction work, THRA is providing drug users with supplies, such as fentanyl test strips, and naloxone, brand name Narcan, that can be used during an overdose, and syringes. They also provide medical care and connections to community resources as well as advocate for the needs of people using illicit drugs and people who are experiencing homelessness. DRUG DEATHS UP Overdoses resulting in death have risen 72.5% from 2019 to 2021.

secure funding for Proj- ect Connect to building trust with our sta that led to improved opera- tions and better relations with our labor union. I’m grateful for his time with us, and our board wishes

him great success in our nation’s capital.” According to the release, Clarke will meet with the Capital Metro board this month to discuss next steps for the transition of leadership.

Historic tag suggested for West Fourth LGBTQ bar block

BY BEN THOMPSON

Plans to demolish a portion of Austin’s LGBTQ entertainment district were put on hold May 4 following weeks of community outcry, although the redevelopment project could still move forward in the coming weeks following further city review. In a unanimous vote, the Historic Landmark Commission initiated historic zoning on a section of West Fourth Street covering the buildings between 310-312 Colorado St. and 201-213 W. Fourth St. The historic tag came in response to a request from Hanover Co. to tear down those structures before partially reconstructing their facades at the base of a new high-rise.

A high-rise is proposed at the site of several bars. (Rendering courtesy city of Austin)

2021: 333 deaths

plans were rst detailed during an April meeting of the commission’s architectural review committee. Ahead of the May vote, Hanover representatives acknowledged the signicance of the bars and the block to Austin’s gay community and said they had crafted the redevelopment based around a recognition of their status.

The properties are now home to LGBTQ bars such as Coconut Club and Oilcan Harry’s, and the district’s status in the local gay community drew dozens of residents to the commission meeting to speak to the fate of those establishments. The redevelopment proposal had also generated widespread community discussion after project

2020: 262 deaths

2019: 193 deaths

SOURCE: AMERICAN BOARD OF FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SIDEWALKS ARE FOR EVERYONE. Keep Austin moving! Together, we can create a more accessible city by keeping sidewalks clear of vehicles, scooters, waste bins, and vegetation. austintexas.gov/ cleartherow

Shop Peoples Rx for the SAFEST, MOST�EFFECTIVE SUNSCREENS, many ON SALE NOW!

four Austin locations

peoplesrx.com

11

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2022

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Round Rock ISD

COMPILED BY BROOKE SJOBERG

QUOTE OF NOTE

District reviews accountability reporting changes for 2022-23

Round Rock ISD board OKs raises ROUND ROCK ISD Officials approved up to 4% pay increases for some district staff following several discussions of teacher compensation. During the April 21 meeting in a 6-0 vote, absent Place 7 Trustee Danielle Weston, RRISD trustees approved a 2022-23 compensation plan that features 4% pay increases for district teachers and librarians, and a 3% increase for administrative and operational support roles. Instructional support, technology, instructional and business exempt, and district police will also receive a 2% general pay increase for the coming school year.

“OVER 20 STAFF MEMBERS ... LEAVE

PURPLE SAGE TO TAKE ON A SECOND JOB.”

“... NOTHING HAS BEEN ADJUSTED TO REALLY TAKE THE PANDEMIC INTO ACCOUNT IN ANY WAY.” RYAN SMITH, RRISD CHIEF OF TEACHING AND LEARNING

ROUND ROCK ISD Staff presented an update on accountability reporting changes for the 2022-23 school year during an April 21 board meeting. RRISD Chief of Teaching and Learning Ryan Smith said there were few changes from the previous year handed down by the Texas Education Agency. Some of the updates are tied to House Bill 4545, a bill passed in 2021 that established learning acceleration requirements for students who do not pass the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness. Under HB 4545, retesting opportunities for grades five and eight have been eliminated, along with separate writing assessments previously administered in grades four and seven, according to the district. “I really wanted to highlight ... that [with] the scaling and the targets and everything that we’re working with in 2022, nothing has been adjusted to really take the pandemic into account

KATHERINE NELSON, FIFTH GRADE STUDENT AT PURPLE SAGE ELEMENTARY

Round Rock ISD board of trustees Meets June 16 at 5:30 p.m. at 300 N. Lake Creek Drive, Round Rock. 512-464-5000. www.roundrockisd.org Pflugerville ISD board of trustees Meets June 16 at 7 p.m. at 1401 Pecan St., Pflugerville. 512-594-0000. www.pfisd.net Austin ISD board of trustees Meets June 23 at 5:30 p.m. at 4000 S. I-35, Austin. 512-414-1700. www.austinisd.org Austin Community College board of trustees Meets June 6 and 20 at 3 p.m. at 5930 Middle Fiskville Road, Austin. 512-223-7613. www.austincc.edu MEETINGS WE COVER

in any way,” Smith said. According to the TEA, “scaling” refers to the methodology behind assigning A through F letter grades for performance reporting. In 2023, scaling and student target groups will be “reset,” Smith said, adding that takes into account the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the state’s education system. “We do anticipate that there could be significant swings in how our scores are scaled after this year,” Smith said.

New starting teacher salary: $52,600

Total cost of pay increases: $15.23 MILLION

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE at ACC

FASHION SHOW WEBSITE

TICKETS

APPLY NOW Summer Classes Start May 31 Fall Classes Start August 22

austincc.edu

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY & COUNTY County pauses legal program over stang issues News from Austin & Travis & Williamson counties

QUOTE OF NOTE “WE NEED TO RECOGNIZE THAT THERE WILL BE NO ANSWER TO THIS; THERE WILL BE NO DISAPPEARING OF ENCAMPMENTS.” AUSTIN MAYOR STEVE ADLER, FINDING HOME STAKEHOLDER

BY DARCY SPRAGUE

have studied the eects of providing arrested individ- uals with public defenders prior to magistration, in which a hearing is held. Less than two weeks after kicking o the program, Sheri Sally Her- nandez said the program would not be possible at the planned pace due to shortages within her department. Other participating departments also

expressed the need for more resources. Prior to the program, after an individual was arrested they would be brought to the county’s central booking facility. Then a hearing would be held, known as magistra- tion, when charges would be read and bond would be set. Hernandez said the program requires extra sta from her oce. This

strain on resources was jeop- ardizing the

TRAVIS COUNTY On April 26, the county paused a program due to stang shortages that provides some defendants with legal representation shortly after arrest. The program was funded through an agree- ment with the Texas A&M Public Policy Research Institute in partnership with Arnold Ventures. The program would

safety of everyone involved in the hearing and could threaten the county jail’s state rating if she did not have the sta to continue operation as normal, she said. Sally Hernandez

HIGHLIGHTS WILLIAMSON COUNTY Commissioners voted unanimously in favor of participating in a pilot program with Flock Group Inc. to install 25 rear license plate- reading cameras in an eort to reduce crime throughout the county. The contract with Flock was approved 4-0; County Judge Bill Gravell was not in attendance at the Commissioners Court’s May 3 meeting. Sheri Mike Gleason said the yearlong pilot program is free for any jurisdiction to participate in. Each camera costs $2,500 and has a $250 installation fee. AUSTIN The 2021 Austin City Limits Music Festival contributed $369.16 million to Austin’s economy last year, according to a new report from the economic analysis rm AngelouEconomics. During a May 10 press conference covering the ndings of the analysis, city ocials commended the festival both for its economic eects and for the portion of festival-related dollars that support Austin parks. NUMBER TO KNOW up monthly by the Austin Resource Recovery, Austin Public Works and the city’s Watershed Protection department on a monthly basis from homeless encampments. 140 tons Austin City Council meets June 9 and 16 at 10 a.m. at Austin City Hall, 301 W. Second St., Austin. 512-974-2250. www.austintexas.gov/department/ city-council Travis County Commissioners Court meets May 24, 26, June 7, 9, 14, 21 at 9 a.m. at the Travis County Administration Building, 700 Lavaca St., Austin. 512-854-4722. www.traviscountytx.gov Williamson County Commissioners Court meets May 24, 31, June 7, 14 and 21 at 9:30 a.m. at the Williamson County Courthouse, 710 Main St., Georgetown. 512-943-1100. www.wilco.org MEETINGS WE COVER Amount of trash picked

Austin reports on eorts to address homelessness

Williamson County to add to Justice Center

HEALING HOMELESSNESS

The city of Austin hopes to use American Rescue Plan Act funds for homelessness programs for housing stabilization, crisis response and support services.

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Judge Bill Gravell said the district court will be moving into the almost completed courtroom on the rst oor of the Justice Center, at 405 Martin Luther King Jr. St., Georgetown. The court- room is expected to be ready Oct. 1, and Gravell said Gov. Greg Abbott will appoint a judge prior to that date. County commissioners approved a contract in October 2020 for $2.8 million with HCS Inc. for n- ish-out work of the new courtroom and other remodeling throughout the Justice Center.

BY GLORIE MARTINEZ

$53 million for housing stabilization $10 million for crisis response $11 million for support services

AUSTIN The Austin Homeless Strategy Division provided updates on the city’s eorts to tackle home- lessness at a May 3 meeting, about one year after Austin voters elected to reinstate a public camping ban. The division held two virtual meetings led by Austin Homeless Strategy Ocer Dianna Grey on May 2 and 3. Topics included camping ordinance enforcement and the Housing-Focused Encamp- ment Assistance Link initiative to move Austinites experiencing homelessness from camps into temporary housing. The HEAL initiative, approved by Austin City Council members last February, directly addresses homeless encampments. HEAL aims to identify

SOURCE: CITY OF AUSTIN COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

encampments that pose health and safety risks, oer residents access to bridge shelters and connect them to longer-term housing. The city approved investing over $100 million of American Rescue Plan Act funds into homelessness programs in June 2021. While Austin provides some direct service programs, the majority of the city’s spending on social services happens through nonprot and community partners, Grey said.

N

Travis County ocials look at causes of ballooning jail population

BY DARCY SPRAGUE

jumped from a pandemic low of roughly 1,400 in May 2021 to 2,095 as of early May this year, according to Valerie Hollier, a planning project manager with the county’s justice and public safety division. At a May 3 presentation

to commissioners Court, Hollier cited higher numbers of arrests for rst- and sec- ond-degree felonies; longer average stays; an increased focus on arresting individu- als with aggravated assault warrants; changes to state bond law; longer wait times

to move individuals to state hospitals; and pandemic-re- lated slowdowns in courts. According to a Travis County report tilted “Who is in Jail and Why,” 46% more individuals were in jail between May 13, 2021 and April 21, 2022.

TRAVIS COUNTY The jail population at the Travis County Correctional Complex has increased signicantly since the start of 2022, according to county o cials. The jail population has

13

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2022

          

  

More pediatric specialists in more places across Central Texas Only in Austin. Only at Dell Children’s. At Dell Children’s, we are growing — just like families and the communities in Central Texas. The hospital, with the most pediatric specialists and specialty programs in the region, is expanding to deliver even more advanced and specialized care. Now more than ever, you have access to the highest level of care, close to home. • New state-of-the-art full-service children’s hospital in North Austin — opening 2022 • New 4th bed tower, adding 72 inpatient care rooms, with

the ability to expand in the future — opening 2022 • New Dell Children’s Specialty Pavilion — now open • New Comprehensive Fetal Care Center — now open • New Specialized Delivery Unit* — now open • New Maternal Care Center* — now open Learn more at DellChildrens.net/Expansion

© Ascension 2022. All rights reserved. *For patients of the Comprehensive Fetal Care Center

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY SUMAIYA MALIK

DESI DINING

An array of southeast Asian desserts, including jalebi, center.

Desi Brothers 2506 W. Parmer Lane, Ste. 170, Austin 512-761-3743 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. An orange-colored dessert that looks like a twisted pretzel but is crispier and thinner and dipped in sugar syrup ROTI OR CHAPATI Flatbread traditionally made with wheat our and water, rolled out and cooked on the stove JALEBI

Desi Brothers carries a selection of fresh produce.

Vipul Patel opened Desi Brothers on Parmer Lane in September 2019.

PHOTOS BY SUMAIYA MALIKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Desi Brothers South Asian grocery store, cafeteria has two locations in Austin F or those who wish to catch a glimpse of the thriving South Asian community

dry goods, the store has a growing clientele of repeat customers. “Our business actually went up by 30% in [the] COVID-19 pan- demic,” Patel said. Patel hails from Gujarat, India, and has been in the U.S. since 2001. He has been in the grocery store business for 16 years, rst in Chicago and then in Kentucky, but Desi Brothers is his rst solo ven- ture. Austin was a well-thought-out plan, he said. Patel decided to open his rst store in Austin when he read that Apple Inc. hired 10,000 employees for its Austin location a few miles from the location he chose for Desi Brothers. “So, I knew, three or four thousand [workers] will be Indian,” he said. In a layout similar to an HEB, the store carries fresh produce; spices; dairy; frozen meats; desserts, including gourmet ice

creams; dals or lentils; and ours as well as packaged Pakistani, Indian and U.S. brands. Its cafeteria sells Indian vegetarian cuisine for lunch and fresh roti—comparable to Mexican tortillas—a staple in South Asian homes. A few scattered cocktail tables ank the cafeteria in the far right corner for customers to stand for a quick bite. Customers can choose an array of colorful mithai, Pakistani and Indian desserts including jalebis and gulab jamuns from behind the glass casing. Fresh-squeezed sugar cane juice at the cafeteria is another cultural favorite. “As long as we have fresh produce, fresh chapati and the cafeteria, our customers are happy,” he said. After the two Austin stores, Patel opened four more outside Austin.

of Austin, a trip to Desi Brothers, a privately owned, local South Asian grocery store and cafeteria at 2506 W. Parmer Lane, Austin, might be all they need. Visited by all ages—from kids who accompany their families, to the elderly who need assistance—Desi Brothers is frequented by a cross-section of people looking for ingredients, food and household supplies. The grocery store opened in September 2019. A month later, owner Vipul Patel opened a second location at 3421 W. William Cannon Drive, Ste. 133, Austin, in the Canyon Oaks Shopping center. The twin stores cater to Aus- tin’s fast-growing South Asian population. With competitive prices, an array of fresh produce, frozen foods and

MOPAC

N

3421 W. William Cannon Drive, Ste. 133, Austin 512-899-1000 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

N

Make a difference on June 3 and join United Way for Greater Austin for Summer Day of Caring! Family-friendly, in-person volunteer activities are available in both Travis and Williamson counties. Before or after you volunteer, connect with CEO David C. Smith and fellow volunteers at breakfast in Austin or lunch in Leander!

Thank you to our Summer Day of Caring sponsors!

15

NORTHWEST AUSTIN EDITION • MAY 2022

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16-17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32

communityimpact.com

Powered by