Chandler Edition - August 2021

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1  AUG. 24SEPT. 20, 2021

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Managing water in the Arizona desert Arizona derives most of its water from the Colorado River, pictured at Horseshoe Bend in northern Arizona. Chandler gets 35% of its water from the river. Reservoirs across the state and western region have reached lower levels than in years past. Chandler ocials are trying to ensure the city is unaected by potential water shortages.

The Colorado River empties into multiple locations. Some of those locations—such as Lake Mead, the biggest reservoir in the country— are drier than they have been according to data from Aug. 9. Colorado River water levels 40% Total system level 35% Lake Mead level 32% Lake Powell level 94% Lake Mohave level 94% Lake Havasu level SOURCE: LOWER COLORADO RIVER WATER REPORTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

JASON M GUTIERREZCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

As drought worsens, city, Intel partner for new reclaimedwater facility As the Colorado River reaches new lows caus- ing concern about the Southwest’s long-term water resources, Chandler ocials say the city is well-posi- tioned to handle drought and has plans to expand the city’s reclaimed water system. reclaimed water and some 32 water wells when it can, ocials said. A new reclaimed water facility will be underway this fall that will further enhance Chan- dler’s water supply, said John Knudson, director of public works and utilities for Chandler. construction of a reclaimed water interconnect facil- ity that will treat 10 million gallons daily. From that facility, water will be funneled beneath the city’s foundation into a recharge aquifer, which stores the water until the city needs to pump it out and access it. “It’s a great way to bring more water home and bring it up to A+ standards and supplement the CONTINUED ON 12 BY ALEXA D'ANGELO Central to that condence is the knowledge that the city gets its water frommultiple sources and uses The city entered into an agreement with Chan- dler’s largest employer—Intel, which employs more than 12,000 people—earlier this summer for the

NewChandler citymanager appointed

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: It’s no secret that we live in the desert—the dirt and temperatures alone are two obvious indicators. As such, it isn’t surprising that water is a topic of conversation, curiosity and concern here. In our front-page story, readers will nd information about water in Chandler, including a new facility being built through a partnership between the city and Intel. Amy Lawson, PUBLISHER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMALEXA: Each month we talk to local restaurant and business owners for our business and dining proles. This month we talked to the teams behind BuSY Day Senior Club and St. Amand Kitchen & Cocktails. If you have an idea for a business or restaurant to prole, let us know by emailing chnnews@communityimpact.com. Enjoy this month’s edition of Community Impact Newspaper ! Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

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WHATWE COVER

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

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CHANDLER EDITION • AUGUST 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Ramen Hood

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ALEXA D'ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALEXA D'ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

located at 250 S. Arizona Ave., Ste. 2, Chandler. The salon is a 1,530-square- foot space with three treatment rooms offering tattoo removal, hair removal, vein removal, scar remodeling and other services. 480-618-7060.

date is not yet known. https://kurasushi.com

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9 Meet Fresh will open a Chandler location in the same shopping center at 1900 W. Chandler Blvd., Stes. 23 and 24, Chandler. An opening date is not yet known. The business specializes in Taro Balls, a specialty dessert. www.meetfresh.us 10 High Tide Seafood is scheduled to open this fall at The Steelyard develop- ment in southeast Chandler. The restau- rant offers a variety of seafood dishes as well as burgers and appetizers. The restaurant also has a Gilbert location. The new location is at 5091 S. Gilbert Road, Chandler. www.hightideseafoodbar.com 11 K9 Resorts Luxury Pet Hotel will open a location in Chandler in October. The 7,000 square foot pet resort will be located 1870 W. Germann Road, Chan- dler. Accommodations include a secure, monitored, 1,500 square foot outdoor play area and luxury suites with HDTV systems, among other amenities. www.k9resorts.com ANNIVERSARIES 12 Founding Fathers Kitchen cel- ebrates one year in business at its Chandler location this summer. The restaurant offers sandwiches, burgers, a variety of seafood and more. The restau- rant is located at 1050 W. Ray Road in Chandler. 480-590-2743. www.foundingfatherskitchenaz.com 13 Modern Allo celebrated its one- year anniversary July 27 in Chandler. The business is a coffee, self care and child

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5 The Paleta Bar is expected to open a Chandler location in November at the northwest corner of Gilbert and Chan- dler Heights roads. The business special- izes in Mexican desserts. The Chandler location marks one of three opening in Arizona; one is in Tempe, and the third will be in Mesa. www.thepaletabar.com 6 Uncle Lee’s Kitchen , a Chinese and Thai food restaurant, will open in Chan- dler this year. The restaurant will be the first Arizona location and will be located in the same shopping center as 99 Ranch Market at the corner of Chandler Boule- vard and Dobson Road. www.uncleleeskitchen.com 7 Ramen Hood , a build-your-own ramen bowl restaurant, will open a location near 99 Ranch Market in Chan- dler. The restaurant will be in the same shopping center as the Asian grocery store located at the corner of Chandler Boulevard and Dobson Road. An opening date is not yet known. https://eatramenhood.com 8 Kura Revolving Sushi Bar is expect- ed to open a location in Chandler in Jan- uary, according to the city of Chandler. The company has locations in California; Texas; Georgia; Illinois; Nevada; Wash- ington; New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Florida; and Michigan. An exact opening

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NOWOPEN 1 Lean Feast Chandler opened in Chandler July 13. The business serves buffet-style meal prep options including proteins and vegetables. It is located at 890 N. 54th St., Ste. A-2, Chandler. 480-687-0132. www.leanfeast.com 2 Icicles , a hand-rolled ice cream shop, opened recently in Chandler. The busi- ness offers flash-frozen ice cream that is rolled and placed in a cup where custom-

ers can select from an array of toppings. The business is located at 3400 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste. 3, Chandler. 480-306-6874. https://iciclescreamroll.com 3 Saigon Bistro opened in Chandler in early August. The Chinese restaurant is located at 2041 N. Arizona Ave., Chan- dler. www.saigonbistroaz.com 4 Delete-Tattoo Removal & Medical Salon opened its second location in Chandler on Aug. 14. The business is

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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High Tide

COURTESY HIGH TIDE

care one-stop shop. With a work space, a conference room and a supervised area for child care, the business offers a place for parents to have a chance to get work done while children are being cared for. The business is located at 5865 W. Ray Road, Ste. 7, Chandler. 480-687-0197. https://modernallo.com CLOSINGS 14 Copper Still Moonshine Grill announced on Facebook Aug. 12 that it would close after Aug. 22. The restau- rant and bar is located at 7450 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler. The restaurant and bar offered a variety of appetizers, salads, sandwiches, burgers and drinks The Gilbert location at 2531 S. Gilbert Road will remain open. https://copperstillmoonshinegrill.com

Tower D was scheduled to open to Chandler Regional Medical Center patients in August. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

FEATURED IMPACT PATIENT TOWER COMPLETE AT DIGNITY HOSPITAL A new patient tower was unveiled at Dignity Health Chandler Regional Medical Center with a dedication ceremony July 16. The new tower, Tower D, is designed to accommodate a growing East Valley and increased health care needs, according to the release. It marks the second major expansion for the hospital in less than a decade, the release said. Tower D is scheduled to open to

W. CHANDLER BLVD.

patients in August, according to the release. “This expansion project is very exciting for all of us at Chandler Regional and for the community at large,” said Mark Slyter, president and CEO of Dignity Health Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical Centers in the release. Tower D will serve as the hospital’s main entrance and include 96 additional patient care beds. This will bring Chandler Regional’s total bed count to 429, according to the news release from Dignity Health.

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CHANDLER EDITION • AUGUST 2021

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TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

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PROJECT UPDATES

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Work begins on I10Broadway Curve, set to nish in 2024

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BY ALEXA D’ANGELO The rst phase of work for the Arizona Department of Transporta- tion’s I-10 Broadway Curve improve- ment project began late July 23 and continues with weekend closures, according to a release from ADOT. As of Aug. 18, eastbound I-10 will be narrowed to four lanes at the I-10/I-17 interchange and eastbound on-ramps at 32nd and 40th streets will be closed, according to ADOT. That closure was expected to last through the weekend. The freeway expansion project will occur across 11 miles of east- and westbound I-10 between Loop 202 and I-17, includ- ing the Broadway Curve between Baseline Road and 40th Street. ADOT anticipates the rst phase of the project will continue through early September, according to the release. Crews are removing the asphalt from I-10 in the project

boundaries between Loop 202 and I-17 and from US 60 at I-10 where ADOT will improve the interchange, according to the release. The driving surfaces will be restored after con- struction is completed in late 2024. According to data from ADOT, ocials expect the number of drivers on this segment of the freeway to grow by 25% by 2040. The project is expected to save drivers 2.5 million hours annually otherwise spent in trac, according to the Maricopa Association of Gov- ernments, the entity responsible for planning Maricopa County’s major highway improvements. The project is estimated to cost $643 million, funded by Proposition 400 and federal funds, according to ADOT and Maricopa County. Closures and project updates are available at https://azdot.gov on the Broadway Curve webpage. 10

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Lindsay Road/Loop 202 interchange An interchange at Lindsay Road and Loop 202 will be built to provide access to Loop 202 and a frontage road system on the north side of Loop 202 between Lindsay and Gilbert Road. Status: Trac restrictions on Lind- say began in March and will remain throughout the remainder of the project. The project is coordinating trac control with the Germann Road improvements project. Timeline: October 2020-November 2021 Cost: $18.15 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds and funds, Maricopa Association of Governments, developer contributions

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ADOT plans to add a collector-distributor road system between Baseline Road and SR 143. LANE CHANGES IN EACH DIRECTION Existing New

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF AUG. 16. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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SOURCE: ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& EDUCATION

News from Chandler & Chandler USD

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

NUMBERTOKNOW

Chandler citymanager appointed

Chandler USD reaffirms COVID-19 mitigation plan CHANDLER USD The Chandler USD governing board met Aug. 12, and district staff during a study session reiterated CUSD’s COVID- 19 mitigation plan that was set in place at the end of last school year. The plan calls for 3 feet of social distancing and daily updates on the district’s COVID-19 dashboard, and it strongly recommends masking. Masks were not mandated in CUSD as of Aug. 18. Several school systems—including Kyrene School District—are requiring masks as of Aug. 18. “We strongly urge that in order to control COVID-19 in our schools to please mask up,” board President Barb Mozdzen said. “I know that everybody is tired of it. Everybody wants not to wear masks. But it does help control the spread.” In the past 22 years, the number of parks has nearly doubled while the number of developed park areas has more than tripled in Chandler. 67 3 DEVELOPED PARKS UNDEVELOPED PARKS 1,281 acres 230 acres Totaling Totaling PARK INVENTORY

70%

According to the Maricopa County

Department of Public Health, more than 70% of COVID-19 cases with the delta variant in Maricopa County have not been fully vaccinated for COVID-19. The county determined this through genetic sequencing, according to the county. County health officials recommend individuals get the COVID-19 vaccine as they are three time more likely to get sick with symptoms and 10 times more likely to be severely ill, hospitalized or die as a result of COVID-19.

Chandler CityCouncil approvesparksplan selected the internal candidate, Joshua Wright,” Chandler Mayor Kevin Hartke said in a news release CHANDLER Chandler City Council officially appointed Josh Wright to the role of city man- ager during a council meeting Aug. 12. Wright had been serving as acting city manager for several months following the departure of Marsha Reed from the role earlier this year. The city manager oversees the day- to-day function of the city. The council approved a contract from Aug. 13 to June 30, 2022, with an annual base salary of $261,500. “Through a five-month recruit- ment process, we interviewed a number of great candidates for the city manager position and ultimately CHANDLER The Chandler City Council approved the city's parks strategic master plan during a meet- ing Aug. 12. The master plan outlines future areas of growth for the city's parks department and serves as a guide for the City Council as it approves developments, renovations and other items related to the city's park system. The parks master plan recom- mends the construction of a regional park in the city; the plan also Joshua Wright

Serving American Comfort Food with a Culinary Twist for Over 30 Years in the Valley Scratch Kitchen • Craft Beer Homemade Desserts Inviting Atmosphere for All Ages KEEGAN ’ S GR I LL recommends conducting a feasibility study for a regional park before embarking on the process of park development. Regional parks are usually more than 50 acres in size, according to the master plan. The plan notes the city is in a deficit of how many athletic fields it needs, and a regional park could fill some of that need. The master plan also highlights areas in need of more parks and recreation spaces, such as Chandler and southeastern Chandler. It also highlights parks and areas that are in need of repair and renovation. dependent on more than the city government, and I will work in this role to build partnerships with major employers and developers, Chandler businesses, the Chandler Chamber of Commerce, nonprofits serving Chandler, school districts, neighboring cities and towns, utilities and other organizations,” Wright told Community Impact Newspaper in a Q&A earlier this month. distributed in July. Wright joined Chandler in 2017 as assistant city manager and has also taken on interim roles as the Chan- dler Airport manager and director of departments that provide building inspection, development permits, engineering, planning and transpor- tation-related services in Chandler. Prior to working in Chandler, Wright served as town manager for the town of Wickenburg for five years. “The success of Chandler is

CITYHIGHLIGHTS

CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved Aug. 12 the purchase of an armored rescue vehicle replacement in an amount of $350,900. The vehicle, Police Chief Sean Duggan said, is designed to protect officers and the public when there is gunfire. CHANDLER The Chandler City Council approved Aug. 12 a preliminary development plan for Chandler Airpark Technology Center which will be located a the southwest corner of Gilbert Road and Insight Way in Chandler. The council also approved a preliminary plat for the Chandler Airpark Technology Center. CHANDLERUSD The Chandler USD governing board voted Aug. 11 to name the Perry High School gym after longtime principal and educator Dan Serrano. The vote was unanimous. Serrano served at Perry High School’s first principal when the school opened in 2007. Chandler City Council Sept. 20, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov Chandler USD board Sept. 8, 22, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

ACTIVITIES BuSY Day Senior Club aims to be a safe, active space for those with cognitive impairments to spend their days socializing, according to owner Mark Young. Activities oered include:

Mark Young owns BuSY Day Senior Club. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Walks around the plaza

Jigsaw puzzles

Crosswords

Dominos

Old board games

Afternoon picnic/tea party

The seniors at BuSY Day Senior Club stay busy playing cards and socializing. (Courtesy BuSY Day Senior Club)

Club patrons can also do gardening. (Courtesy BuSY Day Senior Club)

Gardening

Family-style lunch daily

BuSYDay Senior Club Social club aims to help those with cognitive impairments A t BuSY Day Senior Club, the key is to keep people moving. Games of Yaht- in February 2020, right before the COVID-19 pandemic gripped the nation and hit the senior popula- tion particularly hard. “By social distancing, we were

Pool

Pingpong

Reminisce sessions

members. “They are engaged. Even if they don’t totally comprehend what is happening, they can feel the energy of a game and it brings a sense of connection. That engage- ment and getting invested is what’s fun for them.” Young said it is more than just activities for members and their families. “When you are living a more active life, your attitude changes,” Young said. “People can go from not sleeping to sleeping through the night. From being dicult and belligerent to being a little easier to engage with. We hope to give people more good days. We join their world and get to know them and their interests. It’s amazing what we can do.”

Singing

zee, pingpong and pool make up portions of the day, owner Mark Young said, as do walks, gardening and crosswords. Young said his goal is to make sure all participants are ghting cognitive impairments by remaining active and socially engaged. “There is a real gap in the system,” said Young, who also runs ComForCare, a home health services company. “There wasn’t anything that was serving people who aren’t quite ready for home service. So I wanted to create an adult day care specic for people with cognitive impairment.” Young opened the social club

BuSYDay Senior Club 208 W. Chandler Heights Road, Ste. 102, Chandler 480-827-2600 www.busydayseniorclub.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Closed Sat. & Sun.

able to stay open the entire time,” Young said. “It’s detrimental to the psyche of these people to not have interactions. Humans need that connection. We were able to provide that for people during the pandemic when it wasn’t really possible to get it anywhere else.” BuSY Day Senior Club special- izes in helping members retain the skills they already possess as well as drawing them out of the isolation and depression that can sometimes accompany dementia. “They get excited about activi- ties like Yahtzee,” Young said of the

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DINING FEATURE

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

Baked Brie ($14)

THREE DISHES TO TRY

The baked brie contains baked brie in a pu pastry, tart dried cherries, pecan caramel and toasted garlic ciabatta.

Chilean Sea Bass ($36)

Watermelon Summer Salad ($14)

This dish contains six ounces of miso-glazed bass, grilled asparagus, togorashi risotto, mango salsa and wonton strips.

This seasonal salad contains watermelon, mixed greens, cucumbers, feta cheese, fresh basil, chili lime salt and roasted tomato vinaigrette. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

St. AmandKitchen&Cocktails Restaurant and bar oers approachable menu for all patrons K en Morrow had been a reg- ular at the restaurant and wine bar that previously that felt approachable, like there was something there for everyone. “I wanted it to be open and airy

Lynn Crespo, Morrow’s ancé and head of strategy at St. Amand, said the business is a “labor of love” for the couple—who both work full-time jobs outside of running the restaurant. “We love it here; the sta is incredible, and the atmosphere is approachable and exactly what we hoped it would be,” Crespo said. “It’s a place for everyone.” The restaurant is now serving brunch on Sundays as well as dinner, Crespo said, which is a new concept for the team after COVID- 19. The restaurant also oers live music. “We are excited about Sundays; serving everything from brunch to dinner is new for us, but it’s been going really well,” Crespo said.

Ken Morrow and Lynn Crespo run St. Amand Kitchen & Cocktails.

occupied the space that houses St. Amand Kitchen & Cocktails in Ocotillo. He got into business with the previous owner and put his general contractor skills to use in gutting and renovating the space. By January 2020, Morrow had full ownership of the business. “We have an amazing sta, and we continue to grow and thrive no matter what gets thrown at us,” Morrow said. When Morrow redesigned and recongured the restaurant, he added a big bar that is both inside and outside and brightened the place up with light xtures and win- dows. He wanted to make a place

and have this great four-sided bar,” Morrow said. “We gutted it down to the studs and went from there.” Morrow said the restaurant’s menu includes a variety of dishes— from appetizers and salads to pastas and sh dishes—designed to appease any appetite. “There is something for anyone of any age,” Morrow said. “We are kind of this neighborhood spot here ... Everyone knows each other. People get dressed up and come here, or people do events here and then on the other hand some people come in here right after going to the gym. We don’t turn anyone away; we are open for everyone.”

St. AmandKitchen&Cocktails 3990 S. Alma School Road, Ste. 3, Chandler 480-782-5550 www.stamandaz.com Hours: Closed Mon., Tue.-Thu. 3-9 p.m., Fri.- Sat. 3-11 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE FrankNarducci

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

Chandler USD interim Superintendent Frank Narducci answers Community Impact Newspaper ’s questions ahead of the start of the school year July 21. Narducci began at the district in 1996 as the principal at Santan Elementary School, the district’s rst K-8 school. He has been serving as interim superintendent since July. Interview answers were edited for length and clarity.

WHATMADE YOU DECIDE TO BECOME AN EDUCATOR? I have always enjoyed school. My parents were very supportive of the schools I attended and the value education would play in my life. My mother actually graduated from the University of Arizona in her early 40s and was the rst member of her family to graduate from a college or university. I also had a few teachers growing up who really took interest in knowing me and my family. This relationship between school and home made me feel connected to school, and I felt that I had a trusting relationship with my teachers to guide my success in school. When I started at the University of Arizona I was working at Tucson Medical Center in a supervisory role as I was studying to become a hos- pital administrator. It was my junior year that I visited a second-grade classroom to do a presentation, and what I experienced moved me in a whole dierent direction. What I saw in [the teacher’s] classroom was pure magic. The respect and high expec- tations she held for her students in a caring and nurturing classroom while making learning fun and exciting while drawing from individual students’ strengths changed my direction. I changed colleges and spent that year and my senior year earning my elementary education degree and was hired to teach in Tucson Unied School District in 1983. I taught and was a curriculum generalist for seven years, a principal for 18 years (at both elementary and junior high levels). [I was a] director for six years and assistant superintendent for elementary education for 10 years prior to being appointed the interim superintendent. WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS FOR THE DISTRICT THIS YEAR? The 2020-21 school year was extremely dicult for our children, parents and sta. We learned so

much about ourselves, our families and our organization that I cannot help but be excited about the opportunities this year to impact our students and sta in such a powerful way. Most would say that a new super- intendent would spend the rst 100 days listening; however, I have been with Chandler school district for 25 years and have been a part of the executive leadership team for over 10 years, so I have been involved in the ins and outs, understand and know our community and stakeholders. We are moving forward with our top priorities and will continue to seek our stakeholder input as we move forward as we move Chandler Unied School District to the next level of excellence.

have amazing students and families that value education. And we have a dedicated and highly qualied work force. WHAT NEW INITIATIVES ARE YOU PLANNING FOR THIS YEAR? We are reviewing our Journey 2025 strategic plan and are looking at ways we can modify and enhance our plan to knowing we educate the whole child and that each child needs knowledge and a skill set to be future-ready. As we look toward our strategic plan updates, we have engaged with stakeholders in a variety of areas as we transform educational opportunities to meet these future- ready aspects. For example, we value collaborative leadership that will keep personalized student learning at the center of what we do. We have witnessed over the past year an epiphany as to how students engage in learning. In addition, systems and educa- tional mindsets need to be in place to assist student learning in this expanded space and time. We are looking at improvements by using the Future Ready Framework to ensure that when CUSD students engage in digital learning, they experience opportunities for both collaborative and independent learning that meets their individual needs. Through digital learning, students will access engaging content and activities, and they will interact with that content in rigorous meaningful ways. Students will demonstrate their learning through a variety of performance-based assessments as well as real-world, community-based and creative application opportu- nities. We will be working with our sta to enhance our practices of using data to guide instruction and to utilize research-based instructional practices that increase engagement and yield high results toward aca- demic growth and prociency.

Frank Narducci

CHANDLER USD’S FOCUS Narducci said these are the focus areas for the district: • Providing a world-class education where all CUSD students have access to qualied teachers, rigorous content and instructional strategies that engage students • Ensuring CUSD’s buildings and grounds are clean, maintained and reect the well- being and safety for students • Ensuring students are greeted every day and they perceive CUSD adults as interested and engaged in their academic and personal success • Working with each child, through assessments and data-driven practices, to understand where their unnished learning or learning gaps occurred during the pandemic • Assisting students, parents and teachers both emotionally and socially as many come back to in-person learning for the rst time in over a year • Focusing on the individual student’s needs

WE LEARNED SO MUCHABOUT OURSELVES, OUR FAMILIES ANDOUR ORGANIZATION THAT I CANNOT HELP BUT BE EXCITEDABOUT THE OPPORTUNITIES THIS YEAR TO IMPACT OUR STUDENTS AND

NARDUCCI'S CAREER

1983

Teacher in TucsonUnied School District Narducci began his teaching career in Tucson. Principal at Santan Elementary School Narducci served as the principal at Chandler USD’s rst K8 school. Community Education Director Narducci moved into a new role within CUSD as the community education director. Assistant Superintendent Narducci then transitioned into the role of assistant superintendent of elementary education. InterimSuperintendent Narducci was appointed interim superintendent by the governing board and ocially began in the role in July.

1996

STAFF IN SUCHA POWERFULWAY

2007

FRANK NARDUCCI, CHANDLER USD INTERIM SUPERINTENDENT

I do not take the responsibility of this position lightly. We are a district with over 100 years of a tradition of excellence. Educating over 44,000 students on a daily basis with a work- force of 5,000 employees. A district that continues to be recognized at local, state and national levels. We are committed to excellence, have students who achieve academically, athletically and in the visual and performing arts to name a few. We

2012

2021

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

CHANDLER EDITION • AUGUST 2021

Chandler’s water comes from the Colorado, Salt and Verde rivers in addition to water that can be pumped from 32 underground wells. Managing Chandler’s water supply

GROUNDWATER

This comes from rain and snowmelt in the Salt River Project watershed and collects in lakes and reservoirs north of the Valley. It makes its way to Chandler via streams, rivers and canals. Some water comes from as far as 1,500 miles away in the Colorado River and the Central Arizona Project canal. 90% of Chandler's water comes from surface sources. SURFACE WATER

The most pure water is pumped from deep in the ground via underground wells. The geology of the ground allows water to collect in underground beds of saturated soil or rock called aquifers. 10% of Chandler's water comes from groundwater.

P ACT NEWSPAPER

Groundwater wells 32 surface water treatment plants 2 reservoir pump stations 20 Reclamation facilities 2 City’s water use Chandler ocials say the city is poised to combat current drought conditions and will likely not see use restrictions in the next couple of years.

that processes more than 1 million gallons a day of water the microchip maker has already used in its manu- facturing process. “It benets the city for them to be able to bankwater for the future as part of their drought contingency plan and part of the city’s 100-year water supply requirement,” said Aaron Blawn, cor- porate services site manager at Intel. “It allows us to get—on primarily peak days [in the summer]—water in the cooling towers. It gives us that extra source of non-drinking water quality water that we can go use for our site. So really that became the bigger water source we needed for the two new factories.” Drought conditions The federal government declared a water shortageAug. 16 for theColorado River after levels at Lake Mead—the country’s largest reservoir—reached its lowest-ever point this summer. The declaration comes with manda- tory cutbacks next year that will aect farmers and reduce the water allot- ments of some western states. As of Aug. 8, Lake Mead, the reser- voir near Las Vegas that holds water for

Arizona, stood at 35% full, according to data from the Lower Colorado River Water Support weekly report. State Climatologist Erinanne Saell said Arizona has been in a drought condition for two decades, but this last year marked the “most extreme” of any of the years preceding it. “It’s important to understand that when we look at water supply we are looking at more than one thing,” Saell said. “There is more than one contrib- utor to our water supply. We have res- ervoirs, groundwater and rivers that contribute to the water supply.” She said heavy rain and snowfall over several years could ease the prob- lem causing the Colorado River to dry, but it is dicult to predict how wet a year the region will see. “We’ve been in a drought so long it would take signicant amounts of rain and snow to ease the current condi- tion,” Saell said. A water shortage declaration could mean water restrictions loom for agri- cultural lands and, potentially, for cit- ies down the line. Gregg Capps, water resource manager for the city of Chan- dler, said the Colorado River accounts for roughly 35% of the city’s overall

CONTINUED FROM 1

bring it up to A+ standards and sup- plement the aquifer for Chandler for drought, so that we have plenty of water in Chandler when and if we have a drought condition,” Knudson said. The interconnect facility is esti- mated to cost $26 million, accord- ing to city ocials, with a 50/50 split between the city of Chandler and Intel. Construction is expected to begin in late fall of this year and be completed in July 2023. Not only will the facility add to Chandler’s water resources, but it will also feed directly into Intel’s expan- sion. The company announced earlier this year that it would add two new fabrication plants at its Ocotillo cam- pus—a $20 billion investment. For Intel, the use of water is para- mount to its operation. Water is used in the manufacturing process and throughout the campus in the form of cooling towers. The city and Intel have partnered on projects in the past to create more water supply for both Chandler and its largest employer— including the Ocotillo Brine Reduction Facility, a water treatment operation

Instantaneous capacity for water production Chandler's average daily water demand 58 million gallons 154 million gallons SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Treated, recycled wastewater is used on golf courses, landscapes and in industry. Reclaimed water is a valuable water resource because it reduces demands on groundwater sources. RECLAIMED WATER

RECLAIMED WATER

USEDWATER

The city’s reclaimed water interconnect facility with Intel set to break ground this fall will store water beneath the surface of the city to be used by the city and Intel as needed. Interconnecting with Intel

water. Capps said in July there are stages to a drought, and restrictions in Chandler are not imminent under current con- ditions. The rst stage begins when a shortage is looming and could mean reduction of surface water supplies, but Capps said that does not mean the city would not have enough water to meet its demand. The second stage involves man- datory water reduction at parks and city facilities, Capps said. The third stage asks residents to cut back water use, and the fourth stage requires City Council action to authorize mandatory water restrictions. The city has not yet in history reached any of the stages. “At that point the water wells would be pumping groundwater if we reached that drastic level. If we had zero surface water, even then the sky wouldn’t be falling,” Capps said. ManagingChandler’swater supply Chandler’s “diverse supply of water” began back in the 1980s, Capps said, and the city continues to look at its water supply as the city further devel- ops and nears build-out. Chandler gets its surface water from

the Salt, Verde and Colorado rivers, Capps said. The city’s groundwater supply is made up of 32 wells used to pump groundwater in the event of any future surface water shortages. The city also has a reclaimed water sup- ply used for irrigation and industrial cooling tower needs. Chandler also sits atop a natural aquifer, Capps said. “In 2022, our water supplies are not going to be reduced; there is likely going to be a shortage to some of the farm lands but not to the cities,” Capps said. “If we continue to see surface water reductions and drought condi- tions, then yeah, we could be having some pretty serious surface water shortages down the road. When we do have those more severe shortages, we have drought plans in place to address that.” The interconnect facility project with Intel allows the city to “add to its exibility while addressing the need for more water at Intel,” Capps said. “It increases our ability to move our supply around,” Capps said. “Now we have another point where we could take Salt and Verde and Colorado river water and supplement recharge.” Knudson said the project will help

Chandler with drought protections. “The city has planned very well when it comes to water resources,” Knudson said.

Cost $26M

now” and has enough surface water supply for the next year. But predic- tions for future drought conditions hinge on the amount of winter rain and snow the western region sees this year. “We are not going to run out of water in 2022,” Capps said. “We are always planning and working with our part- ners and making sure we are in the loop and know what’s coming.” Timeline Fall 2021July2023 Intel/city partnership 50/50

“There were people here 20 and 30 years ago that saw the potential for a future drought and began to plan for water resources.” The city purchased more water around the time Intel

Production 10M gallons per day

began its last expansion—the Fab 42 expansion that was completed in 2020, Knudson said. That purchase of additional water is being used now, he said. “The city has always planned for this eventuality, the purchases we have made with water resources, hav- ing that extra volume of water take us beyond build-out and allows us to set aside for growth opportunities,” Knudson said. “At the time the water was purchased, we didn’t know what would happen, and it turns out it made this deal possible.” Capps said that the city is “good for

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