Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | Oct. 2020

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 12  OCT. 14NOV. 10, 2020

ONLINE AT

VOTER GUIDE 2020

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GATEWAY GHOST TOURS

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Opening dates unknown for Riverwalk restaurants

2020Voter Guide HIGH TURNOUT EXPECTED

Denton County residents have historically turned out in far greater numbers for federal, state and county elections than they have for municipal and school board elections. Both are on this year’s ballot. Voter turnout percentage: Federal, state and county Municipal and schools

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Frustration over the delayed opening of the Riv- erwalk at Central Park is not just a topic overheard around Flower Mound. It is etched on the dust-covered windows of one of the property’s empty restaurant buildings. “Hurry and nish—we want margaritas!” one n- ger-scribbled message reads. For now, those vacant restaurant structures lie at the heart of one of Flower Mound’s most anticipated developments. More than a decade after the rst developer laid out a vision for the 158-acre property, the restaurant portion of the site is facing yet another CONTINUED ON 16

5.4%

May 2019 Nov. 2018 May 2018 May 2017 Nov. 2016 May 2016 May 2015 Nov. 2014

58.8%

7.2%

9.6%

64.7%

7.6% 6.4%

35.4%

0

100K 200K 300K 400K 500K 600K

C OLLEG E

Number of registered voters

SOURCE: DENTON COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PHOTO COURTESY ABODE STOCK: TINYAKOVCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Denton County elections face new tests Voters head to polls amid pandemic, with somemunicipal races on ballot

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BY DANIEL HOUSTON

the spread of the virus at the polls. Voting early and during non-peak hours is another way to limit exposure to others, the county said. The county will oer a curbside voting option for those who are sick or whomay otherwise be unable to enter the polling place. Eligibility for mail-in voting remains limited to people age 65 or older,

Ocials in Denton County have geared up for an election like no other as residents have begun to cast ballots in person during the coronavirus pandemic. The county elections department is strongly encouraging voters to wear masks and keep six feet of distance from others in an eort to limit

Restaurant buildings remain empty at the Riverwalk. (Daniel Houston/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 13

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 Local events and things to do

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Barb Delk, bdelk@communityimpact.com EDITOR Daniel Houston SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Michelle Degard ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jason Lindsay METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMDANIEL: Hello Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village! Last month our general manager, Barb Delk, introduced the new team that will be putting together this newspaper going forward. This month, I wanted to take some time to introduce myself as the paper’s new editor. I come to you from our Plano paper, where I spent the last three years covering development, city government and local school policy. As I’ve spent the last two months getting to know

Voterguide

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Federal, state and local election info LOCAL CANDIDATE Q&AS 11 Backgrounds, qualications and select questionnaire responses from county and municipal races BUSINESS FEATURE 14 Gateway Ghost Tours

these three vibrant cities, I’ve been struck by how much there is for me to learn. Your neighborhoods, your concerns and your hopes for your communities have to be at the core of our coverage. Without a mission centered around meeting the needs of our readers, we wouldn’t have a paper. For that reason, it’s important to me to hear from a wide group of voices as I wrap my head around the local questions that are important to you. Last month, we went in-depth on the lack of a grocery store on the east side of I-35E, long a sore point for residents of Old Town Lewisville and the surrounding neighborhoods. This month, we worked to provide clarity on the status of the Flower Mound River Walk development. We know a lot of you are wondering what the next steps will look like, and when you might be able to visit a restaurant or two near the water. You can read that story starting on Page 1. But to keep digging into important stories, we want help from you. We welcome any story tips, quick introductions or other feedback at lnews@communityimpact.com. Thank you! Daniel Houston, Editor

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

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HIGHLAND VILLAGE

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LEWISVILLE LAKE

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JUSTIN RD.

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LLELA NATURE PRESERVE

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CENTRAL PARK AVE.

Lewisville Thrive

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RENDERING COURTESY CITY OF LEWISVILLE

ESPLANADE PL.

SRT TOLL

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LEWISVILLE

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FLOWER MOUND

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SRT TOLL

GRAPEVINE LAKE

Sparrow Collective

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

DANIEL HOUSTON/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NOWOPEN 1 Stone Creek Collectibles opened Oct. 1 at 2260 Morriss Road, Ste. 320, Flower Mound. The shop offers various collec- tor’s items for sale, from porcelain figures and Christmas ornaments to costume jewelry and sports-themed jackets. 2 Tower Bay Lofts opened Aug. 25 at 3000 N. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville. The midrise apartment community, lo- cated near Tower Bay Park off Lewisville Lake, is now leasing one- and two-bed- room units. 972-318-0525. www.thetowerbaylofts.com 3 Buttermilk Sky Pie opened its Flower Mound location in early October at www.facebook.com/ stonecreekcollectibles

5 Kretzschy’s Cajun BBQ opened in September at 1301 FM 407, Ste. 103, Lewisville. The restaurant will feature dishes that combine Texas BBQ and Louisiana Cajun flavors. Upcoming menu options include smoked meats, burgers, po’boys, and fried chicken and catfish. Sauce titles at Kretzschy’s include Bour- bon, Blueberry and Swamp. 214-513-9305. www.kretzschyscajun.com 6 Cryo Nation opened a new location in September at 2630 Justin Road, Ste. 105, Highland Village. The location offers a variety of extreme-cold services, includ- ing whole-body cryotherapy, targeted cryotherapy and a number of techniques to aid in weight loss or muscle building. 972-317-0702. www.cryonationwellness.com

7 Mac&Z was set to open to visitors Oct. 12 and preparing for a wider soft opening Oct. 17 near the River Walk at Central Park, 4281 Esplanade Place, Ste. 100, Flower Mound. The cafe will include a play area for young children, including toddlers and crawlers. The play area will include a number of sensory learning toys. The cafe will serve pastries, sand- wiches and coffees sourced from local roasters. www.macandz.com 8 YogaSix was planning to open Oct. 12 at 4610 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound. The boutique yoga studio was previously expected to open in May, but the coro- navirus pandemic led to some additional delays in permitting, according to YogaSix management. The studio will offer six different class types, including heated and

4610 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 120, Flower Mound. The dessert shop specializes in handmade small and large pies, including buttermilk pie, apple pie, pecan pie and chocolate meringue. Buttermilk Sky Pie has nearby locations in Frisco, Colleyville 4 The city of Lewisville opened its new Thrive recreation center Oct. 3 at 1950 S. Valley Parkway, Lewisville. The 87,000-square-foot facility includes a gym and fitness area, indoor walking track and children’s play equipment. The facility also includes various water fea- tures, such as a lazy river, a lap pool and a leisure pool. Memberships are available on the facility’s website. 469-635-5300. www.lewisvillethrive.com and Dallas. 972-704-3287. www.buttermilkskypie.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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We Sell The Fun Stuff !

FLOWER MOUND RD.

Before stay-at-home orders were issued by state and local governments in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, the city of Highland Village prepared the Kids Kastle construction site for a series of community build days.

(972) 628-6200 www.SKArms.com / Sales@SKArms.com 1221 Flower Mound Rd, Ste 140, Flower Mound, TX 75028

BRIAN PARDUE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS The rebuilding of the Kids Kastle playground in Highland Village will go forward after coronavirus-related restrictions derailed the original plans for a community build. Construction could begin as early as October after Highland Village City Council approved a contract Sept. 8 with Play by Design to complete the rebuild, according to a city sta memo. The playground was designed and constructed by Highland Village residents more than two decades ago in the city’s Unity Park. The original intent behind the project was to have the community come nonheated yoga, fitness and meditation. YogaSix classes will be offered at different intensity levels for people of all fitness levels. 972-638-8598. www.yogasix.com COMING SOON 9 RiverWalk Flats was expected to open in late November at 4650 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound. The apartment community for active adults features a variety of amenities, including a clubhouse, a sports lounge, a saltwater pool, a theater, a 24-hour fitness center and housekeeping services. 214-222-5380. https://rwflats.com/ 10 Sparrow Collective is eyeing a new storefront in Old Town Lewisville, and the city is helping the developer clear the way at 105 E. Main St., Lewisville. The Wiscon- sin-based apparel and gift company would occupy a former automotive building off Main and Mill. The developer is working to renovate the building and will receive up to $40,000 of city assistance for the proj- ect. The interior demolition is expected to wrap up around October, the city said. Work on the facade would begin then and would likely last through the spring. www.sparrowcollective.com ANNIVERSARIES 11 Wellmind Coffee Co. celebrated its first anniversary Sept. 3 at 2300 Highland

together in the summer to nish building the playground structures. But because of coronavirus-related restrictions, including Gov. Greg Abbott’s order banning gatherings of 10 or more people, that community build would have had to be delayed into 2021 at earliest.

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Village Road, Bldg. 9, Highland Village. The shop serves handcrafted coffee and espresso drinks, fresh-pressed lemonade

and more. 972-318-0405. www.wellmindcoffee.com

12 Zion Market marked its first anniver- sary of business Aug. 27 at 2401 S. Stem- mons Freeway, Lewisville. The Korean-in- fluenced center features restaurants, retail and grocery space. 469-637-0070. www.zionmarket.com IN THE NEWS 13 The Lakeside DFW development resumed its Lakeside Music Series in September after a hiatus brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Guests are now required to keep six feet of distance from other groups and to wear masks when within six feet of anyone outside their household. Most of the shows this year had been canceled as the town enforced restrictions on larger events during the pandemic. The venue is located at 2314 Lakeside Parkway, Flower Mound. www.lakesidedfw.com Titans of CNC announced Sept. 25 in a video that it plans to move its workshop facility to Flower Mound. The facility will be home to the company’s manufactur- ing operations, education programs and video studio. The company is known in part for its cable show, “Titan: American Built.” www.titansofcnc.com

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

ONGOING PROJECTS

UPCOMING PROJECTS

COLLEGE ST.

WALTERS ST.

MAIN ST.

VALLEY RIDGE BLVD.

MAIN ST.

PURNELL ST.

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Valley Parkway project The city of Lewisville has sold bonds to fund a major construction project on Valley Parkway, and officials expect the design process to begin in early 2021. Con- struction is not expected to begin until the following year. The project is expected to affect traffic on Valley Parkway between College Parkway and Main Street. The project is addressing the “deteriorating condi- tion” of streets along this major roadway. This stretch of road also has the potential for pedestrian and bicycle improvements. Timeline: July 2022-December 2023 Cost: $2 million Funding source: city of Lewisville

Main and Mill project Crews are nearing the final stretch of an intensive project to upgrade three major stretches of road in Old Town Lewisville. Landscape and hardscape improvements on both streets will continue through the end of the year. The total project encompasses a portion of Mill Street extending from Purnell Street to just past Walters Street; a stretch of Main Street from Mill to the rail station to the east; and the portion of Charles Street in front of the MCL Grand performance venue. Timeline: January 2019-December 2020 Cost: $8.5 million Funding sources: city of Lewisville, North Central Texas Council of Governments

Intersection project at Morriss Road and Valley Ridge Boulevard

Crews are expected to wrap up this project in January after completing the bulk of their work at the inter- section of Morriss Road and Valley Ridge Boulevard. The project involves constructing a new westbound right-turn lane on Valley Ridge as well as improving the existing southbound left-turn lane on Morriss. As part of the project, crews were also expected to rebuild the trail and crosswalk along Valley Ridge. Construction, once scheduled to end in October, has been extended through the end of the year. Timeline: September 2019-January 2021 Cost: $350,000 Funding source: town of Flower Mound

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 23. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION

WHO WOULD BE AFFECTED?

District to explore extending 202122 school year at Lewisville, Rockbrook elementary schools

Lewisville Elementary School 285 Country Ridge Road, Lewisville

BELLAIRE BLVD.

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

would maintain the same teacher for the entire school year. If the program is successful at Rockbrook and Lewisville elementa- ries, it could potentially be expanded

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Administrators will explore the possibility of extending the 2021- 22 school year at two elementary schools in Lewisville. Rockbrook Elementary School and Lewisville

COUNTRY RIDGE RD.

This school may be part of a new program. (Photos by Daniel Houston/Community Impact Newspaper)

to other schools in the district, Project Manager Susan Heintzman told trustees. But Superinten- dent Kevin Rogers said the district would not extend next school year if the proposal does not end up with the support

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“IF APARENT AT ROCKBROOKDOESN’T WANT THEIR CHILD TO BE PART OF THAT 210 DAY SCHOOL YEAR, WHATARETHEOPTIONS FOR THAT PARENT? THOSE ARE THE KIND OF THINGS THAT ... THE GROUPWILL HAVE TO WORK THROUGH.” KEVIN ROGERS, LISD SUPERINTENDENT

Rockbrook Elementary School 2751 Rockbrook Drive, Lewisville

Elementary School would be the rst to roll out this pilot approach next summer if Lewisville ISD decides to move forward with the extended year. The program could add up to 30 additional instructional days at the beginning of next school year.

VISTA RIDGE MALL DR.

of parents and teachers at the

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two campuses. He said district sta

This school may also be part of the program.

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would also have to come up with satisfactory answers to a number of questions about implementation. “If a parent at Rockbrook doesn’t want their child to be part of that 210-day [school year], what are the options for that parent?” Rogers said. “Those are the kind of things that [Heintzman] and the group will have to work through.” If implemented, half of the cost of the new school days would be covered by the state under a school nance law passed in 2019. The district would have to nd a way to cover the rest of the costs, Rogers said.

If approved, the pilot program could be implemented as early as the summer of the 2021-22 school year. WHEN COULD THESE SCHOOLS BE AFFECTED?

WHAT WOULD CHANGE?

Lewisville ISD has hired a project manager and is expected to work with a contractor to plan the design and possible implementation of the program at the two schools, according to a Sept. 8 sta presentation to trustees. The project manager’s salary and other planning expenses are being funded by $200,000 in grant money the district received in June. The extended school year itself has yet to be approved, and details are still subject to change. But under the current outline, students at Rock- brook and Lewisville elementaries

The district could tack on 30 additional instructional days at the start of the school year.

WHY IS THE DISTRICT CONSIDERING EXTENDING THE SCHOOL YEAR?

The current study phase is funded by a $200,000 grant.

For students, this would mean more time for clubs and brain breaks.

For teachers, there would be more time for professional learning and collaboration.

The district also anticipates there could be benets to school culture.

SOURCE: LEWISVILLE ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

MEETINGSWE COVER Lewisville City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Mondays of each month. www.cityoewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. the rst and third Mondays of each month. www.ower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.highlandvillage.org NUMBER TOKNOW In Lewisville, a family with a $300,000 home would pay $1,330 in city property taxes under the unchanged tax rate the city approved in August. For a home of the same value, a Flower Mound family would pay $1,277 in city property taxes, while a Highland Village family would pay $1,689. Each municipality approved its new tax rate and budget in recent weeks. $1,330

30 ACTION ITEMS Lewisville adopted more than two dozen action items to make the city more inclusive of its Black residents. Here are some of the highlights.

• Prioritize recruitment of minority job candidates and reduce opportunities for bias in hiring • Implement new training for police ocers • Explore sending civilian employees in response to certain mental health calls instead of police

City ocials heard from community leaders in August. (Courtesy city of Lewisville)

Lewisville pursuesmore inclusive policies towardBlack residents

SOURCE: CITY OF LEWISVILLECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LEWISVILLE The city has adopted a series of goals that ocials hope will make Lewisville a more inclusive place for its Black residents. On Sept. 21, Lewisville City Council adopted more than two dozen action items on racial inclusion that were the result of the city’s talks in recent weeks with leaders in the Black community. The proposals ranged from over- coming implicit bias in the process of hiring city employees to emphasizing

training in the police department. The report the city approved this week was the result of Mayor Rudy Durham’s “Listen, Learn, Lead” commission. The information-gath- ering series featured feedback from dozens of community leaders and was an explicit response to the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the city said. Under the proposals approved by council, the city will prioritize the hire of a new full-time employee

whose job would involve “cham- pioning diversity, inclusion, and transparency” and ensuring that the city follows through on the other recommendations in the report. The city would also initiate a number of training opportunities for its police ocers and explore the possibility of having civilian personnel respond to some mental health or substance abuse calls for which police have typically been responsible.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

VOTER GUIDE 2020

DATES TOKNOW

MORE INFORMATION For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote.

OCT. 30 Last day of early voting NOV. 3 Election Day *DATE RECEIVED, NOT POSTMARKED

OCT. 13 First day of early voting OCT. 23 Last day to apply for ballot by mail*

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

Supreme Court, Place 8 R Brett Busby* D Gisela D. Triana L Tom Oxford Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3 R Bert Richardson* D Elizabeth Davis Frizell Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4 R Kevin Patrick Yeary* D Tina Clinton Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 9 R David Newell* D Brandon Birmingham Second District Court of Appeals, Place 6 R Mike Wallach* D Delonia A. Watson

State Board of Education, District 14 R Sue Melton-Malone D Greg Alvord TEXAS LEGISLATURE State senator, District 12

NATIONAL

STATE Texas Railroad Commission R James “Jim” Wright D Chrysta Castañeda L Matt Sterett G Katija “Kat” Gruene Supreme Court, chief justice R Nathan Hecht* D Amy Clark Meachum L Mark Ash Supreme Court, Place 6 R Jane Bland* D Kathy Cheng Supreme Court, Place 7 R Je Boyd* D Staci Williams L William Bryan Strange III

DENTON COUNTY Denton County commissioner, Precinct 3 R Bobbie J. Mitchell* D Delia Parker-Mims Denton County District Judge, 431st District R Jim Johnson D Diana Weitzel MUNICIPAL Flower Mound Town Council, Place 2 David Johnson Sandeep Sharma* Flower Mound Town Council, Place 5 Ann Martin Claudio Forest*

President R Donald J. Trump* D Joseph R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins U.S. Senate R John Cornyn* D Mary “MJ” Hegar L Kerry Douglas McKennon G David B. Collins U.S. representative, District 26 R Michael C. Burgess* D Carol H. Iannuzzi L Mark Boler

R Jane Nelson* D Shadi Zitoon State representative, District 63 R Tan Parker* D Leslie Peeler State representative, District 65 R Kronda Thimesch D Michelle Beckley*

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Welcome to

Hai r | Aesthet ics | Permanent Makeup

Beaut y and bus i ness go hand- i n-hand when you par tner wi th Sandi Hammons Studi o. From prov idi ng l uxur y beaut y serv i ces to rent i ng out Luxur y Sa l on Studi o to the f i nes t s t y l i s t s and aes thet i c i ans i n the area, we prov ide for a l l beaut y enthus i as t s . Stop by today for a l uxur y exper i ence you can on l y f i nd at Sandi Hammons Studi os .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CANDIDATES

2020 Voter Guide

Get to know the candidates running in the general election

Incumbent

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Denton County commissioner, Precinct 3

Flower Mound Town Council, Place 2

DAVID JOHNSON

BOBBIE J. MITCHELL

Party affiliation: Republican Relevant experience: county commissioner since 2000; former Lewisville mayor; more than 300 training hours related to the position, plus other county-related training www.votecommissionermitchell.com

Occupation: commercial banker Relevant experience: chair of Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commission with 10 years experience; served on boards of directors for area nonprofits www.facebook.com/johnsonforflomo

R

SANDEEP SHARMA

DELIA PARKER-MIMS

Party affiliation: Democrat Relevant experience: lawyer trained in economics; small- business owner, advocate of green economic growth; 35 years of experience working with area residents 469-464-9427 | www.votedeliaparkermims.com

Occupation: management (CEO) Relevant experience: current council member, former member of Planning and Zoning Commission, member of Lions Club, school PTA volunteer 972-762-3661 | www.engageourtown.org

D

Flower Mound Town Council, Place 5

CLAUDIO FOREST

ANN MARTIN

Occupation: construction manager Relevant experience: current council member; former member of Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commission; active in local charities; career background in architecture and construction www.facebook.com/claudioforestflowermound

Occupation: service director Relevant experience: president of Friends of the Flower Mound Library; Lewisville ISD volunteer; 23-year resident of Flower Mound; career in commercial insurance 972-977-2142 | www.ann4towncouncil.com

Candidate Q&A The answers below were submitted by each candidate in response to a questionnaire from Community Impact Newspaper . Each response has been edited for length and clarity. For each candidate’s full responses, visit communityimpact.com/voter-guide/.

Q: If elected, what would your top priorities be over the coming term?

SANDEEP SHARMA A: “I will continue to support low-density and responsible growth, and traffic improvements will continue to be my top priority. I will keep encouraging the town to enhance parks and open spaces and continue to hold developers to the town’s park land dedication requirement. I will encourage the town to stop waiving park development fees. I will continue to listen to and engage with the residents.” DAVID JOHNSON A: “Return respect to town staff at Town Council meetings. Initiate strategic discussions to get results for many issues that council keeps putting off. I will push support for a bond referendum to issue debt to buy and develop park land and open space. Encourage discussion with developers to bring quality residential commercial projects to Flower Mound. Improve communication with neighboring municipalities.”

BOBBIE J. MITCHELL A: “Continue working to correct the damages COVID-19 has caused. Continue addressing problems in our health care system. I am a part of the Denton County Behavioral Health Leadership Team, which advocates and facilitates for a collaborative person-centered behavioral health system to repair and restore lives. Continue to address homelessness and human trafficking. Work to keep citizens in their homes.” DELIA PARKER-MIMS A: “Dealing with the comprehensive effects COVID-19 will have on our community, from health care to economics, is a top priority. I intend to work in a coordinated manner with local municipalities and lobby upper-level representatives for real relief, such as a mortgage moratorium. I would seek to expand the qualifications of indigent health care as more residents begin to lose insurance.”

CLAUDIO FOREST A: “We need a strong town manager candidate who is willing to put their staff first and further develop the impressive talent that we currently have representing our town. My second priority will be working with town staff, landowners and developers to negotiate the best options for the town. Thirdly, the town will need to continue addressing its aging infrastructure, such as water and sewer lines and roads.” ANN MARTIN A: “In the coming months, selecting an outstanding candidate to fill the vacant position of town manager is of the utmost importance. Attention to the master plan and preserving and protecting what is left of our unique country atmosphere and quality of life should guide all of my decisions. I signed the ‘Back the Blue’ pledge, establishing my commitment to our first responders: police and firefighters.”

Answers may have been edited for length. Read full Q&A’s at communityimpact.com/vote .

11

LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2020 Voter Guide

CONTINUED FROM 1

DIFFERENT ELECTIONS, DIFFERENT ISSUES VOTING CURBSIDE: STEP BY STEP

disabled, out of the county during the voting period or conned in jail but eligible to vote. In addition to the dizzying array of new voting protocols, this general election—in which the nation’s pres- ident, congressional representatives and state oces are all on the ballot— also provides an unusual backdrop for a series of municipal races that are tra- ditionally held earlier in the year. In Flower Mound, two races for Town Council were pushed from May—when voters typically go to the polls for nonpartisan elections for their city government and school dis- trict —to this traditionally more parti- san, higher-turnout election cycle. A changed race Holding the municipal election in a November general election cycle has posed a number of challenges for cam- paigns, from recruitment of volunteers to increased politicization of a typi- cally nonpartisan process. David Johnson, chair of the Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commis- sion, launched his bid in September of last year to unseat sitting Council Member Sandeep Sharma in May’s elections. He did not realize, he said, that he was signing up for a campaign that would last more than a year. “We were building up a head of steam in March, ... [heading toward a] crescendo in May—and then, everything hit the skids” when the council elections were postponed, Johnson said. Sharma, the incumbent coun- cil member, said the pandemic has changed his approach to reaching out to voters. “Because of the COVID issue, there’s hardly any kind of meet-and- greet type of events,” Sharma said.

The town of Flower Mound is among several municipalities holding its council elections during this November election cycle, an unusual measure spurred by the pandemic. Here is how these federal cycles tend to dier from municipal election cycles.

Denton County is oering a curbside option this year for some voters. Here is how it works.

Municipal and school board cycles

Federal, state and county cycles

Who is it for?

May of any given year (diers by municipality or school district)

People who are sick or who are physically unable to enter the polling place

When does each election typically take place?

November of even-numbered years

How do you get started?

Federal and state laws; state and federal budgets and tax rates; drawing of congressional district boundaries; party control of various levels of government

Call 940-349-3200 in advance to let the elections oce know when and where you plan to vote

Street repairs; police and re personnel; school district policies; zoning and development rules; local bonds; ordinances; property tax rates

What areas of responsibility are aected?

Park curbside at the polling place and request a ballot from an election ocer What do you do when you get there?

Do candidates typically run under a party aliation? What does turnout for each election typically look like in Denton County?

Yes, these races are partisan

No, these races are traditionally nonpartisan

What happens next?

Either hand the ballot to the election ocer, who will put it in the ballot box, or allow a companion to deposit it for you

35%-65% of registered voters

4%-10% of registered voters

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE, DENTON COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE, DENTON COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Instead, Sharma and Johnson have reached out to a broader array of voters on platforms, such as social media. Sharma has also sent out mailed yers to reach more Flower Mound residents, something that Johnson said he had avoided through most of the election. In addition to the race between Johnson and Sharma, the town is also holding an election for council’s Place 5 seat. Incumbent Claudio Forest is being challenged by Ann Martin. Because the local May election has been combined with the November presidential election, many more Flower Mound residents are expected to have a chance to weigh in on the Town Council races. In Denton County, recent municipal

elections have attracted 4%-10% of registered voters. Voter turnout typi- cally jumps to 35%-65% in midterm or presidential election cycles, according to Denton County election records. Flower Mound Town Council races will appear near the end of the ballot after a long list of Republicans and Democrats who are vying for federal, state and county oce. Municipal positions, on the other hand, are nonpartisan. Cities and towns make decisions about street repairs, water and trash pickup and a host of other issues that are consid- ered less political. The national and state contests risk overshadowing the municipal races further down the ballot, Martin said. “You have to make a mark in every

race if you want to vote in that race,” Martin said. “So we’re just hoping that people will, A, turn the ballot page over, and then, B, just keep going all the way to the end where our [munici- pal] races are.” Forest, Martin’s opponent, saidmore voters have also shown an interest in his party aliation this year. “We are nonpartisan at the local level—as it should be, to be honest with you,” Forest said. “And my national politics or my belief system, I don’t think plays a huge role in the decisions I make for Flower Mound.”

For more information, visit www.communityimpact.com/ voter-guide/

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Gateway Ghost Tours Flower Mound woman takes interest in the paranormal in Old Town Lewisville T hroughout Old Town Lewisville, some of the city’s oldest buildings now house

“I’m a psychic; we’re still in the Bible Belt of the country, and some people are still a little judgmental of things,” Ross remembers think- ing at the time. But the city employee she spoke with was actually enthusiastic about putting her tours on the city calen- dar, she said. The city has promoted her tours in a variety of ways since. Ross said she works closely with local business owners, several of whom let her groups inside their buildings to get an up-close look at the spirits she claims dwell there. Using dowsing rods, pendulums and other tools, Ross shows guests on her tours how she searches for signs of these apparitions. During the pandemic, fewer people have been coming on the tours, Ross said. She has moved to more private tours as a result. In the weeks leading up to Halloween, however, Ross said, she plans to ramp up group tours while keeping the numbers limited to no more than 10. The tours are open to anyone who is interested, even skeptics of her psychic methods, Ross said. But the typical tour participant is usually well-versed in the concepts, she said. “People that take the tour— they’re usually very aware of the energy,” she said.

theater groups, coee shops and other small businesses. But in these time-tested places, Cindy Ross said, she sees more than the average person—and for the last seven years, she has asked others to explore them with her. “When you have a lot of history, you have the paranormal,” Ross said. Ross is a Flower Mound resident who gives regular tours of Old Town Lewisville for those with an interest in the paranormal. Ross said she believes the area’s streets, buildings and cemetery are lled with ghosts of people who died long ago. Her business,

Participants in Cindy Ross’s ghost tours explore some of Lewisville’s oldest historic buildings. (Photos courtesy Cindy Ross)

SITES OF INTEREST Gateway Ghost Tours stops by a number of prominent buildings in Old Town Lewisville. These places inspire discussions of the city’s history—and, Cindy Ross said, experiences of the paranormal. Here are some of the locations her tours focus on the most. Greater Lewisville Community Theatre 160 W. Main St., Lewisville Irene’s Bakery 116 W. Main St., Lewisville Main Street Cafe 208 E. Main St., Lewisville Old Town Wine House 119 W. Main St., Lewisville Smith Cemetery 1 2 3 4 5

Gateway Ghost Tours, provides tools and guid- ance for guests interested in learning more about these spirits’ stories.

“WHENYOUHAVE A LOT OF HISTORY, YOUHAVE THE PARANORMAL.”

CINDY ROSS, OWNER OF GATEWAY GHOST TOURS

B LVD.

The tour started as a one-time thing, Ross said. A psychic by profession, she did some historical research on various Old Town attractions and started spreading the word about her rst tour a few years ago. When the city caught wind of her eorts, a sta member called her up. She was nervous when she rst got the call, she said.

For seven years, Cindy Ross has been giving tours of Old Town Lewisville as part of her Gateway Ghost Tours business.

5

GatewayGhost Tours Address: Check website for meeting place Upcoming tour dates: Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Oct. 30-31 www.gatewayghosttours.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Carne asada with cheese enchilada ($16.50)

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Angelina’s Mexican Restaurant in Lewisville is operated by a family consisting of Eliza Velez (from left), Isabel Velez, Louis Velez and Adriana Luna. (Photos by Daniel Houston/Community Impact Newspaper)

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Angelina’sMexican Restaurant Family works to keep matriarch’s business legacy alive

I n recent months, loyal customers have lined up for curbside service at a Lewisville Tex-Mex favorite in an eort to keep it aoat. But Angelina’s Mexican Restaurant is more than just a local staple. The family behind it, whose restaurant roots can be traced back more than 30 years in the North Texas community, is defending a wide-reaching legacy. The restaurant gets its name from Angelina Velez, who started a small restaurant in The Colony in 1986 and grew it into a group of North Texas establishments. In the years since her death in 2013, Velez’s family has taken over the locations in Lewisville and Corinth. “We can’t let what she built die with us,” said Adriana Luna, Velez’s granddaughter. “We’ve got to gure this out.” Luna operates the Lewisville location of Ange- lina’s alongside her sister, Eliza Velez. In recent months, they and their parents have been working like many restaurant owners to adapt to the BY DANIEL HOUSTON

challenges of food service in the pandemic. Thanks to continued support of their most loyal customers, the Lewisville restaurant has been able to make it so far without needing to lay o any sta, Luna said. “I’m sure people were sick of Mexican food, but they continued to come and do curbside pickup— not only because of the food, but because of our sta,” Luna said. In addition to curbside and pickup service, Angelina’s has beneted from selling family meal packs, Luna said. The Texas executive order that allowed restaurants to sell margaritas for takeout was a boost as well, she said. Luna said she and her family members in the restaurant business have leaned on each other for advice during the pandemic. At the Lewisville location, the loyal customer base has proven to be a big help, she said. “We don’t have a lot of people who just come in and don’t come back,” Luna said. “We have people who come in for generations.”

Chicken fajita nachos and quesadillas are served with autitas and more.

Angelina’sMexicanRestaurant 1396 W. Main St., Lewisville 972-221-9892 www.angelinastexas.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Gross domestic product, or GDP, is the monetary value of all the goods or services produced in a given industry. On the chart below, negative bars mean that the portion of the U.S. economy that includes hotels, food services and entertainment contracted during that quarter. The biggest contractions generally happened during national recessions, which aected the Riverwalk development.

The Riverwalk at Central Park project has seen three dierent owners and two national recessions since the town of Flower Mound rst approved the project in 2008. The chart below shows the percentage change in the portion of the nation’s gross domestic product that includes hotels, restaurants and entertainment businesses. Compare key Riverwalk events below to the economic climate at the time.

Quarter 1

Quarter 2

Quarter 3

Quarter 4 National recession

0.3

0

2005 2006 2007

2010 2011

2012

2013

2014 2015

2016 2017

2018 2019

2020

January 2010 Lenders foreclose on McDowell’s project July 2010 The Baptist Foundation, a nonprot, acquires most of the land

August 2013 Most of the property switches hands again, with the current developer, Centurion American, buying the Riverwalk and beginning construction

December 2016 Flower Mound approves plans for Riverwalk amphitheater; construction not yet completed

March 2020 Town issues permits for three restaurants, Primo’s, Tillman’s and Scout, which all have yet to open July 2020 Construction on chapel and event hall is largely complete; booking is now available for events near the end of the year

-0.3

2008

August 2008 Town approves plans by developer Cole McDowell

2009

-0.6

SOURCES: TOWN OF FLOWER MOUND, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF ST. LOUISCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

American, from making progress on the next phases of construction. “Constructionandnishout contin- ues and has progressed greatly on the River Walk restaurants even during the pandemic,” Centurion American spokesperson Courtney Morrow said in a statement. “While we don’t have a rm opening date for our signature dining concepts, we look forward to announcing more within the next 1-2 months.” In recent weeks, crews have worked to erect a series of long-planned mixed-use buildings on the western side of the development.

The property’s chapel and event center is being nished out, and may hold its rst events before the end of the year, Morrow said. Developers have also submitted plans to the town for the project’s prominent amphitheater, a farmer’s market, and splash pad and prom- enade additions. A second hotel, Home2 Suites, is also under construc- tion. It will join the existing Courtyard by Marriott. But some Flower Mound resi- dents are still eager to know when the restaurants are expected to come online.

“Everybody wants to know when they’re opening, which is— we don’t know,” town spokesperson Molly Fox said. Snags and progress Visit the Riverwalk today, and the heart of the development is a

CONTINUED FROM 1

setback due to the economy. Unlike the Great Recession, which aected the project as it was getting o the ground in 2008, the current downturn was brought about by a deadly virus and by resulting health measures that have made many resi- dents more reluctant to eat out. “It’s gone through its trials and tribu- lations at no fault, really, of the current developer,” said Andrea Roy, the town’s economic development director. The economic jolt has not stopped the current developer, Centurion

-1.36

juxtaposition of babbling water fea- tures, active residential communities and the six empty restaurant spaces the developer is seeking to ll. Those residential features across

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