Richardson October 2021

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 2  OCT. 25NOV. 21, 2021

ONLINE AT

Data from the 2020 census revealed that Richardson is more diverse than ever before. A concerted eort has been made by various groups to build understanding and respect among people of dierent racial and ethnic backgrounds. The faces of Richardson

Census data shows diversity on the rise inRichardson

“MY PRESENCE ON THE BOARD SPEAKS VOLUMES. ONCEWE ARE OUT THERE IN THE COMMUNITY, BEINGVERYACTIVE ANDPROACTIVE TO SHOW THAT SOMEONE LIKEME CANBE IN THIS POSITION, IT’S VERY IMPACTFUL TOOUR STUDENTS.”

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Richardson’s population has grown in number and diversity since 2010, according to decennial census data released Sept. 16. The city was home to 119,469 peo- ple in 2020, an increase of more than 20% over the decade, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The 2010 census counted Richardson’s population at 99,223. According to the bureau, large cities with populations of 50,000 or more grew at a faster pace in the South than in any other region. Since the last census, the population of people in these cities grew by about 12%, per the bureau. Due to the scarcity of developable land in Richardson, much of the city’s population uptick over the past decade is linked tomore dense housing, Mayor CONTINUED ON 14

PRESCHOOL GUIDE 2021 IMPACTS 4

REGINA HARRIS, FIRST BLACK FEMALE TRUSTEE IN RICHARDSON ISD

“WE ARE AMINI UNITEDNATIONS IN RICHARDSON; WE HAVE SOMANYDIFFERENT GROUPS THATAREPRACTICINGANDCOEXISTING INHARMONY, AND THAT IS SOMETHINGWE NEED TOPAT OURSELVES ON THE BACK FOR.”

NIRANJAN HANUMANNA, CHAIR OF RICHARDSON INTERFAITH ALLIANCE

PRESCHOOL LISTINGS

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“I BELIEVE ONE OF THEMOST IMPORTANT KEY ELEMENTS OF POLICING INADIVERSE CITY IS THAT APOLICE AGENCYREFLECTS ITS COMMUNITY IN ITS OFFICERS. THISWAY, WE CAN SERVE OUR COMMUNITIES BETTER.” RICHARDSON POLICE OFFICER RAUL REYES, LATINO COMMUNITY LIAISONCOORDINATOR OF THE UNIDOS PROGRAM

Newne arts center to serve Plano ISD

Exploring the arts

When it opens later this year, the Robbie & Lynore Robinson Fine Arts Center will serve as a home for the nearly 23,000 district students in seventh to 12th grades who participate in ne arts programs.

BUSINESS FEATURE

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SOURCE: PLANO ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Performing means happiness to Abbie Walker, a Hendrick Middle School eighth grader who aspires to one day be either a theater teacher or a Broadway performer. The Plano ISD middle schooler is helping choreo- graph an upcoming performance of “The Wizard of Oz.” She will also play CONTINUED ON 16

total cost $67.5M

square feet 82,200

performances per year 320+

performance areas 4

auditorium seats 1,502

SOURCE: PLANO ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DINING FEATURE

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WILLIAM C. WADSACKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLEANNE: The results of the 2020 census reveal that Richardson has grown by more than 20% in population since 2010, and the racial and ethnic breakdown of the city’s residents has shifted. This month’s front-page story explores ways we can continue to support Richardson’s growing population as it becomes more of a melting pot. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMOLIVIA: Choosing a preschool can be overwhelming, especially in Richardson, where there are so many options. When I tried to nd the best t for my daughter three years ago, there was nowhere I could go to learn about the schools near me. Our inaugural Preschool Guide (see Page 10) provides a detailed list of Richardson facilities. We hope this guide helps parents make this important life decision. Olivia Lueckemeyer, SENIOREDITOR

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby SENIOR EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer SENIOR REPORTER William C. Wadsack REPORTER Erick Pirayesh GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

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CORRECTIONS: Volume 4, Issue 1 In the Voter Guide on Page 16, Proposition E should have listed information about the city’s $7.5 million bond proposition for park improvements. In the Voter Guide on Page 17, Proposition 8 does not include an age requirement for spouses of deceased armed service members to receive exemptions on homestead property taxes.

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IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon or expanding

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972-707-0002. www.noraasianfresh.com 3 HTeaO opened a new location Oct. 15 just east of Richardson’s southeastern edge at 3428 W. Buckingham Road, Gar- land. The business offers a drive-thru, 25 flavors of Texas-style iced tea, Yeti prod- ucts and snack items. 972-805-5082. www.facebook.com/hteaogarland COMING SOON 4 Dunkin’ plans to open a new restau- rant in early 2022 at 1225 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson. The nationwide chain is known for its coffee and doughnuts and also offers bagels and all-day breakfast sandwiches. There are currently more than 170 Dunkin’ restaurants in Texas, according to a company press release. A phone number is not yet available. www.dunkindonuts.com 5 Salad and Go plans to open its new

location Oct. 27 on Richardson’s western edge at A 14909 N. Coit Road, Dallas. The company also expects to open a new location in early 2022 at B 1301 E. Belt Line Road, Richardson. The drive-thru restaurant offers made-to-or- der salads, wraps, soups and drinks. Its menu also includes breakfast items, such as organic cold brew and five different breakfast burritos. Salad and Go opened its first Richardson location in June. www.saladandgo.com/dallas 6 Image Studios Salon Suites expects to open by the end of November at 1415 State St., Ste. 900, Richardson, in the CityLine development. The salon will offer 32 suites for rent by hair and beauty professionals. 469-219-7911. https://im- agestudios360.com 7 Dutch Bros Coffee will open a drive-thru location early next year at 819 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. A special permit to allow the coffee shop near the

NOWOPEN 1 Lizzie Bee’s Flower Shoppe opened a new retail store Sept. 28 at 506 Lockwood Drive, Ste. 200, Richard- son. The shop offers plants and flower arrangements for any occasion. Online ordering and contactless delivery within 15 miles of Richardson are also avail- able. The business, which also offers garden-style arrangements and luxury event design, was started by owner Elizabeth Fisher in 2011. 972-495-7969. www.lizziebeesflowershoppe.com 2 NoRa Asian Fresh opened a new restaurant Oct. 21 at 1401 E. Arapaho Road. Ste. F, Richardson. The fast-casual restaurant offers a variety of Asian fusion dishes, such as egg rolls, rice bowls, ra- men and more. The restaurant is located in the former location of Lohas Teriyaki.

Greenville Avenue Pizza Co.

COURTESY GREENVILLE AVENUE PIZZA CO.

southwest corner of West Arapaho Road and West Shore Drive was approved by Richardson City Council in March. The area was previously zoned for commercial use. With more than 400 locations across 11 states, the Oregon-based drive-thru coffee company serves specialty coffee, smoothies, freezes, teas, a private-label Dutch Bros Blue Rebel energy drink and nitrogen-infused cold brew coffee. Dutch Bros Coffee opened a McKinney location in May and a Plano location in July. www.dutchbros.com

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8 Bella Flan Bakery and Café plans to open in early November at 819 W. Arap- aho Road, Ste. 56, Richardson. Owner Siv Lopez said the eatery’s new location will offer a full menu with savory items, such as Cuban sandwiches, potato balls and meat pies, as well as the desserts Bella Flan has been offering since 2020. Lopez said the bakery’s Garland location will become a Bella Flan Express once the new location opens in the Arapaho Village Shopping Center. 214-566-3656. www.bellaflan.com 9 Greenville Avenue Pizza Co. plans to open its new location at 520 Lockwood Drive, Richardson, in November. GAPCo, as the eatery is also known, originally hoped to open its Richardson location by the end of 2020, but delays related to construction and the coronavirus pandemic pushed that date back. GAPCo offers made-from-scratch pizzas with a thin, crispy crust and homemade sauce. The business has a Facebook page for its Richardson location where it is providing updates on progress of the new space. 214-826-5404 (Greenville location). www.facebook.com/gapcorichardson Mixed-use development CityLine will celebrate its fth anniversary in Richardson this fall. The 186-acre development was established in 2016. “We at CityLine are proud to be part of Richardson and can’t wait to continue growing, evolving and thriving over the next several years and decades,” CityLine Director of Marketing Jessica Robertson said in a statement. The development’s retail oerings include Whole Foods Market, Hollywood Feed and CVS Pharmacy. Dining options include Ace’s Sports Hangar, Fish City Grill, Fernando’s Mexican Cuisine, Edith’s French Bistro and more. Corporate tenants such as State Farm and Raytheon have oces in CityLine. Three planned oce buildings will add 1.4 million square feet to CityLine,

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according to developer KDC. “These towers will provide additional destination and event venues with a focus on amenities, particularly green and outdoor space,” KDC Senior Vice President Aarica Mims said in a statement. “We see these as a great draw as corporate America shifts its focus toward large mixed-use, transit- oriented projects.” CityLine also oers residential options with around 1,900 luxury apartments, townhomes and houses. 972-739-5080. www.citylinedfw.com

10 CityLine Dry Cleaners expects to open before the end of the year at 120 W. CityLine Drive, Ste. 400, Richardson. The business will provide a full line of dry cleaning and laundry services, including wash and fold options and alterations. A phone number and website are not yet available. 11 Construction on a new Jason’s Deli location is currently underway at 165 S. Plano Road, Richardson. Work on the nearly 4,700-square-foot building is slated to be completed during the first quarter of 2022, according to a filing with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. An opening date has not been announced. The restaurant is known for its sandwiches, salads, soups and more. www.jasonsdeli.com EXPANSIONS 12 Men’s apparel and accessories boutique Best Dressed Man expanded in August at 811 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 442, Richardson. The boutique’s showroom is located inside the Comer- ica Bank Building. Owner and stylist Oking Habib said he has worked in men’s apparel since 1983. 214-757-9233. www.okinghabib.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

TODO LIST

October & November events

Now Open for Lunch Dine in, to-go, and curbside pick up avai lable. Wed-Fr i at 11:30

NOV. 78

PRACTICE YOGAWITH GOATS LOCKWOOD DISTILLING CO., RICHARDSON

Goat Yoga Dallas is hosting an event at Lockwood Distilling Co. in Richardson. Attendees practice yoga while a herd of goats dressed in holiday sweaters graze around them. The company sometimes put the goats on students’ backs while participating, according to its Facebook page. Tickets can be purchased online. 8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. $32. 506 Lockwood Drive, Ste. A, Richardson. 469-399-1599. www.facebook.com/goatyogadallas. (Courtesy Goat Yoga Dallas)

Editor’s note : These events were still on as of press time Oct. 21 but may change due to coronavirus concerns. Check the website or call before attending.

COMPILED BY ERICK PIRAYESH OCTOBER 29 THROUGH 31 SEE A 'FRIGHTFULLY DELIGHTFUL' PLAY

sale. It features music from the 1960s through the 1980s. Tickets can be purchased online or at the box oce. 7:30 p.m. $35-$50. 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com/events-tickets 13 PLAY CARDS FOR A GOOD CAUSE The Richardson Woman’s Club holds its annual Casino Night in the club’s Founder’s Hall. The event, which is open to the public, includes gaming tables, food, drinks, a cork pull and a silent auction. All prots go toward funding community outreach and scholarships provided by the Richardson Woman’s Club. 7-10 p.m. $50. 2005 N. Clie Drive, Richardson. 972-238-0841. To register, visit www.rwctx.org. 18 MAKE ARTWITHWOOL AT CITYLINE The Paint Your Pet With Wool Workshop takes place at CityLine Plaza in Richardson. The Creative Arts Guild of Wylie leads the class, and those attending use needle felting and paint to create artwork of their pets. Reservations can be made online. All materials are provided. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $55. 1150 State St., Richardson. 469-209-1907. www.cagwylie.com 19 CATCHA SHOWAT THE TAVERN Blues musician Jeremiah Johnson is playing at Six Springs Tavern in Richardson. The artist moved to Houston in 1999 and nished in rst place for three consecutive years at the Houston Regional Blues Challenges hosted by the Houston Blues Society, according to the artist’s website. 7 p.m. $12.50. 147 N. Plano Road, Richardson. 469-917-3040. www.sixspringslive.com

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The world of Gomez, Morticia, Uncle Fester, Grandma, Wednesday, Pugsley and Lurch comes to life in "The Addams Family," a Broadway musical based on the characters created by cartoonist Charles Addams. 7:30 p.m. (Fri.-Sat.), 2 p.m. (Sun.). $17 (teens), $28 (adults). Repertory Company Theatre, 770 N. Coit Road, Richardson. 972-690-5029. www.rcttheatre.com NOVEMBER 06 SIP TEA INA FANCY HAT The annual Flaunt Your Hattitude Tea Brunch hosted by the Christian Women Empowerment Network happens at the Canyon Creek Country Club in Richardson. The event includes a silent auction that will benet Dress For Success Dallas, a nonprot that provides professional attire for low-income women. Food and drinks will be served, and there will be guest speakers, vendors, rae prizes, games and more. Women attending are encouraged to dress fancy and wear a hat, according to the event listing. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $40. 625 W. Lookout Drive, Richardson. 972-637-8800. www.cweninc.com 12 HAVE ANIGHT OF LAUGHS AT THE THEATER “Menopause: The Musical” plays at the Eisemann Center in Richardson. The play is a musical parody about four women shopping at a lingerie

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Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

Jeng Chi Restaurant & Bakery

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400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 www.jengchirestaurant.com

The design of the station at UT Dallas will pay tribute to the university, according to Dallas Area Rapid Transit. (Rendering courtesy DART)

Station designs released for Silver Line

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BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

according to the newsletter. The theme for the CityLine/ Bush station is convergence and connectivity, according to the newsletter. Because this station will sit alongside the existing Red/Orange lines, commuters will be able to go in multiple directions, according to DART. The station is projected to service 1,204 daily riders by 2040, according to DART. Travel time to DFW Airport is estimated at 51 minutes and to the station at Shiloh Road in Plano will take a projected eight minutes, according to DART. The existing station at this loca- tion already oers more than 1,900 parking spaces, access to CityLine and the Veloweb, and connections to DART buses. Coronavirus-related complications are behind a delay in the completion of the $1.89 billion project, originally scheduled for 2022, according to DART. However, construction on the Richardson stations will continue as planned, DART spokesperson Gordon Shattles said. between Wilshire Way and Plano Road may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. for a ber optic project, according to an Oct. 8 newsletter from the city of Richardson. Timeline: October-April Cost: unknown Funding source: MCI (utilities provider)

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Once the 26-mile Silver Line corridor debuts in 2024, two of its 10 stations will be located in Rich- ardson. In its September newsletter, Dallas Area Rapid Transit released nal designs for each location. A team of project engineers, architects, artists and members of neighborhood advisory committees collaborated on each station’s design from concept to completion, according to DART. The design of the station at The University of Texas at Dallas will pay tribute to the university, according to the newsletter. DART anticipates the station to service 1,205 daily riders by 2040. Travel time from Dallas Fort Worth International Air- port to the station is a projected 44 minutes and to the station at Shiloh Road in Plano will take a projected 15 minutes, according to DART. The station will include con- nections to the UT Dallas campus, apartments, restaurants, future developments, the Veloweb Hike & Bike Trail, and DART buses,

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RICHARDSON EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

DEVELOPMENT Restaurant parkwill now include Biergarten, Eiland Coee Roasters

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BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

request to add Dave’s Hot Chicken to the development. The objection rested primarily on the desired full-service drive-thru as well as issues related to walkability and trac. As a compromise, Hermansen returned with a plan that gives up one of the future drive-thru restaurants and reduces the size of the drive-thru at Dave’s from two lanes to one, among other concessions. The updated proposal also includes a 16,000-square-foot outdoor dining and entertainment plaza known as the Biergarten. Hermansen said the area will include picnic tables, a bar, space for live music or movie screenings, a game court and other amenities. Hermansen worked closely with Eiland to incorporate a new location for his coee roasting business. In 2019, Eiland pitched his idea for a coee roasting warehouse and drive-thru restaurant north of the

City Council voted Oct. 11 to approve two zoning requests that pave the way for the expansion of Richardson Restaurant Park and the construction of a new location for Eiland Coee Roasters. Kirk Hermansen, developer of the restaurant park, and Clay Eiland, owner of Eiland Coee Roasters, both plan to bring drive-thru restaurants to the property, triggering the need for special permits. At a meeting in December, Herman- sen was approved to bring two addi- tional restaurants with prepaid order pickup windows to the restaurant park, which is located o the US 75 frontage road just north of Spring Val- ley Road. However, council reserved the right to vet Hermansen’s tenants if he decided to pursue full-service drive-thrus via a special permit. In July, council denied Hermansen’s

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Dave’s Hot Chicken, a new location for Eiland Coee Roasters and an outdoor Biergarten will be added to the north end of Richardson Restaurant Park. (Rendering courtesy Hermansen Land Development)

restaurant park. Council voted down the proposal, citing potential trac congestion on the US 75 frontage road and insucient parking as the main areas of concern. This version of Eiland’s plan eliminates access from the frontage road as a means of relieving trac. Cross access and cross parking with Hermansen’s property should improve access for pedestrians and provide more parking, according to city documents. The location, which will be built on the northern edge of the restaurant

park property, will include a two-story restaurant with a drive-thru as well as an adjacent coee roasting warehouse with administrative space. Most of council agreed that Her- mansen’s new plan was a sucient compromise; however, some were concerned that there was no guaran- tee the Biergarten would be built. In response, Hermansen agreed to a contingency in the ordinance that would revoke the drive-thru order board at Dave’s if construction on the Biergarten does not begin within 24 months.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Richardson, Richardson ISD & Plano ISD

HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON ISD The district began oering free COVID-19 testing Oct. 18 for district students and sta who are not experiencing symptoms. The testing sites are oered at the Lake Highlands High School auditorium on Mondays and the Richardson High School auditorium on Wednesdays. Testing hours are 7:30-9:30 a.m. at both schools. Advanced registration for the PCR testing is required. The testing is being done in partnership with MCI Diagnostic Center in Dallas, according to the district. RICHARDSON ISD The district has 35 classes in pre-K through fourth grade that exceed the state cap of a 22:1 student-to-teacher ratio. It received approval from its board of trustees Oct. 4 to submit the necessary waivers to the Texas Education Agency for those sections. The 35 class- size exceptions requested by the district are for 16 of its elementary campuses. Stults Road, O. Henry and Brenteld elementary schools had the most exception requests with four each, while seven other campuses had just one request. PLANO ISD District sta said nalized class rosters for PISD’s Virtual Academy pilot program included 1,111 students in kindergarten through sixth grade. Senate Bill 15 allows for the online learning option to be oered through the 2022-23 school year without a loss in state funding. Sta said enrollment for next school year will open in December. STATE Preliminary ndings from federal regulators indicate that more needs to be done to weatherize the Texas power grid to prevent an outage similar to the one that happened in February. Sta from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the North American Electric Reliability Corp. drafted 28 recommendations with suggested deadlines ranging from November 2021 to November 2023. Richardson City Council meets Oct. 25, Nov. 1 and Nov. 8 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. The meetings are open to the public and are streamed live online. Richardson ISD meets Nov. 15 at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD meets Nov. 3 and 16 at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER

Council approves apartment buildingwith coworking space

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SPRING VALLEY RD.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

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RICHARDSON Sherman Lofts, a four-story apartment building with a live-work component and coworking space, is headed to Spring Valley Road following City Council approval of a special permit for the project Oct. 18. The building will include 299 traditional units as well as three live-work apartments and a 932-square-foot cowork- ing space that will be open to the public. An attached four-story garage will include 462 parking spaces. The majority of the units will be one bedroom, applicant Tommy Mann of Winstead PC law rm said. However, there will be some two-bedroom units available. The average size will be 700-750 square feet and will cost somewhere around $1,300 per month to lease, he added. Mann said the developers plan to tear down a two-story, defunct oce building on the property, which is located at the southeast corner of Spring Valley and Sherman Street. Amenities will include a pool, outdoor workspace, a tness yard and more. The building will also have an in-house coee shop that will be open to the public during business hours and remain open for residents after hours.

Sherman Lofts will be located across the street from the Spring Valley light-rail station. (Rendering courtesy city of Richardson)

Sherman Lofts will be located across the street from Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s Spring Valley light-rail station and next to the Central Trail. Mann said developers plan to construct an outdoor plaza facing Spring Valley that will be open to the public. A mural will be added to the facade of the garage that faces the Central Trail to enhance the visual appeal of the structure, Mann said. Bill Belshaw of Wilder Belshaw Architects said his team is 5-6 months away from having drawings to submit for a building permit. Once a permit is approved, construction should take 18-24 months, he said.

Council approves request to expand JJ PearceHigh School

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

RICHARDSON City Council unanimously approved a request by Richardson ISD to begin the second phase of expansion at JJ Pearce High School. The request included the con- struction of an additional 74,000 square feet of classroom, ofice and lobby space. It also included the relocation of existing driveways along Melrose Drive and a revision to the parking lot coniguration, according to city documents. This request follows council approval earlier this year for the irst phase of construction, which included expansion of two wings of the building, the relocation of the softball ield, the addition of a soccer ield and modiications to a parking lot on Melrose, according to the city. The second phase of construction was approved by RISD voters as part of the district’s 2021 bond program, James Watson, RISD’s executive director of operations, said during the Oct. 18 council meeting.

Some speakers at themeeting asked that the position remain vacant until the next election in 2022. (WilliamC. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

Richardson ISD trusteeswill not ll board vacancy created by president’s resignation

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

oversaw the meeting as the board’s presiding ocer.

RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees voted unanimously Oct. 18 to leave the single-member District 5 seat vacant until the board’s next election in May 2022, when that position is scheduled to go before voters. The seat became vacant when former President Karen Clardy resigned from the board Sept. 24 in a letter to the other trustees and Superintendent Jeannie Stone. “Because there was less than one year left in the term for sin- gle-member District 5, the board may decide whether it wishes to leave the position vacant or ll it with an interim appointment,” said trustee Regina Harris, who

During the public comment sec- tion of the Oct. 18 meeting, several community members expressed their preferences that the position be lled through an election rather than having trustees appoint a new member at this time. “I have not heard one single person from District 5 say that they wish that we would appoint someone to ll this spot for the short term,” trustee Eron Linn said. Clardy gave no reason for her resignation. She had held the board’s District 5 seat since 2017. The board voted unanimously Oct. 4 to accept her resignation.

9

RICHARDSON EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

GUIDE

Preschools in Richardson

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

2 0 2 1 P R E S C H O O L G U I D E RICHARDSON

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Richardson parents have a variety of options when it comes to early childhood care and education. The following is a noncomprehensive list.

Primrose School of North Richardson at Lookout

KEY

Breakfast served

Lunch served Spanish instruction Weekend care

Buddha's Light Private School

Peanut-free facility

After-school pickup Secured entrance Parent videomonitoring

COURTESY PRIMROSE SCHOOL OF NORTH RICHARDSON AT LOOKOUT

COURTESY BUDDHA'S LIGHT PRIVATE SCHOOL

1 A Bright Beginning Private School 407 E. Polk St. 972-235-8213 2 Arapaho United Methodist Day School 1400 W. Arapaho Road 972-231-1005 www.arapahoumc.org/dayschool 3 Bilingual Whiz Kidz Language Immersion Preschool 720 W. Lookout Drive 469-525-3094 https://bilingualwhizkidz.com 4 Bluebonnet Learning Center 1414 Collins Blvd. 972-664-1666 www.thebluebonnetlc.com 5 Breckinridge Montessori School 3900 Breckinridge Blvd. 972-664-1177 www.breckinridgemontessori.com 6 Buddha’s Light Private School 1111 International Parkway 972-907-0588 https://dallasibps.org/school

7 Campbell Road KinderCare 511 W. Campbell Road 972-669-1130 www.kindercare.com 8 Care Child Development Center 1504 E. Campbell Road 972-644-0766 www.carechurch.org/cdc

13 Heights Baptist Church Child Development 201 W. Renner Road | 972-238-7289 www.theheights.org/child-development- center 14 Kids Montessori Academy 1521 E. Arapaho Road 972-235-6930 www.facebook.com/ kidsrichardsonmontessori 15 Kids R Kids Richardson 3521 North Star Road 972-235-5437 www.krkrichardson.com 16 The Learning Experience 524 Centennial Blvd. 972-707-0895 https://thelearningexperience.com

19 Montessori at Bowser 300 S. Bowser Road | 972-690-8351 www.montessoriatbowser.com

20 North Star Learning Center 3901 North Star Road | 972-669-9454

www.canyoncreekpres.org/ northstar-learning-center

21 Octopus Garden Preschool 1075 Executive Drive E. | 972-234-6286 www.octopusgardenpreschool.com/ links.asp

9 Early Learning Center 601 E. Main St. 972-235-8233 www.my-elc.org

22 Primrose School of Breckinridge Park

10 First Baptist PreKindergarten 1001 N. Central Expressway 972-235-5296 www.richardson.org/rst-kids 11 Great Achievers Preschool 1210 W. Belt Line Road 972-707-0039 https://greatachieverspreschool.com

4301 E. Renner Road | 972-671-5437 www.primroseschools.com/schools/ breckinridge-park 23 Primrose School of North Richardson at Lookout 2425 N. Plano Road 469-514-2670 www.primroseschools.com/schools/ north-richardson-at-lookout 24 Primrose School of Richardson 1100 Jonsson Blvd. 972-479-9888 www.primroseschools.com/schools/ richardson

17 Little Disciples Early Learning Program 600 S. Jupiter Road 972-231-1218 www.littledisciplesel.com

12 Greenville Avenue Child Development Center 1013 S. Greenville Ave.

18 Little Steps Montessori School 635 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 230 972-231-0345 https://lsmschool.com

972-644-0134 www.gacdc.org

Private & Group Lessons FOR ALL AGES, CHILDREN THRU ADULT FREE FIRST LESSON

Violin and Piano lessons available

601 W. Plano Parkway #153 Plano, TX 75075 | 972-955-3339 info@kawaipianosdallas.com | www.kawaipianosdallas.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 P R E S C H O O L G U I D E

25 Rainbow Connection Preschool 1651 E. Campbell Road 972-644-0283 www.rainbowconnectionpreschool.com 26 Small Miracles Academy- Richardson Campus 1015 Newberry Drive 972-235-0267 www.smallmiraclesacademy.org 27 Tzu Chi Great Love Preschool and Kindergarten 534 W. Belt Line Road 972-680-8869 https://tzuchieducation.us/school/ great-love-preschool-dallas-tx 28 Weekday Kids at First 503 N. Central Expressway 972-996-1120 www.fumcr.com/children_weekday-kids 29 Whistle Stop Station 3501 Murphy Road 972-680-3062 http://whistlestopstationprivateschool.com

PLANO PKWY.

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RENNER RD.

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3 LOOKOUT DR.

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BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

JONSSON BLVD.

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EXECUTIVE DR.

COLLINS BLVD.

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INTERNATIONAL PKWY.

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NEWBERRY DR.

BELT LINE RD.

POLK ST.

78

BOWSER RD.

SPRING VALLEY RD.

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BUCKINGHAM RD.

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

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RICHARDSON EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

David and Merrick Porcheddu own and operate Artist Uprising and Artist Uprising Studios in Richardson.

ERICK PIRAYESHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

A SPACE FOR ARTISTS Filmmakers and

BUSINESS FEATURE

Artist Uprising Studios is a rentable space that was formerly an old auto shop. (Courtesy Artist Uprising Studios)

photographers can use the space for visual storytelling projects, commercial advertisements, family portraits and more.

Artist Uprising Studios Couple strives to bring creatives together in Richardson N etworking and a collaborative workspace are critical to an artist’s success, according to David and Merrick Porcheddu. BY ERICK PIRAYESH

Musicians can use the studio as a place to collaborate or hold private events.

helping her corporate clients nd the right local artists for various projects. She said the two sides of the business work hand-in-hand. “I call it the two-river system,” Merrick said. “We have these two kinds of ows in and out. We will get a lot of artists that will come in and say, ‘How can you help me?’ And we’re like, ‘Well, we can totally put you in this project.’” As a photographer, David said he enjoys curating the studio side of things and being part of an artist’s creative process. “A typical day here looks like so many dierent things,” he said. “You could have like … an editorial shoot and then … a bridal shoot and then …maybe someone wanting to [take photos] of their dogs.” The couple, who live in Richardson, said the city is the perfect place for their business to thrive. Merrick said the increasing number of art and technology professionals encourages creativity. “Richardson is really starting to get their nger- print on art and technology,” she said. “You are seeing animation, you are seeing graphic design, you are seeing augmented reality and virtual reality … [and] you are seeing muralists. I personally think that is where Richardson is headed and what it is going to be known for.”

The couple, who own Artist Uprising and Artist Uprising Studios in Richardson, said their two- pronged business works to accomplish both. David operates the company’s physical location, a studio space at 707 S. Floyd Road, which aspiring artists can rent for photoshoots, lm productions, design projects or anything their creative minds can come up with, the couple said. Merrick works the agency side of the company. She and her teamwork to connect artists and entertainers with businesses that could benet from their services. The goal of their work is to end the archetype of the starving artist, they said. “Every single thing that we do and have done since the beginning of time is to get artists paid work,” Merrick said. When the company rst launched in 2016, Merrick said her work was more focused on managing artists and coaching them on how to build portfolios and grow their unique businesses. Now, she said, her work has pivoted more toward

Fashion photography and branding opportunities are also popular uses for the space.

PHOTOS COURTESY ARTIST UPRISING STUDIOS

Artist Uprising Studios 707 S. Floyd Road, Richardson | 301-202-4459 www.artistuprisingstudios.com | www.artistuprising.com Hours vary

75

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SPRING VALLEY RD.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Joe Gibson and Debbi McSwain have owned The String Bean: Restaurant and Bar since 1980. (Courtesy The String Bean: Restaurant and Bar)

TheStringBean: Restaurant andBar 1310 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 101, Richardson 972-385-3287 www.thestringbean.com Hours: Sun.-Wed. 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu.-Sat. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. COME FOR DINNER, STAY FOR DESSERT Cobbler of the day ($3.99) : Flavors include apple, blueberry, cherry, peach and blackberry, and it can be paired with homemade ice cream. Coconut cream pie ($4.50) : This is topped with fresh whipped cream and toasted coconut. Banana pudding ($3.50) : This is made fresh daily with bananas and a graham cracker crust. COURTESY THE STRING BEAN: RESTAURANT AND BAR

DINING FEATURE

The Pot Roast ($12.99) is slow-cooked and served with mashed potatoes, gravy and green beans. (Erick Pirayesh/Community Impact Newspaper)

The String Bean: Restaurant and Bar Family brings Southern-style comfort food to Richardson T hrough 30-plus years, four locations and a variety of twists and turns, Joe Gibson and Debbi McSwain keep pushing to make their outdoor patio, an expanded bar and even a children’s playroom. All those factors helped the company nd success, he said. The menu is mostly recipes created by Debbi BY ERICK PIRAYESH

restaurant successful. The husband-and-wife owners of The String Bean: Restaurant and Bar in Richardson opened their original Dallas-area location in 1980. The original menu had four entrees, two sandwiches and three desserts. After moving the restaurant twice and starting a family, the couple settled in Richardson in 2010. Dakota Gibson, the couple’s youngest son, started at the current location when it rst opened 11 years ago. Dakota now manages the eatery at 1310 W. Campbell Road and said his parents worked through many ups and downs before it became a local staple. “They basically took a big gamble when they rst came to this location,” Dakota said. “They took out a loan, decided to move, and it just blew up. [They] were able to pay all [their] loans and debts back within a year.” Dakota said the current space allowed for an

and Joe, and it has grown considerably since 1980, Dakota said. The String Bean is known for its home- style southern cooking, its various Tex-Mex options and a popular dessert menu, he said. “There have always been about four faithfuls,” he said. “The pot roast, meatloaf, chicken fried steak and our marinated chicken breast.” The company also oers rotating daily specials and a weekend brunch. Dakota said the sta feels like a family, and some employees have stayed with the business since it started. Long-time server Renee Diebold has been with the restaurant for 31 years and even invested some of her own money into the company, he said. Dakota said while his father was working for a food distribution company to help support the restaurant, his mother would work overtime. “She was here more than she was home for sure—50-plus hours every week, just to make sure it was staying aoat,” he said. “It has denitely been a labor of love.”

MCCALLUM BLVD.

W. CAMPBELL RD.

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13

RICHARDSON EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

A Diversifying

CONTINUED FROM 1

White residents still make up the bulk of the city’s population; however, that group saw the smallest percent increase between 2010 and 2020. This map shows the percent of residents who identied as white in Richardson in 2020. POPULATION

Percent of white residents

Paul Voelker said. Commercial milestones, such as the opening of CityLine, are also behind the shift. “If you combine a good place to live, great neighborhoods, jobs and then nally access to those jobs … that’s where our growth came from,” he said. Ameltingpot Richardson has long been known as a haven for people of various cultures, Voelker said. Having a diverse set of residents is advantageous for the city, he added. “I can live around people that are dierent from me ... and not have to travel the world,” Voelker said. “I can have a business here with people that think dierently and solve problems in dierent ways.” The largest percent change in racial demographics occurred within the Black and African American commu- nity. The number of residents who fall into this category increased by more than 53%, from8,238 to 12,615, accord- ing to the bureau. The city’s share of Asian residents grew by nearly 37%, and residents who identify as Hispanic or Latino increased by nearly 30%. White res- idents still make up the bulk of the city’s population but saw only a less than 5% change over the decade. The Richardson Police Department has made an eort to build in-roads with the city’s growing Hispanic/ Latino population in recent years. The purpose of its Unidos program is to not only build trust with Span- ish-speaking residents but to also give them the necessary tools to avoid becoming victims of a crime, said Ocer Raul Reyes, coordinator of the program and the department’s Latino community liaison. “One of the topics we’ve talked about is how to buy a house,” he said.

6079% 80%+ 4059% 19% or less 2039%

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CHANGE OVER THE DECADE

White Black/African American Asian Hispanic/Latino Other

The number of residents of color saw signicant increases across the board between 2010 and 2020.

75

ARAPAHO RD.

Population

57,600

8,283 14,929 15,849 2,562

Total 99,223

60,286

12,615

20,412 20,528 5,628

Total 119,469

N MAP NOT TO SCALE

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“So, what does that have to do with police business? And the reality is: nothing and everything. No, we don’t sell houses. But at the same time, we don’t want people to get scammed for $25,000 and then we have to … try to nd who the scammer is.” Another groupworking to build rela- tionships among residents is the Rich- ardson Interfaith Alliance, which seeks to foster a sense of respect among members of various faiths. “Most of the time we have these communication barriers and misun- derstandings, and through education and increased awareness, we should be able to … not just talk about religion but also act upon it,” said Niranjan Hanumanna, chair of the alliance. Hanumanna said his group has grown from20 faith-based groups to 40

such groups since itwas formed in 2012. India Association of North Texas, which is headquartered in Richardson and has around 40,000 regular mem- bers, works to promote Indian culture by hosting events and seminars. It also connects Asian and Indian residents to various resources, such as vaccina- tions and mental health care. President of the association Shailesh Shah said residents who identify as Indian or Asian choose to live in Rich- ardson because of the city’s high qual- ity infrastructure, competitive home prices and renowned school district. In June, Richardson residents elected Aren Shamsul to City Coun- cil. Shamsul, who emigrated from Bangladesh to the U.S., has lived in Richardson since 2005, according to his online biography.

“Richardson has provided much to our family,” Shamsul said in his bio. “Transparent government, good infra- structure, strong [emergency medical services], re and police protection, and great city parks, to name a few.” Addressingequity in schools Richardson ISD has also become more diverse since 2010. According to the Texas Education Agency, students of color make up about 70% of the dis- trict, while white students make up roughly 29%. In response, the district has invested time andmoney into adapting curricu- lum and resources to support students of color, said Angie Lee, executive director of RISD’s Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Department, formed in 2017. The district recently implemented a

Kitchens Bathrooms Room Additions Roofing Windows Siding

972.669.7807 bryjo.com

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