Coppell - Valley Ranch - Las Colinas Edition - March 2020

COPPELL VALLEY RANCH LAS COLINAS EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 6  MARCH 10APRIL 13, 2020

ONLINE AT

FUNDING the

Irving residents will cast ballots May 2 on 12 bond measures. Voters will choose for or against for each category, which is tied to a specic dollar amount. The largest sums of money are being sought for streets, public safety and parks and recreation.

IMPACTS

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Joint public safety facilities

Street improvements

Irving Arts Center

City facilities

Library facilities

Government facilities

12 BOND MEASURES

$563.4 MILLION

LOCAL COMIC STORE

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IT infrastructure

Human services facilities

Park and recreation facilities

Police facilities

Fireghting facilities

Animal Care campus

TOMMY TAMALE

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INSIDE

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NewCoppell boards to advise council on city’s future housing, technology needs

Coppell created two new boards in December aimed at shaping future planning for the city. B OA R D S TO A DV I S E COU N C I L

BY GAVIN PUGH

how best to prepare for technolog- ical advancements and on evaluat- ing the city’s future housing needs, respectively. Coppell Community Programs Man- ager Molly Bujanda said city ocials wanted to ensure residents would continue to help shape Coppell. “Those boards were created for two reasons,” she said. “[No.] 1 [was] to keep the community engaged in the implementation of [Vision 2040]. … No. 2 was to further vet some of the big ideas that came up in the plan to CONTINUED ON 18

Coppell is tapping residents to help shape the future of the city’s technol- ogy and housing. Once a decade, the city of Coppell solicits resident feedback to help plan for the future of the largely suburban community. Sta published the latest iteration of its 20-year strategic plan, Vision 2040, in April 2019. In November, the city created two new boards: Smart City and Future Oriented Approach to Residential Development. These boards are tasked with advising City Council on

COFFEE GUIDE

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2020-40 Plan to be executed from

AIMING FORA MAYOPENING

2

new city boards

2,000 Based on community feedback from residents

20-year Implementing Coppell's strategic plan

SOURCE: CITY OF COPPELLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COPPELL ARTS CENTER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERDFWMETRO Christal Howard GENERAL MANAGER Ana Erwin, aerwin@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth EDITOR Gavin Pugh COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury STAFFWRITERS Anna Herod, Miranda Jaimes, Anna Lotz, Liesbeth Powers CONTRIBUTINGWRITER Lindsey Juarez Monsivais EDITORIAL INTERN Bryce Brakebill ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Stephanie Burnett DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway ASSOCIATE ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tobi Carter STAFF DESIGNER Chase Autin, Michelle Degard, Chelsea Peters BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US

FROMANA: Do you nd yourself asking, “What is coming to that vacant storefront?” or “Why is there dirt turning down the road?” Those are exactly the kinds of questions we answer each month (see Pages 4-5) with businesses now open and coming soon. If you have a tip or a place you want us to look into, please email lvcnews@communityimpact.com. Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

FROMGAVIN: With local elections around the corner on May 2, don’t forget about the city of Irving’s $563.4 million bond election. Listed among a slew of candidates running for public seats in Coppell and Irving are 12 bond propositions, which would pay for street improvements, public safety facilities and much more (see Pages 16-17). Gavin Pugh, EDITOR

TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Road projects near you CITY& COUNTY 8 Latest local news BUSINESS FEATURE 12 Sanctuary Books and Games

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 20

Businesses coming soon 5

Community events 16

New account executive 1

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Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

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COPPELL  VALLEY RANCH  LAS COLINAS EDITION • MARCH 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon or closing

COMPILED BY GAVIN PUGH AND ANNA HEROD

NOWOPEN 1 Trusted Pediatric Urgent Care opened Feb. 24 at 8200 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 110, Irving. The medical facility offers extended hours, including evenings and weekends. The urgent care offers treatment for a wide range of acute and mild pediatric illnesses and offers on-site radiology and lab services. 682-477-3901. www.trustedmedicalcenters.com 2 Kebab Uncle opened in October at 612 E. Sandy Lake Road, Coppell. The restaurant serves dishes inspired by Turkish and Persian cuisine. The menu includes rice platters, burgers, wraps, salads and more. Kebab Uncle serves zabiha halal dishes. 469-453-0700. 3 Row House is expected to open by the end of April at 4000 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 100, Irving. The boutique fitness business will offer rowing classes designed to build aerobic endurance and muscular strength. 469-501-2624. www.therowhouse.com 4 A new Amazon facility is expected to open at 2601 S. Airfield Drive, Irving. According to details filed with the state, the $35 million facility will be completed by the end of August. “Amazon recently signed a lease to build a fulfillment center in Irving, Texas, creating 1,000 new, full- time jobs, with industry-leading pay of $15 an hour and comprehensive benefits start- ing on day one,” an Amazon spokesperson said in a statement. “Employees will pick, pack and ship customer orders. The fulfill- ment center is anticipated to open later this year.” A phone number and website are not yet available for this location. 5 Though the restaurant was originally slated to open by the end of January, The Biscuit Bar now expects to open a new location by the end of the year or early next year at 104 S. Denton Tap Road, Coppell. The eatery will serve biscuits with various toppings, such as fried chick- en, bacon, cheese and honey butter. Pa- trons will also be able to purchase tater tots, cocktails and more. A phone number is not yet available for this location. www.thebiscuit.bar www.kebabuncle.com COMING SOON

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Trusted Pediatric Urgent Care

W. BETHEL RD.

COURTESY TRUSTED PEDIATRIC URGENT CARE

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The Biscuit Bar

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COURTESY THE BISCUIT BAR

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LAS COLINAS BLVD.

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DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

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LAKE CAROLYN

PGBT TOLL

Fish City Grill

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COURTESY FISH CITY GRILL

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6 Invesco Real Estate and Perot Devel- opment Co. are working on a new industrial park, dubbed DFW Park 161, in Irving. The first phase of construction will include three logistics buildings totaling more than 1 million square feet. When the project is complete, it will include 2.4 million square feet of space on 196 acres, according to a news release. The first phase of construc- tion is expected to be completed in early 2021. www.perotdevelopment.com

S. AIRFIELD DRIVE

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DOGGY DAY CARE & BOARDING • TRAINING • GROOMING

CAMP BOW WOW ® COPPELL campbowwow.com/coppell 972-393-2267

CAMP BOW WOW ® GRAPEVINE AIRPORT campbowwow.com/grapevine-airport 817-329-7667

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Quality Dental Care for the Whole Family r

ALICIA DWYER DENTISTRY Take advantage of your renewed dental benefits today!

Pacific Table is open for lunch, dinner and brunch. (Courtesy Pacific Table)

• Personalized compassionate care • General & Cosmetic Dentistry • Orthodontics • Implants, performed in our office

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Pacic Table opened in mid-February at 5238 N. O’Connor Blvd., Ste. 136, Irving. The casual Pacic Northwest- inspired restaurant serves hand-crafted cocktails, wines, salmon, sushi and oysters. It is located in Las Colinas near Williams Square at Gables Water Street. “We’re excited to bring our brand to the Dallas area,” said Leah Thomas, executive administrator for Pacic Table. “We oer a variety of menu items ranging from classic sushi and oysters to a slow-braised short rib and even a veggie burger for our REBRAND 7 Fish City Grill is undergoing a re- branding effort as part of its 25-year an- niversary, including at one of its locations in Las Colinas. The rebrand comes as part of the opening of Fish City Grill’s new San Antonio location this spring. “We believe the look and feel will be welcoming to a broader crowd while not alienating any of our current customers,” Fish City Grill co-founder Bill Bayne said. The restau- rant chain has grown to 20 locations since its inception. The rebrand includes an update to Fish City Grill’s logo design with a blue color palette. The Las Colinas restaurant is located at 7750 N. MacAr- thur Blvd., Ste. 160, Irving. 214-484-9437. www.fishcitygrill.com ANNIVERSARIES 8 SpeedPro of Irving celebrated its 15th year of business Feb. 22. The graph- ics company specializes in large-format imagery, such as murals, displays, vehicle wraps and more. The company has also ramped up its green initiative by only providing Greenguard Gold-certified products. These products adhere to strict certification criteria, such as emissions controls for educational and healthcare environments. 972-550-5200. www.speedpro.com 9 American Tea and Coffee celebrat- ed its fifth anniversary Feb. 15. Located at 230 N. Denton Tap Road, Ste. 104, Coppell, the shop offers a variety of iced and hot coffees, teas, bobas, pastries and breakfast food. 972-745-1246. www.americanteaandcoffee.com

vegetarian guests. We make everything in- house, including our desserts.” The restaurant serves lunch, dinner and brunch and oers happy hour Mon.-Fri. from 4-6 p.m. 972-957-7620. www.pacictable.com

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9400 NMacArthur Blvd., Irving www.dwyer-dentistry.com 972-556-2414 Same location for 31 years!

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NEWOWNERSHIP 10 Restaurateur Frank Brightwell announced Feb. 27 on Facebook that he has sold the Local Diner , located at 8305 N. Belt Line Road, Irving. The eatery is now owned and operated by Irving Diner. Under new ownership, the retro-style restaurant will serve classic American breakfast and lunch food. 972-929-2200. 11 The Chick-Fil-A at 7850 N. MacAr- thur Blvd., Irving, has been undergoing a five-month renovation project. As of this paper’s print deadline, Chick-Fil-A expected to reopen March 9. The opening comes as franchise owner Scott Mayes celebrates 22 years with the restaurant company. The fast-food chain offers chicken sandwiches, chicken nuggets, salads and other menu options. www.chick-fil-a.com CLOSINGS 12 The Pier 1 Imports storefront in Irving is one of about 450 locations scheduled to close, according to a Feb. 17 news release. Pier 1 also filed for volun- tary Chapter 11 bankruptcy. “Today’s ac- tions are intended to provide Pier 1 with additional time and financial flexibility as we now work to unlock additional value for our stakeholders through a sale of the company,” Pier 1 CEO and CFO Robert Riesbeck said in the release. The Irving storefront is located at 7805 N. MacAr- thur Blvd., Ste. 110, Irving. 214-574-5545. www.pier1.com www.irvingdiner.com RENOVATIONS

M A K E A L L O F Y O U R D A Y S M A T T E R

The specialists and clinical care teamat Medical City Las Colinas provide personalized, compassionate care for your heart, close to home. Workingwith the latest technology and treatments, we keep the hearts of Texas beating strong. To learnmore or to schedule an appointment, call (972) 969-2010 or visit MedicalCityLasColinas.com

®

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COPPELL - VALLEY RANCH - LAS COLINAS EDITION • MARCH 2020

TODO LIST

March-April events

COMPILED BY GAVIN PUGH AND ANNA HEROD

APRIL 0205

DFWFIBER FEST 2020 IRVING CONVENTION CENTER AT LAS COLINAS

MARCH 20

SUNSET SOCIALS OLD TOWN COPPELL

Toyota Music Factory hosts live music events. (Courtesy Toyota Music Factory) LIVEMUSIC TOYOTAMUSIC FACTORY 316 W. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving 972-810-1499 www.toyotamusicfactory.com

This ber festival, which began in 2005, is based on the goal of supporting knitting, crocheting and spinning crafts. It will include a vendor hall. See website for price. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. (Fri.-Sat.), 10 a.m.-4 p.m. (Sun.). Irving Convention Center at Las Colinas, 500 W. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving. 214-799-1347. www.dfwberfest.org (Courtesy DFW Fiber Fest)

The outdoor event will include dinner and snacks available for purchase from food trucks. Entertainment will include a screening of Disney’s live-action “Aladdin.” 7-10 p.m. Free. Old Town Coppell, 768 W. Main St., Coppell. 972-462-0022. www.coppelltx.gov (Gavin Pugh/Community Impact Newspaper)

MARCH 10 YOGA STORYTIME The Irving Public Library will host a structured storytime designed to teach preschoolers how to follow instructions while moving and listening to a story with their caregivers. Free. 10:30-11:15 a.m. South Irving Library Program Room, 601 Schulze Dr., Irving. 972-721-2606. www.cityorving.org 10 TWILIGHT GUIDEDHIKE Residents can explore Coppell Nature Park under the guidance of an experienced master naturalist during a twilight guided hike. Hikers should wear close-toed shoes and bring a water bottle. Children must be accompanied by an adult. No registration is required. Free. 5-7 p.m. Biodiversity Education Center, 367 Freeport Pkwy, Coppell. 972-304-3581. www.coppelltx.gov/ news-media/events/twilightguidedhike 12 CPRAED CLASS The three-hour class will teach attendees critical skills that can be used in emergency situations before medical professionals arrive. Attendees will learn rst aid, choking relief, and what to do if an adult, child or infant experiences sudden cardiac arrest. Those planning to attend the class must register online. Children under 15 do not have to register,

but must be supervised by an adult. 6-9 p.m. Free. Coppell Life Safety Park, 820 S. Coppell Road, Coppell. 972-462-5373. www.coppelltx.gov 12 HOME SWEET HOMEWILD DAY Attendees can explore Coppell’s nature park to learn about the dierent places that local wildlife call home. The come-and-go event will include hands-on experiences and discussion. This event is primarily for families and children ages 3-14. 1-3 p.m. Free. Biodiversity Education Center, 367 Freeport Parkway, Coppell. 972-462-0022. www.coppelltx.gov 14 TORNADO TOWN This event will teach children about severe weather awareness and emergency preparedness. It will include a scavenger hunt, and participants will build emergency kits and learn about various weather topics. 1-3 p.m. Free with advance registration (children in grades 4th-6th). Life Safety Park, 820 S. Coppell Road, Coppell. 972-462-5373. www.coppelltx.gov 17 IRVINGWRITERS SALON On the third Tuesday of each month, the West Irving Library holds a salon for writers of all skill levels. The event allows local writers to meet, share work and improve their writing techniques. Readers are also invited to

listen and provide feedback. 7-8 p.m. Free. West Irving Library Meeting Room, 4444 W. Rochelle Road, Irving. 972-721-2691. www.cityorving.org 21 BENEFITS OF BEES Bee hobbyist Bruce Crozier will teach the audience about the importance of bees and their role in the world. 10 a.m.-noon. Free (with advance registration). Biodiversity Education Center, 367 Freeport Parkway, Coppell. 972-462-0022. www.coppelltx.gov 20 THROUGHAPRIL 04 INHERIT THEWIND, PRESENTED BYMAINSTAGE This drama features the players in the 1920 Scopes “Monkey” trial. The production is directed by Harry Friedman. 7:30 p.m. (evening performances), LAS COLINAS FARMERSMARKET 7701 N. MacArthur Blvd., Irving www.fourseasonsmarkets.com Hours: Sat. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FARMERSMARKETS COPPELL FARMERSMARKET 768 W. Main St., Coppell www.coppellfarmersmarket.org Hours: Sat. 8 a.m.-noon

MARCH 21 Femme It Forward 28 Irving Marathon 2020

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2:30 p.m. (Sun. matinee). $21-$28. Irving Arts Center, 3333 N. MacArthur Blvd., Irving. 972-252-2787. www.irvingartscenter.com 28 CRAWFISH FESTIVAL This inaugural event will include a Cajun-style crawsh boil with live music entertainment and children’s activities. The crawsh are sourced from the Bayou and served by the Flying Fish restaurant at The Sound. 2-6 p.m. $7 (children), $15 (adults). The Sound Stage and Amphitheater, 3081 Olympus Blvd., Dallas. 972-483-0400. www.thesoundtx.com APRIL 03 GLOMAZING ADULT EGG HUNT This 21-and-up event includes hundreds of prize-lled eggs. Snacks will be provided, but the event is BYOB. Free. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Saddlehorn Park, 9199 Saddlehorn Drive, Irving. 972-869-1430. www.valleyranch.org

WORTH THE TRIP St. Paddy’s Texas Style

St. Paddy’s Texas Style is an all-day event in Old Town Lewisville to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. The event will include live entertainment, carnival activities for children, a zip line, bounce houses, face painting and more. Attendees will have the chance to watch live musical performances and an Irish dance performance at Wayne Ferguson Plaza. Pets on leashes are allowed at the event, and attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets to use throughout the day. Free. Noon-7:30 p.m. Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St., Lewisville. 972-219-3400. www.cityoewisville.com/home/ components/calendar/event/36974/485 (Courtesy city of Lewisville)

MARCH 14

ST. PADDY’S TEXAS STYLE OLD TOWN LEWISVILLE

Find more or submit Coppell, Valley Ranch or Las Colinas events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COPPELL

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PARKWAY BLVD.

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W. BETHEL RD.

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HOSTED BY THE WOMEN’S DIVISION OF THE GRAPEVINE CHAMBER

PRESENTING SPONSOR

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Hilton DFW Lakes Executive Conference Center 1800 Highway 26, Grapevine, TX 76051 Thursday, April 9, 2020 from 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm Admission includes Sampling of all foods One complimentary beverage Souvenir wine glass & much more! Live Music • Cash Bar • Raffle Tickets Available Proceeds benefit the Women’s Division of the Grapevine Chamber of Commerce School Supplies program and the Christmas Spirit program for local seniors! Admission $30 | Adults Early Bird $40 | Adults at door $10 | Children (12 & under)

DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

35E

CALIFORNIA CROSSING RD.

IRVING

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MAPNOTTOSCALE N

183

For tickets call, (817) 481-1522 or visit www.grapevinechamber.org

3 SH 121/I-635 interchange widening NorthGate Constructors reported in mid-February that this project is now 54% complete. Since the start of the new year, crews have opened the new northbound SH 121 auxiliary lanes, which will serve as a new direct connector to FM 2499. In ad- dition, crews have demolished the former northbound FM 2499 bridge to move the project further toward completion, North- Gate spokesperson Maria Woodrow said. In the coming weeks, Woodrow said, the community can expect weekend work to take place as the weather becomes ideal for construction. Every weekend, utility, structures, paving and roadway teams will continue to perform work throughout various areas of the project. Timeline: August 2018-2022 Cost: $370 million Funding source: TxDOT 4 California Crossing Road closes Construction on a new water lift station near Las Colinas’ Urban Center has result- ed in the closure of California Crossing Road from Riverside Drive to Luna Road. The area’s water infrastructure was dam- aged in 2015 by the flooding of the Elm fork of the Trinity River. Drivers can use detours along West Northwest Highway, Tom Braniff Drive or Wildwood Drive, according to the city. Timeline: construction to run through summer 2020 Cost: $11.3 million Funding source: city of Irving

RECENT PROJECTS 1 SH 114 closures/Signature Bridge construction The Texas Department of Transportation is constructing a bridge near the intersec- tion of SH 114, Loop 12 and SH 183. This Signature Bridge construction resulted in various closures of the eastbound and westbound managed lanes of SH 114 from Tom Braniff Drive to Spur 482. That work was conducted from Feb. 20-23. The bridge work is part of a four-year project that is meant to preemptively improve road infrastructure ahead of new business and residential development planned for the area. Timeline: 2020-24 Cost: $420 million Funding sources: TxDOT, Texas Clear Lanes initiative 2 Crews still working to open lanes on Parkway Boulevard Construction continues on Parkway Boule- vard, where crews are working to open all lanes of traffic in March. The work began in March 2019 and consisted of pavement and utility replacement as well as the construction of side paths and sidewalks. Crews will continue to install landscaping features, panels and stamped concrete at intersections until the project’s expected completion in the spring. Timeline: March 2019-spring 2020 Cost: $7.4 million Funding sources: city of Coppell bond funds, sales tax revenue COMPILED BY MIRANDA JAIMES AND GAVIN PUGH

Recycle your clean, empty, and dry bottles and cans!

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 2. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LVCNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COPPELL - VALLEY RANCH - LAS COLINAS EDITION • MARCH 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Coppell, Las Colinas and Valley Ranch

$285MVerizonRealty project adds high-rise buildings in Las Colinas

PULSE POINT Coppell residents who are trained in CPR and AED use will have the potential to help save lives by using the PulsePoint mobile app. Users are notied when an emergency cardiac arrest occurs near their location. HOWPULSEPOINT WORKS:

BY GAVIN PUGH

VALLEY RANCH PKWY.

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IRVING Las Colinas’ skyline will receive two new high-rise buildings over the next three years. Verizon Realty Corp. is building two large oce buildings in Las Colinas as part of a $285 million construction project, according to the company’s ling with the state. The project’s scope includes the construction of 2.3 million square feet of space on 13 acres near the intersec- tion of Hidden Ridge and MacArthur Boulevard in Irving. The work will also add 3,600 parking spaces, according to the ling. Construction is expected to begin June 1 and be complete in May 2023. On Jan. 30, Irving City Council amended a $24.3 million incentive deal with Verizon, which also managed the Hidden Ridge mixed- use project. The amended agreement stipulates that the developer pay for building costs of a new Dallas Area Rapid Transit light rail station. That station, located along the Orange Line near Pioneer Natural Resource’s campus, is expected to be complete in December.

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911 receives a call about someone in cardiac arrest.

The project will be located near the intersection of Valley Ranch Parkway and MacArthur Boulevard. (Courtesy Criterion Development Partners)

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A dispatcher ags the call as cardiac arrest.

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Council approves plans for 236-unit Valley Ranchmultifamily development

PulsePoint sends an alert to CPR-certied bystanders within a 400-yard radius. Bystander performs CPR while ambulance is en route.

BY GAVIN PUGH

from about 600 square feet to 1,300 square feet. The project will also include 295 parking spaces, according to city documents. The city received 26 letters from the community in sup- port of the project and none in opposition, according to city documents. The apartments will be located northwest of the intersection of MacArthur Boulevard and Valley Ranch Parkway. Criterion Development Partners is spearheading the project, which is called The MacArthur at Valley Ranch. The project was approved by council in a 6-3 vote, with Council Members Allan Meagher and Kyle Taylor and Mayor Rick Stopfer opposed.

IRVING City Council cleared plans for a two-building, 236-unit multifamily project in Valley Ranch at its Feb. 13 meeting. The 5.3-acre project will be developed in one phase on property that has been vacant for at least 20 years, according to city documents. “Sta believes that a proposed multifamily development is a good inll use between the commercial property to the east and the lower density multifamily development to the west,” a sta memo on the project stated. The apartment units are broken down into 200 one-bedroom and eciency units and 36 two-bed- room units, according to the developer. The units will range in size

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Emergency response is dispatched to the scene.

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Ambulance arrives to scene.

400-yard radius

1,000 people experience cardiac arrest in the U.S. daily TWICE the chance of neurological recovery if bystander CPR is performed. A person in cardiac arrest has approximately

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3 PULSEPOINT FEATURES

CFBISDplanning $95.6M in campus renovations, additions

INSTRUCTIONS: If needed, the app can provide step-by-step CPR and AED instructions. LANGUAGE: PulsePoint oers multi- language support for users. GPS SERVICES: When there is a nearby incident requiring CPR, users who acknowledge the alert are given directions to the person in need, the precise location of every AED in the area and current trac conditions.

BY GAVIN PUGH

The Perry Middle School project will include renova- tions of classroom areas, roofs, mechanical equipment and building inishes, according to CFBISD documents. The Smith High School project will include renovations on career- and technical-based classrooms, roofs, mechanical equipment and building inishes. The district expects to start the construction projects in May 2021 and to have them completed by August 2022, according to district staff. The approved bond funds will also support work on nine other CFBISD facilities.

CFBISD Trustees approved tapping $95.6 million in bond funds for major renovation projects throughout the district at a Feb. 6 meeting. These funds come from the district’s $350 million bond package, which was approved by voters in November 2018. The two largest projects—one worth $33.4 million at DeWitt Perry Middle School and another worth $25.4 million at Newman Smith High School—will be com- pleted by VLK Architects and LPA Inc., respectively.

SOURCE: PULSEPOINT, CITY OF COPPELL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NUMBER TOKNOW

County u deaths rise to 17 in February

Eight Coppell ISD schools to receive newgymooring COPPELL ISD The school district is planning to spend up to $240,000 in gym oor renova- tions at eight campuses. The board of trustees approved these projects at a Feb. 24 meeting. Projects at seven of the ele- mentary schools will be funded through the district’s 2013 bond. Those elementary schools are Austin, Cottonwood Creek, Denton Creek, Lakeside, Town Center, Valley Ranch and Wilson. New Tech High at Coppell will also receive a gym oor renovation, which will be funded through the district’s 2016 bond. The work is expected to begin this school year and to be done before the start of the 2020-21 school year, according to the district. BY GAVIN PUGH A 2015 ooding event threatened to compromise the station entirely, which would havemade Coppell’s wastewater system inoperable until the oods subsided, according to the city. City sta expects the new lift station will take about 12 months to design and another 12 months to construct. Its lifespan will be between 30-40 years.

2020

A U.S. Census Bureau representative

presented to Coppell City Council some key dates coming up ahead of the nationwide census population count. Census Day is April 1, but households will begin receiving notication by mail as early as mid- March. To learn more, visit www.dallascounty.org/government/ comcrt/jenkins/census CITY HIGHLIGHTS COPPELL Town Center is getting an overhaul of its heating, ventilation and air conditioning system. City Council approved on Feb. 25 a $748,660 contract to replace the town center’s 35-year- old A/C system. The air handlers and chillers are at the end of their useful lives, according to the city. COPPELL Recent complaints from Kid Country Playground park-goers have prompted city ocials to review the city pet access ordinance. The city has placed signs throughout the park reminding pet owners to use leashes and to clean up after their pets, according to a Feb. 25 memo. IRVING ISD Prekindergarten programs are getting more than $8 million in resources and materials ahead of the 2020-21 school year. The school district will begin oering full-day pre-K starting in the fall for all eligible 3- and 4-year-old students. The district expects to enroll about 1,700 students. Coppell City Council Meets on second and fourth Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. 225 E. Parkway Blvd., Coppell. 972-462-0022. www.coppelltx.gov Dallas City Council Meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays at 9 a.m. 1500 Marilla MEETINGSWE COVER Meets on designated Thursdays at 7 p.m. 825 W. Irving Blvd., Irving. 972-721-2600. www.cityorving.org Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD Meets on rst Thursdays at 7 p.m. 1445 N. Perry Road, Carrollton. 972-968-6100. www.cisd.edu Coppell ISD Meets on fourth Mondays at 7 p.m. 200 S. Denton Tap Road, Coppell. 214-496-6000. www.coppellisd.com Irving ISD Meets on designated Mondays at 7 p.m. 2621 Airport Freeway, Irving. 972-600-5000. www.irvingisd.net St., Dallas. 214-670-3111. www.dallascityhall.com Irving City Council

BY GAVIN PUGH

risk of severe u illness. Practicing everyday preventive actions can also help slow the spread of inuenza and other respiratory illnesses. These steps include frequent hand washing, covering your coughs [and] sneezes with a tissue or into your elbow and staying home if you have u-like symptoms. Finally, if you do get sick with the u, take antiviral medica- tions if your doctor prescribes them.” The Center for Disease Control recommends yearly u vaccines for individuals age 6 months and older.

DALLAS COUNTY There have been 17 u-related deaths tracked this season as of Feb. 26. The Dallas County Health and Human Services department announced Feb. 14 the death of a 54-year-old patient who already had underlying medical conditions. That brings the tally up to 16 adult deaths and 1 pediatric death, according to the agency. Two additional pediatric deaths are also being investigated for u-related causes of death. “This latest death is another reminder that u is serious and remains at high levels in our commu- nity. It is still not too late to get the u vaccine, if you have not already done so, and practice prevention measures,” Dr. Philip Huang, DCHHS director and health authority, said in a news release. “Getting the u vaccine is especially important for persons with chronic health con- ditions, such as asthma, diabetes or heart disease, to decrease their

Dallas County u deaths in 2019-20 season

10 12

8

6

4

2 0

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Coppell City Council OKs $5Mupgrade for wastewater system

This station has serviced Cop- pell’s wastewater system since the 1970s and has “reached [the end of] its useful life,” according to the city. The project’s scope will include adding new monitoring instru- ments, replacing odor control units, adding new ow meters and raising the lift station out of potential oodwater zones.

BY GAVIN PUGH

COPPELL A $5 million project to revamp Coppell’s wastewater system will ensure the city is protected from future ooding events in years to come. Coppell City Council approved a $645,538 design contract with Plummer Associates on Feb. 26 to design the updated lift station on Sandy Lake Road.

Texas Central gives rst glimpse of interior for high-speed train car

BY ANNA LOTZ

or two-by-one seat congurations and more legroom. In addition, train cars will feature high-speed Wi-Fi and comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, according to the company. Some of the eight train cars may also be “quiet cars” with dierent lighting and restrictions on cell phone usage. The cars will also feature larger seats, wider aisles and more legroom compared with a regional jet, accord- ing to Texas Central estimates.

DALLAS COUNTY Texas Central ocials announced interior plans Feb. 17 for the company’s proposed high-speed train connecting Houston and Dallas. Based on the Central Japan Railway’s Tokaido Shinkansen high-speed rail, Texas Central’s rail cars will be customized for Texas, according to Texas Central infor- mation. This includes no middle seat—train cars will have two-by-two

Texas Central has revealed the interior of its proposed high-speed train. (Courtesy Texas Central)

9

COPPELL  VALLEY RANCH  LAS COLINAS EDITION • MARCH 2020

GOVERNMENT

Questions remain on proposed shift with sales tax for online purchases

REVENUE REDISTRIBUTING Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar has proposed a new rule that would change how sales tax revenue collected from online purchases is distributed. SOURCE: TEXAS STATE COMPTROLLER’S DESIGNED BY CHELSEA PETERS COMPILED BY ANNA HEROD

BY ANNA HEROD

Hegar said the proposed rule is meant to distribute sales tax revenue from online purchases more equita- bly across the state. “We believe that the amendments will provide clarity to the businesses and the local jurisdictions and also will help to prevent any arbitrary shifting of local revenues from one jurisdiction to another,” Hegar said at a Feb. 6 hearing. However, many cities, including Coppell and Irving, are preparing for what the proposed rule could mean for their budgets going forward. Housed within the city of Coppell are multiple major online retail distribution centers, including Sta- ples, The Container Store and three Amazon facilities. Irving has similar facilities that could be affected. “This whole game is changing,” Coppell City Manager Mike Land said. “We have to build a new model

Coppell could lose as much as $12 million in annual sales tax revenue if a proposed rule change involving online purchases is adopted. Currently, if a Texas resident makes an online purchase, the sales tax dollars from that purchase do not necessarily go to the city in which that resident lives. Instead, that revenue goes to the city where the business is located. Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar is proposing to redirect sales tax revenue collected on internet pur- chases to the city where a customer is located. This would mean, for example, that if a Coppell resident bought a computer online from Dell, the city of Coppell would receive the sales tax revenue from that purchase instead of Round Rock, where Dell Technologies is headquartered.

OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HOW IT WORKS NOW

Sales tax dollars generated from online purchases would be generated by the municipality where the customer making the purchase is located. HOW IT WOULD WORK UNDER THE NEW RULE

When a customer in Texas orders something online, the sales tax collected is sent to the municipality in which the online seller is located. Businesses that have multiple locations can choose to direct online sales tax dollars to any municipality in which they have a physical presence.

If the rule is adopted, cities such as Coppell and Irving that have distribution centers generating online sales tax revenue could lose millions of dollars. However, other municipalities without such businesses, including Flower Mound and Highland Village, could benet because they would begin to receive sales tax from online purchases their residents make. WHY THIS MATTERS

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

for how we attract revenues because sales tax, ... [as] we have always said, is volatile.” Holli Davies is the vice president of advocacy for the North Texas Commission, a public-private group that works with 13 North Texas counties on regional issues. She said that representatives of some cities in the region believe that the comp- troller does not have the authority to implement such a sweeping change. “If the comptroller moves forward with this rule change, it will affect cities all over North Texas, each in unique, nuanced ways,” Davies said. She added that the North Texas Commission has not yet taken a position on the proposed rule. “The other critique some cities have about this is that they believe the comptroller’s office is moving forward too fast because they have not completed an impact analysis,” Davies said. “So some cities feel they don’t have the data they need to fully understand how their budgets would be impacted. They only have rough estimates.” However, not all municipalities

internet purchases to a single city in which it has a facility. Cities with warehouses or distribution centers are typically the ones chosen. Businesses often choose cities as locations because of cities’ efforts to reward businesses that locate within their borders. For example, in exchange for Bed Bath & Beyond choosing

would be negatively affected by the proposed change. In fact, neigh- boring cities like Flower Mound and Highland Village, which do not have warehouses or distribution centers, could benefit financially under the rule because they would begin receiving sales tax revenue from online purchases made by their

cities, Georgia cities, Florida cities and Arizona cities,” said James Kunke, Lewisville community relations and tourism director. “This rule would take an economic devel- opment tool out of our toolbox that those other states will still have.” What the future holds The comptroller’s office has extended the public input period on its proposed rule change through April 3. “There’s a lot of questions out there that cities are asking, and it sounds like the comptroller is wanting to accommodate those questions,” Davies said. If the rule is implemented, busi- nesses and cities that have entered into economic incentive agreements involving internet sales tax rebates before Sept. 1, 2019, would be exempt until Dec. 31, 2022. Land said Coppell anticipates the rule change will go into effect Oct. 1. “However this rule changes, we are going to abide by it,” Land said. Gavin Pugh contributed to this report.

residents. Economic development Some local officials said they believe the proposed rule will make their cities less competitive in the economic development arena.

Lewisville for its distribution center, the city agreed to give the business a partial refund in online sales tax dollars that would have otherwise gone to the city. If the rule is adopted, cities

“IF THE COMPTROLLERMOVES FORWARDWITH THIS RULE CHANGE, ITWILL AFFECT CITIES ALL OVERNORTH TEXAS, EACH INUNIQUE, NUANCEDWAYS.” HOLLI DAVIES, VICE PRESIDENT

OF ADVOCACY FOR THE NORTH TEXAS COMMISSION

As the system stands, Texas businesses are legally allowed to direct internet sales tax dollars to any city in which they have a physical presence. This means that a corporation can choose to send all of its sales tax from

will no longer be able to offer internet sales tax

rebates as economic incentives. “I’ll tell you right now. There’s a lot of competition for businesses between Texas cities and Tennessee

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COPPELL - VALLEY RANCH - LAS COLINAS EDITION • MARCH 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY LINDSEY JUAREZ MONSIVAIS

Shawn Besaw opened Sanctuary Books and Games after being a comic book fan for more than 40 years.

SOURCES: DC COMICS, MARVELCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

A cardboard cutout of Thanos stands in front of a wall of classic comic books. (Photos by Lindsey Juarez Monsivais/Community Impact Newspaper)

Sanctuary Books andGames Comic store provides patrons an escape from the world

COMIC BOOK TRIVIA

A s one of two children raised by a single collection of comic books. Besaw said he would visit his local comic book store every week to see what new story was available. “Comics were just a great diversion,” he said. “I enjoyed the characters, the artwork, the stories.” As an adult, Besaw decided to create his own haven from the cares and worries of the world. He opened Sanctuary Books and Games in 2018 after spending three decades in a corporate setting. The store oers both new and classic comic books as well as games, toys and art. Sanctuary features Besaw’s personal comic book collection, which he is selling after collecting for more than 40 years. He said after he had collected all the books he had hoped to get, he wanted to share his collection with others. Besaw said it gives him joy to see collectors go through his stacks and nd a comic they had been looking for. “It’s tough after collecting for 40 years. …Comics were pretty muchmy life,” he said. “But it makes it easier when I see someone, and they really appreciate the books, and they love them as much as I do.” Just like the comic book store Besaw visited as a mother, Shawn Besaw said he did not have a lot growing up. But what he did have was a

Find the answers online at communityimpact.com.

child, Sanctuary receives new comic books regularly. The store also hosts events throughout the week, including game tournaments and prerelease events for new products. Besaw said one of his favorite things to see at events is people laughing and forming friendships with others who have similar interests. Besaw said he knows the store is a business, but making money is not his endgame. “We have really great people who come here, and that’s what makes the shop,” he said. “It’s not the books; it’s not the statues; it’s not the games. It’s the people.”

1. Under which comic book brand

2. Which superhero gave The Avengers their name?

did Superman make his rst appearance?

4. According to the origin story for the Joker, what was he

3. Captain America’s shield contains vibranium, a powerful metal. Where is vibranium found?

originally known as?

Sanctuary Books andGames 9400 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 138, Irving 469-372-0777 www.sanctuarybooksandgames.com Hours: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. daily

6. In what year did Iron Man make his rst appearance?

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CIMARRON TRAIL

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Tommy Tamale Restaurant brings tamales to Coppell all year

A restaurant that primarily sells tamales might seem like a risky business model to outsiders, general manager Erich Mota said, but that is part of what makes Tommy Tamale dierent. “What makes Tommy Tamale very unique … is that nobody does tamales every day,” Mota said. Tamales are traditionally available only during the holidays or more sporadically throughout the year from mom-and-pop shops, he said. While the holidays are still the most popular time for tamales, Mota said, people who nd them at Tommy Tamale tend to come back. “We get so busy through the holi- days that we have hundreds of new people come in,” Mota said. “That’s just another regular that comes in from here on out.” The Coppell location was the restaurant’s rst expansion from its original Grapevine storefront. After nearly two years of business, the Coppell tamale spot continues to gain recognition by taking part in Foodsby, a lunch ordering service, and by oering fresh takes on tamales.

Most of their sales come from their 16 varieties of tamales, includ- ing frozen beef, pork, chicken, veg- gie and dessert tamales, Mota said. Six of these varieties are kept hot and ready to eat at the restaurant. “The favorite is going to be the tamales, right?” Mota said. “Then, we do our own twist of that: que- sadillas with tamales in them, if they want, or a burrito with tamales crushed up inside.” Mota joined the Tommy Tamale team after nine years of experience with a big chain restaurant. He began his employment with the tamale restaurant with a handshake rather than a contract. “I really respected that,” Mota said. After managing in Grapevine, he became the general manager of the Coppell store. Keeping Tommy Tamale a family business remains important for every location, Mota said. “We’re family-owned and -oper- ated,” Mota said. “I’ve got nieces and kids that work for me; the owners have their grandkids and kids that work for them. And that’s how we’re going to keep it.”

Tommy Tamale dining options include the Tamale Plate ($6 for two, $8 for four), served with rice and beans; the Tommy Bowl ($7 one tamale, $9 two tamales), a beef chili, queso, pico and rice bowl with a choice of tamale; and quesadillas ($8 for one 12-inch, $12 for two), which can include steak, tamale pork, chicken or beans and are served with sour cream, salsa and pico de gallo. (Photos by Liesbeth Powers/Community Impact Newspaper)

SHOPPING THEMARKET

One section of Tommy Tamale is dedicated to local and unique market items. This includes specialty salsas, such as cherry salsa, peach salsa and habanero salsa; specialty salts, such as scorpion salt and ghost salt; and margarita mixes.

“WE HAVE SO MANY DIFFERENT SAUCES THAT IT’LL MAKE YOUR HEAD SPIN.” ERICH MOTA, GENERAL MANAGER

Tommy Tamale 680 N. Denton Tap Road, Ste. 350, Coppell 972-450-4940 www.tommytamale.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., closed Sun.

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Erich Mota began working with Tommy Tamale at its agship Grapevine location three years ago. He nowmanages the Coppell location.

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COPPELL  VALLEY RANCH  LAS COLINAS EDITION • MARCH 2020

COMPILED BY BRYCE BRAKEBILL AND GAVIN PUGH  DESIGNED BY MICHELLE DEGARD

& VALLEY RANCH

1 Zenzero Kitchen & Bakery 171 N. Denton Tap Road, Ste. 600, Coppell 469-293-3550 | http://zenzerokitchen.com Along with its large selection of coee and teas, this shop also oers full menus for breakfast, brunch and lunch, along with an assortment of baked goods. Signature drink: salted caramel latte Signature foods: gooey buttercake, chocolate chip cookies 2 American Tea & Coee 230 N. Denton Tap Road, Ste. 104, Coppell 972-745-1246 http://americanteaandcoee.com This comfy shop oers a variety of iced and hot coees, teas, boba, pastries and breakfast, which is sold all day. Signature drinks: boba milk tea, chai latte Signature food: trail mix cookies 3 Liberation Coee Co. 651 N. Denton Tap Road, Ste. 200, Coppell 972-427-1991 http://liberationcoeecompany.com This coee shop prides itself on oering locally roasted coee as well as a selection of pastries from local bakers and an assortment of teas. Signature drinks: honey-cinnamon latte, lavender mocha Signature foods: cinnamon twists, chocolate chip cookie bars 4 GEORGE: Coee + Provisions 462 Houston St., Coppell 469-464-3107 http://georgecoeeandprovisions.com This farmhouse-style coee shop oers hot and cold coees made from beans roasted in-house as well as teas and American and breakfast food items. Signature drinks: honey-vanilla latte, iced lavender latte

2

GUIDE Wi-Fi available Patio seating

American Tea & Coee uses a grosche infuser for some of its drinks. (Courtesy Randy Truesdell/American Tea & Coee)

When looking for a caffeine fix, there are several options available in Coppell, Las Colinas and Valley Ranch. This non-comprehensive list includes shops that offer more than drip coffee.

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This mocha latte is from GEORGE: Coee + Provisions. (Bryce Brakebill/Community Impact Newspaper)

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3

121

W. BETHEL RD.

2

1

E. SANDY LAKE RD.

HOUSTON ST.

4

6 Cuppa Espresso Bar 2435 Kinwest Parkway, Irving 972-560-4623 www.facebook.com/cuppa-espresso- bar-1597862857165255/ This coee shop is located on the second oor of the Irving Bible Church and oers a range of hot and cold coees, all of which are roasted in-house. It also serves teas, specialty drinks and food items. Signature drinks: subata latte, shakerato Signature foods: cold cut sandwiches, breakfast sandwiches This iced caramel macchiato is fromCuppa Espresso Bar. (Courtesy Cuppa Espresso Bar) 7 Pax & Benecia Coee 5244 N. O’Connor Blvd., Ste. 150, Irving 214-390-6883 | https://paxandbenecia.com This shop with Mediterranean and Middle Eastern inuences oers hot and cold brewed coee, assorted teas, pastries and other food items with a Turkish air. Signature drinks: cardamom latte, cortado Signature foods: avocado toast, cruns

W. BETHEL RD.

5

PGBT TOLL

OLYMPUS BLVD.

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Signature foods: avocado toast, Mediterranean board with hummus

KINWEST PKWY.

635

5 Ascension Coee 3121 Olympus Blvd., Dallas 972-863-3000 http://ascensiondallas.com

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This is one of seven Ascension locations in North Texas. It oers hot and cold coees as well as full breakfast, lunch and dinner menus. Signature drinks: rotating specialty coee roasts Signature food: The Original Avocado Toast

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MAPNOTTOSCALE N

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