Georgetown | May 2021

GEORGETOWN EDITION

VOLUME 14, ISSUE 9  MAY 13JUNE 16, 2021

ONLINE AT

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IMPACTS

GUIDE

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OUT ABOUT and Families begin to gather more frequently on the Georgetown Square.

More in-person events return toGeorgetown

BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

With continued eorts to get individuals over age 16 vaccinated in order to reach herd immunity, the city of Georgetown is beginning to see a glimpse of normalcy with the return of live events starting this summer. Since March, Georgetown has already hosted sev- eral in-person events, all of which have and continue to operate with safety precautions such as recom- mendations of wearing masks and social distancing, city ocials said. Those events include Second Sat- urday Market Days, Pistons on the Square, the Spring Fling and a crawsh boil. With the decreasing number of COVID-19 cases and

Georgetown residents celebrate Mother’s Day on the Square.

ALI LINANCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 22

State leaderspush for post-stormreformbills

Addressing concerns The state Legislature is considering bills regarding statewide issues from the Texas winter storm.

BY TAYLOR GIRTMAN

74% of Texans disapproved of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas’ performance during the winter storm.

26M customers are served through ERCOT’s power grid management.

Over 2/3 of Texans lost electricity at some point.

A number of legislative bills are underway in the Texas House and Senate in response to the February winter storm that swept the state, causing power out- ages, water outages and widespread damage. This led the state to report at least 151 storm-related deaths as of May 6, including three Williamson County residents and 12 Travis County residents, according to state data.

SOURCES: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON HOBBY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS SURVEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER State Sen. Charles Schwertner, RGeorgetown, lays out Senate Bill 3 on the Senate oor. (Courtesy Texas Senate Photography)

CONTINUED ON 24

and trust use.

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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON Contribute to CI Patron today!

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Teresa Lopez Auxiliary Employee of the Year Custodian Lakeway Technology Center Leslie Mauch Paraprofessional Employee of the Year Administrative Assistant Transportation

We are proud to recognize our staff for their outstanding work and commitment to our district vision and mission. Please join us in congratulating our employees and teachers of the year.

Chad Hennessey Support Employee

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of the Year Athletic Trainer Georgetown HS

Cheryl Richards Elementary Teacher of the Year

Third Grade Mitchell ES

Carolyn Hise Secondary Teacher of the Year Geometry & Calculus Georgetown HS

@georgetownisd

www.georgetownisd.org

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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GEORGETOWN EDITION • MAY 2021

New Year. New Home. Save Big!

CALL 512-591-5121 TO LEARN ABOUT OUR SPECIALS* ON SELECT APARTMENTS!

Whether you’re looking to relax and enjoy retirement or skip the chores to focus on your social schedule, Skye Luxury Retirement Living is the place to do it! *Restrictions apply, see sales director for details. INDEPENDENT LIVING 11350 Hero Way West • Leander, TX 78641 • 5125915121 • www.SkyeLiving.com

Georgetown celebrates love this June.

In honor of Pride Month this June, the Georgetown Public Library is putting together bundles of items, including age appropriate movies and books with LGBTQ+ themes. Items will be available for check out and to browse in the library. The library will also have DIY Pride Flag kits.

For more information, visit library.georgetown.org. #LoveWhereYouLive

The Georgetown Public Library is located at 402W. Eighth St.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMDENISE: As the number of COVID-19 cases continue to decrease, we see more and more people venturing out and getting back to the things they used to do. One fun thing I love to do most in Georgetown is take my family to local events such as festivals and listening to live music. At the top of my list has to be the upcoming POPPtoberfest, which is the rescheduled version of Red Poppy Festival. I am truly looking forward to strolling around the Square, listening to live music and enjoying the smell of roasted corn and cotton candy. If you see me there, please come say hi! Denise Seiler, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMALI: By the time this paper reaches your mailbox, there will be only a couple of weeks left in the biennial Texas Legislature. During this period, there is a major push for nal legislation to get through, and many Williamson County state leaders have their eyes set on passing energy reform following the February winter storm (see Page 1). Ali Linan, EDITOR

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GEORGETOWN EDITION • MAY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

Dr. Craig P. Torres D.D.S., Endodontist Board Certified (COL US Army Dental Corps RET) • Non-surgical root canal therapy • Root canal retreatments • Root canal surgery Dr. Gloria T. Torres D.D.S., Prosthodontist (LTC US Army Dental Corps RET) 58 Years Combined Experience (Retired Army Dentists) 6 Romeo’s Pizza broke ground on its Georgetown location April 6. The nation- al pizza chain plans to open in June and will be located at 5731 Williams Drive, Georgetown-owned business Lily Belle opened in February. The shop is online and sells hand-cut leather earrings each made with high-quality materials and unique in- tention and meaning. www.lilybelle.shop Tiny Texans Soft Play , a children’s mobile play zone rental service, opened March 12. Tiny Texans offers soft play mobile rentals and play equipment for children from crawlers up to age 4, including delivery, setup and takedown within a 20-mile radius of the 78626 ZIP code. 512-677-3704. https://tinytexanssoftplay.wixsite.com/ my-site Georgetown-owned business Peace of Mind Pool Service opened in February. Peace of Mind offers weekly pool main- tenance, as well as repairs, cleanings and replacements of pool equipment such as filters, pumps, plumbing leaks and Polaris pool cleaners. 512-591-6314. www.peaceofmindpoolsatx.com Georgetown-owned business BuckWild Designs opened in March. The online busi- ness specializes in making customizable tumblers, coasters, wine and beer glasses, and more. www.facebook.com/buckwild. designs.atx Georgetown business owner and massage therapist Tesa Wilder opened Wellness by Wilder in February. The business pro- vides in-home massages and reflexology treatments, including Swedish massage, shiatsu, general polarity therapy, reflex- ology and hot-stone massage. 512-640-9445. www.facebook.com/ wellnessbywilder COMING SOON 5 Georgetown Pediatrics is set to open in June. The medical practice will be located at 4841 Williams Drive, Bldg. C, Ste. 105, Georgetown. Services pro- vided include sports physicals, attention deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, allergies, asthma, behavioral health, telemedicine, vaccina- tions and more. 512-730-3957. https://georgetownpedi.com

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NOWOPEN 1 All Star Liquor opened in Georgetown on Feb. 2. The business offers a variety of liquor, wine and beer. It is located at 1011 Leander Road, Ste. 102, Georgetown. 512-240-5359 2 Code Ninjas opened its Georgetown location April 26. The coding center teaches computer science and program- ming through students building their

own video games. Programs are geared toward children ages 7-14. It is located at 4853 Williams Drive, Ste. 103, George- town. 737-253-8995. www.codeninjas.com/tx-georgetown 3 Rock Collision Center opened its sec- ond location in Georgetown on May 4. The second auto collision repair shop is located at 608 Leander Road, Georgetown. The full-service shop is staffed with certified technicians and offers auto collision repairs,

painting services, bumper and dent repairs and hail damage repairs. Rock Collision Center also has a location in Temple. 254-773-9591. http://rockcollision.net 4 Hydrate opened its second Georgetown location on the Square on April 6. Hydrate is a healthy food eatery and smoothie bar that sells sandwiches, kombucha and dry goods. It is located at 711 S. Main St., Georgetown, while the first location is on Williams Drive. 512-863-9812. www.hydratetexas.com

Call for an appointment 512-868-5999 Advanced Technology CEREC (one day all ceramic crowns) Endodontic Microscopes Digital radiography/photography CBCT (3-D) scans Oral/nitrous sedation www.Torres-Dental-Specialties.com

• Restorative Dentistry • Cosmetic Dentistry • Full mouth reconstruction

(severe wear/malocclusions) • Complex esthetic and functional cases • Dental implants • Dentures / partial dentures

4402 Williams Drive, Suite 104 • Georgetown, TX • Hours M-F 8-5 • Most insurance accepted

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA & ALI LINAN

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Lily Belle COURTESY LILLY BELLE

Georgetown Pediatrics

Romeo’s Pizza

Pupology

FERNANDA FIGUEROA/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY ROMEO’S PIZZA

ALI LINAN/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Georgetown. Romeo’s Pizza offers hand- crafted pies using fresh ingredients. It has over 40 locations across the country. www.romeospizza.com RELOCATIONS 7 All Care Therapies of Georgetown plans to relocate to a new location in Georgetown by the end of the year. The business is currently located at 4402 Wil- liams Drive, Ste. 115, Georgetown. It will move to 3610 Williams Drive, George- town. All Care Therapies services include a therapy pool; an adaptive playground; and physical, occupational, speech, feed- ing and massage therapy. 512-256-7627. www.allcaretherapygt.com 8 Pet store Pupology will relocate to a new location at 4326 Williams Drive,

Georgetown, on June 1. Currently, Pupolo- gy is located at 4320 Williams Drive, Ste. A, Georgetown. Pupology offers pet supplies, healthy baked treats, nutrition advice and a self-service dog spa. 512-688-5730. https://shoppupology.com 9 Papa Frank’s Barber Shop celebrat- ed its 10-year anniversary in early April. The shop specializes in short styles and undercuts for men and women. The busi- ness also does designs, eyebrow services and hot-towel shaves. Papa Frank’s is located at 209 S. Austin Ave., George- town. 512-815-1606. www.facebook.com/

in April. The restaurant offers authentic Southwestern and Mexican cuisine. Both restaurants have the same owners. The Le- ander restaurant is located at 11840 Hero Way W., Bldg. A, Leander. The Georgetown restaurant is located on the Square at 212 W. Seventh St., Ste. 105, Georgetown. www.bluecornharvest.com 11 Lamppost Coffee opened its fifth Aus- tin-area location March 3 in the Anderson Mill area. The cafe, located at 13376 US 183, Ste. 800, Austin, serves pour-over coffee and handcrafted espresso drinks alongside traditional coffee shop offerings. Lamppost Coffee also has a location in Georgetown at 809 S. Main St., George- town. www.lamppost.coffee 12 Williamson County and Cities Health District Clinical Services Division will ex- tend its hours at several locations including the one in Georgetown beginning May 17.

New hours are Monday through Thursday 7a.m.-6 p.m. Services include child and adult vaccinations, COVID-19 vaccinations, well-woman services, and testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infec- tions and tuberculosis. It is located at 100 W. Third St., Georgetown. 512-943-3600. www.wcchd.org IN THE NEWS 13 Williamson County named a trail on the west side of I-35 of Berry Springs Park and Preserve after Susan Black- ledge on May 4. Blackledge retired after 16 years as park manager. Berry Springs Park and Preserve is located at 1801 CR 152, Georgetown. 512-930- 0040. www.wilco.org/Departments/ Parks-Recreation/County-Parks-Trails/ Berry-Springs-Park

papafranksbarbershop EXPANSIONS

10 Georgetown’s Blue Corn Harvest Bar & Grill expanded to add a Leander location

Our job is to make sure you don’t want to keep wearing your mask!

Georgetown Family Orthodontics provides a team-oriented approach with pediatric dentistry and orthodontic care in one convenient location. We offer 100% free, no pressure evaluations and consultations which can be done online! Visit our website and click on Virtual Consultations. BEAUTIFUL, HEALTHY SMILES

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Aaron J. White, DDS 4507 Williams Drive • 512.869.4100 GTFamilyOrtho.com

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GEORGETOWN EDITION • MAY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

May-June events

COMPILED BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

MAY 15

FISHAT PARK PONDS GAREY PARK

1. Sunken Garden, 439 E. Morrow St. 2. Edwards Park, 704 Ash St. 3. Near 701-799 S. Elm St. 4. Near 907 S. Elm St. 5. Near 801-899 S. Elm St. The blooming of the red poppies is usually celebrated with the annual Red Poppy Festival, which has been postponed this year due the coronavirus pandemic. Here are some of the most common poppy locations: RED POPPY TOUR The Red Poppy has become an integral part of Georgetown. Henry Purl Compton sent his mother poppy seeds from Europe after World War I. After planting them at her home, now located at 507 E. Seventh St., the seeds spread across the city.

Spend the morning shing at Garey Park ponds. Garey Park will provide shing equipment, instruction and bait. Children under 12 must have a parent enrolled to participate. Face masks are required if social distancing is not possible. 8-10 a.m. $15 (resident), $20 (nonresident). 6450 RM 2243, Georgetown. 512-930-6800. https://parks.georgetown.org/gareypark/garey-park-programs

MAY 14 ENJOY MUSIC FROM THE BEACH BOYS The Georgetown Palace Allstar band performs the hits of the Beach Boys, such as “Kokomo,” “Surng USA,” “Fun Fun Fun” and more. Groups will be distanced apart, and masks are required when sitting. 7:30 p.m. $20 (student with ID), $24 (military, student and 55+), $26. Georgetown Palace Theatre, 810 S. Austin Ave., Georgetown. 512-869-7469. www.georgetownpalace.com 14 THROUGH JUNE 13 SEE ART BY JR RAPIER JR Rapier’s “Symphony of Entities” exhibit opens May 14. The exhibit highlights the human condition by examining Rapier’s own psyche in showing what her feelings and emotions look like if they were certain characters. Times vary. Free. Georgetown Art Center, 816 S. Main St., Georgetown. 512- 930-2583. www.georgetownartcentertx.org 20 ATTENDANARTIST SPEAKER SERIES Hosted by GTX Film Festival, the Full Circle event brings together creatives to share, network and inspire. Refreshments are provided. 6-7 p.m. Free. Grace Heritage Center, 817 S. Main St., Georgetown. www.facebook.com/ susiekellyatauabstractart 21 CORYMORROWLIVE Kick o the summer with an outdoor music event that includes food trucks, reworks and a live performance from Cory Morrow. 6:30 p.m. (doors open), 8 p.m. (show begins). $65. Age 21 and up. Reunion Ranch, 820 CR 250, Georgetown. 512-868-9544. www.faithinactiongt.org 21 THROUGH 22 LEARNABOUT BIRDING Learn the basics of birding from master naturalist Jim Hailey in two days. The course will cover what to look for, what binoculars to use, and information about books and guides. Masks will be required when inside Garey Park facilities. The program is for age 14 and up. 10 a.m.-noon (Fri.), 8-11 a.m. (Sat.). $15 (resident), $20 (nonresident). RM

2243, Georgetown. 512-930-6800. https://parks.georgetown.org/ gareypark/garey-park-programs 28 ROTARY INVITATIONAL GOLF TOURNAMENT Take part in the 2021 Rotary Club of Georgetown Invitational Golf Tournament. Lunch is provided. 1 p.m. (shotgun start). Prices vary. Cowan Creek Golf Course & Pavilion, 1433 Cool Springs Blvd., Georgetown. 512-913-3743. https://rigtx.ejoinme.org/myevents/ 2021rotaryinvitationalgolftournamnet JUNE 05 THEMISS CENTRAL TEXAS PAGEANT Attend the Miss Central Texas Pageant and enjoy some Texas charm as young ladies compete to advance to the Miss Texas Teen USA and Miss Texas USA pageant. 6-8 p.m. Free. Sheraton Austin Georgetown Hotel & Conference Center, 1101 Woodlawn Ave., Georgetown. www.austintexaspageant.com 07 THROUGH 11 TAKE YOUR CHILD TO CAMP COURAGE Children of all military branches of active-duty service members, veterans or fallen service members and veterans are welcome to attend Camp Courage, a leadership horsemanship camp. 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. (June 7-10), 5-8 p.m. (June 11). Free. Merlin Hoppe Arena, 2050 Rockride Lane, Georgetown. 512-930-7625. https://rockride.org/ event/camp-courage-2021/ 12 BRING YOUR CHILDREN TO EXPLORE TRUCKS Wolf Ranch Town Center is holding a touch-a-truck event where children can safely see, touch and explore trucks and machinery. Children will have the opportunity to see emergency and military vehicles, construction equipment and more. 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Wolf Ranch Town Center, 1019 W. University Ave., Georgetown. 512-930-8008. https://wolfranchtowncenter.com

6. Near 1002 S. Ash St. 7. Near 912 S. College St. 8. Near East 10th St. 9. Near 915 S. Pine St. 10. Near East 11th St.

11. Near 804 E. Eighth St. 12. Near 904 S. Walnut St. 13. Near 915 S. Walnut St. 14. Near 873-999 S. College St. 15. Near 406 E. Seventh St. 16. Near 504 E. Seventh St. 17. Near 512 S. Myrtle St. 18. Near 411 S. Church St. 19. Near 105 E. Fifth St. 20. Near 200-298 S. Church St.

14 CELEBRATE NATIONAL BOURBONDAY Sit back, relax and enjoy a bourbon at Hardtails Bar & Grill as part of National Bourbon Day. 11 a.m.-midnight. Prices vary. 1515 N. I-35, Georgetown. 512-869-5454. https://hardtailsbarandgrill.com 14 LEARNHOWTO LANDSCAPE DESIGN Attend a landscape design course with landscape consultant and designer Colleen Dieter, who will show you the steps of landscape design. The class teaches attendees how to start a design project, how designs come together and how to maintain the design. 7-8 p.m. Free. Via Zoom. 512-943-3300. https://txmg.org/williamson/event/ practical-landscape-design-one-pros- process-part-1-colleen-dieter

Find more or submit Georgetown events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

9

GEORGETOWN EDITION • MAY 2021

MAY IS SKIN CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Richarte High School Thursday, May 27 at 8 p.m.

With 5.4 million cases in more than 3.3 million people diagnosed annually, skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Fortunately, skin cancer is also one of the most preventable forms of cancer and highly treatable when detected early. 1 5 in Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime

Georgetown High School Friday, May 28 at 8 p.m.

East View High School Saturday, May 29 at 8 p.m. Community Parade Saturday, May 22 at 9 a.m.

Call (512) 883-9437 to Schedule your Annual Skin Exam

@georgetownisd

WWW. US DERMATOLOGY PARTNERS .COM 700 San Gabriel Village Boulevard, Suite 105, Georgetown, TX 78626

www.georgetownisd.org/graduation2021

Ascension Medical Group Seton Women’s Health Williamson is open in Round Rock. Our doctors and care teams listen to you as a woman and an expecting mom. By taking the time to understand the care you need, we can create a care plan that’s right for you, your baby, and your new family. We are maintaining strict precautions to keep you and your family safe while in our care. Appointments are now available with Richard Benedict, MD Call 512-687-3498 to schedule or visit SetonBaby.com

Ascension Medical Group Seton Women’s Health Williamson 301 Seton Parkway, Suite 407 Round Rock, TX 78665

Before all the baby talk, let’s talk babies

Ascension Texas © Ascension 2021. All rights reserved.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PUBLIC SAFETY As pandemic restrictions ease, reports of child abuse increase

FEWER CASES, MORE ABUSE

While the Williamson County Children’s Advocacy Center saw a decrease in reported cases, experts warn abuse was still happening, but it just was not being reported.

March 2020

BY ALI LINAN

which in turn led to a form of abuse, Deazvedo said. “The overriding message is that children have not been safe this year; children have not been seen,” Sturman said. “[Children] are one of the only populations when a crime is committed against them are not able, do not know how or are not willing to report that crime, or they don’t even know it’s a crime. …We will not know the full repercussions and depth of what has happened to our children, abuse- and neglect-wise, I think for some time to come.” Sturman did say the center learned a lot during the pandemic and has pivoted in some of its focuses on how it educates the public on child abuse and how to report it. For example, since a large percent- age of reports come from teachers, the center developed education geared toward spotting signs of abuse over Zoom. The pandemic also highlighted the center’s need to focus education beyond teachers. It has since enhanced its eort of reaching out to the commu- nity members and building awareness around child abuse, hoping to elicit their helping in caring for area kids. The center also adapted to the pandemic by now providing virtual forensic interviews, which it did not do before, Deazvedo said. While the WCCAC did not see the high spike in reports as it predicted would come when children returned to school, Sturman said it was likely because students did not return all at once. Instead, a few students returned to in-person learning over time. However, she warned that the center is still bracing for more cases as individuals begin to get vaccinated and return to pre-pandemic activities. She added the center is beginning to see a rise in number of total reports similar to numbers seen prior to the pandemic. “[Child abuse] was something that was already an epidemic in our society that was driven further underground [by the pandemic],” Sturman said. “It’s going to take all of us to make sure that our children can thoroughly heal from the trauma of abuse.”

At the start of the pandemic in March 2020, child abuse advocates feared they would see a drop in reported cases of suspected abuse and/ or neglect. Not because less abuse was happening but rather kids—kept at home—would not be seen by commu- nity members and primarily teachers, who are the No. 1 reporter of suspected child abuse, according to area experts. That fear was realized when the number of reported cases in Williamson County in 2020 dropped to 3,694, down from 4,115, or about 10%, in 2019. “We know abuse was happening, and we know from past research that given times of high family stress that the severity and the intensity of child abuse increases,” said Tiany Sturman, director of community engagement at the Williamson County Children’s Advocacy Center. While the overall number of reported cases dropped, WCCAC Director of Programs Jennifer Deaz- vedo said the center was seeing more severe cases. Experts said they feared this would be the case as high-stress situations such as job loss or nancial struggle can often lead to increased violence. “THE OVERRIDING MESSAGE IS THAT CHILDRENHAVE NOT BEEN SAFE THIS YEAR; CHILDRENHAVE NOT BEEN SEEN.” TIFFANY STURMAN, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AT THE WILLIAMSON COUNTY CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER Many homes also became multifam- ily homes where an abuser—such as an uncle who lost a job—was brought into the home and would abuse a child who lived there, she said. Another trend the center saw was that some children had unsupervised access to technology, resulting in using apps or social media to meet strangers,

April May June July August September October November December

15.85% YOY

Reports will generally be higher when children return from a holiday break.

January 2021

31.41% YOY

March February*

17.93% YOY

April**

projected to be up YOY

0 100

200 300 400 500

Cases

* NUMBER COULD HAVE BEEN IMPACTED BY THE TEXAS WINTER STORM

**AS OF APRIL 19

4,115 3,694 2019 2020

The WCCAC expects the trend to continue back to “normal if not higher” reports. 2021

REPORTED CASES YEAR OVER YEAR

10.23% YOY

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

REPORTING BREAKDOWN

Professionals are the primary reporters of abuse. Here is a breakdown of all abuse reporters, according to the Children’s Bureau.

Day care/foster care provider: 1.1% Mental health personnel: 6% Social services personnel: 10.3%

Education personnel: 21%

Legal and law enforcement personnel: 19.1%

Who calls in?

Medical personnel: 11%

Unclassied sources including anonymous, other and unknown report sources: 15.8%

Nonprofessionals— including friends, neighbors and relatives: 15.7%

SOURCE: CHILDREN’S BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Texas Department of Family and Protective Services 800-252-5400 Williamson County Children’s Advocacy Center 512-943-3701

HOWTOREPORT If you suspect a child has been abused or neglected, here is how to report it.

11

GEORGETOWN EDITION • MAY 2021

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Georgetown ISD

DATES TOKNOW LAST DAY OF SCHOOL May 28 GRADUATION (no tickets needed) Birkelbach Field,

School districtmakes plans for in-person summer learning

SUMMER SCHOOL NUMBERS TO KNOW More details for Georgetown ISD’s summer learning will be presented at the board workshop May 17.

2275 N. Austin Ave. Richarte High School May 27, 8 p.m. Georgetown High School May 28, 8 p.m. East View High School May 29, 8 p.m. COMMUNITY PARADE May 22, 9-11 a.m. Location TBD

SOURCE: GEORGETOWN ISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER starting in June for high school. 6 WEEKS Runs JULY 19-AUG. 5 Runs for first through eighth grade

BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

will each offer summer learning for their respective students with administrators from each campus ensuring their students’ success, Acosta said. “We wanted to make sure that we are offering all of those opportunities that [GISD students] need to take and maintain their direction in their high school careers,” Acosta said. Elementary and middle school summer learning will be between July 19-Aug. 5 and expand to be available to first- through eighth-grade students with 200 students from each grade being offered the chance to attend, Acosta said. “[Summer learning] is about making sure that they have numeracy skills, literacy skills, learning skills that we

GEORGETOWN ISD The district is working on plans for in-person summer learning with a low teacher-to- student ratio, said Terri Conrad, GISD chief strategist for learning design. A low ratio will allow for more personalized learning plans that will help get students excited about learning, Conrad said. Summer learning for high school will start in June and last for six weeks. It will focus on classes to help students who need credits to graduate and those who are looking to get credits ahead of time, said Courtney Acosta, GISD chief strategist for systems and operations. Richarte High School, East ViewHigh School and Georgetown High School

Georgetown ISD board of trustees Next meeting is at 7 p.m. May 17 in the Hammerlun Center for Leadership and Learning Boardroom MEETINGSWE COVER the center will continue to provide care for students, staff and their immediate families Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m.-4 p.m. and virtually on Friday from 7 a.m.-4 p.m. GEORGETOWN ISD The district is accepting dual-language program applications for incoming kindergarten students. The program is offered at Carver, Cooper, Purl, Village and Williams elementary schools. Students zoned to other campuses may still apply to the program. If accepted, they may not be enrolled at their home campus. The early deadline is May 28. SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS GEORGETOWN ISD GISD SeaPerch students from 12 campuses competed March 27 to earn a spot in the international SeaPerch competition in June. The goal of the competition was to complete an obstacle and mission course with a remotely operated vehicle that had to pick up and move sunken and floating trash. GEORGETOWN ISD Students involved in athletics, Reserved Officer Training Corps, Health Occupations Station of America and fine arts programs are required to obtain an annual physical. Mass physicals will be offered to all students at East View High School on May 22. Registration is required by May 20. GEORGETOWN ISD A virtual art show displays the works by GISD fine arts students. The art show is usually held at the Georgetown Public Library; however, due to the pandemic, pieces can now be found online at www.georgetownisd.org/artshow. GEORGETOWN ISD The district and health and wellness center operated by Lone Star Circle of Care will operate under summer hours from June 11-July 30. The district offices will be open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., while

want them to have,” Conrad said. “And we feel like we can embed that into something that’s exciting and interesting and speaks to our vision and mission and beliefs about service learning.” She added that summer learning for GISD will also offer help to extended school year students from June through July.

Maskmandate remains despite upset parents

These projects have been completed: • purchase micro-bus; • replace athletic complex audio equipment; • replace high school basketball goals and hall doors; • construct the canopy outside the weight room; • upgrade gym to LED lights; and • purchase semitrailer. COMPLETED BONDPROJECTS

These projects are expected to be completed by August: • replace campus parking lot lights; • purchase band uniforms; • repair athletic complex stucco; • construct practice putting green; • enclose Wagner Middle library clerestory; and • replace EVHS turf. UPCOMING BONDPROJECTS

BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

GEORGETOWN ISD Parents spoke out April 19 against the mask mandate, demanding board members to remove the policy. Parents Jennifer Walker, David Gauthier and Alex Campo urged board members at the April 19 meeting to lift the mask mandate due the negative effects it has on their children. “Children need to be able to read and interpret facial cues to learn and develop appropriately,” Walker said. “Mask wearing in children reduces their ability to learn from audio and visual stimuli and negatively impacts speech language and cognitive development, emotional regulation and social interactions all because they cannot read information displayed through facial cues.” Gauthier called the board members hypocrites for not wearing their masks where they sat, saying it was a luxury his kids did not have. Campo urged the board members to remove the mandate or GISD parents would have no choice but to take their children and the funding they provide the district. The board did not respond to comments, but Superintendent Fred Brent said GISD is still implementing the mask mandate because vaccines are not widely available to students yet; staff report feeling safer with mask requirements; herd immunity has not yet been reached; and COVID-19 cases are still appearing on campuses, among other reasons.

SOURCE: GEORGETOWN ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

4more added bond projects complete

GEORGETOWN ISD The district has completed four more projects of the 16 additional bond projects the school board approved in January, said David Biesheuvel, GISD executive director of construction and development, during an April 19 board meeting. In January, the board approved the additional projects at a cost of $7.2 million to be completed with savings from the 2015 and 2018 bonds. In March, GISD completed two BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

of the 16 projects.

Since then, four new projects have been completed, including replacing the basketball goals and hall doors in Georgetown High School’s gym, constructing the canopy outside the East ViewHigh school weight room, upgrading to LED lights in the EVHS gym and purchasing one semitrailer to pull band trailers, Biesheuvel said. Approximately $2.1 million remains for the remaining six projects, Biesheuvel said.

13

GEORGETOWN EDITION • MAY 2021

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Georgetown & Williamson County

Future of former Sheri Robert Chody’s multi-county indictments remains unknown

10TH ST.

BY ALI LINAN

Travis County DA’s Oce is still gathering and providing discov- ery to attorneys in that case. Defense attorneys for both Chody and Nassour argued at least one case

WILLIAMSON COUNTY A decision on how to proceed with two separate but related charges between the two entities against former Williamson County Sheri Robert Chody for evidence tampering is still unknown following an April 28 announcement docket. The attorneys representing Chody and Jason Nassour, a former general counsel to the Williamson County Attorney’s Oce, asked the William- son County District Attorney’s team how it plans to move forward since the Travis County District Attorney’s Oce too has indicted Chody and Nassour in connection to the death- in-custody case of Javier Ambler. Prosecutors from the Williamson County DA’s Oce said they hope to have a better understanding of which case will go rst and whether one of the cases is dismissed for a later time in about 60 days, as the

N

Former Williamson County Sheri Robert Chody

The Jessie Daniel Ames house is located just south of the Georgetown Square at 1004 S. Church St. (Ali Linan/Community Impact Newspaper)

Historic JessieDaniel Ames house set to become a day spa

should be dismissed due to potential for double jeopardy—an instance of prosecuting someone twice for the same oense. The prosecutors did not comment on that claim and only that they would work with Travis County on determining a timeline and plan for how the two cases will move forward. The presiding judge over the Williamson County case is Sid Harle, of the Fourth Administrative Judicial Region of Texas, and the attorneys agreed to a July 23 update.

BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

WHATWILL IT COVER? Here is a breakdown of what the money will cover: Consulting for small area plans for San Jose $100,000 Police for if and when a signicant investigation is needed mark status, and even if this passes, I hope that maybe we can reach out to the owner and see if we can work with them to get this property the historic recognition and attention it deserves for future generations,” Jonrowe said. Georgetown Square and downtown Georgetown through the establish- ment of two distinct zones, Nelson said. The home is located just south of the Georgetown Square at 1004 S. Church St. It was once owned by Jessie Daniel Ames, a champion for women’s and civil rights in the early 1900s. Council Member Rachel Jonrowe, who voted against the item, voiced her concerns about the historic signicance of the property and the negative impact rezoning could have. “I think this is a house of land-

GEORGETOWN The historic Jessie Daniel Ames house is set to become a day spa following rezon- ing approval from Georgetown City Council. Council approved the change in a 5-2 vote during an April 27 regular meeting. The rezoning is two-fold and would change the area from a residential single-family district to a mixed-use downtown district. It will also shift from the old town historic overlay district to the downtown historic overlay district. The change to a mixed-use district allows for a variety of land use, including general and retail, Georgetown Planning Director Soa Nelson said. The downtown overlay district is intended to protect the aes- thetic and visual character of the

Workforce housing development agreement between city, Vida Apartments approved

BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

GEORGETOWN A workforce housing development agreement with Vida Apartments, a new com- plex slated to open in 2022, and the city of Georgetown was approved during an April 13 meeting. The move, which encourages aordable housing, will set aside 12 units to be available for individ- uals whose income is less than or equal to 80% of the area median income, or AMI, for 10 years. The current AMI for Williamson County is $98,900; therefore, 80% AMI is $79,120 for a family of four, city ocials said. In exchange, the city will allow the complex to build an additional impervious cover on the property because Vida is setting aside 10% of the units and is therefore eligible to use dimensional standards that allow for the cover, city ocials said. Vida Apartments will be located at 2900 NE Inner Loop, George- town, and have 124 units total.

Excess funds to go to added city services

The Vida Apartments will be located at 2900 NE Inner Loop Road, Georgetown. (Rendering courtesy Vida Apartments)

BY FERNANDA FIGUEROA

Georgetown City Council Meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at 6 p.m. 101 E. Seventh St., Georgetown 512-931-7715 • www.georgetown.org Williamson County Commissioners Court Meets Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. 710 S. Main St., Georgetown 512-943-1550 • www.wilco.org MEETINGSWE COVER

GEORGETOWN Approximately $910,000 from excess funds will be used for additional city services, following direction from City Council during an April 13 workshop meeting. The funding is part of a total $5.6 million in excess funds the city had in its scal year 2020-21 budget due to conservative budgeting during the COVID-19 pandemic, ocials said.

$300,000

Winter storm debris removal

$250,000

SOURCE: CITY OF GEORGETOWN COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Winter storm overtime $80,000 Two trucks for inspections $180,000

15

GEORGETOWN EDITION • MAY 2021

Follow the two-day watering schedule

City of Georgetown water customers should follow the two-day watering schedule for irrigation systems and hose-end sprinklers. The year-round schedule is based on the last digit of the street address.

Since last summer, approximately 5,000 new utility customers have been added to the Georgetown water utility service area due to continued population growth from new housing starts. During the summer months, 75 percent of the drinking water treated each day in the city is used for irrigation of lawns and landscapes.

No watering on Mondays.

Watering with a hand-held hose or bucket, or washing a vehicle can be done any day at any time. Violations of the irrigation schedule may result in fines.

For information on programming your irrigation controller, water rebates, and AquaAlerts, visit water.georgetown.org.

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