Southwest Austin - Dripping Springs Edition - October 2021

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION

VOLUME 14, ISSUE 7  OCT. 21NOV. 17, 2021

ONLINE AT

Austin behind in goal for aordable housing as need, costs increase

P R O G R E S S R E P O R T

The Austin Strategic Housing Blueprint aims to build 135,000 homes across all income levels, including 60,000 aordable units, between 2018-2028. By the end of 2020, the city had added 25,964 units.

IMPACTS

6

BY BEN THOMPSON

Via 313’s rst food truck in 2010 was a springboard to its now eight brick-and-mortars. (Courtesy Via 313) 7 AUSTIN RANKS AS th − FRIENDLIEST CITY FOR FOOD TRUCKS SOURCE: FOOD TRUCK NATION, 2018 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER City sta, housing advocates and others have pointed to the city land development code, last revised in the early 1980s, and the time and cost for any new develop- ment these days as key reasons for the lagging progress. “Status quo is a failure for the city of Austin,” said Greg Anderson, an Austin Habitat for Humanity repre- sentative and University of Texas lecturer. “It will only get worse moving forward.” CONTINUED ON 26 Four years ago, Austin ocials set a goal to make the city a more aordable place for current and new resi- dents to live by 2028. However, by the end of 2020, the city had reached 12% of its 10-year goal to ensure tens of thousands of new homes and rental units would be available to those earning less than the area’s median income, according to a city report released in September.

NEW UN I TS ADDED, 20 1 8 - 20

R EMA I N I NG UN I TS NE EDED, 202 1 - 2 8

80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0

A family of four making $79,100 OR LESS ANNUALLY in the Austin area is considered low-income.

56,176

DARK SKIES LAW

16

33,098

19,762

18,824

Election Day Nov. 2

238

6,902

30% AND BELOW

31%80%

81% AND ABOVE

HOUSING AFFORDABI LITY LEVEL BY MEDIAN FAMI LY INCOME

SOURCES: CITY OF AUSTIN, HOUSINGWORKS AUSTINCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

XXXXXXX VOTER INFORMATION

XX 19

Food trucks jump-start initial success for Austin restaurateurs

BY MAGGIE QUINLAN & DARCY SPRAGUE

meantwehada built-inaudience from the start,” Zane Hunt said. He said the pair made $200 their rst night, and they knew at that moment they would succeed. They currently have three brick-and-mortar locations in Austin and three food trucks, including one in Utah. The brothers are planning up to eight more locations in Texas and throughout the U.S.

Zane Hunt and his brother, Brandon, started Detroit-style pizzeria Via 313 in a food truck in front of the Violet Crown Cinema 10 years ago. The pair served pizzas until 2 a.m. every day from a hot, black spray- painted trailer that featured a handwritten menu and an oven that could make eight pies every 12 minutes. “For us being at a busy bar

BUSINESS

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CONTINUED ON 28

DINING

34

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Close tohome.

The care you need is right around the corner. Schedule appointments and get expert care at one of our convenient locations around Austin.

Two hospitals close to home

Baylor Scott &White Medical Center — Austin 5245 W. US Highway 290 | Austin, TX 78735 512.654.2100 | BSWHealth.com/Austin

Baylor Scott &White Medical Center — Lakeway 100 Medical Parkway | Lakeway, TX 78738 512.654.5000 | BSWHealth.com/Lakeway

Seven clinics in your neighborhood

Baylor Scott &White Clinic — Austin Circle C 5000 W. Slaughter Lane | Building 6, Suite 100 Austin, TX 78749 | 512.654.4000 Urgent Care hours: Weekdays 8:00 AM — 8:00 PM, Weekends 8:00 AM — 5:00 PM Baylor Scott &White Clinic — Austin Oak Hill 5251 W. US Highway 290 | Austin, TX 78735 512.654.3000 Baylor Scott &White Clinic — Austin Southwest 9521 W. US Highway 290 | Suite 105 | Austin, TX 78736 512.654.4300

Baylor Scott &White Clinic — Lakeway 3108 S. Ranch Road 620 | Lakeway, TX 78738 | 512.654.4200 Baylor Scott &White Specialty Clinic — Lakeway 200 Medical Parkway | Lakeway, TX 78738 | 512.654.1234 Baylor Scott &White —West Hills Family Health Center 11805 FM 2244, Suite 100 | Bee Cave, TX 78738 | 512.654.4450 Baylor Scott &White Clinic — Bee Cave 16018 W. SH 71 | Bee Cave, TX 78738 | 512.654.3900

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Medical Centers: Physicians provide clinical services asmembers of themedical staff at one of Baylor Scott &White Health’s subsidiary, community or affiliatedmedical centers and do not provide clinical services as employees or agents of thosemedical centers or Baylor Scott &White Health. Clinics: Physicians are employees of Scott &White Clinic, an affiliate of Baylor Scott &White Health. ©2021 Baylor Scott &White Health. 99-ATX-295001 GD Now accepting newpatients. Baylor Scott &White Health accepts most major insurance plans, including Medicare.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Curious what is selling in your neighborhood? Scan me

ACTIVE

PENDING

ACTIVE

ACTIVE

realtyaustin.com/p/6665835

realtyaustin.com/p/6029498

realtyaustin.com/p/5230181

realtyaustin.com/p/1705141

$924,900

$975,000

$1,950,000

$795,000

4 bds

3.5 ba 3,478 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

2,355 sq ft

5 bds

4 ba

4,330 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

1,777 sq ft

183 Gallatin Ct, Austin, TX 78737 Carlisle Kennedy | 512-689-9579

4508 Tejas Trl, Austin, TX 78745 Tony Elias | 512-351-0823

503 Oak Crest Dr, Dripping Springs, TX 78620 Melissa Roberts | 512-769-0877

5308 Buffalo Pass, Austin, TX 78745 Lisa Munoz | 512-856-4549

PENDING

PENDING

PENDING

PENDING

realtyaustin.com/p/8450896

realtyaustin.com/p/8920016

realtyaustin.com/p/9598370

realtyaustin.com/p/8191717

$899,000

$900,000

$975,000

$1,250,000

4 bds

3 ba

3,290 sq ft

4 bds

3.5 ba 2,974 sq ft

3 bds

2.5 ba 2,348 sq ft

5 bds

4 ba

4,525 sq ft

12500 River Rock Ct, Austin, TX 78739 Sarita Kuykendall | 512-826-1478

6712 Vitruvius Dr, Austin, TX 78739 Nick Easley | 512-363-2980

4421 Sacred Arrow Dr, Austin, TX 78735 Juanita Thornton | 512-947-4366

7516 Doswell Ln, Austin, TX 78739 Caroline Mowry | 512-589-7412

PENDING

SOLD OVER ASKING

SOLD OVER ASKING

SOLD

realtyaustin.com/p/1411813

realtyaustin.com/p/9719157

realtyaustin.com/p/4456214

realtyaustin.com/p/9335135

$1,650,000

$850,000

$895,000

$1,150,000

4 bds

3.5 ba 3,286 sq ft

5 bds

3.5 ba 3,358 sq ft

5 bds

3 ba

3,050 sq ft

4 bds

3 ba

3,948 sq ft

12800 Silver Creek Rd, Dripping Springs, TX 78620 Robert Kellogg | 512-748-3548

270 Abbott Dr, Austin, TX 78737 Jeffrey Schnabel | 512-913-7480

186 Big Meadow Rd, Austin, TX 78737 Denise DeJardo | 512-944-5179

7604 Bettis Trophy Dr, Austin, TX 78739 Melissa Roberts | 512-769-0877

I f you ’re scratching your head wonder ing why your home i sn’ t receiv ing of fers , we’ve got answers . Why Isn’t My Home Selling?

Scan the QR code to read the most common reasons a home doesn’t sel l .

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN - DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

The more you feed the blob the bigger it gets becoming a monster clog causing expensive repairs, foul odors and sanitary sewer overflows! Fat, oil and grease comes from food like cooking oil, meat drippings, butter, sauces, gravy, dairy products, and even salad dressing. Help stop the Grease Blob! 6 Scrape food scraps into the trash or compost if you can 6 Collect cooking oil in a container then toss into the trash 6 Use paper towels or wipes to remove grease. DON’T FLUSH , toss them into the trash WASTEWATER AVERAGING You are in control of your wastewater costs for the next year STARTING Mid-November ENDING Mid-March Find your wastewater averaging period and start saving today! www.austintexas.gov/department/ wastewater-averaging

Austinwater.org

Austinwater.org

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THIS ISSUE

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FROMDEEDA: Oh my gourd we’re growing! We’re happy to announce the launch of two new editions serving the San Antonio metro area. These will be our 33rd and 34th editions nationwide. We’re excited to continue building communities of informed citizens. It would not be possible without your readership, so thank you. Orange you glad you get CI in your mailbox? Ok, enough Mom jokes! Deeda Lovett, GENERALMANAGER dlovett@communityimpact.com

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FROMDARCY: At the heart of every Austin story recently is the rapid growth our city is experiencing. This month we looked at how growth aects aordable housing and food trucks. Darcy Sprague, EDITOR dsprague@communityimpact.com

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CORRECTION: Volume 14, Issue 6 In the Voter Guide on Page 26, Proposition 8 does not include an age requirement for spouses of deceased armed service members to receive exemptions on homestead property taxes.

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened, are coming soon or renovating

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PROMONTORY POINT DR.

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WINNEBAGO LN.

FLEMING CT.

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5

Fierce Whiskers Distillery

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COURTESY FIERCE WHISKERS DISTILLERY

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130 TOLL

6 Aerie Oine , a clothing store selling activewear for women, including leggings, sports bras, workout dresses, skirts and more, opened at 2901 S. Capital of Texas Hwy., Austin, in Barton Creek Square Mall in Oct. 512-541-3807. www.ae.com COMING SOON 7 Celebrate Dental & Braces will open at 111 W. William Cannon Drive, Ste. 200, Austin on Nov. 1. Drs. David Ensley and Nazgol Gharbi oer general, children’s and cosmetic dentistry, including braces and clear aligners. There are currently 15 other locations throughout Texas, New Mexico, Nevada, Kansas and Missouri. 512-521-7000. www.celebratedental.com 8 The Japanese grocery store Asahi Imports will open a second location at 3005 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 105B, Austin, in late October. The store, owned and operated by Sally Matsumae, currently has one location at 6105 Burnet Road, Austin. The store oers a wide selection of Japanese grocery items, including snacks, household items and 30 dierent types of rice, as well as prepared meals. www.asahiimports.com 9 Freddo ATX will open in November at 2336 S. Congress Ave., Austin. The coee shop will have both an indoor space and a patio. Menu oerings will include Greek food, such as baklava and spanakopita, and iced cappuccinos and espresso along with beer, wine and food. The coee shop will be located in the historic Walter Tips House, which was built in 1876 and restored in the 1970s. 512-599-4069 www.freddoatx.com

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35

71

360

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290

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2

MOPAC

183

ST. ELMO RD.

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN

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71

PLEASANT VALLEY RD.

OAK BRANCH DR.

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290

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15

1626

NUTTY BROWN RD.

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN NOWOPEN

4 BoxLunch opened Aug. 27 in Barton Creek Square at 2901 S. Capital of Texas Hwy., Austin. The shop oers a collection of pop culture-themed merchandise for all ages, including Disney-, Marvel- and “Harry Potter”-themed collectibles, clothing and accessories. BoxLunch supports Feeding America, which provides meals to those in need. www.boxlunch.com 5 Earthbound Trading Co. , a store for “bohemian” home decor, clothing and gifts, opened Aug. 13 at the Barton Creek Square shopping mall, 2901 S. Capital of Texas Hwy., Austin. Since starting in 1994 as a rock and mineral shop, the store now has dozens of U.S. locations, including one at Lakeline Mall. www.earthboundtrading.com

“recovering attorney,” said the studio creates a community where clients can practice yoga and buy locally made products, including jewelry and self-care items. 512-240-2709. www.oakandlotusyoga.com 3 Home goods store Ollyloo Shoppe opened Oct. 2 at 12016 Hwy. 290, Ste. 4, Austin. The store focuses on a mixture of handmade and international home goods and gifts, including textiles, houseware, handmade rolled incense and reed diusers, art and more. Owner Bronwyn Walsh said her store steers away from the farmhouse style to oer more colorful nds. 737-300-1919 www.facebook.com/ OllylooHandmade

1 Fierce Whiskers Distillery opened Sept. 25 at 5333 Fleming Court, Austin. Native Texans Tim Penney and Tri Vo named the distillery after a quote from former U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes. Hayes called Austin a place with “erce whiskers, gaming and drinking very abounding in all quarters.” 512-537-5779. www.ercewhiskers.com 2 Oak + Lotus Yoga Studio and artisan market opened in mid-August at 510 E. St Elmo Road, Ste. B-3, Austin. Owner Alia J. Khan, who calls herself a

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(512) 892-0013 3755 S Capital of Texas Hwy, Suite 292 Austin, TX 78704 thielpediatricdentistry.com We take pride in providing a fun, comfortable visit for your child.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY MAGGIE QUINLAN, DARCY SPRAGUE & TRENT THOMPSON

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Oak + Lotus Yoga Studio

Ollyloo Shoppe

COURTESY OAK + LOTUS

COURTESY OLLYLOO SHOPPE

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15

Freddo ATX

Locally owned cafe Madrone Coee replaces Austin Pizza Garden.

Nutty Brown Amphitheatre

COURTESY FREDDO ATX

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

DEEDA LOVETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Madrone Coee Co. opened Oct. 2 in the former Austin Pizza Garden location at 6266 Hwy. 290, Austin. Its menu includes everything from drip coee to a range of espresso drinks, such as a cortado and a cafe Americano. Austin Pizza Garden closed Jan. 17 after 27 years in the community. The restaurant operated inside a stone building built in 1898, just east of The Y at Oak Hill in Southwest Austin. The building has also served as a steakhouse, a masonic lodge and an art 14 Elon Musk announced Oct. 7 that Tesla will move its headquarters to Austin. He also conrmed that the company’s new Gigafactory in Southwest Travis County will begin production by the end of 2021 but will take a year to ramp up to full capacity. Musk does not plan to close California locations. www.tesla.com

ANNIVERSARIES 10 Local franchise owners Emmie Knox and Louis LeSassier celebrated ve years of business at Assisting Hands Home Care on Oct. 3 at 2906 S. First St., Ste. 103, Austin. It provides seniors and those with disabilities with services including meal preparation, medication or grocery pickup, and transportation to appointments. 512-999-7379. Rebuilding Together partnered to supply The Void Martial Arts with new mats; make drywall repairs; renovate the bathroom; and completely overhaul its heating, ventilation and air conditioning system in September. The Void Martial Arts oers classes such as kickboxing, and Brazilian jiujitsu. Free self-defense classes are oered for women and restorative yoga classes for seniors at 4327 S. First St., Ste. 104D, Austin. 512-707-8977. www.thevoidmartialarts.com www.assistinghands.com RENOVATIONS 11 UFC, Modelo and nonprot

12 The Shield Ranch Foundation , a family organization working to protect the Central Texas environment, broke ground on a new campsite for El Ranchito, a 15-year-old summer camp for children and young adults, at its 6,400 acre campsite located on Barton Springs 18 miles southwest of downtown Austin. The campsite will feature designs focused on environmental sustainability elements, such as landscapes to reduce water demand, solar panels and potable water supplied from rainwater. www.shieldranch.com IN THE NEWS 13 Drive a Senior Central Texas has changed its name to Chariot . The mission of providing transportation and socialization for seniors age 60 and up will remain the same. Chariot serves 4 ZIP codes in South Austin, Dripping Springs and Southwest Austin. The organization’s three other chapters are keeping their original names. The Austin headquarters is located at 6705 Hwy. 290, Ste. 50268, Austin. 512-445-5552. www.chariot.org

gallery. The structure was designated a historic landmark in 1970. 512-894-5000. www.madronecoee.com

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CLOSINGS 15 After 20 years of hosting artists such as Willie Nelson, Nutty Brown Amphitheatre at 2225 Hwy. 290, Austin, will close Nov. 28. The Randy Rogers Band will be the venue’s nal show before it reopens in Round Rock. 512-301-4648. www.nuttybrown.com

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

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We have a new test where we are comparing the performance of these two technologies side by side.” -EH Does HESOLAR install batteries? “Yes, HESOLAR is a certified installer of the Tesla Powerwall. With the Tesla Powerwall, a solar pv system can continue to operate in the event of a power outage. The Powerwalls can be added now or retrofitted to a system in the future without replacing existing equipment. This year we added Tesla Powerwalls to the test array and will continue to make suggestions based on our findings.” -DH What makes HESOLAR different from their competitors? “We have many answers to that question. The most common feedback we get is that our customers value working directly with Derrick and I from start to finish. Customers also have our direct contact after installation. On the sales side, we don’t knock on doors and we don’t push the sell, we just educate. Behind the scenes is where we really differentiate ourselves. Derrick and I have been Master Electricians for over 10 years, and we’re NABCEP Certi- fied Solar Installation Professionals. We lead our team through the design, installation, and warranty of your system. We don’t subcontract our labor and we use the highest quality materials available. Below is a table we use to display the differences between HESOLAR and our competitors.” -EH

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What exactly does HESOLAR Do? “The service we provide is a specialized form of electrical contracting. Derrick and I are second generation Master Electricians that grew up in the electrical industry. We’ve spent the last 10 years building on our skill-sets as Master Electricians specializing in solar power, energy storage, and electric vehicle charging. ” -Eric Hoffman Why are customers adding solar? “Saving money, back-up power capabilities, lowering their carbon footprint, energy independence... Ultimately, solar power allows customers to invest in their own energy needs. The cost of solar installation will be offset by savings gained on their electric bills. Additionally, the current Federal Tax Credit of 26% has motivated a lot of our customers to act now before the credit goes away.” - Derrick Hoffman How does the Tax Credit work? “The credit is factored on the entire system cost. It is currently at 26% and will ramp down to 22% next year. Homeowners should consult with a Tax Professional regarding applicability.” -DH Are all solar panels the same? “Not at all. Solar panels come in different colors, sizes, and quality. That’s why we created the HESOLAR Test Array. We are actively monitoring the top solar panels in the solar industry and specify our material based on the results. We are also testing leading inverter technologies.” -DH

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The HESOLAR Test Array video is available at hesolarllc.com

What are inverters? “The inverter converts the solar panel’s DC voltage to an AC voltage. Solar consumers will have a choice between Microinverters and DC-Optimized String Inverters. Microinverters convert the DC to AC under the solar panel. A DC-Optimized string inverter manipulates the DC voltage under the solar panel and then sends it to an inverter near the electrical service.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY MAGGIE QUINLAN

Businesses that are coming soon or under new ownership

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CORTARO DR.

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Pig Pen BBQ’s brick-and-mortar location is set to open in October. FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON The former food truck Pig Pen BBQ is set to open its new brick-and- mortar location in October at 1005 Hwy. 290 in downtown Dripping Springs. Co-owners and partners Bill Warren and Michelle Matthews will serve items including pulled pork and brisket sandwiches and chicken. 512-858-0060. www.pigpen-bbq.com MAGGIE QUINLANCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Club Pilates Belterra

COURTESY MOLLY LINDENER

190

SPORTS PARK RD.

northwest of downtown. The development will bring 250 senior living units in a retirement home, along with new roads to relieve trac on Ranch Road 2222.www.doublelranchtx.com NEWOWNERSHIP 5 Husband-and-wife team Hector Hernandez and Molly Lindener, owners of seven Club Pilates franchise locations in the Austin area, acquired a Pilates studio at 166 Hargraves Drive, Ste. C500, Austin, from the previous owners, Theresa and Glen Fraser. Club Pilates Belterra , their eighth studio, had its ribbon-cutting Oct. 21. Hernandez discovered Pilates while recovering from Iron Man events. Lindener’s background is in public health. 512-212-7525. www.clubpilates.com

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COMING SOON 1 Major League Pickleball is launching at Dreamland in Dripping Springs. For its inaugural season, the upstart sports league will host a four-day, tournament— called the Pritchard Cup—at 2770 US- 290, Dripping Springs. www.majorleaguepickleball.net 2 Ashton Woods is developing the 31-home Cortaro community at 257 Cortaro Drive, Dripping Springs. Several homesites remain available with the developer nishing the rst of those in March 2022. Lots start at three-quarter acres with seven dierent home plans and cost around $700,000. A commercial

property will sit adjacent to the planned neighborhood. 512-768-4586

3 Village Grove , a new townhome development, is proposed in Dripping Springs, though developers do not yet have a timeline, according to a presentation to City Council on Oct. 5. Village Grove will bring about 35 single- family townhouse and duplex units and about 180 single-family homes near Sports and Recreation Park on Sports Park Road, at 290 and Ranch Road 12. 4 The city of Dripping Springs approved an updated plan on Sept. 21 for Double L Ranch , a 2,231-home development, to move forward

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

October & November events

COMPILED BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE & DARCY SPRAGUE

NOV. 25

THUNDERCLOUD SUBS TURKEY TROT THE LONG CENTER

The annual Turkey Trot event will return in person and virtually after only oering a virtual option in 2020. Races include a 5-mile run, 1-mile walk and a kids run. Registration is available online. $10+. The race benets Caritas of Austin and starts at 9:30 a.m. at the Long Center for the Performing Arts, 701 W. Riverside Drive, Austin. www.thundercloud.com (Courtesy ThunderCloud Subs)

OCTOBER THROUGHOCT. 31 CELEBRATE FALL

dogs. There will be local food, ciders and beer available. Doors open at noon. $15 (general admission). 13551 FM 150 Driftwood. 512-766-1842. www.vistabrewingtx.com NOVEMBER 02 VOTE ON ELECTIONDAY Austin voters have the opportunity to weigh in on two city ballot propositions this fall pertaining to public safety and parkland maintenance as well as several state propositions. Early voting runs through Oct. 29. Polls are open on Election Day from 7 a.m.- 7 p.m. and during early voting from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. (Mon.-Sat.) or noon-6 p.m. (Sun.). Polling locations are available on the Travis County clerk’s website, www.countyclerk.traviscountytx.gov. Learn more at www.communityimpact.com/ voter-guide-2021. 02 GET A LIL’ BIT COUNTRY The Hill Country Ramblers will play at Dreamland in the beer garden. The all- acoustic band features ddles, harmonica, mandolins and other instruments. The show will be free to attend, and there is no need to RSVP. The band will also return Dec. 7. 5-7 p.m. Dreamland, 2770 W. Hwy. 290. 512-827-1279 05 THROUGH07 CHECKOUT AUSTIN’S FOOD SCENE Austin’s annual Food & Wine Festival will present three days of food and drink oerings as well as cooking and grilling demonstrations from notable chefs, including Andrea Juarez and Helene

Henderson. Local restaurants, including Aba, La Vacher, Suerte and Uchi, will be represented. Times vary. $275 and up. Republic Square Park, 422 Guadalupe St., Austin. www.austinfoodandwinefestival.com 13 THROUGH 14 TAKE A TOUR Circle C Creatives, a group of 20 artists, will host a studio tour at the Circle C Community Center. This will be the rst year such an event will be hosted in South Austin. In the past, large studio tour events have been in East and West Austin. The event will be open to the public and will have art, jewelry and other items for sale as well as food trucks. Noon-6 p.m. 7817 La Crosse Ave., Austin. www.circlecranch.com 11 HONOR LOCAL VETERANS The Rotary Club of Dripping Springs will host a dinner and dance to honor veterans. The event will be free to attend. Sponsorships are available starting at $250. Hot Texas Swing Band will perform. 6 p.m. Mercer Street Dance Hall, 23490 RR 12, Driftwood. www.drippingspringsrotary.org 12 ENJOY BREAKFAST AND BOOZEWITHAVIEW Austin’s Underground Pop-Up Art Show will take place at the Far Out Lounge after a brief hiatus during the pandemic. The event will feature more than 75 local artists and over 300 pieces of art, free pancakes and two musical stages. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. $10 (presale), $15 (at the door). Far Out Lounge, 8504 S. Congress Ave., Austin. www.pancakesandbooze.com

Pick pumpkins, run through a hay maze and play outdoor games at the Dripping Springs Pumpkin Festival. The inaugural kid-focused event is hosted at the 5-acre Dr. Pound Historical Farmstead. There will be food trucks, balloon artists, a petting zoo and other events. Free (Mon.), $5 (Tue.-Fri.), $10 (Sat.-Sun.). 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. 419 Founders Park Road, Dripping Springs. 512-643-5533. www.drippingspringspumpkinfestival.com 24 LISTEN TO THE SEASON The Austin Symphony Orchestra will present its annual Halloween Children’s Concert featuring “frightfully fun symphonic music” for ages 2-10. Families are encouraged to dress in costume for the one-hour concert and the hall will be decorated. 3 p.m. $10 and up. Long Center for the Performing Arts Dell Hall, 701 W. Riverside Drive, Austin. 512-476-6064. www.austinsymphony.org 28 TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE Trivia bus and spooky movie fans can test their skills at the Tim Burton trivia night. The questions will cover “Beetlejuice to Batman, Skellington to Scissorhands.” 7 p.m. Free. Still Whiskey Co., 440 E. St. Elmo Road, Unit F, Austin. 512-276-2700. www.getitgals.com 30 DANCE TOADIFFERENT TUNE Outside the City Limits will host its third annual festival—after missing 2020—at Vista Brewing. Bands include a mix of folk, bluegrass and more. The event will be family-friendly, including

The 17,000-square-foot Marktplatz building hosts Wurstfest. (Community Impact Newspaper sta) WORTH THE TRIP Nov. 0514 Wurstfest Visit New Braunfels for the annual festival. Visitors will nd German food, music, dancing, carnival rides and games, special events and entertainment. German, Texan and domestic beer will be available. 11 a.m.-midnight (Sat.), 11 a.m.- 10 p.m. (Sun.), 5-10 p.m. (Mon.- Thu.), 5-11 p.m. (Fri.). $18 (online). $20 (at gate) 120 Landa St., New Braunfels 830-625-9167 www.wurstfest.com

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Find more or submit local events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Capital MetroOKs $255Melectric bus investment inAustin

COMPILED BY BENTON GRAHAM

ONGOING PROJECTS

Running on battery The 40-foot-long buses go slightly further, with an average of 114 miles per charge, compared to 95 miles per charge for the 60-foot-long buses. Capital Metro plans to charge them in the depot as well as on their routes.

VINEMONT DR.

Capital Metro’s board of directors unanimously approved the $255 million purchase of 197 electric- powered buses frommanufacturers Proterra and New Flyer during its Sept. 27 meeting. According to a Capital Metro press release, the purchase represents the largest procurement of electric vehicles in U.S. history. The transit agency has a total of 424 buses currently with 12 of those being electric. The buses will roll out over the course of the next five years, according to Capital Metro documents. They will have vinyl seats with USB ports, a perimeter seating format and validators to

check tickets at all doors. Dottie Watkins, Capital Metro chief operating officer, said the electric vehicles present numerous advantages including the reduction of greenhouse gases and air pollution. “It’s a much better environment, not just for our riding public, but for our community as a whole,” Watkins added. The buses will be able to travel between 95 and 114 miles per charge. Watkins said charging the vehicles will likely include a mix of on-route charging and charging at the bus depot, but Capital Metro is continuing to evaluate its long-term strategy. “With climate change as it is we really need to accelerate these types

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Slaughter Lane pedestrian crossing signal

The city of Austin began construction on a new pedestrian crossing signal on Slaughter Lane at Vinemont Drive in September. The signal will allow pedestrians and bicyclists to push a button to indicate to oncoming traffic that they are crossing Slaughter. Timeline: September-December Cost: $480,000 Funding source: 2016 mobility bond

40-foot bus charge

60-foot bus charge

SOURCE: CAPITAL METRO/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

of purchases and investments,” said Pio Renteria, a board member and Austin City Council member. Capital Metro announced its zero emissions goal in 2019.

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Stassney Lane bus stop, intersectionwork begins The Austin Transportation Department kicked off Phase 2 of its Stassney Lane improvement project in October. It will focus on bus stop improvements and pedestrian crossings along the road fromWest Gate Boulevard to South Congress Avenue. The project will make bus stop improvements at the Lewood Drive, South 1st Street and South Congress Avenue intersections. The pedestrian crossing improvements would be at Buffalo Pass, Lewood and Emerald Forest Drive. The second phase costs approximately $600,000 and is expected to be completed by the end of the year, said Jack Flagler, Austin Transportation Department public information specialist.

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Crossing improvements

Bus improvements

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BUFFALO PASS

Area leaders question I-35 design Travis County Commissioners and Austin City Council members sent letters to the TxDOT in September expressing concerns, including a need for decks and widened bridges, about designs for I-35. Timeline: anticipated construction to

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begin late 2025 Cost: $4.9 billion

The first phase of the initiative began in the summer and focuses on restriping, adding protected bike lanes and upgrading traffic signals, according to the press release. The third phase, expected to begin in 2022, will make intersection improvements. The phase is still in design and does not have an estimated cost nor timeline. Funding for the entire project comes from the 2016 mobility bond and Capital Metro.

Funding source: TxDOT and Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF OCT. 18. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SWANEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN - DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

NEWS BRIEFS

Abridged stories from online

APD to no longer respond to some nonemergency calls

Sobering Center to separate patients by substance used

DEFINING NONEMERGENCY Crimes that meet the following criteria will no longer receive on-scene response from APD officers as of Oct. 1.

BY DARCY SPRAGUE

The Sobering Center opened a new dorm in October that will be used to separate patients based on what substance they used instead of gender, per a press release. The Sobering Center, located at 1213 Sabine St. in downtown Austin, is a co-funded operation of the city and county intended to serve as an alternative to jails and emergency rooms for publicly intoxicated individuals. “Someone using a depressant will likely need things like rest while those using stimulants will have more energy and be looking for ways to engage,” the Oct. 11 press release stated. The new dorm has couches, bean bags, crafts, television and other activities, according to the release. “If someone [can] intervene at the point that they’re clearly a threat to themselves, or to others, and they could be in a space where they could safely sober up and not lose their minds, it would make all the difference,” former Board Member Doug Smith said in the press release.

Types of crime subject to the change:

These crimes can be considered nonemergency if they meet these three standards.

BY DARCY SPRAGUE

• Animal services • Attempted theft of property • Burglary • Theft • Prostitution • Suspicious vehicle or person • Some vehicle crashes • Verbal disturbances

The Austin Police Department will no longer respond to the scene of some nonemergency crimes, Police Chief Joseph Chacon announced Sept. 29. Chacon said several types of crimes, including verbal disturbances, theft and prostitution, that are no longer an active threat to people or property should be considered nonemergency and reported to 311 or online instead of to 911. Residents who are unsure if their situation is an emergency should call 911. The new measure went into effect Oct. 1. Chacon said this change comes as growth within the city and staffing issues stretch APD’s resources thin. “We are trying to keep up with a rapidly growing city,” Chacon said. He said crime reports will still be taken, and the incidents will still be investigated despite officers not responding to the scene. He also said in limited cases civilian APD

Nonemergency: • Incidents are no longer in progress • The suspect is no longer on scene • No further threat to life or property

SOURCE: AUSTIN POLICE DEPARTMENT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

employees, such as crime scene experts, might respond. Chacon said the measure is not permanent yet, but he added the department may stick to the new model even after reaching full staffing levels depending on its success.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Austin’s land development code case back in court

Austin, Travis County, AISD look to build disaster hubs

DATE TO KNOW

NUMBERS TOKNOW

The disaster hubs would provide safe places for Austinites in an emergency.

NOV. 14 Oral arguments over

Austin’s land code will kick off before a panel of justices of the Fourteenth Court of Appeals in Houston.

400 the estimated number of hubs that would be needed 15 minutes the maximum amount of time it should take each Austinite to get to a hub once the plan is completed $1 million the maximum cost of retrofitting a location to be a disaster hub, though most will not receive complete upgrades

BY BEN THOMPSON

BY BEN THOMPSON

Austin’s appeal to a court ruling over the city’s contentious and long-delayed land development code rewrite is set to move forward later this fall. Since 2012, Austin’s attempt to rethink city rules for land use has taken many forms. The code sets parameters for development, such as the height of a building or the density of a project. A development code rewrite process, CodeNEXT, fizzled out in 2018 but was followed by a new version the next year. That eventually made it weeks away from a final City Council vote— before ending up the subject of the lawsuit that has held up movement since the early days of the pandemic.

After the fallout fromWinter Storm Uri in February left many without power or running water, Austin-area entities began looking to create a network of safe shelters for residents during disaster situations. At a joint meeting Sept. 24, Austin, Travis County and Austin ISD officials heard updates and voiced support for a process that could see dozens of local facilities improved and added to a network of resilience hubs—locations that could provide water, food, electricity or a place to gather in an emergency. The targeted spots include neighborhood schools, recreation centers, clinics, libraries and other government buildings. “These extreme weather events have really highlighted the need for accessible community spaces that can offer services to community members at the neighborhood and interpersonal

At issue in the lawsuit was whether city residents have a right to protest the widespread zoning changes proposed in the new code. The city holds that residents do not have this right, while a group of property owners who filed suit called Austin’s process illegal. A Travis County judge ruled against the city in March 2020, leading City Council to vote to appeal the decision weeks later. Oral arguments in the city’s appeal are set for Nov. 14 in front of the Fourteenth Court of Appeals. The debate will take place virtually.

SOURCE: CITY OF AUSTIN/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

level,” Austin Climate Program Manager Zach Baumer said. Growing the hub network will take additional time, funding and community input, Baumer said. Each hub could cost up to $1 million to renovate. The goal is to have a hub within a 15-minute walk of every resident. This would require about 400 hubs, according to Baumer.

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN - DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

A look at Austin’s light pollution in 2020 can be assessed through the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, or VIIRS, a satellite instrument capable of collecting images of the Earth at night. Radiance shows the power of a light source and how much of that light is propagated. Measuring dark skies

TOURISM State law protects dark skies

LOW RADIANCE

HIGH RADIANCE

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BY AMY RAE DADAMO & IAIN OLDMAN

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The Milky Way—the galaxy that includes Earth’s solar system—can no longer be seen by nearly 80% of North Americans due to light pollution. “The Hill Country, we know, is becoming a hotspot for astro-tourism, and the reason that people move to the Hill Country is because they want that natural connection, and part of that is the night sky,” said Dawn Davies, the Night Sky program coordinator at Hill Country Alliance. Lighting regulations Under the International Dark-Sky Association’s designation, there are already several existing International Dark Sky Places dotted throughout the state. In all, 15 sites are designated as Dark Sky Places in Texas, and seven of those are located between Fredericksburg and Austin. Dripping Springs became the rst Dark Sky Community in 2014, meaning the city adopted outdoor lighting ordinances to preserve the quality of

the night sky, according to the IDA website. “Dripping Springs is well on its way to securing a place as one of the truly night-sky-friendly communities in the United States,” IDA Texas Coordinator Stephen Bosbach said at the time. Since then, Lost Creek and River Hills, two neighborhoods in South Austin, were given IDA designations as Dark Sky Friendly Developments of Distinction for enacting planning that “promotes a more natural night sky,” according to the IDA. The provisions outlined in Senate Bill 1090 allow other areas to apply for the designation. The bill establishes standards for materials used in development—such as light structures and sconces. “In 2019 there was action taken by the Legislature to ensure that cities and other governmental entities wouldn’t be in the business of picking winners and losers in the market for products used

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MCKINNEY FALLS STATE PARK PURSUING IDA CERTIFICATION

BEE CAVE

PURSUING IDA CERTIFICATION

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DRIPPING SPRINGS IDA CERTIFIED 2014

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HORSESHOE BAY IDA CERTIFIED 2015

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MAP NOT TO SCALE

SOURCES: INTERNATIONAL DARKSKY ASSOCIATION, VISIBLE INFRARED IMAGING RADIOMETER SUITE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

in constructing homes. It didn’t have legislation that permitted future Dark Sky communities to be established,” said state Rep. Andrew Murr, RJunction, who sponsored the 2021 bill. “[SB 1090] picks up where that left o as an unintended consequence.” In 2011, the IDA approved its model lighting ordinance,

or MLO, to serve as a template for municipalities to develop more responsible lighting standards. Under the MLO, outdoor lighting xtures such as street lamps must be designed with proper shielding to reduce glare and prevent light trespass, which occurs when articial light extends past a property line. Other

requirements include an 11 p.m. lights-out curfew for nonresidential properties as well as standards for lighting color and temperature. Dark sky tourism Dark sky proponents say designated sites can attract a niche visitor to the Hill Country—astro-tourists. These tourists come

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