Cy-fair Edition | March 2021

CYFAIR EDITION

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 7  MARCH 431, 2021

ONLINE AT

Electric shock: Winter event sends shivers through Texas grid

IMPACTS

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Floodmitigation at Longwood Golf Club

Responders with the Cy-Fair Fire Department transfer a person suering from carbon monoxide poisoning. The department reported 49 people had to be evaluated for carbon monoxide poisoning between Feb. 1419. (Courtesy Capt. Daniel Arizpe/Cy-Fair Fire Department)

ENVIRONMENT

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CAMP GUIDE SUMMER CAMP GUIDE 2021

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & MATT DULIN

of homes suered plumbing damage caused by frozen pipes. Among the residents and businesses aected by the storm’s turbulence was the Aerodrome Ice Skating Complex

in Northwest Houston, where power went down for 38 hours and a burst pipe ooded the rink’s compressor room, almost leading to a monthslong closure.

When Winter Storm Uri brought record-low temperatures to Texas, mil- lions of people lost power for extended periods of time, and tens of thousands

CONTINUED ON 24

Access, education in focus asmore vaccines hit Houston area

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2019-20 2020-21 (in-person) 2020-21 (remote)

10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

Cy-Fair ISD ocials said more virtual students failed at least one class during the second grading period compared to their in-person classmates. behind ALLING

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

Public health ocials in Harris County are looking to kick distribu- tion eorts for the coronavirus vac- cine into high gear in the coming weeks, with a new mass distribution site now open at NRG Stadium and a federal plan bringing tens of thou- sands of vaccines to local pharmacies. As of late February, ocials said they were hopeful vaccinations of the general public could begin this spring. With more vaccines becom- ing available, focus has increasingly turned to access and education. CONTINUED ON 29

0 5%

Middle school

Elementary school

High school

BUSINESS FEATURE

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SOURCE: CYFAIR ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

In her second year of teaching in Cy-Fair ISD, Mariah Najmuddin said students would show up to class in tears when the pressures of sub- mitting assignments on time while either learning in front of a com- puter screen for eight hours a day or fearing they would contract COVID- 19 on campus became too much to handle. CONTINUED ON 26 Learning gaps grow in lingering pandemic BY DANICA LLOYD

DINING FEATURE

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CY-FAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMEMILY: Surviving an unprecedented ice storm in Texas while navigating a pandemic has certainly gotten our year started o in a wild way. In this issue our editorial team takes a close look at Winter Storm Uri, provides updates on the COVID-19 vaccine rollout and examines how the pandemic is contributing to educational learning gaps. Emily Heineman, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMSHAWN: The true scope of the damage caused by Winter Storm Uri is still unfolding as investigations kick o and state legislators try to gure out what went wrong. In the immediate aftermath of the storm, businesses and families are doing their best to recover. Our front-page story this month analyzes what we know so far, catches up with a community in recovery and keeps an eye on the future of energy. Shawn Arrajj, SENIOR EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

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CLARIFICATION: Vol. 12, Issue 6 In the article “New eort to track economic equity in Harris County,” the 478 contracts studied were worth roughly $1.26 billion with $980.2 million going to prime contractors.

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CYFAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Dingers Baseball

COURTESY DINGERS BASEBALL

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fossils for collectors or home and office decor. Walser said products are typically purchased in bulk directly from mines and finishers. 346-336-6986. www.facebook. com/angelsrocksandfossils99 5 Heart & Hustle CrossFit opened at 21901 Hwy. 249, Ste. 400, Houston, on Jan. 4. The new business is housed in a climate-controlled facility that features state-of-the-art equipment. It offers five different classes that cater to all levels of experience and incorporate high-intensity interval training, weight lifting and cardio circuits. 832-377-7153. www.hxhcrossfit.com 6 Juice and smoothie bar franchise Main Squeeze Juice Co. opened a location Feb. 26 at 16734 House & Hahl Road, Cypress, that also features an on-site production facility. Run by Marc Miller and Jeff and Tabitha Drost, the new loca- tion offers a menu of juices and smooth- ies that are based on superfoods and designed by nutritionists, including vegan and gluten-free options. Miller and Drost said they are looking to open five more Houston-area locations in the coming years. www.mainsqueezejuiceco.com 7 Stone Lake Dentistry opened in late January at 17211 Telge Road, Ste. 100, Cypress. Run by Dr. Christian Escobar, the practice offers dental care services in- cluding routine preventive care, cosmetic smile makeovers and full mouth resto- rations as well as Invisalign and teeth whitening. 832-930-7856. www.stonelakedentistry.com 8 A new Village Medical clinic opened Feb. 4 at 10220 Louetta Road, Ste. 100, Houston, near the Cutten Road inter- section. The clinic offers comprehensive

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NOWOPEN 1 Dingers Baseball opened Feb. 1 at 16125 Cypress Rosehill Road, Cypress, offering five batting cages as well as a pitching lane with a mound and pitch- ing target. All cages have L screens for coaches, and nets are retractable so teams can practice fielding indoors. A party room is available for guests, and owner Angela Maniha said she plans to introduce a Bownet volleyball net for players to practice serving, hitting and drills with a partner. 713-999-1311. www.dingersbaseball.com

2 The Texas BBQ Lab opened in January at 12634 Grant Road, Cypress, offering brisket, pulled pork, ribs, pork chops and barbecue chicken plates with an assortment of sides for lunch and din- ner. Barbecue sandwiches, loaded baked potatoes and loaded barbecue nachos are also on the menu along with burritos and biscuits for breakfast. Catering options are also available. 713-252-6240. www.facebook.com/thetexasbbqlab 3 After challenges posed by the coro- navirus pandemic forced Cy-Fair business owners Ginger and Terrell Jones to close the doors of their business, Gooey’s Ice

Cream Sandwiches , in December, the couple reopened the shop Feb. 3. The specialty dessert shop sells a variety of treats made out of homemade brownies, cookies, doughnuts, waffles and churros. 281-304-2626. www.gooeysicecreamsandwiches.com 4 After participating in gem and mineral shows throughout the state for the past several years, Angel’s Rocks and Fossils opened a storefront in February at 12918 Malcomson Road, Houston. Angelyn Davis founded the business in late 2014, but Doug Walser has moved into the owner role for the storefront. The business offers rocks, minerals and

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD

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Tiff’s Treats, Milk Mustache and Half Baked Cookie Co. have opened new storefronts.

PHOTOS COURTESY TIFF’S TREATS, MILK MUSTACHE, HALF BAKED COOKIE CO.

The Texas BBQ Lab

Heart & Hustle CrossFit

FEATURED IMPACTS NOWOPEN Three cookie delivery businesses recently opened in the Cy-Fair area.

COURTESY THE TEXAS BBQ LAB

COURTESY HEART & HUSTLE CROSSFIT

primary care as well as virtual care and telehealth services. Services include pre- ventive care, treatment for illnesses and injury, and the management of chronic conditions.832-376-3880. www.villagemedical.com 9 Dallas and Elysa Coleman opened HomeWell Care Services Feb. 1 at 17920 Huffmeister Road, Ste. 250, Cypress. The business offers in-home care for seniors and others, including compan- ionship, housekeeping, meal preparation, and care for those with dementia or Alz- heimer’s. The business mainly caters to the north and northwest Houston areas. 281-213-4302. www.homewellcares.com Spring resident and chemical inventory specialist Mark Oliver opened a new branch of Pool Scouts Feb. 8 servicing the Cypress area, including the 77377, 77070 and 77429 ZIP codes. Oliver, who worked in the oil and gas industry for 26 years, said he provides swimming pool care services such as cleaning, mainte- nance and minor repairs. 281-542-3540. www.poolscouts.com/northcypress COMING SOON 10 NewQuest Properties is wrapping up construction on The Shops at Rock Creek, located at 14123 Grant Road, Cypress, near the Spring Cypress Road intersec- tion. Officials said Wingstop is slated to open this summer in a 1,400-square-foot space. Founded in Garland, the chain offers chicken wings and tenders in a va- riety of flavors for delivery, takeout and dining in. www.wingstop.com 11 Officials with NewQuest Properties signed Domino’s Pizza to a lease at The

Shops at Rock Creek at 14123 Grant Road, Cypress. The pizza chain is slated to open in a 1,400-square-foot location this sum- mer. The 21,350-square-foot site is 32% preleased, according to NewQuest. www.dominos.com 12 Dr. Michael Do has announced his plans to open a ketamine infusion clinic, Redefined Mind , at 10242 Greenhouse Road, Ste. 1002, Cypress, in April. Do said ketamine infusions via IV can treat de- pression and chronic pain. 832-880-5052. www.redefinedmindtx.com ANNIVERSARIES 13 The 10-year anniversary of local nonprofit Cy-Hope took place Feb. 16 in Cypress. The nonprofit, which provides a variety of services that largely focus on helping students enrolled in Cy-Fair ISD, grew out of the Foundry Methodist Church but became an official 501(c)(3) nonprofit in February 2011. In 2020, the group’s backpack feeding program served 750 bags of food across 52 schools, while counseling centers served about 200 students per week. The nonprofit’s head- quarters is at 12715 Telge Road, Cypress. 713-466-4673. www.cy-hope.org CLOSINGS 14 Chef Jasmine Anderson, owner of 1101 Southern Kitchen , closed the restaurant Jan. 31. Located at 12020 FM 1960 W., Ste. 100, Houston, the eatery opened in September. Anderson said the closure is due to COVID-19, but she is hopeful she can reopen this summer and is offering catering services. 832-604-7238. www.1101southernkitchen.com

Milk Mustache celebrated its grand opening Jan. 30 at 13718 Oce Park Drive, Houston. Classic avors as well as unique options such as the Campre Bliss and Celebration cookies are on the menu and available for delivery or in-store pickup. According to the website, cookies are also shipped via FedEx Mondays-Wednesdays to ensure fresh deliveries. 832-761-5161. www.themilkmustache.com Austin-based Tiff’s Treats opened Feb. 1 at 13201 Fry Road, Ste. 110, Cypress. The bakery specializes in warm cookie and brownie delivery services and also oers pickup options. Frozen desserts and party packs are also on the menu, and some items are able to be shipped nationwide. Another location opened in mid-December at 13126 FM 1960, Ste. 145, Houston, near the Hwy. 290 intersection. 346-437-9500. www.cookiedelivery.com Half Baked Cookie Co. , a cookie pickup, delivery and catering service, opened Feb. 8 at 16326 Mueschke Road, Ste. E10, Cypress, according to owner Stephanie Ferreira. The menu features a wide variety of cookies and cookie cakes, including sugar, chocolate chip, oatmeal raisin and peanut butter supreme. Gluten- free, keto and paleo options are also available. 346-332-2227. www.halakedgoodness.com

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CY-FAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

IT’S “MORE“

SEASON

There’s now even more to love at Elyson. Our 12 new model homes are open, along with Timber Grove Park, our newest place to play. Come out and see them all— and start your tour at our brand-new Welcome Center. Of course, you can always visit Elyson.com/more to learn ... well, more.

NEWHOMES FROM THE MID $200S 281.640.4004 23634 Savannah Sparrow Lane, Katy, TX 77493

From Grand Parkway, exit FM529 and travel west. Turn right at Elyson Blvd. and follow signs to Model Home Village.

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Homes at Elyson ® are built and sold by home builders (“Builders”) unaffiliated with NASH FM 529, LLC (“Owner”), Newland Real Estate Group LLC (“Newland”) or their related entities. Buyers should review the purchase agreement, public offering statement, and other offering materials provided by the seller prior to signing any contract to purchase a home. Details on the prospective development are provided for informational purposes only and there is no guarantee that the final development will match the developer’s vision. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. Copyright © 2021 NASH FM 529, LLC (“Owner”). All Rights Reserved. No reproductions, distribution, or unauthorized transmission of any portion is permitted without written permission of Fee Owner. (2/21)

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

March events

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD

MARCH 1314

32NDANNUAL AUTO SWAPMEET TRADERS VILLAGE

MARCH 2728

CYFAIR HOME ANDOUTDOOR LIVING SHOW BERRY CENTER

Giovannie & The Hired Guns

COURTESY GIOVANNIE & THE HIRED GUNS

The local market will host its annual Auto Swap Meet, featuring hundreds of vendors oering car parts and accessories. Classic and antique vehicles will also be on display. 8 a.m. Free (admission), $5 (parking). 7979 N. Eldridge Parkway, Houston. 281-890-5500. www.tradersvillage.com/houston

This show will feature home and garden exhibitions, color and design consultations from home improvement experts, a plant sale, food demonstrations, DIY workshops and food trucks. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. (Sat.), 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (Sun.). $5 (adult admission), free (age 12 and younger). 8877 Barker Cypress Road, Cypress. 832-274-3944. www.cyfairhomeandgarden.com

LIVEMUSIC CYPRESS TRAIL HIDEOUT 25610 Hempstead Road, Cypress 281-213-4136 www.cypresstrailhideout.com MARCH 13 The Shades of Grey, 7 p.m. THE RANCH BAR + KITCHEN 13245 Jones Road, Houston 832-960-7111 www.facebook.com/ theranchbarandkitchen MARCH 5 Jody Booth, 9 p.m.

MARCH 05 THROUGH 6, 1114 SUPPORT LOCAL THEATER Four performances remain of the Playhouse 1960 production of “Arsenic and Old Lace,” a dark comedy about a drama critic who has to deal with his unusual family. The theater has implemented safety precautions including maintaining social distancing and requiring face coverings for everyone age 10 and older. 8 p.m. (March 5-6, March 11-13), 3 p.m. (March 14). $18- $21. Playhouse 1960, 6814 Gant Road, Houston. 281-587-8243 www.ph1960.com 06 CHECKOUT A COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE Members of the Barker Lake community in Cypress will host a communitywide garage sale that is open to the general public. 7 a.m.-noon. Free. Barker Lake community, Barker Cypress Road at Riata Lake Drive, Cypress. 281-463-1777. www.barkerlakehoa.com 08 GOLF TO SUPPORT LOCAL AUTISMNONPROFIT The Foundation for Autism Care, Education and Services will host its

VIRTUAL EVENTS 01 THROUGH 31 PARTICIPATE IN THE ANNUALWALK TO ENDHIV

annual golf tournament fundraiser. Proceeds will benet the local organization, which provides scholarships for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders to receive Applied Behavior Analysis therapy. 7:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. $175 (individual), $700 (team). BlackHorse Golf Club, 12205 Fry Road, Cypress. 281-757-6750. www.facesautism.org 17 CATCHANOUTDOORMOVIE ATMATZKE PARK Harris County Precinct 4 will hold a family-friendly movie night, featuring “The Princess and the Frog” and take- home craft kits. Social distancing and face covering requirements will be enforced. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Matzke Park, 13110 Jones Road, Houston. 713-733-6444. www.hcp4.net 27 COMPETE INA BARBECUE COOKOFF Frio Grill will host the 12th annual 3BQ Cooko for local residents to compete. Mike Gilbert and The Wilder Blue will perform live music. 11 a.m. Free (admission). Frio Grill, 16410 Mueschke Road, Cypress. 281-256-3746. www.friogrill.com

The 2021 iteration of this event, hosted by AIDS Foundation Houston, has gone virtual and will run through the end of March. To participate, walkers can create a fundraising page, set goals and share the page with people they know. Participants will track their progress leading up to a virtual celebration set for April 9. All-day event. Free. Online event. 713-623-6796. www.aidswalkhouston.org 27 LEARNABOUT SUMMER CAMPS INHOUSTON The Houston Camp Fair will take place online and is free and open to the public. Attendees can learn about summer camp providers in the Houston area and their plans for summer camps in 2021. 10-11 a.m. (Houston), 11 a.m.-noon (Katy and Sugar Land). Free. Virtual event. 800-437-6125. www.activityhero.com

THE BACKYARD GRILL 9435 Jones Road, Houston 281-897-9200 www.thebackyardgrill.com MARCH

19 Scott LeDoux, 8 p.m. THE BARNAT FRIO 16416 Mueschke Road, Cypress 281-968-4220 www.friogrill.com MARCH 13 Pecos & The Rooftops, 5 p.m. 19 Mike Ryan, 6 p.m. 20 Giovannie & The Hired Guns, 5 p.m. 27 Cody Morrow, TBA

Find more or submit Cy-Fair events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

281-807-8700 or visit shrp.com POST TIME: 6:45PM SATURDAY, MARCH 20 TH OVER $700,000 IN PURSES!

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CYFAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES TxDOT to begin construction on FM 1960 project this summer

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

PROJECT UPDATES

Louetta Road extension and bridge A joint project between Harris County precincts 3 and 4 will extend Louetta Road from Stablewood Farms Drive to Telge Road as a four-lane concrete boule- vard with twin bridges over Little Cypress Creek. Precinct 3 is working west of the creek, and Precinct 4 is completing the bridge and the eastern segment. Timeline: Sept. 14, 2020-March 2022 Cost: $8.8 million Funding sources: Harris County precincts 3 and 4 FM 529 improvements A joint project between Harris County Precinct 4 and the Texas Department of Transportation involves making traf- c improvements to FM 529 between Greenhouse Road and North Eldridge Parkway, including turn lane and median improvements. Timeline: August 2019-March 2022 Cost: $9.4 million ( joint project that includes Hwy. 249 improvements) Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 4, TxDOT METRO provides update on Park & Ride usage during pandemic Usage of Park & Ride facilities along Hwy. 290 in December was down substantially compared to before the coronavirus pandemic in March, accord- ing to Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County data presented to the Cy-Fair Houston Chamber of Commerce at a Feb. 4 meeting. More than 4,000 people used three Hwy. 290 stations in March. Later on in 2020, the three park & rides were combined into one route, which saw roughly 400 riders in December.

LITTLE CYPRESS CREEK

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

since been pushed back twice due to challenges associated with right of way acquisition. As of Jan. 11, TxDOT Public Information Ocer Danny Perez said all parcels needed for the project have been acquired, but several utility relocations and adjustments still need to be made. With costs previously estimated at $16.4 million, Perez said the project design has since been rened to incorporate fast-track concrete, which will expedite the project, drainage enhancements and addi- tional trac control during construc- tion, contributing to the higher cost. Bobby Lieb, the president and CEO of the Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce, said while the improvements are needed, he is concerned two years of construction could be detrimental to the corridor’s businesses—some of which will be displaced. “Retail is already feeling the pinch from the pandemic; it would be unfortunate to have it then compounded by diculty accessing [businesses],” Lieb said.

After several years of delays, the Texas Department of Transportation will begin construction in June on a nearly $20 million project to alleviate trac in the Willowbrook area. The project, which will take an estimated 28 months to complete, will add dual left turn lanes at Cutten Road, Breton Ridge Street and the Willowbrook Mall entrances as well as lengthen all turning lanes on FM 1960 between Centereld Drive and Cutten Road to provide addi- tional space for vehicles, TxDOT ocials said. Additionally, TxDOT plans to add a dedicated right-turn lane at Willow Center Drive and at Cutten Road and add a through lane east- and westbound from the Willowbrook Mall center entrance to Cutten Road. The $19.9 million project will also add pedestrian and bicycle accommo- dations, replace existing pavement and upgrade trac signals, according to TxDOT information. Originally scheduled to go out for bid in January 2018, the project has GROWING PAINS The project will add dual left-turn lanes at Cutten Road, Breton Ridge Street and the Willowbrook Mall entrances as well as lengthen all turning lanes on FM 1960 between Centereld Drive and Cutten Road to provide more space for vehicles.

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Timeline: June 2021-October 2023 Cost: $19.9 million Funding sources: 80% federal, 20% state

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF FEB. 19. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CYFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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CYFAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ENVIRONMENT Floodmitigation project proposed at LongwoodGolf Club

SPRING CYPRESS RD.

BY DANICA LLOYD

a viable business.” A feasibility study has already been conducted for this project, but the preliminary engineering and nal design phases—which take nine to 12 months each—still have to take place before the construction process begins. District ocials said the project, if approved, would take three to ve years overall. The ood mitigation project falls under the Little Cypress Creek Frontier Program, a masterplan for the fast-growing, 52-square-mile watershed, which was included in the HCFCD’s $2.5 billion bond program that passed in August 2018. Recon- structing the remaining 18 holes is a $6.5 million, six- to nine-month proj- ect that would come out of Triumph Golf’s pocket. But before plans can move forward, the Longwood Village Homeowners Association must approve the amend- ment of the golf course’s existing deed restriction to give the property a higher valuation, which would sup- port the cost of retaining an 18-hole golf course after the ood mitigation project is constructed. After two informational meetings with the district and Longwood residents, negotiations are “at a standstill,” HCFCD Deputy Executive Director Matt Zeve said at a Feb. 11 Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce meeting. “The ood control district does have the ability to exercise eminent domain to acquire property, and we have done that in the past. It’s generally our last

Dozens of homes in the Longwood Village neighborhood have ooded in recent years—including more than 100 in Hurricane Harvey alone—but a Harris County Flood Control District project proposed at Longwood Golf Club could mitigate eects of future ooding events. This plan consists of converting a portion of the golf course to a storm- water detention area and widening Little Cypress Creek in the middle of the property from 340 feet to 600 feet to improve drainage. HCFCD Director of Operations Alan Black said pre- liminary plans show a water surface elevation reduction of about 6.7 feet at Longwood Trace and nearly 11 feet at Kluge Road. If fully constructed, HCFCD ocials said the risk of ooding would be reduced for hundreds in Longwood Village, and more than 3,000 homes in surrounding neighborhoods would benet from the project. Billy Sitton is a founding partner with Triumph Golf, the company that owns Longwood Golf Club, and he said these plans would mean losing nine of the course’s 27 holes and rerouting the remaining 18 for a high-end golf course. He said he believes the project would protect the neighborhood and the golf course. “It’s not like the golf course wins and the community loses or anything like that,” Sitton said. “The golf course would keep two-thirds of its land with the chance that it doesn’t ood in the future—a chance to have

Longwood Golf Club has taken on $1.47 million in ood damage since 2016, and dozens of nearby homes have ooded in that time. (Courtesy Longwood Golf Club)

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84% said they were either “very concerned” or “somewhat concerned” about future ooding in the neighborhood. 75% said they would support HCFCD purchasing nine holes of the golf course for proposed ood mitigation eorts. 62% said they support the Longwood Village HOA lifting the current deed restrictions. SURVEY SAYS Harris County Flood Control District conducted a survey among Longwood Village residents in late 2020.

PROPOSED PLANS Pending the HOA’s deed restriction amendment approval, Longwood Golf Club would restore two-thirds of the property to a high-end, 18-hole golf course while giving one-third to Harris County Flood Control District.

HCFCD ood mitigation: 82.2 acres

Restored 18- hole course: 169.1 acres

Total Longwood Golf Club property: 251.3 acres

SOURCE: LONGWOOD GOLF CLUB COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

resort,” Zeve said. “We like to try to negotiate a deal, but no decision has been made if the Longwood HOA situation doesn’t work out.” Ocials from the HOA board did not respond to a request for comment before press time. Sitton said most of the resident feedback he receives is positive, but those from the 2% of homes located on the golf course where construction would talk place are concerned about a potential decline in property values and an unattractive detention area. However, he said the detention area could become a park featuring jogging, shing and other activities. He also

said property values are likely to increase with reduced ood risk. Longwood Golf Club has invested $1.47 million in ood repair work since 2016—the last time the course was protable. Sitton said a functioning 18-hole course is more practical than the 27-hole course that regularly closes for ood damage renovations. “Everyone keeps talking about Triumph proting o of this. I’m still trying to gure out how losing a third of our business and trying to … have a chance at a viable business is prot- ing,” Sitton said. “Triumph’s not the big winner in this. ... The community is the big winner in this.”

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CYFAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Harris County & the city of Jersey Village

Harris County, Houston open rent relief program

Jersey Village approves flood-control contracts

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & EMMA WHALEN

to work together on an application to be approved. Officials said they still encourage landlord participation, but funding in the new program can also be awarded directly to tenants in instances when landlords refuse to sign on. Tenants who apply for relief will be asked to select their landlord from a list of those who have enrolled. If a landlord has not enrolled in the program, they will be contacted and asked to enroll. Once the amount is confirmed by both the tenant and landlord, a payment will be made directly to the landlord’s bank account. Garcia said it is important to keep in mind that landlords are also hurting. He said the ability to help people pay rent for two months into the future—instead of just one month at a time—will be a “game changer” for a lot of people, land- lords and tenants alike. “The way this program is structured, it will now allow us to really make the landlord com- munity whole, recognizing the pandemic is not over yet [and] the economy is not repaired yet,” Garcia said at the Feb. 9 meeting.

HARRIS COUNTY The city of Houston and Harris County are partnering on a new $159 million rental relief program that will allow residents to apply for funds to help pay overdue rent from as far back as April. The program is funded largely with money from the U.S. Treasury Emergency Rental Assis- tance Program and approved as part of a federal stimulus package passed by the U.S. Congress in December. Harris County received $74 million, and the city of Houston received $70 million while also chipping in roughly $15 million in federal funds from other sources. Officials began accepting applications from landlords Feb. 22, while residents were able to apply as of Feb. 25, according to the Catholic Charities Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, which is running the program with BakerRipley. The two groups also partnered on previous rental relief programs in the county last year. Roughly 37,100 eviction cases have been filed in county courts so far in 2021 as of March 1, according to January Advisors. In addition to allowing renters to get help for rent from as far back as April, the new program can also allow applicants to seek help for up to two months into the future. Residents can also apply for some past-due utility bills, including electricity, gas and water. The new programwas approved several days after Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced a $1 billion statewide rental relief program that will function under similar guidelines. At a Feb. 9 meeting of the Harris County Commissioners Court, Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia said he hopes the state will coordinate with the county to prevent confusion. A compliance program is underway within the county to ensure benefits are not duplicated for any residents, according to documents submitted to the Commissioners Court. The rental relief program run by Harris County in 2020 required tenants and landlords

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

JERSEY VILLAGE City Council unanimously approved two contracts for flood-control projects at a Feb. 22 meeting that have been part of city plans since 2017. The projects include a 4-foot earth berm—or earthen barrier—that will be built around the Jersey Meadow Golf Course at a cost of $1.3 million and drainage improvements on some of the city’s most flood-prone streets—Wall, Crawford, Carlsbad and Tahoe streets as well as Capri Drive—at the cost of $5.7 million. The city is contracting with SER Con- struction Partners on the drainage project and with Greenscapes Six LLC on the golf course project. When combined, the two projects will reduce damages from a 100-year storm by $757,580, according to city estimates. City Manager Austin Bleess said the projects will be funded by about $6.4 million in grant money, while the city will pay about $600,000. Both projects are expected to take 300 days to complete starting from when the contract is officially signed, Bleess said.

HOWTOAPPLY

Earth berm

JERSEY MEADOWS DR.

Eligibility • income lower than 80% of average family median income • able to demonstrate housing instability • able to prove COVID-19 had negative effect on economic situation • residents with 50% AFMI and residents unemployed for 90 or more days will be prioritized • open to all residents in Harris County and the city of Houston Selection process • selected randomly outside of priority for AFMI and unemployment

JERSEY MEADOW GOLF COURSE

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MEETINGSWE COVER

Jersey Village City Council Will meet virtually at 7 p.m. March 22 713-466-2100 • www.jerseyvillagetx.com Harris County Commissioners Court Will meet virtually at 10 a.m. March 9 713-698-1102 • www.harriscountytx.gov

Contact www.houstonharrishelp.org

SOURCE: CATHOLIC CHARITIES ARCHDIOCESE OF GALVESTON- HOUSTON/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15

CY-FAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

C A M P G U I D E

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD Parents looking for camps for their children have a number of options to choose from in the Cy-Fair area. This list is not comprehensive.

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A+ Academics ART Arts DAY Day NIGHT Overnight SP Sports

Cost: $150 per week 10300 Warner Smith Blvd., Cypress 281-807-8900 www.csd.net/summercamps 4 Camp Hope Messiah Lutheran Church hosts a day camp for children ages 5 through sixth grade. Campers experience Bible stories through worship, art and STEM activities, play games and enjoy snacks. DAY ART Dates: July 5-23 Cost: $80 per week, $80 for additional siblings 11522 Telge Road, Cypress 281-890-3013 www.messiahlc.org/camp-hope 5 Color Me Mine Children ages 5-13 paint themed ceramic projects over the course of four-day workshops. Each week has a dierent theme, including Intergalactic Adven- tures, Mythical Creatures and Animation Invasion, among others. Registration includes all materials and snacks. ART DAY Dates: June 14-Aug. 12 Cost: $140 per camp 24140 Hwy. 290, Ste. 300, Cypress 281-758-4139 www.cypress.colormemine.com 6 Cy-Fair ISD Pre-K-8 students in Cy-Fair ISD can participate in weeklong summer camp sessions at two dierent locations op- erating as a licensed child care program. Activities include arts and crafts, indoor and outdoor games, STEAM challenges and team-building exercises.

SUMMER CAMPS

1 ARt Camp AR Workshop Cypress hosts four-day DIY camps featuring custom projects such as photo frames, mini plank trays, canvas pillows, tie-dye crafts and T-shirts for children age 7-14. A teen camp features projects catered to those ages 12 and up. ART DAY Dates: June 15-Aug. 12 Cost: $195-$225 16718 House & Hahl Road, Ste. C1, Cypress 832-653-7277 www.arworkshop.com 2 Camp Blessing Individuals from age 7 and up with phys- ical or intellectual disabilities can attend weeklong camp sessions throughout the summer. Activities include horseback riding, canoeing, archery, arts and crafts, music, swimming, team sports, a ropes course and sensory stations. ART NIGHT SP Dates: June 8-Aug. 7 Cost: $950 7227 Camp Blessing Lane, Brenham 281-259-5789 www.campblessing.org 3 Camp Captivate K-8 students in Cy-Fair ISD are invited to attend weeklong camp sessions at Smith Middle School covering topics such as cooking, science, and arts and crafts. Before- and after-care programming is available for an additional fee. A+ ART DAY Dates: June 14-July 23

InSPIRE Rock Climbing

Stageworks Theatre

COURTESY INSPIRE ROCK CLIMBING

COURTESY STAGEWORKS THEATRE

9 Drama Kids Campers develop communication, cre- ativity and collaboration skills through dramatic movement, acting, musical performances, writing their own scenes and crafting props. Summer camps are available for children ages 4-12. ART DAY Dates: June 7-July 30 Cost: $159-$259 per week 7103 Glen Chase Court, Houston 15415 N. Eldridge Parkway, Cypress 281-855-2555 www.dramakids.com/tx2 10 IDEA Lab Kids The tutoring center hosts weeklong camps for children ages 5-12 covering topics including veterinary science, culi- nary arts, digital editing, toy engineering, zoology and astronomy. Morning and afternoon sessions are available. A+ ART DAY Dates: June 7-Aug. 27 Cost: $250 per week 11808 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. C, Cypress 281-746-2008 www.cypress.idealabkids.com 11 InSPIRE Rock Climbing Daily rock climbing camps take place from 9 a.m.-noon and cater to all skill levels. Camps focus on the basics of

A+ ART DAY SP Dates: June 8-July 30 Cost: $135-$165, $30 registration fee

11111 Telge Road, Cypress 10002 Mills Road, Houston 281-807-8900 www.csd.net/summercamps 7 Cy-Fair Music & Arts

A variety of camps are oered through- out the summer for children ages 4-13, including drums, piano, guitar, painting, gure drawing and art collages. ART DAY Dates: June 7-July 23 Cost: $139-$265 per week 7103 Glen Chase Court, Houston 281-855-8855 www.cyfairmusicandarts.com 8 Cypress Academy Children ages 4 and older get active with open gym, splash days, games and challenges. DAY SP Dates: June 14-Aug. 20 Cost: $185 per camp 11707 Humeister Road, Houston 16710 House & Hahl Road, Cypress 281-469-4599 www.cypressacademy.com/camp

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16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

climbing technique and safety, and will also include activities and games, both on and o the climbing wall. DAY SP Dates: June 7-Aug. 13 Cost: $185 per week (members), $215 (nonmembers) 16730 House & Hahl Road, Cypress 281-213-0589 www.inspirerock.com 12 Life Time Cypress Life Time Cypress oers camps for children ages 5-12 featuring new lesson plans each week on science, technology, engineering, arts and math as well as the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. A+ ART DAY SP Dates: May 31-Aug. 20 Cost: $200 per week (members), $220 per week (nonmembers) 9922 Fry Road, Cypress 832-745-4100 www.lifetime.life/cypress 13 School of Rock Weeklong musical camps include Rock 101, ‘80s Rock and 21st Century Rock.

Ages, skill levels and times vary by camp, with Rock 101 catering to beginner and intermediate players and other camps ranging from beginner to advanced. ART DAY Dates: June 21-Aug. 6 Cost: $450 12904 Fry Road, Ste. 300, Cypress 281-304-7625 www.cypress.schoolofrock.com 14 Sew Camp Sew Houston oers sewing camps for kids and teens throughout the summer. Students can choose from a variety of projects ranging from beginner to advanced. Campers can make stued animals, housewares and fashion items, depending on their interests. ART DAY Dates: June 7-Aug. 15 Cost: $200 per 12 hours of instruction 7710 Cherry Park, Ste. F, Houston 832-427-6349 www.sewhouston.com 15 Sports Quest The Christian soccer camp hosts four-day sessions at churches throughout the

Greater Houston area. Boys and girls ages 5-12 learn skills grouped according to age and experience levels, win daily gifts and prizes, and have a daily devotional. DAY SP Locations vary 832-593-7777 www.sqsoccer.com 16 Stageworks Theatre Stageworks Theatre oers summer camps Dates: June 7-Aug. 4 Cost: $150 per camp for various ages, including camps for children ages 6-12 and camps for teens between the ages of 13-18. Camps vary in length, and themes include Horror Show, It Must Be Love and The Seussication of Romeo and Juliet. ART DAY Dates: June 7-Aug. 20 Cost: $150-$485 10760 Grant Road, Houston 281-587-6100 www.stageworkstx.org 17 Villa Palooza

sports and games. Sport camps are available for soccer, basketball, perfor- mative swimming and ag football, while other camp themes vary from Chemical Reaction to Space is the Place. ART DAY SP Dates: June 7-Aug. 20 Cost: $114-$190 members, $131-$219 guests 12951 Barker Cypress Road, Cypress 346-818-5114 www.villasport.com/cypress 18 YMCA Camp Cullen Youth campers between the ages of 5-17 choose among activities such as water sports, horseback riding, nature explo- ration, science, arts and drama. Teen leadership camps are also oered. ART NIGHT SP

Dates: June 6-Aug. 7 Cost: $1,295-$2,795 460 Cullen Loop, Ste. A, Trinity 936-594-2274 www.ymcacampcullen.org

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CYFAIR EDITION • MARCH 2021

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