Richardson July 2021

RICHARDSON EDITION

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 11  JULY 26AUGUST 29, 2021

less than 6 months of inventory Seller’s market: more than 6 months of inventory Buyer’s market:

7.0

6.5

When the real estate market does not have enough houses to meet 6 months of buyers’ demand, it is considered a seller’s market. According to June gures, just over 1 month of housing inventory is available in Richardson.

6 months of inventory Stable market

6.0

5.5

2020 2021

2.5

2.0

Lowest level of inventory since Jan. 2020

1.5 1.0 0.5 0

IMPACTS

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REAL ESTATE EDITION 2021

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Historic housing shortage spurs local buying frenzy Prospective homebuyers in Rich- ardson are facing a historically tight market characterized by a dearth of inventory and skyrocketing sales prices. chairman of real estate advocacy group Texas Realtors. “It’s not just per- ception—it’s reality.” Realtors. A stable market is one that has 6 months worth of homes on the market, according to the Texas Real Estate Research Center. BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

SNAPSHOT

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As of June, there was 1.1 months worth of housing inventory in Rich- ardson, down from 1.8 months in June 2020, according to data pro- vided by Collin County Association of

A lack of supply and rapid pace of sales are behind the surge in home costs in Richardson and beyond, said CONTINUED ON 16

“We are seeing inventory levels at a 50-year low,” said Marvin Jolly,

Redevelopment projects designed to help ‘The IQ’ grow

DINING FEATURE

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E. COLLLINS BLVD.

E. ARAPAHO RD.

JOB LISTINGS

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BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Richardson ocials are looking to redevelop 14 acres of land around Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s Arapaho Center Station as revitalization eorts unfold in The Innovation Quarter. CONTINUED ON 21

The city-owned building at 1302 E. Collins Blvd. will be shared by city of Richardson sta and UT Dallas. The Innovation Quarter is home to more than 1,000 businesses across its approximately 1,200 acres. (Rendering courtesy UT Dallas)

EMPLOYMENT

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Look at What Our Customers are Saying:

Jerry Parks (left) meeting with his banker, Maureen McGuire, ”‡•‹†‡–ǡ‡šƒ•‡’—„Ž‹…‘”–‰ƒ‰‡ (right). “As CEO of Traditional Select Homes, a custom home builder, I’ve been with ‘big banks’, but this time I was looking for a bank that understood my business needs and could provide that ‘personal touch.’ I wanted a bank where the bankers greeted me with a handshake and actually knew me by name ! That’s why I chose Texas Republic Bank. My banker is Maureen McGuire, and she has handled my banking needs for years. I can always count on her to make the loan process quick and easy. On one occasion, she approved and closed a home loan in f ive days to a buyer of one of my houses. Maureen is committed to providing outstanding customer service. She understands my business needs and what my buyers want. I am ‘sold’ on Texas Republic Bank and I plan on continuing my relationship with them for many years to come." – Jerry Parks, CEO of Traditional Select Homes (Jerry is author of The Builder Book) www.texasrepublicbank.com 690 W. Campbell R ‘ƒ†ǡ Richardson, TX 75080 Next to UTD • 972-685-2040 W. Campbell UTD RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2021 3

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMLEANNE: Businesses are reopening at a rapid pace, and as demand for services increases, new job opportunities are plentiful in Richardson. As part of our mission to help local businesses thrive, we’ve developed a new jobs listings section (see Page 22) highlighting local opportunities available in Richardson. If your business has an opening to list, reach out to us at ricads@communityimpact.com for more information. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMOLIVIA: According to the latest statistics from the National Association of Realtors, housing inventory nationwide declined by 18.8% in June, and median prices for all existing home types saw a year-over-year increase of just over 23%. Richardson is a micro study of what is happening at the macro level. In a story that begins on our front cover, we delve into the reasons behind a historic inventory shortage, possible solutions and what the next two to three years could bring. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

PLANO PKWY.

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PGBT TOLL

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RENNER RD.

BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

RICHARDSON

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TELECOM PKWY.

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CAMPBELL RD.

Reverie Bakeshop

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COURTESY REVERIE BAKESHOP

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were purchased. The business is relocat- ing from 2111 E. Arapaho Road, Richard- son. www.thebikeshoprichardson.com 7 Royale Ballet Dance Academy plans to relocate Aug. 1 to a new studio at the corner of Coit Road and Campbell Road, just outside Richardson city limits. The business is a registered school of the Royal Academy of Dance, which has its global headquarters in London. In addi- tion to ballet, students age 3 and older also learn dance styles such as modern, contemporary, lyrical and jazz. Royale Ballet Dance Academy puts on an annual performance of “The Nutcracker” as well as its spring recitals at the Eisemann Center in Richardson. The academy is adding new dance oors to the location previously occupied by Centre for Dance, which moved to a new location in Rich- ardson in May. Royale Ballet Dance Acad- emy’s new address will be 7517 Campbell Road, Ste. 400, Dallas. 972-818-4949. www.royaleballet.com 8 Reverie Bakeshop opened July 13 in its new location at 980 N. Coit Road, Ste. 2850, Richardson, with a grand opening celebration to follow July 31. The bakery oers a variety of vegan cakes and pastries as well as gluten-free options and more. The business closed its former location at 1930 N. Coit Road, Ste. 140, Richardson, in early June to make the move. 972-238-7511. www.reveriebakeshop.com EXPANSIONS 9 Industrial Pizza + Brew intends to expand into the vacant space next door to its Richardson Heights Shop- ping Center location at 100 S. Central

COLLINS BLVD.

6

ARAPAHO RD.

8

75

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5

BELT LINE RD.

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SPRING VALLEY RD.

2

BUCKINGHAM RD.

TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

3 Texas Family Fitness opened just outside of Richardson on July 13 at 7622 Campbell Road, Dallas. The North Dallas-Richardson location oers a kids club, a free weight center, a cardio center, group exercise classes, personal training, showers and hydromassage beds. The gym opened in the former lo- cation of 24 Hour Fitness. 214-258-6185. www.texasfamilytness.com COMING SOON 4 West Coast University plans to open its Richardson campus Aug. 23 at 2323 N. Central Expressway. The campus will have 140,000 square feet of learning space for students and faculty. The university oers undergraduate degree programs in nursing and dental hy- giene as well as master’s and doctorate programs in nursing, health adminis- tration, occupational therapy, physical

therapy and pharmacy. 866-508-2684. www.westcoastuniversity.edu 5 According to its website, Alamo Draft- house has set a tentative date of Aug. 13 for the planned reopening of its theater at 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 14, Rich- ardson. The movie theater chain initially closed its locations in March 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic but reopened its Richardson theater in August 2020 before closing again in early October. 972- 534-2120. www.drafthouse.com/theater/ richardson RELOCATIONS 6 The Bike Shop plans to relocate this fall to a bigger space at 1002 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 116, Richardson. The shop stocks bicycles for men, women and children as well as accessories, bike racks and more. It also has a mechanic who will work on bicycles no matter where they

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK & ERICK PIRAYESH

NOWOPEN 1 Salad and Go opened June 28 at 850 E. Campbell Road, Richardson. The drive-thru concept eatery oers made-to-order salads, wraps, soups and breakfast items, such as organic cold brew and ve dierent breakfast burritos. Salad and Go opened a location in Plano in May and has plans for another loca- tion in North Dallas later this summer. www.saladandgo.com/dallas 2 Murad Furniture opened in mid-June at 888 S. Greenville Ave., Ste. 302, Rich- ardson. The store oers custom-designed and -built furniture as well as a variety of options for living rooms, bedrooms, dining rooms and children’s rooms. The business oers free delivery on orders of more than $3,000. 469-980-0615. www.muradfurniture.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Town North Mazda’s new facility will be 32,000 square feet in size.

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RENDERING COURTESY TOWN NORTH MAZDA

Expressway, Ste. 72, Richardson. The expansion will add 750 square feet to the restaurant’s total space. Renovations will include the addition of a second oven, more kitchen space, extra seating, additional storage and more oce space. “We need another oven real bad for those Friday and Saturday nights,” co-own- er Kelly Newsom said. The restaurant plans to reopen during lunch hours after the renovation is complete sometime this fall, Newsom said. 469-399-7877. www.industrialpizzaandbrew.com NAME CHANGES 10 Kansha Japanese Sushi Bistro held a grand reopening July 5 at 1899 N. Plano Road, Richardson. The restaurant recently underwent a makeover and added several new menu items to go along with its new name. It was formerly known as Ken Japanese Bistro. The new version of the restaurant will continue serving sashimi and sushi rolls as well as other Japanese dishes. 972-807-9460. www.kenjapaneserichardson.com “We’re currently in a facility that was built in 1974,” General Manager Alex Tsvang said. “[The new building] will be a state-of-the-art Mazda facility with 27 automotive tech bays.” Tsvang said the dealership’s facility has just 13 tech bays, so the expansion will allow the business to serve more customers at a time. The new facility will also have an air conditioning service shop and an automated car FEATURED IMPACT EXPANSION Town North Mazda is in the midst of an expansion that will see a new 32,000-square-foot facility completed in spring 2022. In addition to new and used vehicle sales, Town North Mazda oers customers an in-house nance center as well as parts and service departments.

EVERYWEDNESDAYNIGHT Three-CourseMenu - LadiesOnly! RESERVATIONS ONRESY.COM Visit jaspersrichardson.com for full menu Enjoy covered free parking garage behind our restaurant Located in CityLine, on the corner of State St. and Plano Rd 1251 State St Richardson, TX 75082 | 214.716.2610

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wash for customers, according to Tsvang. The dealership’s expansion began in June, Tsvang said. Town North Mazda, which has been in business since 1974, is located along US 75 at 307 S. Central Expressway, Richardson. 972-236-7981. www.townnorthmazda.com

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RENOVATIONS 11 After being closed for the entirety of June for turf revitalization, the Richardson city dog park Bush Central Barkway reopened to the public July 1. The park was initially scheduled to be closed May 19-June 18 to allow aerifying and fertilizing work to help establish new grass throughout the park. However, the heavy rains the city saw in June pushed the reopening back, according to Richardson Deputy City Manager Don Magner. “It was really just about looking for the ideal time to open it up,” Magner said. “We didn’t want to be premature and kind of undermine a lot of the good growing that had occurred.” The closure was the nal step in an eight-week turf revitalization project undertaken by the parks and recreation department, as city sta said the park’s turf had become bare from heavy use and the eects of last winter. The park is located underneath the highway at 3581 N. Central Expressway. Updates on the park can be found by calling 972-744-4301 or by visiting www.facebook.com/ richardsonparksandrec.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2021

TODO LIST

July and August events

COMPILED BY ERICK PIRAYESH

14 BATH BOMBWORKSHOP Simply Organic Soap is hosting a Bath Bomb Workshop at CityLine Plaza in Richardson. Attendees can customize and take home four bath bombs infused with essential oils, along with an additional recipe and bath bomb mold. Materials included. Reservations can be made online. 11 a.m.-noon. $45. CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. 469-500-9013. www.simplyorganicsoap.com 21 JUSTIN CASHION Lockwood Distilling Co. is hosting a performance by Dallas-based singer- songwriter Justin Cashion. Cashion and his band play a variety of traditional country songs and modern Americano music. 2 p.m. Free. Lockwood Distilling Co., 506 Lockwood Drive, Ste. A, Richardson. 469- 399-1599. www.lockwooddistilling.com 18 THROUGH 22, 24, 2529, 31 ‘MIDDLETOWN’ The play “Middletown” is being performed at the Eisemann Center in Richardson. The play tells the story of two couples who reminisce about a friendship 33 years in the making. Tickets can be purchased online or at the box oce. Various showtimes. $49, $55. Eisemann Center, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com

08 SCHOOL OF ROCK Six Springs Tavern is hosting its summer student showcase, School of Rock. The show is an afternoon of rock ‘n’ roll performances from student-age bands. This event is for all ages, but a guardian is required if the attendee is under 18. 1-6 p.m. Free. Six Springs Tavern, 147 N. Plano Road, Richardson. 469-917-3040. www.sixspringslive.com 11 AND 17 FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL Plano ISD students return to school Wednesday, Aug. 11, and Richardson ISD starts on Tuesday, Aug. 17. Both school years will end May 27, 2022. Face coverings will not be required by either district following an executive order by Gov. Greg Abbott in May. Class start times range from 7:30-9:20 a.m. Exact times can be found on each district’s website. www.pisd.edu. www.risd.org 13 CITYLINE NIGHTMARKET BY THE BOHOMARKET CityLine and The Boho Market are partnering to bring more than 25 dierent local vendors to Richardson. This is a night-time shopping event with live music held at CityLine Plaza. Free parking is available. This is a socially distanced event. 6-10 p.m. Free. CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. 972-739-5080. www.citylinedfw.com

JULY 26 THROUGHAUG. 5 HEALTHY KIDS SNACK DRIVE The public is invited to donate child- friendly snacks as part of a drive organized by high school interns participating in the Richardson Mayor’s Summer Internship Program. Donations can be made in-person at Network of Community Ministries, or preselected items can be purchased online via the event’s Amazon wishlist. For more information on how to participate, visit www.discoverrichardson.com/business/ summer-interns-host-healthy-snack- MUSIC BINGOAT GUITARS AND GROWLERS Guitars and Growlers hosts a music bingo night every Monday at its Richardson location. The event combines classic songs and bingo with dierent prizes on the line. 7-9 p.m. Free. Guitars and Growlers, 581 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 101, Richardson. 469-904-5165. www.guitarsandgrowlers.com/ richardson-location drive-for-kids. AUGUST 02 , 09, 16, 23, 30

AUG. 28

‘THEKING LIVES’ STARRINGKRAIGPARKER

The Elvis Presley tribute show “The King Lives” starring Kraig Parker is coming to the Eisemann Center in Richardson. Parker is joined by the Royal Tribute Band and has been playing Elvis tribute shows for 22 years. 7:30 p.m. $27-$52. Tickets for children age 12 and younger are $15. Eisemann Center, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972- 744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com (Courtesy Kraig Parker)

Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Silver Line pushed back, Richardson stations on schedule

ONGOING PROJECTS

W. BELT LINE RD.

E. MAIN ST.

75

BY ERICK PIRAYESH The Silver Line has been delayed by two years and is now estimated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit to be complete sometime in 2024. This is the second delay for the long-awaited commuter rail project that will travel 26 miles between Plano and the Dallas Fort Worth Inter- national Airport. The line will include 10 stations along its planned route, including the existing CityLine/Bush Station and a new station at The University of Texas at Dallas. Construction that is already under- way on those stations will continue as planned, DART spokesperson Gordon Shattles said. The 2024 completion timeline is not set in stone, Shattles said, and it will be up to the transit agency’s board of directors as to when the rail will ocially be put into service. DART executives announced in May that the estimated $1.29 billion cost for the Silver Line had increased

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Main Street project All lanes of Greenville Avenue and Main are open, and the Main Street project is 99% complete. One westbound lane of Main west of Interurban Street will remain closed for storm-sewer work for the Belt+Main development. The right lane of eastbound Main between McKinney Street and Greenville, and the right lane of Greenville between Kaufman Street and the police head- quarters north of Main may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Timeline: July-late August Cost: $21 million Funding source: city of Richardson

The Silver Line will stop at the existing CityLine/Bush Station as well as one other future station in Richardson. (William C. Wadsack/Community Impact Newspaper)

along the 26-mile line. Construction of 15-foot-high sound mitigation walls along the route is also contributing to delays, Shattles said. Despite the setback, Richardson ocials are excited about the project, City Spokesperson Greg Sowell said in an email. “It’s understandable that any large project like this may have delays,” he said. “We very much look forward to the day when this connection is made.”

to $1.89 billion. Rising costs of construction supplies caused by pandemic-related inventory short- ages has played a role in the increase, according to DART ocials. Shattles said the board has been discussing project delays since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic due to a variety of issues in acquiring land and negotiating work agree- ments with the freight companies that also operate along the planned Silver Line route. He said DART is continuing to work with landowners

W. PRAIRIE CREEK DR.

W. CAMPBELL RD.

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Median work on, near Campbell Road The inside lanes of Campbell Road between Lakeside Boulevard and West Prairie Creek Drive may be closed to trac during median work. A portion of the inside lane of the northbound US 75 frontage road at the intersection may also be closed. Timeline: July-August Cost: $2 million Funding sources: city of Richardson, Texas Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration

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New toll road rates noweective

LEVELING UP The penny increase for TollTag custom- ers will repay debts related to system im- provements and new construc- tion, according to NTTA.

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

this increase is being used to repay $9.5 billion borrowed to construct the toll road system and to pay for nearly $2 billion of improvements over the next ve years. Crews will update toll rate road signs in the coming weeks, according to NTTA.

Eective July 1, North Texas Tollway Authority increased rates for TollTag customers by an average of $0.01 per mile. Those without TollTags now pay toll rates at least 50% higher than TollTag users. NTTA Chairman John Mahalik said

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2021

EDUCATION STAAR results showsharp decline inmath scores for RISD students

RICHARDSON ISD STAAR RESULTS The Texas Education Agency released spring 2021 STAAR scores in June. Here is a year-over-year comparison of the percentage of Richardson ISD students who passed the test in each subject. EOC* stands for End of Course.

Spring 2019 Spring 2021

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

Tabitha Branum said in an email. RISD saw the greatest decline in seventh-grade math with a more than 50% decline in the number of students passing from spring 2019 to spring 2021, according to TEA data. On the contrary, the district’s smallest decline was in English II, which only dropped 2% in the number of students passing from spring 2019 to spring 2021. “One major area of focus for us will be eighth-grade math, where learning loss was higher than other areas and results were closer to the Dallas County average,” Branum said. “We attribute this to the district’s strong effort to encourage junior high stu- dents to take advanced math courses to be ready for Algebra I, which is a primary indicator of high school and college success.” Matt Stephens contributed to this report.

State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness results released June 28 showed an across-the-board decline from spring 2019 to spring 2021 in the number of Richardson ISD students who passed the test, accord- ing to data from the Texas Education Agency and Data Interaction for Texas Student Assessments. The release stated districts with a higher percentage of students learning virtually in 2020-21 saw greater declines in assessment results. RISD’s in-person learning population was 68% at the end of last school year. “While we all anticipated some learning loss due to the pandemic, we were encouraged that RISD students experienced less learning loss than students in almost all other Dallas County districts in most subject areas and also fared well compared to Texas,” Deputy Superintendent

Only subjects with higher scores in 2021

100 90 80

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson, Richardson ISD and Dallas County

Richardson City Council Meets Aug. 2, 9, 16 and 23 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. The meetings are open to the public and are streamed live on the city’s website. Richardson ISD meets Aug. 9 and 23 at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD meets Aug. 3 and 17 at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER against COVID-19, Dallas County reached herd immunity on July 4, according to a July 7 statement from the Parkland Center of Clinical Innovation. The 80% herd immunity threshold includes people who are vaccinated as well as those with natural immunity from a previous COVID-19 infection. According to The Mayo Clinic, herd immunity occurs when a large portion of a community becomes immune to a disease, which makes the spread of the infection from person to person unlikely. The more infectious delta variant could cause the threshold to increase to 88% as it becomes the dominant strain. RICHARDSON The city animal shelter is at capacity as the number of stray animals and adoption surrenders has risen throughout the summer. Animal Services Manager Noura Jammal estimated that roughly 300 animals come into the shelter each month during summer. Jammal said she does not believe the rise in strays and pet surrenders is due to the pandemic but rather a normal trend experienced during this time of year. NUMBER TOKNOW There are 43 registered Little Free Library locations in the city of Richardson, according to Little Free Library, a nonprot that increases book access to readers through a "take a book, leave a book" free exchange. Friends of the Richardson Library, a nonprot in Richardson, is working to increase that number by oering free, unassembled Little Free Library kits and a starter collection of books to Richardson homeowners. For more information on how to apply for one of the kits, visit www.richardsonfol.org/little-free- libraries. 43 HIGHLIGHT DALLAS COUNTY After a more than 16-month battle

At the December meeting, council approved drive-thru lanes for prepaid order pickups only; however, Her- mansen’s special permit requested a conventional drive-thru and menu board for the proposed restaurant. Six people spoke against the application, citing concerns, such as safety and health hazards caused by exhaust fumes from idling cars. Six others spoke in support. The addition of Dave’s would have been the “rst domino to fall” in a series of planned openings in the restaurant park, Hermansen said. Financing for Dave’s is tied to devel- opment of the second restaurant pad approved in December among other projects, he said. Rejection of the zoning le and ordinance was ultimately approved by council in a 4-3 vote, with Council Member Bob Dubey, Mayor Paul Voelker and Mayor Pro Tem Janet DePuy opposed. Hermansen believes there is a path forward for Dave’s. “We still feel like this is a great asset,” he said. “You’ll be hearing from us soon.” RISD cancels plans for virtual academy BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK RICHARDSON ISD The district will not oer a virtual learning option in the 2021-22 school year, according to district sta. RISD was developing a per- manent virtual academy option for students to begin in the fall with an anticipated enrollment of 500-750 students, provided legislative approval for funding was received. However, the regular session of the Texas Legislature ended May 31 without nal approval of a bill that would have expanded online learning and provided funding for full- time virtual students. RISD’s virtual academy was to be oered for students in kin- dergarten through eighth grade, though Deputy Superintendent Tabitha Branum said the majority of students who had expressed interest were in kindergarten through sixth grade.

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RICHARDSON RESTAURANT PARK

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Dave’s Hot Chicken would have included in-house dining, a drive-thru and a patio. (Rendering courtesy Hermansen Land Development)

Council votes down drive-thru business at restaurant park

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

occupy a 2,800-square-foot building near the corner of James Drive and the Central Expressway service road. Council approved a zoning change for the development in December that allows owner and developer of the restaurant park Kirk Hermansen to build two additional restaurants on the property—one of which would have housed Dave’s.

RICHARDSON An application to allow a drive-thru restaurant in the Richardson Restaurant Park was rejected by City Council on July 12 after several hours of public comment and discussion. The zoning le would have added California-based Dave’s Hot Chicken to the development. It was slated to

Utility rates could go up inRichardson

RATES ON THE RISE 3% INCREASE A to $36 to the average this year's rate would add Richardson resident's bill.

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

RICHARDSON City Council is looking at an annual increase of about 3.5% to the city utility rates for each of the next ve years. City sta on July 19 presented council with a number of annual maintenance initiatives and capital improvements needed to ensure Richardson’s water and wastewater infrastructure can meet regulatory standards and future demands. “We feel these are critical and essential improvements,” Deputy City Manager Don Magner said at the meeting. “Much like we’re spending $100 million, hopefully, in the next ve years through a bond program on the street program, this infra- structure is equally important to being able to continue to provide the core services that the community has come to expect.” The 3.5% increase to the utility rate for each of the next ve years is an estimate, Magner said. The

increase is expected to never be more than about 4% and never less than about 3%, he said. For the city’s water system, the planned improvements include an expansion of the Northside Pump Station, the addition of a 5 mil- lion-gallon ground storage tank at that station, a new transmission line from the Northside Pump Station to Alma Road, a new waterline along Alma Road from Renner Road to the President George Bush Turnpike and a new waterline from the Eastside Pump Station to Apollo Road. Magner said benets of the improvements would include increased operational eciencies and improved water pressure for larger users. Wastewater improve- ments would also be funded by the increase. SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N MARKET AT AGLANCE

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

Across Richardson, the median price of homes has increased, most notably in the 75082 ZIP code, where costs grew by more than 13% since June 2019. A shortage of inventory means homes are selling faster and more frequently, as evidenced by citywide data, which shows the average home selling between 26 and 46 days after being listed. SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PGBT TOLL

75082

RICHARDSON

75

75080

75081

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 AVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE

June 2019-May 2020 June 2020-May 2021 NUMBER OF HOMES SOLD

50

800

$315,000

46

43

75080 SOLD

672

41

+8.81%

40

37

561

600

$342,750 $283,570

33

446

30

26

378

75081 SOLD

400

+11.08%

20

263 282

$315,000 $361,000

-23.26%

-36.59%

-19.57%

200

10

75082 SOLD

+19.79%

+17.99%

+7.22%

+13.57%

0

0

75080

75081

75082

75080

75081

75082

$410,000

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2021

GUIDE

Local businesses oer home improvement tips

2 0 2 1 R E A L E S T A T E E D I T I O N

COMPILED BY MATT STEPHENS & WILLIAM C. WADSACK

ASKAN EXPERT

MAINTAINING YOUR HOME

Crimson Landscape, which is headed up by owner and chief designer Clint Pingleton, has been in business in Richardson for six years. The company’s services include landscape design and installation for residential and commercial properties as well as irrigation, drainage and concrete repair. HOW DO YOU HELP CLIENTS DECIDE WHAT TO DO FOR THEIR YARD?

The National Association of Home Builders oers routine home maintenance tips for homeowners looking to maintain their homes’ value and ensure their safety.

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irrigation [and] put a border in. All the plants go to recycling; we don’t throw them in the trash. The only time it takes a little bit longer is if it’s, like, a lot of plants. WHAT’S THE BIGGEST ISSUE YOU SEE IN RICHARDSON? [Plants] thrive when we properly prepare the soil and make sure the irrigation is installed correctly. ... What we see [commonly] in Richardson is some of the homes are older, [and] the drainage is incorrect, or the dirt is too high on the house. We see that a lot because a lot of the homes here have some age to them. Those are things we look to correct as part of a new landscape, and that’s a big part of what we do.

Find other useful home ownership tips at www.nahb.org.

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With outdoor living, it’s all about how they’re going to use [the area]. Do they want a repit area? Do they want a dining area? The second thing we take in consideration is where the sun hits on the back of the property. If you tie that into plants or landscaping, it’s all about what direction your house faces [and] how much sun you get. That makes all the dierence in the world, and that’s how we determine landscape. HOW LONG DOES A TYPICAL LANDSCAPING PROJECT TAKE? In one day, we can take out all the old shrubs and put in all new [ones], check

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EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

1 Roofs should be inspected by a qualied roofer every three years, and skylights should be inspected so leaks do not develop. 2 Ensure downspouts and gutters do not get clogged with leaves and other debris. 3 Inspect siding each year to see if it needs repainting, and trim shrubs away so they do not touch the siding. 4 Check for split or cracked caulking on windows and doors annually, and replace the caulk as necessary. 5 Moving parts of garage doors need to be oiled once every three months.

6 Air lters require regular replacement, generally once every three months. 7 Safety and security : Regularly check security alarms and circuit breakers. Check batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors twice a year. 8 Clean each faucet’s aerator every three to four months. Maintain garbage disposals by running cold water through them. 9 Masonry walls can develop a white powder that can be scrubbed o with water and a sti brush. 10 Hardwood oors without polyurethane need to be waxed with a liquid or paste “spirit” wax. Use emulsion wax on vinyl.

Clint Pingleton Owner, chief designer Crimson Landscape 1218 Executive Drive West, Richardson 214-989-3314 www.crimsonlandscape.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

SECURITY ROW

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SOURCE: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

TL Remodeling Long-time Richardson business leads clients through custom home renovation projects W hen Peter Garcia rst opened his business nearly 20 years ago, it oered BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

A to Z, so that way the client can just do what they have to do in their daily life and not have to worry about whether something is going right or not,” Pedro said. “It is a lot less stressful for them.” During the early months of the pandemic, the company’s Richard- son-based showroom was remodeled to include

only tile sales and installation. But as the company’s reputation and client base grew, so did its services. “Little by little, we began to evolve into what we are today: a full remod- eling company,” Peter said. “[Clients] would

Father-son duo Peter (left) and Pedro Garcia run TL Remodeling, which has a showroom in Richardson. (Olivia Lueckemeyer/Community Impact Newspaper)

samples of reno- vation materials in addition to tile. As people began to spend more time at home, Peter said TL Remodeling saw an uptick in business. “COVID actually helped us,” Peter said. “As time pro- gressed, people

“WE HANDLE EVERYTHING FROM A TO Z, SO THATWAY THE CLIENT CAN JUST DOWHAT THEY HAVE TO DO IN THEIR DAILY LIFE AND NOT HAVE TOWORRY ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING IS GOING RIGHT OR NOT.” PEDRO GARCIA, TL REMODELING

COMPANY FAST FACTS Established in 2003 45

2030

say, ‘It’s so hard to nd good people who can come to your house and do good work.’ So it was an eye- opener for us.” Peter had just retired from the Air Force when he took over his sister and brother-in-law’s

A team of about

specialized workers

dierent projects happening at all times

SERVICES

• Full home remodels • Kitchen remodels • Bathroom additions • Room additions • Floor and wall installation • Custom countertops and cabinets

Houston-based business and moved it to Richardson in 2003. For 17 years, his company was called Tile Land, but in early 2020, the company rebranded and became TL Remodeling. Peter, his son and Chief Operating Ocer Pedro Garcia, and a team of about 45 specialized workers oer a full range of custom projects, from kitchen and bathroom renovations to room additions and entire home remodels. Through one-on-one service, TL Remodeling helps bring a client’s vision to life, Pedro said. “We handle everything from

were actually cooped up. So instead of doing nothing with their money … they started using that money for remodeling and renovations.” What sets TL Remodeling apart from other custom home renovation companies is that its sta provides a high level of hands-on service that puts clients at ease, Pedro said. “We are there making sure that every step along the way, there’s professionalism, service, quality of work and communication, and that [clients] always feel comfortable,” Pedro said.

The company rebranded last year to showcase its breadth of renovation projects, including full home remodels. (Courtesy TL Remodeling)

TL Remodeling 318 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 106A, Richardson 214-361-5820 www.tlremodeling.us Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sun.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2021

CONTINUED FROM 1

Chris Kelly, president and CEO of Ebby Halliday. June data lists the median sales price in Richardson as $380,000, an increase of 16.7% year over year. “The $1 million price point has been on re—anything above that has been selling at an accelerated pace—but when it comes to some- one looking to buy in the [two- and three-hundred-thousand dollar price range], that is a very dicult prop- erty to nd right now,” Kelly said. Despite these challenges, real estate experts hold out hope that inventory levels will go up as seller condence is restored and issues around the building supply chain are resolved. “We do expect the market to slow down,” said Jim Gaines, an econ- omist with the Texas Real Estate Research Center. “The dominoes have to fall in the right order and at the right time—and that’s being dis- rupted a little bit.” Eect on rst-time homebuyers High levels of demand mean most homes are selling for above asking price. But the bank will only approve a loan for what a home is worth, said Lisa-Marie Thompson, a loan ocer with Primary Residential Mortgage Inc., which has oces across the metroplex. Many rst-time homebuyers don’t have the cash on hand to make up the dierence, Thompson said. “This isn’t a market that is feasi- ble for them,” she said. “It’s almost impossible.” As a result, millennials and other rst-time homebuyers are leaving inner-ring suburbs like Plano and Richardson and moving to less pop- ulated nearby counties—such as

Grayson, Kaufman, Hill, Parker and Ellis—that have a greater supply of homes at lower price points, Kelly said. “We are seeing sales growth in those counties, sometimes 30% to 40% year-over-year,” he said. “Part of the reason is that when you get out to those areas, the aordability starts to come down again.” Skyrocketing prices are not the only thing preventing rst-time homebuyers from entering the mar- ket. Baby boomers and other older residents are aging in place, which is curtailing resale inventory, Kelly said. “What we have found is that peo- ple are living longer, they’re health- ier, and they’re staying in their homes longer,” Kelly said. “So there wasn’t this natural migration out of homes … that would have created a supply as millennials grew into the homebuying age.”’ The prevalence of investors buying single-family homes as rental proper- ties is also responsible for low levels of supply, Jolly said, noting he esti- mates 30% of buyers in the metrop- lex are investors. “A lot of them have a very, very high level of cash,” he said. “So, they’re putting either 50% down or in some cases 100% cash down.” Jolly said his association is work- ing with the National Association of Realtors and state legislators to enact policies that would alleviate aord- ability and supply issues. One strat- egy would be to ease loan restrictions around paying above-asking prices. “Buyers that are using FHA loans or VA loans cannot pay above appraisal price—it is actually illegal for them to attempt to do that,” Jolly said. “The federal documentation does not

The median price of homes in Richardson has increased by more than 99% since January 2015.

0 $500K $400K $300K $200K $100K

$380,000

$190,500

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The 30-year mortgage rate in Texas has tumbled to historic lows in recent years. Buyers eager to settle into an already-hot housing market see this as an added incentive.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Housing market accelerates as 30-year rate drops under 3%

SOURCE: RESIDENTIAL STRATEGIES INC. COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

waiver,” Kassen said of the strat- egy, which waives the buyer’s right to terminate the contract due to an appraisal. “Before January, I’d proba- bly only use an appraisal waiver once or twice a year.” Waiving an appraisal can be risky because it locks the buyer into the purchase price of the home, even if it is worth much less, Thompson said. It may also disqualify the buyer from their loan, she added.

support the current market we are in.” Winning the bid Buyers able to aord Richardson listings have to get creative to win the bidding war. One approach is to oer a full or partial appraisal waiver, said Susan Kassen, a Richardson-based Realtor with Ebby Halliday. “On almost every single oer that I write, I have some sort of appraisal

Kitchens Bathrooms Room Additions Roofing Windows Siding

972.669.7807 bryjo.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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