Franklin - Brentwood Edition - March 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1  MARCH 23APRIL 26, 2020

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SENIOR LIVING GUIDE 2020

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Nashville begins tornado recovery: How to help

Due to the fast-changing nature of coronavirus in the region, readers should visit communityimpact.com to nd the latest coverage on announcements, case numbers, school closures and more.

IMPACTS

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The hotel industry in Williamson County continues to expand. Five hotels are expected to open this year, and even more are in the planning process.

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Even as growth and development spread ever-out- ward in Williamson County, one rural tract of land in Brentwood will stay undisturbed for future generations. The Brentwood City Commission voted unani- mously March 9 to approve the purchase of 52 acres of the 90-acre Windy Hill Farm, located near Old Smyrna Road, a historic corridor in the area. The city will buy the land at its appraised value of $100,000 per acre, for a total of $5.2 million, and convert the land into Windy Hill Park, preventing the area from being turned into an additional neighborhood. “This is a signicant action by the city,” City Manager Kirk Bednar said. “If this property wasn’t purchased today, it goes away. It would be a subdi- vision, and it just leads to a continuation of that type of development. So this is an important step for the CONTINUED ON 18 The city will purchase a portion of the 90-acre farm. (Courtesy city of Brentwood) Brentwoodapproves $5.2Mfor newpark Windy Hill Farm to be preserved, halting future development BY WENDY STURGES

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The Harpeth Hotel, located in Harpeth Square in downtown Franklin, is one of the newest hotels to open in Williamson County; however, local experts said several more are planned for the area. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERNASHVILLE METRO Lacy Klasel lklasel@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth EDITOR Wendy Sturges REPORTER Alex Hosey COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maureen Sipperley DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lindsay Scott STAFF DESIGNER Chelsea King BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a

LACY: Longtime residents of Williamson County have likely noticed an increase in the number of tourists in recent years, and the area is seeing new development as a result. Take a look out our front page story to see how the hotel industry is faring amid a boom in new buildings. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

WENDY: Many of our readers know to expect an issue from us once a month detailing all of the news and projects happening in your backyard. But did you know we also cover daily news online? Head to communityimpact.com for the latest on city meetings, new businesses and more. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Road projects in Franklin, Brentwood DEVELOPMENT UPDATES 8 Local construction projects CITY& COUNTY 9 Latest local news BUSINESS FEATURE 12 Brentwood Skate Center DINING FEATURE 13 Mojo’s Tacos

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

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Local sources

New businesses Community events Senior living communities

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Party Fowl

Ti’s Treats

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY TIFF’S TREATS

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NOWOPEN 1 Pet People opened a new location in the Hill Center at 225 Franklin Road, Brentwood, on Feb. 14. The pet supply store sells natural pet foods, supplies and treats and also oers washing and groom- ing services for animals. 615-864-7899. www.petpeoplestores.com 2 Party Fowl , a hot chicken eatery and bar, opened March 2 at 1914 Galleria Blvd., Franklin, near the CoolSprings Galleria. The restaurant, which also has a location in downtown Nashville, oers a variety of hot chicken dishes with ve spice levels; a full brunch menu; and a wide selection of beers, cocktails and alcoholic slushies. 615-614-3636. www.partyfowl.com 3 Alan Wellness Center opened a location at 5111 Maryland Way, Ste. 210, Brentwood, in January. The center oers a wide variety of services from experi- enced sta, including facials, weight loss management programs, oxygen therapy, Botox injections, IV therapy and more. 615-730-6831. www.alanwellnesscenter.com 4 The Biologix Center for Optimum Health opened its doors at 554 Franklin Road, Franklin, on March 16. The center specializes in treating a wide variety of chronic illnesses by treating the underly- ing causes of diseases, according to the center’s website. 855-844-7609. www.biologixcenter.com 5 Mosquito Joe opened a new location in the Carothers Corner shopping center at 330 Mayeld Drive, Franklin, on March 23. The pest control company will treat

properties throughout Williamson County for mosquitoes, ticks, eas and more. 615-679-2001. www.southwestnashville. mosquitojoe.com 6 Ti’s Treats opened a new location in Cool Springs at 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin, on March 9, according to a social media post from the company. The company sells cookies made from scratch, and the new Franklin store will be its 59th location. Cookies are available in classic avors such as chocolate chip, peanut butter and snickerdoodle and can be bought by the dozen or in specialty boxes. 629-216-4400. www.cookiedelivery.com COMING SOON 7 Franklin Bakehouse , originally sched- uled to open in December, will now open in May at 100 Main St., Franklin, according to a post on the bakehouse’s social media. The community market and bakery will oer groceries, produce and prepared foods as well as owers, wine and craft beer. www.franklinbakehouse.com RELOCATIONS In a move that will bring nearly 350 jobs to the Middle Tennessee region, Spirit Airlines will relocate its operations control center from Florida to Williamson County, according to a Feb. 13 announce- ment from ocials with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. An exact location for the center in Williamson County has not yet been announced. www.spirit.com

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Spirit Airlines

The Westhaven Foundation

COURTESY SPIRIT AIRLINES

COURTESY WESTHAVEN FOUNDATION

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee and Bob Rolfe, Department of Economic and Community Development commissioner, announced the relocation of the headquarters of tech rm Thnks from New York City to Williamson County on March 2. The move is expected to create over 50 jobs in the next three years for the company that provides a web platform for expressions of gratitude for the sake of improving business relationships. A location or date for the new headquarters’ opening has not yet been announced. www.thnks.com ANNIVERSARIES 8 Front St. Tavern , located in the Westhaven Town Center at 158 Front St., Ste. 100, Franklin, will celebrate its rst year of business in April. The bar and restaurant serves American brunch, lunch and dinner along with a variety of drinks and hosts live music events. 615-472-1853. www.frontsttavern.com NAME CHANGE Daniel Jones Landscaping changed its name to Harpeth Decks and adopted a new logo at the beginning of 2020, according to a Feb. 20 release from the company. The company began in 2012 by providing lawn care to the Nolensville area and now designs and constructs out- door decks, patios and other hardscapes. 615-636-9341. www.harpethdecks.com NEWMANAGEMENT 9 Members of the Heritage Foundation of Williamson County and the Franklin Theatre announced a new vision and

mission statement Feb. 26, along with an upcoming performing arts series and the naming of Paul Couch as executive director. “We are so lucky to have Paul. He brings decades of experience with him to the Franklin Theatre,” said David Garrett, pres- ident of the Heritage Foundations Board of Directors. The theatre, located at 419 Main St., Franklin, was founded in 1937. 615-538-2075. www.franklintheatre.com IN THE NEWS 10 The Westhaven Foundation , a non- prot organization in Franklin, presented a check for $53,000 to Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt on Feb. 12 as a part of the foundation’s 2019 Concert 4 the Cure fundraiser to support pediatric cancer research at the hospital. “This is an incredibly important event to so many people in Franklin, and espe- cially within Westhaven, where multiple families have dealt directly with child- hood cancer,” Westhaven Foundation board member Matt Magallanes said in a release. www.westhavenfoundation.org 11 The Classical Academy , a Christian, pre-K-12 private school located at 810 Del Rio Pike, Franklin, will welcome for- mer students of The Pasture Pre-School and introduce a new preschool program combining Montessori methods with the school’s classical Christian approach next year. Applications are now open for the 2020-21 school year, and the new program will be available with full- and part-time options for children ages 3-5. 615-790-8556. www.tcafranklin.org

A tornado hit portions of northeast Nashville and nearby counties March 3.

ALEX HOSEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT RELIEF FORMIDDLE TENNESSEE In the aftermath of a tornado in the Middle Tennessee region March 3, community groups are working to help families and residents aected by the storm. Here are some ways to help. This list is not comprehensive. The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee activated a Middle Tennessee Emergency Support Fund on March 3, which will award grants to local nonprots providing services, according to a social media post from the organization. Those wishing to make a donation to CFMT can visit their website. 888-540-5200. www.cfmt.org Ocials with The Red Cross of Middle Tennessee have said those wanting to help can donate blood by nding a location near them at www.redcrossblood.org. Monetary donations can be made at www.redcross.org. 615-250-4300. The United Way of Greater Nashville has activated its Restore the Dream Fund, which helps to provide long-term support for individuals aected. The organization is also working to keep its 211 resource and referral phone line updated with information for people in need of shelter, food and additional services. Those interested in donating to the fund can visit

www.unitedwaynashville.org or text RESTORE20 to 41444. Hands On Nashville is a local organization that helps connect residents to volunteer opportunities. 615-298-1108. www.hon.org. Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee is working to provide food to those in need. Residents can sign up to receive more information about how to help by emailing volunteer@ secondharvestmidtn.org. 615-329-3491. www.secondharvestmidtn.org One Generation Away will accept donations for its mobile pantries in Davidson, Wilson and Putnam counties. According to a release, items of greatest value include sturdy, reusable bags; bottled water; peanut butter; and pop- top cans of chicken, tuna, fruits and vegetables, though cans of all kinds will be accepted. 615-538-7413. www.onegenaway.com Bank of America centers throughout Middle Tennessee will partner with the Community Resource Center to have all 35 Nashville-area locations serve as drop- o sites for relief supplies, including but not limited to personal hygiene products, baby items, ashlights, gloves, cleaning products, batteries and towels. Check to see which locations will accept donations

on the company’s website. www.bankofamerica.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2020

TODO LIST

March-April events

COMPILED BY ALEX HOSEY

MARCH 28

KIDS’ ART FESTIVAL OF TENNESSEE PINKERTON PARK

APRIL 18

ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION PINKERTON PARK

Gray’s onMain oers weekly livemusic. (Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper) LIVEMUSIC FRANKLIN THEATRE 419 Main St., Franklin 615-538-2076 www.franklintheatre.com APRIL 02 Joseph, 8 p.m. 0405 Charles Esten, 8 p.m. 06 Gateway Chamber Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. 08 The James Hunter Six, 8 p.m. 15 Rickie Lee Jones, 8 p.m. 16 Max Weinberg’s Jukebox, 8 p.m. GRAY’S ONMAIN 322 Main St., Franklin 615-435-3603 www.graysonmain.com MARCH 26 Stephy Jean, 7:30 p.m. 27 Tosha Hill, 9 p.m. 28 Stephanie Adlington, 9 p.m. APRIL 02 Danielle Cormier, 7:30 p.m. 03 Van Darien, 9 p.m. 04 James Vandeuson, Jenn Bostic, 9 p.m. 05 James Vandeuson, 9 p.m. 10 Dairy Daughters, Kristie Krauss and Jesse Lopez, 9 p.m. 11 The Martini Shakers, 9 p.m. 16 Karlie Bartholomew, 7:30 p.m. 17 Tosha Hill, 9 p.m. 23 Lucy Isabel, 7:30 p.m. 24 Kyshona Armstrong, 9 p.m. 25 Stephanie Adlington, 9 p.m. THEMOCKINGBIRD THEATER 230 Franklin Road, Bldg. 6, Franklin 615-429-0157 www.mockingbirdtheater.com APRIL 04 Bebe le Strange, 7 p.m. 05 Jay Brown and Friends, 8 p.m.

The city of Franklin will host the annual Kids’ Arts Festival at Pinkerton Park, where families are invited to enjoy a day full of food trucks, art performances, art displays and crafts for sale. All Tennessee children from kindergarten to 12th grade are also invited to submit their art for a juried exhibit, with the winner to be announced at City Hall. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. 405 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov (Courtesy city of Franklin)

The Franklin Tree Commission and the Franklin Parks Department will host their annual Arbor Day celebration at Pinkerton Park, where residents can educate themselves about various types of trees in the area. Information booths, free tree seedlings and a rock climbing wall will be available at the event. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. 405 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov (Courtesy city of Franklin)

MARCH 28 FRANKLINHIGH SCHOOL SPRINGMARKET The Franklin High School class of 2021 and the Franklin High School Parent Association will put on the seventh annual Spring Market, a shopping experience and gift show featuring the works and goods of local artisans and merchants. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. 810 Hillsboro Road, Franklin. 615-472-4450. www.facebook.com/sspringmarket 28 PAWSOME GALA 2020 A gala is being held by the Friends of Williamson County Animal Center, a local nonprot, to benet the center at The Factory at Franklin. The event will include a buet, a silent auction and live entertainment. 6-9 p.m. $100 (individual), $1,500 (table). 230 Franklin Road, Franklin. 615-790-5590. AMIGO GUITAR SHOW The 13th annual Amigo Nashville Guitar Show for Franklin will take place at the Williamson County Agricultural Expo Park this spring and features an international market to buy, sell and trade guitars and ampliers of all kinds. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $20. 4215 Long Lane, Franklin. 817-312-7659. www.amigoguitarshows.com APRIL 03 INEBRIATED SHAKESPEARE’S ‘HAMLET’ Give back to local thespians by getting them inebriated while they perform William Shakespeare’s classic tragedy about the prince of Denmark. Each $5 donation, which goes to support the nonprot theater company, will purchase a shot of liquor for an actor as they perform an abbreviated version of “Hamlet” on stage at The Mockingbird Theater at The Factory at Franklin. www.friendsofwcac.org 28 THROUGH 29

egg hunt at the Williamson County Enrichment Center. Activities will include storytime, sing-alongs, face painting and more. 2-5 p.m. $12. 110 Everbright Ave., Franklin. 615-786-0186. www.wcparksandrec.com 18 WESTHAVEN 5KMEMORY RUN The Westhaven Foundation will host a 5K run and a 1-mile, child-friendly fun run in the Westhaven community to benet the Tennessee chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. Last year’s run raised $17,000 for the organization, and the goal for this year is to raise $20,000. Riverbend Nurseries will oer a way for children to learn about nature and gardening at its kids club in April. Each child will be able to create a nature- oriented craft and go to the garden to pick what is in season. 10-10:30 a.m. $5. 2008 Lewisburg Pike, Franklin. 615-468-2008. www.riverbendnurseries.com 18 NIGHT FOR NEWBORNS Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee, a nonprot organization dedicated to working against child abuse, child neglect and infant mortality, will host its annual fundraising gala at The Factory at Franklin, complete with dinner, a silent auction and entertainment from local singers and songwriters. 6-9 p.m. $115. 230 Franklin 8-11 a.m. $30 (5K), $15 (fun run). 401 Cheltenham Ave., Franklin. www.westhavenfoundation.org 18 APRIL’S KIDS CLUB Road, Franklin. 615-313-9989. www.nursesfornewborns.org 24 MOVIE IN THE PARK The city of Franklin will host a screening of “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part” at Pinkerton Park as a part of its seasonal Movie in the Park series. 8-10 p.m. Free. 405 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov

8-11 p.m. $10. 230 Franklin Road, Franklin. www.inebriatedshakes.com 04 ARBOR DAY The city of Brentwood will host its annual celebration at the John P. Holt Brentwood Library. The city will give out free tree seedlings for residents to plant at home. The event will also include face painting, activities and guided tours of the library arboretum. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. 8109 Concord Road, Brentwood. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov 04 SKYHUNTERS Owl’s Hill Nature Sanctuary will invite animal care specialists from The Wilderness Station and local falconers to educate attendees on several kinds of birds of prey and the roles they play in our environment. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $15 (online), $20 (at event). 545 Beech Creek Road, Brentwood. 615-370-4672. www.owlshill.org 04 RUN FORMERCY Nonprot organization Mercy Multiplied will host the Run for Mercy 5k and family walk at the park at Harlinsdale Farms to support its eorts to provide hope and help to women in dicult life circumstances. Registration for the run or walk comes with a T-shirt. 7:45-11 a.m. $30. 615-831-6987. www.mercymultiplied.com 04 URBAN BIRDING Go sightseeing and bird watching at Aspen Grove Park while learning more about migrant birds returning from the tropics as well as birds that ew to Franklin from farther north for the winter. This event is recommended for age 12 and up. 8:30-10:30 a.m. Free. 3200 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin. 615-794-2103. www.franklintn.gov 05 SUPER ROYAL EGGSTRAVAGANZA Boys and girls can meet their favorite superheroes, princesses and the Easter Bunny at a spring party and Easter

09 Carmen Mills, 6 p.m. 18 The Chill Band, 8 p.m.

Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication. Event dates current as of press time, however in light of the recent coronavirus outbreak, they could be subject to cancellation.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

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new technology will automatically adjust traffic signal timing to reflect current traffic conditions, according to the city of Franklin. Construction on the signals is expected to be completed later this year, and signals will be turned on shortly afterward, according to the city. Timeline: spring-summer 2020 Cost: $1.6 million Funding sources: federal funds (80%), city of Franklin (20%) 3 Traffic signal at Westhaven Boulevard The city of Franklin will begin construc- tion to install a new traffic signal at the intersection of New Hwy. 96 West and Westhaven Boulevard at the entrance to the Westhaven community. Timeline: early 2020-late August Cost: $640,000 Funding source: city of Franklin UPCOMING PROJECTS 4 McEwen Drive improvements Work is slated to begin this summer to add a left-turn lane to McEwen Drive from the westbound lanes heading southbound on I-65. This is meant to help improve road capacity during peak travel times, according to the city of Franklin. Additional projects on McEwen Drive in- clude the recently completed roundabout improvements at Cool Springs Boulevard and a widening of the roadway from Cool Springs Boulevard to Wilson Pike, which is expected to begin in 2022. Timeline: June-late 2020 Cost: $1 million Funding source: city of Franklin

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES ONGOING PROJECTS

WENDY STURGES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

1 Franklin Road widening Beginning Oct. 24, crews with the Tennessee Department of Transporta- tion shifted south to the intersection of Franklin Road and Moore’s Lane near Brentwood as work continues to widen the road from two to five lanes with a continuous center-turn lane. The road- work will reduce traffic down to one left- turn lane and one right-turn/thru lane, and drivers should expect delays. Traffic shifts to the newly constructed pavement are expected this spring, according to TDOT. The project was originally slated to be completed in 2020; however, TDOT officials said the timeline has been ex- tended to allow for more time to relocate utilities along the roadway. Timeline: January 2020-April 2022 (Phase II) Cost: $27.4 million Funding source: TDOT 2 Adaptive signal control in Cool Springs The city Franklin will install new adaptive signal control technology at 19 intersec- tions in the Cool Springs area, including at Mack C. Hatcher Parkway, Mallory Lane, Galleria Boulevard and I-65. The

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2020

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in your community

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALEX HOSEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HILL CENTER BRENTWOOD BRENTWOOD New retailers in Phase II of development at Hill Center Brentwood have begun opening near Franklin Road and Maryland Way in Brentwood. In late 2019, leasing company H.G. Hill announced that two new tenants—Peace, Love & Little Donuts and Scissors & Scotch—would open in spring and summer, respectively.

TRU BY HILTON FRANKLIN A new, 135-room Tru by Hilton hotel is under construction on Knoll Top Lane and Liberty Pike near Columbia State Community College’s Williamson County campus, according to pipeline reports from Visit Franklin. The boutique hotel chain is expected to oer open-concept rooms and several guest amenities. An opening date has not been announced.

VIRGINIA SPRINGS BRENTWOOD Construction has begun on Virginia Springs Phase II, located on Virginia Way and Granny White Pike in Brentwood. The class A oce building will be about 111,000 square feet and is expected to be complete in the fourth quarter of 2020, according to Cory Lombardo, marketing coordinator at Highwoods Properties, the building manager for the project.

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OMAN BRENTWOOD Construction is underway on Oman, a 21-lot neighborhood being built by Grove Park Construction. In late January, the city of Brentwood announced a new trac signal has been installed at Fountainhead Drive and Franklin Road, which will allow access into the neighborhood.

MCEWENNORTHSIDE FRANKLIN Tenants have begun opening at McEwen Northside, a mixed-use development in Cool Springs near McEwen Drive. Construction is still ongoing on multiple buildings inside of the development, including a new 150-room Springhill Suites hotel and multifamily homes.

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WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Franklin Special School District and Williamson County

For the latest on coronavirus outbreaks and news in Williamson County, visit communityimpact.com . CORONAVIRUSUPDATES

FSSD receives grant to improve school meals FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT Ocials with the Chef Ann Foundation and Whole Kids Foundation announced in mid-February that Franklin Special School District has been named one of ve schools in the nation to be a part of Get Schools Cooking, a three-year grant program designed to improve school lunch programs. The program is intended to transition lunch programs away from highly processed foods to more nutritious, from-scratch foods. The district will receive $35,000 in funding for equipment and software to help improve several aspects of the lunch program, according to CAF. “This is an opportunity for districts to take a ‘deep-dive’ in to all of their processes, programs, nances and man- agement, with the goal of overall improvement of their system,” CAF founder and board president Ann Cooper BY WENDY STURGES

QUOTEOFNOTE “EVERYDAY, WE

LEARNMORE ABOUT CORONAVIRUS AND ITS IMPACTS, ANDWE WILL CONTINUE TO ADAPT OUR POSITION

The Chef Ann Foundation provides funding to help schools create more nutritious lunches from scratch. (Courtesy Chef Ann Foundation)

TO FITWHATWE BELIEVE IS BEST FOR TENNESSEE.” BILL LEE, GOVERNOR OF

said in a release. “Get Schools Cooking can transform a district and set them on the path towards a fully scratch- cook program.” According to CAF, over the next 18 months, the district will go through an evaluation of its existing meal program to nd recommendations for improvements.

TENNESSEE, ON THE SPREAD OF CORONAVIRUS ACROSS THE STATE

CITY HIGHLIGHTS FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen will hold a nal vote March 24 on whether to prohibit the operation of electric scooters in the city limits, including short-term rental, or on-demand, scooters. Under state law, cities and municipalities can ban scooters on the basis of safety. The board voted unanimously for the ban during its March 9 meeting. The city had previously rejected the idea of letting scooters operate in the Cool Springs area in December. BRENTWOOD The city will host an event as part of National Drug Take-Back Day on April 25 at Brentwood City Hall where residents can safely dispose of expired, unused or unwanted prescription drugs. Liquids and needles will not be accepted, according to the city.

Williamson County SheriDusty RhoadeswinsMarch 3 county primary

Comprehensive land use plan approved by Williamson County WILLIAMSON COUNTY The Williamson County Planning Commis- sion approvedWilliamson 2040, the county’s comprehensive land-use plan for unincorporated areas, at its March 12 meeting. The plan’s draft presents long-term planning and strategies for dealing with increases in development, pressures from growth, keeping up with transportation needs, changes to density in unincorporated areas and maintaining scal responsibility. BY ALEX HOSEY

BY WENDY STURGES

Rhoades was

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Williamson County Sheri Dusty Rhoades has won the March 3 Republican primary and will pro- ceed to the county general election. Rhoades won more than 99.6% of the vote against 56 write-in votes. Rhoades ran as a Republican, and no Democratic candidates ran in the primary election, according to the Williamson County Election Commission. As of press time, no other candidates have led to run against Rhoades in the county general election Aug. 6.

appointed in February 2019 to serve out the unexpired term of former Sheri Je Long, who resigned from

Dusty Rhoades

the oce a month prior to serve as commissioner for the Tennessee State Department of Safety and Homeland Security. In this year’s county general election, voters will also select candidates for local school boards.

MEETINGSWE COVER

Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen

Meets March 24 at 7 p.m. at 109 Third Ave. S., Franklin; workshop meetings are always held two hours

prior. 615-791-3217 www.franklintn.gov

Land byGentry’s Farmup for annexation

Brentwood City Commission Meets March 23 and April 13 at 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood 615-371-0060 www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools Board of Education Meets March 23 at the Williamson County Administrative Complex at 1320 W. Main St., Franklin 615-472-4000 • www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District Board of Education Meets April 13 at Liberty Elementary School, 600 Liberty Pike, Franklin 615-794-6624 • www.fssd.org

BY WENDY STURGES

E

are later approved by the board. In other words, the vote is not an approval of the lot’s development by the board or its annexation. The applicant, Brentwood-based developer CPS Land, had not yet submitted design plans, but city sta said preliminary discussions suggested the intent to construct 154 single-family attached and detached townhomes on the land, if approved. The resolution was passed in a

FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved a resolution to initiate the annexation process for a plot of land o of Old Charlotte Pike, located adjacent to Gentry’s Farm, at its March 10 meeting. The vote will allow city sta to begin work on a draft of a city services plan for the annexation and possible development of the property

96

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7-1 vote, with Alderman Brandy Blanton dissenting; Blanton said she was against any progress toward the property’s potential development due to its proximity to the historic Gentry’s Farm.

9

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2020

Navigating the Parkinson’s Path Join Us For These Featured Presentations: Parkinson’s Disease and the Management of OFF Episodes Laxman B. Bahroo, D.O., Georgetown University Hospital Food as Medicine: Eating Your Way to Better Health Bethany Thompson, RDN, LDN, CLT Living and Progression of PD / Research Updates Thomas Davis, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center Date: Saturday, April 4 th Check-in: 8:30 AM Location: Brentwood Baptist Church Wilson Hall 7777 Concord Rd Brentwood, TN 37027 Register (No Cost) at https://petersonforparkinsons.org/events or call: 615-269-5312 Sponsored by: Amneal Abbvie Acadia Pharmaceuticals Abbott

CAREGIVING

• Post Surgery Recovery

• Hospital

• Respite

Companion

Register a team at www.movingdaynashville.org Or call Amanda Spiehler at 615-338-5948 or email aspiehler@parkinson.org

TECHNOLOGY

• Electronic

• Emergency

• RX

Caregiver™

Mobile Alerts

Technology

Centennial Park 200 West End Ave, Nashville, TN 32203 Activities Begin: 9:00 a.m. We Move Ceremony & Walk: 10:00 a.m. Moving Day Nashville Saturday, June 6, 2020 We Care. We Fight. We Move. To Beat Parkinson’s.

TRANSPORTATION

• Wheelchair Accessible

• Medical &

• Door-

Non-Medical

through-door

WELCOME TO A BRAND NEWDAY THE HERITA

Why wait? At The Heritage at Brentwood, carefree retirement living can be yours today in a beautifully designed apartment home or villa. With unsurpassed amenities, refundable buy-in plans and -- if ever needed -- unlimited days of on-campus healthcare, the time is now. Call us today at (615) 200-9052 THE HERITAGE LOGO

As a

all si

This

Visit TheHeritageLCS.com to see the best amenities in Middle Tennessee!

900 Heritage Way, Brentwood, TN 37027 (615) 200-9052

Follow us on social media:

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Data and resources for local seniors

COMPILED BY ALEX HOSEY

GUIDE TO SENIOR LIVING As the number of senior adults nationwide and in the Franklin and Brentwood area continues to grow, so does demand for residential options. The following list is not comprehensive.

DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

28,232

Williamson County

or 91.7% of seniors in Williamson County have a high school education or higher.

12.4%

DEFINITIONS/KEY

Independent - living communities

Hospice care is intended to relieve symptoms and suffering associated with a terminal illness in those who have been given six months or less to live. facilities provide care to those with illnesses or mental conditions requiring full-time monitoring and medical care. The patient must choose to forgo further curative treatment. Mixed - use facilities offer some or all of these services. Nursing home/skilled nursing

14,820

cater to older adults with limited care needs. Most include amenities, such as fitness programs, housekeeping, communal meals and more. Assisted - living communities specialize in providing care and supervision. These facilities frequently offer a full range of amenities as well as limited medical assistance. Memory care facilities specialize in providing care to seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia or other cognitive issues. Staff members are trained to help residents manage these diseases. 1 Avenida Cool Springs 222 Mallory Station Road, Franklin 615-502-2626 www.avenidapartners.com 2 Belvedere Commons of Franklin 303 S. Royal Oaks Blvd., Franklin 615-794-6693 www.belvederecommonsfranklin.com 3 Brighton Gardens of Brentwood 103 Arcaro Place, Brentwood 615-376-5299 www.sunriseseniorliving.com 4 Brookdale Franklin 910 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-794-6005 www.brookdale.com 5 Brookdale Senior Living 5043 Thoroughbred Lane, Brentwood 844-643-3146 www.brookdale.com 6 Canterfield of Franklin 7015 Moores Lane, Brentwood 615-584-8749 www.canterfieldoffranklin.com 7 Fountains of Franklin 4100 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-567-3717 www.fountainsfranklin.com 8 Grace Healthcare of Franklin 1287 W. Main St., Franklin 615-794-8417 www.gracehcfranklin.com 9 The Hearth at Franklin 1035 Fulton Greer Lane, Franklin 615-592-0510 www.thehearth.net

218,648 Total population

27,140 Age 65 or older

or 48.1% of seniors in Williamson County have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Age 65 or older:

LIFE EXPECTANCY

15.7% 14.9%

The average U.S. life expectancy rose from

68 years

79 years

Tennessee

Nationwide

in 1950

to

in 2013.

SOURCE: WWW.AARP.ORG/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NOTE: DATA AS OF 2018, THE MOST RECENT AVAILABLE

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SENIOR POPULATION INCREASES The number of seniors is increasing nationally and statewide. Here is how the senior population has changed in Williamson County since 2014.

10 The Heritage at Brentwood 900 Heritage Way, Brentwood 615-200-9052 www.theheritagelcs.com

WILLIAMSON COUNTY

Female Male

11 The Manor at Steeplechase 314 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin 844-450-0619 www.holidaytouch.com 12 Maristone of Franklin 347 Riverside Drive, Franklin 615-590-8804 www.maristoneliving.com 13 Morning Pointe of Brentwood 1522 Wilson Pike, Brentwood 615-285-3455 www.morningpointe.com 14 Morning Pointe of Franklin 1005 Generations Way, Franklin 615-614-8555 www.morningpointe.com 15 NHC Place Cool Springs 211 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin 615-778-6800 www.nhccare.com

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

0

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

FRANKLIN

10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

16 Somerby Franklin 870 Oak Meadow Drive, Franklin 615-591-2333 www.somerbyseniorliving.com 17 Southern Care Inc. 3595 Carothers Parkway, Franklin 615-791-4430 www.southerncaretn.com 18 Willowbrook Hospice 235 Noah Drive, Franklin 615-399-2220 www.willowbrookhealth.com

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

BRENTWOOD

10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION

BUSINESS FEATURE

SKATING GAMES Limbo Lucky Number Skate race Theme night Wipeout

Brentwood Skate Center Skating rink and arcade oering fun for all ages since 1980s A sign on the back wall of the skating rink depicting Brentwood Skate Center’s motto, “It’s fun you can feel,” has been covered in fog, lit by laser lights and had thousands of children skate past it over and over again dozens of times a night since its opening in 1981. One of those children, Nick Pasquale, grew up to become the manager of the skate center and share his love of skating with new generations. “I just have a passion for roller skating as a whole and this building specically,” Pasquale said. “I’ve been to rinks around the United States, … but this building is just something magical. I started skating here when I was 10, and then, I just kept coming back.” Skate centers and rinks had their arguable heyday in the ‘70s and ‘80s, according to Pasquale, but he said attendance at the Brentwood Skate Center has grown in recent years, with the center averaging 450 people each Friday night. “This year has kind of been a big, record-breaking year for us. Three Friday nights this year so far, we’ve already surpassed 600 people,” Pasquale said. “I wouldn’t say it’s where it was in the late ‘70s [or] early ‘80s, but I would say [skating] is now starting to make a comeback.” With events like birthday parties, adult skate nights and fundraisers for local schools often being held at the center, Pasquale said attendance is up across all age groups. “In a daytime session, we probably have one- third adults skating and two-thirds kids skating. On a Friday or Saturday night, it’s ip-opped,” Pasquales said. “Almost every day here, I’ll hear someone say, ‘Wow, I remember back when they opened in the ‘80s.’” Along with the rink, the skate center has 28 arcade games that line the walls, including classics like air hockey and Skee-Ball, a ticket-exchange gift counter with roller skates and blades for sale and a concession stand with pizza, Slurpees and more. To keep skating interesting, Pasquale said dierent skating games and themed nights often dominate the rink, like their “Ghostbusters” or “Thriller” nights, when the lights go dark and the rink is covered in fog; or interactive skating games, like skating limbo, races and more. “This is an entertainment center, so we do our best to make sure everybody has as much fun in the time that they’re here that they can,” Pasquale said. “Our end goal is fun here.” BY ALEX HOSEY

The Brentwood Skate Center opened in 1981. (Photos by Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

ARCADE GAMES Air hockey Skee-Ball Jurassic Park Pac Man Fruit Ninja

Along with the skating rink, the Brentwood Skate Center is home to 28 arcade games both new and classic.

“WE DOOUR BEST TOMAKE SURE EVERYBODYHAS AS MUCH FUN IN THE TIME THAT THEY’RE HERE THAT THEY CAN.” NICK PASQUALE, MANAGER

Along with being an avid skater, manager Nick Pasquale also works as the skate center’s DJ.

Brentwood Skate Center 402 Wilson Pike Circle, Brentwood 615-373-1827 www.brentwood.skatecenter.com

Hours: Tue. 4:30-7 p.m., Wed. private parties only, Thu. 5-8 p.m., Fri. 5-11 p.m., Sat. 9:30 a.m.-11 p.m., Sun. 1-5 p.m., closed Mon.

WILSON PIKE CIRCLE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

The Korean cauliower ($4) This taco is made with Gochujang sauce, Mojo sauce, ginger slaw and toasted sesame seeds.

The brisket ($4) This taco is made with smoked brisket, guajillo barbecue sauce and chipotle slaw.

The Baja sh ($4) This taco is made with beer- battered cod, shredded cabbage, pico de gallo and Mojo sauce.

Mojo’s Tacos opened in the Factory at Franklin on Cinco de Mayo in 2018.

Mojo’s sells tacos, salads, margaritas, signature cocktails and more at The Factory.

Mojo’s tacos has 11 dierent tacos to choose from, all of which cost $4, with the exception of the puy taco, which costs $5. (Photos by Alex Hosey/Community Impact Newspaper)

Mojo’s Tacos Factory restaurant serves taco inspired by Austin food trucks M ojo’s, pronounced with a hard “J,” gets its name from a 2,700-pound bull that lives on the land of Bill Butler, one of the taco restaurant’s co-founders. A portrait of Mojo hangs behind the bar. food at Mojo’s, said the restaurant makes every- thing from scratch. He described the tacos he and his sta make as “like a relaxed-t Levi’s jean—not a skinny jean” like other street tacos.

BY ALEX HOSEY

Story said the key to the restaurant’s success so far has been the sta, who have been there since the days when Mojo’s was only a food truck. “[There’s] no way we could have projected that we’d be doing how we’re doing, and I think it’s a testament to the sta we’ve got. We’ve got the same sta we started with when we opened our truck,” Story said. “I’ve always said, ‘When I start my own business, I want to take care of the people,’ especially in this industry that’s notorious for just turning and burning people.” Along with margaritas, draft beer and signature cocktails, Mojo’s menu has 11 unique taco choices inspired by the street tacos and food trucks of Austin, Texas, including favorites like the Korean cauliower taco made with Gochujang sauce and ginger slaw, the puy taco made with pork adovada in a fried our tortilla and the Baja sh taco with beer-battered cod and shredded cabbage. “Everyone can nd a taco they like here, from kids to adults,” Story said. “[Mojo’s Tacos] is based o the Austin food trucks back in the day when I lived there in 2010. The thought was, ‘How do we take that style of taco that wasn’t here and give it the Tennessee twist and make it our own?’”

Since opening a brick-and-mortar location inside The Factory at Franklin in 2018 after spending a few months as a food truck, Mojo’s Tacos’ success has exceeded the expectations of its owners from day one, according to co-owner Dave Story. “THE THOUGHTWAS, ‘HOW DOWE TAKE THAT STYLE OF TACO THATWASN’T HERE AND GIVE IT THE TENNESSEE TWIST

Mojo’s Tacos 230 Franklin Road, Franklin 615-435-3476 www.mojostacos.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.- 9 p.m., Sun. 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Co-owner Dave Story stands beside a picture of the taco restaurant’s namesake, Mojo the cow, behind the bar of Mojo’s Tacos.

ANDMAKE IT OUROWN?’” DAVE STORY, COOWNER OF MOJO'S TACOS

“Our rst day was Cinco de Mayo, and as you can imagine, it was chaos,” Story said. “We can’t complain about business. It’s blown us away. I’m just humbled because it’s food that I came up with with some of the prep cooks, and to see a line out the door on the weekends—it just makes you feel warm inside.” Story, who is the culinary creative behind the

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2020

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40

40

31

37205

440

Green Hills

Belle Meade

37204

Oak Hill

37215

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37220

431

65

Brentwood

37027

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96

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840

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in NOW OPEN THOMPSON’S STATION

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Community Impact Newspaper reaches ,

990 Elliston Way, Ste 101 Thompson’s Station TN 37179 StonesRiverDermatology.com 615-904-2010

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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM/CONTACT (866) 989-6808

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NONPROFIT

Waves provides jobs, in part, through its oce recycling program for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (Photos courtesy Waves Inc.)

MAKINGWAVES Waves Inc. has several programs for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in Williamson County. Early Learning Waves’ early learning program supports children from birth to 3 years old who have been diagnosed with a developmental disability. Early interventionists with Waves help families implement strategies to encourage developmental growth. Adult Services day programs at their day center as well as through community and residential programs to provide supported living options that t the needs of Waves clients. Employment support Waves’ employment program provides pre-employment training, on-the-job coaching and long-term support for clients looking to get jobs with community partners or with Waves’ Oce Recycling Program, which collects recyclable materials for over 100 businesses in the area with the help of Waves’ clients. Waves provides support for adults age 22 and up via the

Waves Inc. Nonprot empowers people with disabilities W aves Inc. was founded 47 years ago in Fairview by a group of families who had BY ALEX HOSEY

expand it to serve families who need the support Waves provides. Waves now has early intervention programs for children up to age 3; adult day programs tailored to t clients’ individual needs; residential programs for clients who want to live more independently; and employment support and coaching services that allow adults to join the workforce in places like Publix or for Waves’ oce recycling program. “Our services are very person-cen- tered within our capacity to serve those individuals,” Adult Services Director Marci Cohen said. “[These services] provide meaning and opportunity and a level of dignity that everybody deserves.” Gina Wilson, Waves’ early learning program director, said she and a sta of eight currently provide support and help for 460 children and their families through Waves. Wilson said Waves easily serves 1,000 families over the course of a year for free, and her own son is also assisted through the organization’s training and job support program. “I’m really invested in this place,” Wilson. “It’s made a dierence in his life and in my life.”

Waves Inc. oers programs for those with developmental disabilities.

children with disabilities who were aging out of the school system. As the parents did not want to put their kids into a state institution, they decided to develop a day program for their children together. Since that time, the program has grown beyond the small community to serve those in need from birth to beyond throughout the county. “I’MREALLY INVESTED IN THIS PLACE ... IT’SMADE ADIFFERENCE INHIS LIFE AND INMY LIFE.” “Because we have such a wide vari- ety of services, the youngest person we could be serving at any time could be 6 weeks, and the oldest person is 94,” Waves Executive Director Lance Jordan said. For now, Jordan said the nonprot only operates in Williamson County, but he said he hopes to be able to GINA WILSON, WAVES’ EARLY LEARNING PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Waves sta members conduct developmental therapy sessions.

Day programs provide education, entertainment and exercise for adults.

Waves Inc. 145 Southeast Parkway, Ste. 100, Franklin 615-794-7955 www.wavesinc.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., closed Sat.-Sun.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MARCH 2020

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