Franklin - Brentwood Edition - September 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 7  SEPT. 15OCT. 13, 2020

ONLINE AT

Hockey sports complex proposed on Long Lane

Nearby residents voice concerns over development, trac eects

BY WENDY STURGES

The Nashville Predators may not bring home the Stanley Cup this year, but developers in the city of Franklin are looking to give future generations of hockey players a new place to train. Earlier this summer, plans were presented to the public for the new, 25.17-acre Long Lane Sports Com- plex, set to be located at Long Lane in Franklin. The complex—which isnear theWilliamsonCountyAgExpo Center and adjacent to the Ladd Park neighborhood— would oer a site for youth and adult hockey leagues

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A new recreation facility is proposed for a rural area near the Williamson County Ag Expo Center and the Ladd Park neighborhood in Franklin. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

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2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

Addressing COVID19 learning loss Local districts deal with eects of school closures

“WE THINK LEARNING LOSS BY BACKTOSCHOOL MAY BE UP TOAHIGHOF 49%, WHICH TRANSLATES TOABOUT FIVEMONTHS OF LEARNING LOSS. SOME OF THAT INCLUDES NORMAL SUMMER LEARNING LOSS, WHICHMIGHT EQUATE TOABOUT HALF OF THAT.” STUART UDELL, CEO OF ACHIEVE 3000, AN ONLINE LEARNING PLATFORM

BY WENDY STURGES

students are faring after months of being away from the classroom. WhileFranklinSpecial School District and Williamson County Schools o- cials said educators are still conducting

Students in Williamson County have been back at school, either online or in-person, for roughly a month. In that time, school ocials said, teachers have been working to determine how

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2020 PUBLIC

How ItWorks: Roundabouts

EDUCATION E D I T I O N

DISTRICT DATA

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Wendy Sturges

FROMLACY: This school year already looks very dierent than those in years past for many families, but teachers and school ocials are still hard at work to help students learn in every situation possible. Our special Public Education Edition this month takes a close look at our school districts, from data and demographic analysis to how educators are working to help prevent learning loss. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

News, data on local road projects DEVELOPMENT UPDATES Local construction projects CITY& COUNTY

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lindsay Scott ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maureen Sipperley METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel, lklasel@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

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Latest local news

PUBLIC EDUCATION

FROMWENDY: Development has long been a hot topic in Williamson County as the area has continued to grow in population size. One of our cover stories this month takes a look at a proposed development in an area that has seen a signicant amount of construction: Southeast Franklin. Additionally, our monthly development updates (see Page 7) feature a number of projects underway across the county. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

DISTRICT DATA

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Statistics on Franklin Special School District, Williamson County Schools CAMPUS DEEP DIVE School-level demographics

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Schools covered

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 A new brick-and-mortar location of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams is now open in McEwen Northside at 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin. The scoop shop opened in mid-August and oers a wide variety of ice cream avors, including Gooey Butter Cake, Milkiest Chocolate, Salty Caramel and Savannah Buttermint. Jeni’s now operates seven locations in the Great- er Nashville area, including one in The Factory at Franklin and one in Hill Center Brentwood. www.jenis.com 2 Pinnacle Dermatology opened its newest location in early September at 125 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 210, Franklin. The medical oce oers treatment for skin conditions, such as acne, rosacea, eczema and moles. Pinnacle also oers cosmetic procedures as well as an online retail store with skin care products. Pin- nacle Dermatology operates locations in Belle Meade, Murfreesboro and Mt. Juliet as well as in North Carolina, Indiana and 3 The Boilery Seafood & Grill opened in July at 545 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 195, Franklin. The eatery oers fresh seafood dishes, including shrimp, crawsh, lobster and crab, as well as burgers, steak, sh and sandwiches. The Boilery also features a raw bar and seafood boils, in which each order is custom-made with a choice of meat, sauce and spices. 615-567-6853. www.theboileryseafood.com Illinois. 615-716-0673. www.pinnacleskin.com 4 Pies by Gigi opened Aug. 31 at 330 Franklin Road, Ste. 906D, Brentwood. The bakery, founded by Gigi Butler, oers a variety of baked goods, including scones, breads, quiches, and specialty sweet and savory pies. Take-home meals, such as casseroles and pasta dishes, are also available. The menu includes gluten-friendly and vegan options. Butler founded Gigi’s Cupcakes in the Middle Tennessee area as well as Meals by Gigi, which launched earlier this year. http://piesbygigi.com COMING SOON 5 Westhaven Conservatory , a new music school, will open in January 2021 at 1008

Westhaven Blvd., Ste. 101, Franklin. The school will oer music lessons for piano, bass, guitar and voice, with instruction in other instruments available upon request. While the physical location will not open until 2021, Westhaven Conservatory has begun oering virtual lessons, according to a social media post from the school. 615-861-9859. www.facebook.com/ westhavenconservatory 6 Nashville K-9 will open a new facility this fall at 1415 Liberty Pike, Franklin. The 15,000-plus-square-foot indoor dog train- ing facility will oer a wide variety of dog training programs, including Police K-9 training and search-and-rescue programs. The company has been in operation in the Nashville area for more than 15 years. 615-283-7100. www.nashvillek9.com 7 CoreLife Eatery will open at 401B Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 220, Franklin, in the former site of Pie Five Pizza. The restaurant will oer salads, grain bowls, soups made with bone broth, rice bowls, tacos and protein-focused entrees. An opening date for the eatery has not been announced. 615-387-9996. 8 City Farmhouse will open Oct. 1 at 117 Third Ave. N., Franklin, according to a social media post from the owners. The shop is currently located in The Barn Door at 109 S. Margin St., Franklin, and oers curated antiques and vintage home decor. The business will be located in the site currently occupied by The Shop Around the Corner, which announced Aug. 23 it will close. Three sellers that currently occupy the shop—Vintage Jolie, Sarah Menkel Art and Audrey Peep Bou- tique—will stay on after the new owners move in, according to the post. The shop will also feature new vendor Camp David Interiors, which oers antiques. www.cityfarmhousefranklin.com 9 Parks Realty moved its oce in August from 198 E. Main St., Ste. 200, to 106 E. Main St., Franklin, at Harpeth Square. The real estate company oers home buying and selling services and operates multiple oces across Middle Tennessee. 615-790-7400. www.parksathome.com www.corelifeeatery.com RELOCATIONS

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COURTESY PIES BY GIGI

EXPANSIONS 10 Sal’s Family Pizza , located at 595 Hillsboro Road, Ste. 311 Franklin, announced plans earlier this summer to build an outdoor service patio to its exist- ing restaurant. Construction on the patio is slated to begin in the coming weeks; however, a completion date has not been announced. The New York-style pizzeria oers pizza, pasta, salad and Italian des- serts. 615-472-8387. www.mysals.com IN THE NEWS Brentwood city ocials announced Aug. 20 that the city has received a perfect score on a sanitary survey of its water system. The sanitary survey is an inspection of a city’s public water system to assess capability to provide safe drink-

ing water to residents. During surveys, in- spectors from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation review records, leak repairs, training and certi- cations and take samples of water in real time, according to a release from the city. Surveys are conducted at least one every two years. www.brentwoodtn.gov CLOSING 11 Stein Mart ’s locations at A 300 Franklin Road, Ste. 150A, Brentwood, and B 545 Cool Springs Blvd., Ste 100, Frank- lin, will close as part of a company-wide bankruptcy process. Stein Mart Inc. announced Aug. 12 that it had voluntarily led for bankruptcy, as it does not have “sucient liquidity” to continue opera- tions. An exact closing date has not been announced. www.steinmart.com

Owner Kevin Pataluna opened Scissors & Scotch in August.

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FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Kevin Pataluna opened the men’s barbershop Scissors & Scotch on Aug. 15 in Hill Center Brentwood at 205 Franklin Road, Ste. 120, Brentwood. The barbershop oers haircuts and styling services as well as spa treatments and trims and shaves for facial hair. Scissors & Scotch also features a full bar with more than two dozen scotch oerings and liquor and beer on tap, according to the company. The Brentwood location is the rst in Middle Tennessee for the company.

The barbershop is the newest tenant to open as part of Phase II of Hill Center’s development. Peace, Love and Little Donuts and MOOYAH Burgers, Fries and Shakes opened earlier this year. 615-852-8108. www.scissorsscotch.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

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Roundabouts can be found in Franklin in downtown and Cool Springs.

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WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HOW ITWORKS HOWSHOULD DRIVERS ENTER A ROUNDABOUT?

Franklin Road-Main Street- Columbia Avenue repaving

Franklin Road improvements The city of Franklin has begun work to improve the area of Franklin Road from the Harpeth River Bridge to Hooper Lane/ Harpeth Industrial Court near downtown Franklin. Barricades have been placed on the west side of the roadway. When com- plete, the roadway will be widened to three lanes and will feature bike lanes on both sides of the road, sidewalks on both sides of the road, and decorative street lighting, similar to Hillsboro Road. Timeline: summer 2020-winter 2020-21 Cost: $12.8 million Funding source: city of Franklin

The Tennessee Department of Transpor- tation began work Aug. 31 on a repaving project in three sections along Franklin Road, Main Street in downtown Franklin and Columbia Avenue. The project spans from Country Road running south to Mack C. Hatcher Parkway. According to the city of Franklin, residents can expect to see signage and cones along the road- way as well as intermittent lane closures, overnight road closures and detours. Timeline: Aug. 31-late October Cost: TBD Funding source: TDOT

Roundabouts and trac circles can be found at multiple intersections in Williamson County, such as the Public Square in downtown Franklin and along McEwen Drive and Liberty Pike in Cool Springs. According to the Federal Highway Administration, roundabouts operating within capacity have lower vehicle delays than other intersections, as it is not necessary for a vehicle to come to a complete stop when there are no approaching vehicles. This has caused many cities to use roundabouts in areas that need trac calming.

New drivers and those who may be unfamiliar should follow a few key rules when entering an intersection with a roundabout.

Yield at all entry points, looking to the left for approaching cars. Yield to drivers already in the roundabout. Once inside the roundabout, do not stop.

Yield to crossing pedestrians. Signal intention when entering or exiting the roundabout. SOURCE: FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Local construction projects

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER SPRINGHILL SUITES

ANDREWS TRANSPORTATION GROUP An expansion project is underway at Andrews Transportation Group, home to the Cadillac, Jaguar and Land Rover dealerships in Brentwood. The project will add 16 new vehicle services bays and more than 8,000 square feet to the service and parts department. Construction on the project began in June along Old Hickory Boulevard.

SONDRAMORRIS &ROBERT N. MOORE JR. CENTER FOR ARTS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP The Sondra Morris & Robert N. Moore Jr. Center for Arts and Entrepreneurship is under construction at Battleground Academy in Franklin. School ocials broke ground on the center in September 2019. When complete, the center will feature a 550-seat theater as well as classrooms, oce and meeting rooms.

A new 150-room Springhill Suites hotel is under construction at McEwen Northside, a 45-acre mixed use development at McEwen and Aspen Grove Drives. The hotel will feature patio seating, meeting space and a bar, according to site plans from the developer. A number of tenants have already opened in McEwen Northside, including Ti’s Treats, Club Pilates, Just Love Coee Cafe, Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams and Prose. The hotel is slated to open this fall.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Franklin and Brentwood

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

NUMBER TOKNOW This is the number of days that Williamson County had a mask mandate in place for residents in public spaces. County Mayor Rogers Anderson announced Aug. 29 that the county would not renew the mandate. 53 CITY HIGHLIGHTS FRANKLIN The city of Franklin was recognized in August with one of just 10 All-American City awards by the National Civic League for its work in civic engagement in the past year. BRENTWOOD The city of Brentwood announced Sept. 1 it has donated more than $344,000 across 12 Brentwood-area schools, the Brentwood YMCA, Brentwood Blaze, the FiftyForward Martin Center and other organizations. In the last 34 years, the city has donated more than $8 million to public schools and other service providers. In accordance with an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least Oct. 28. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets Sept. 22 and Oct. 13 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets Sept. 28 and Oct. 12 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets Sept. 21 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets Oct. 19 at 6:30 p.m. at Moore Elementary School at 1061 Lewisburg Pike, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Williamson County reports nearly $500M in visitor spending in 2019

FranklinHigh School names newmascot WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS Franklin High School’s new mascot will be the Admirals following a student vote held earlier this month. Ocials with Williamson County Schools announced the new mascot Aug. 18. “The Admirals was chosen because Franklin High is touted by the students, faculty and alumni as ‘The Flagship’ school of Williamson County and is the oldest high school in the district,” FHS Principal Shane Pantall said in a release. “While new changes are on the horizon, Franklin High will remain anchored in tradition.” The change comes after a local committee submitted a recommenda- tion in July. New branding and logos are expected to be presented in the coming weeks, according to WCS.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY Wil- liamson County set a new record in visitor spending last year, reporting $497.2 million in 2019, according to a report from Visit Franklin released Aug. 25. This is an increase of 3.67% over 2018, and it marks the county’s tenth consecutive year with an increase in visitor spending. However, Visit Franklin President and CEO Ellie Westman Chin said these numbers do not reect the economic issues caused by the coronavirus pandemic, citing research from the U.S. Travel Asso- ciation projecting the state could see a 35%-40% decline in spending. “We know we will not see economic results like this when the nal numbers from 2020 come in,” Westman Chin said.

TRACKING TOURISM Visitors to Williamson County spend millions in the area each year, according to Visit Franklin. However, travel organizations have projected that spending could be down by 35%-40% in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

2018 $479.6M 2017 $452.6M 2016 $427.3M

2019 $497.2M

2020

$298.3M-$323.2M*

SOURCES: VISIT FRANKLIN, U.S. TRAVEL ASSOCIATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

*PROJECTED

Williamson County Schools Board Chair Gary Anderson retires after 30years of service

WILLIAMSONCOUNTY SCHOOLS Following 30 years with the district and 11 years as school board chair, Williamson County Schools Board Member Gary Anderson presided over his last meeting Aug. 17. Anderson did not run for re-election earlier this year, signaling his intent to retire. During his tenure, Anderson served as a PTO president and as a volunteer coach and music teacher, according to the district. To honor Anderson’s career, WCS

ocials proclaimed Aug. 24 as Gary B. Anderson Day in Williamson County. Anderson was recognized during the board’s August meeting by County Mayor Rogers Anderson and was presented with a Tennessee ag that was own over the state capitol. “Gary has had such a positive impact on so many people over the years. We can’t even begin to measure his inuence,” WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said in a district release. “He has taught me personally the

Board chair Gary Anderson (right) was honored for his 30 years of service with Williamson County Schools.

COURTESY WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS

value of instruction and the value of what we do for students.” Anderson’s seat will be lled by Jennifer Aprea, who won the Aug. 6 election for District 5. The board will select a new chair at its Sept. 21 meeting.

Adhering to strict COVID-19 protocols, we are accepting new residents. Physical distancing while connecting and socializing.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

DISTRICT DATA

F R A N K L I N S P E C I A L S C H O O L D I S T R I C T

W I L L I A M S O N C O U N T Y S C H O O L S

Williamson County Schools comprises 49 campuses throughout the county. The district has more than 40,000 students enrolled as of the 2020-21 school year, and it ranked highest in the state on the 2018-19 TNReady results in English, math and social studies, according to the district. In 2019, WCS was recognized as an Exemplary District by the Tennessee Department of Education.

Franklin Special School District is a pre-kindergarten through eighth grade school system located inside the city of Franklin. The district was created through a special act of the state Legislature and has its own taxing authority. In 2019, FSSD was one of only 10 districts in the state to score in the top 10 in the state for all subjects on the TNReady assessments, according to the district.

SOURCES: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS, FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT, TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

202021 TEACHER STATS

*Estimated STUDENT ENROLLMENT

202021 SUPERINTENDENT ANNUAL SALARY

STUDENT TO TEACHER RATIO

NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON

20.49:1 GRADES K3

GRADES 46 GRADES 712

24.49:1 18.6 : 1 GRADES K8

30.49:1

$41,461 $40,150 STARTING TEACHER SALARY

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20*

2020-21*

FROM 201617 +5.9% -10.6%

SCHOOL DISTRICT STATS

TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 6,300

201819 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

201819 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS 1.3%

NUMBER OF CAMPUSES 49

YEAR COUNTY WAS FOUNDED 1799

3.4%

740

TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

13.3%

9.8%

8

NUMBER OF CAMPUSES

34.9%

4.6%

1906

YEAR FOUNDED

STATE AVERAGE

STATE AVERAGE

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT W I L L I AM S O N C O U N T Y S C H O O L S D ATA A N D D E M O G R A P H I C S B Y C A M P U S CAMPUS DEEP DIVE Williamson County is home to two school districts: Franklin Special School District, which includes grades K-8 in the Franklin area; and Williamson County Schools, which serves the rest of the district and higher grades in Franklin. Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and waivers from the Tennessee General Assembly and the U.S. Department of Education, Tennessee schools were not required to conduct testing or report assessment data for the 2019-20 school year.

SCHOOL STATS

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

OF WCS SCHOOLS HAVE A LOWER PERCENTAGE OF ECONOMICALLY

DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS THAN THE STATE AVERAGE. 100%

IS THE NEWEST CAMPUS INWILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS AND THE 49TH SCHOOL IN THE DISTRICT. Legacy Middle School

OF STUDENTS AT FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT AND WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS REPORTED SOME TYPE OF DISABILITY .

9.4%-11.6%

CAMPUSES IN WILLIAMSON COUNTY WERE NAMED AS REWARD SCHOOLS BY THE TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IN 2019. 30

DEMOGRAPHICS

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT F R A N K L I N S P E C I A L S C H O O L D I S T R I C T D ATA A N D D E M O G R A P H I C S B Y C A M P U S

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201819 DATA

1 Allendale 2 Bethesda

2.4% 0.8% 14.2% 0.8% 4.3% 5.8% 5.4% 0% 83.8% 6.7% 1.3% 11.9% 0% 1.5% 4.6% 5.8% 0% 88.1%

3 Chapman's Retreat

0% 3.3% 9%

6.5% 1.9% 11.7%

8.3% 0.7%

78.6%

DEMOGRAPHICS

4 Clovercroft 5 College Grove 6 Creekside* 7 Crockett 8 Edmondson 9 Fairview 10 Grassland 11 Heritage 12 Hillsboro 14 Jordan 15 Kenrose 16 Lipscomb 17 Longview 13 Hunters Bend 18 Mill Creek 19 Nolensville 20 Oak View 21 Pearre Creek

0.5% 1.5% 10.2% 0.1% 17.7% 2.8% 5.8% 0.5% 73%

4%

0.3% 10.2% 0.7% 3.3% 6.4% 4.7% 0%

84.9%

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201819 DATA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.3% 0.8% 10.3% 0.3% 9.4% 5.6% 2.5% 0%

82.2%

0.8% 0.8% 9.8% 0.4% 12.7% 5.2% 4.8% 0.3% 76.7% 14.3% 0.2% 12.9% 0.8% 1.4% 3.1% 8.4% 0% 86.3% 2.5% 1.1% 10.6% 0.2% 2.3% 4.1% 4.8% 0.2% 88.5% 3.8% 3.2% 14.4% 1.3% 3.7% 5.9% 11.2% 0% 77.9% 8% 1% 11.7% 0.3% 2.6% 1.3% 5.8% 0% 89.9%

1 Franklin 2 Johnson 3 Liberty 4 Moore

19.9% 4.1% 15.2% 0.7% 3% 23.6% 11.1% 0% 61.5% 19.5% 11.9% 12.2% 0.7% 13.5% 26.4% 23.8% 0% 35.6% 12.1% 13.8% 8.5% 0.2% 4.7% 11.7% 31.1% 0.4% 51.9%

6.8% 12.5% 13.9%

0.4% 13.9% 8.4% 18.2% 0.8%

58.2% 51.9%

2.9% 2.3% 10% 1.2% 5.4% 3.3% 6.4%

0.4% 83.2%

5 Poplar Grove

16.5% 26.1% 11% 1.1%

1.9% 4.1% 40.9% 0%

0.8% 1.6% 6.1% 0.8% 11.7% 1.9% 6.4% 0% 79.3%

7% 0.1% 43.3% 2.6% 2.9% 0.4%

0.8% 12.3%

50.6%

DEMOGRAPHICS

1.3% 1.4% 10% 0.1% 11.5% 4.8% 2.3% 0.4% 80.8%

MIDDLE& INTERMEDIATE

3.7% 1.3% 11.7% 0.4% 4.1% 5% 9.6% 0.6%

80.4%

1% 1.7% 7.5% 0.2% 6.9% 8.8% 3.4% 0% 80.7%

1% 8.8%

3.2%

0.9% 6.1% 6.8% 6.2% 0.5%

79.5%

SCHOOLS 201819 DATA

1.4% 2.4% 9.3% 0.4% 13.5% 2.9% 3% 0.7% 79.5%

1.1% 1.1% 9.8% 0.8% 2.5% 1.7% 5.3%

0.6% 89.1%

22 Scales 23 Sunset

0.4% 1% 10% 0.2% 5% 2.4% 2.4% 0% 89.9%

6 Freedom Intermediate 7 FreedomMiddle 8 Poplar Grove Middle

11.7% 4.3% 9.8% 0.7% 6.4% 18.5% 24.2% 0.2% 50.1%

1.5% 0.6% 5.6% 1% 14.8% 7.7% 5% 0.4%

71.1%

13%

4.3% 10.8% 1.2% 6.3% 17.8% 23.6% 0.7%

50.4%

24 Thompsons Station

4.9% 0.8% 9.8% 0.2% 3.5% 5% 6% 0.5% 84.9%

12.8% 5.5% 13.4%

0.5% 4.1% 4.4% 35% 0.8% 55.2%

25 Trinity

1% 8.3% 0.9% 15.8% 4.2% 4% 0%

2.6%

75.1%

26 Walnut Grove 27 Westwood

2.2% 2.7% 12.1% 0% 6.8% 3.8% 4% 0.2% 85.2%

18% 2.4% 12.4% 0.2% 1.1% 6%

6% 0.2%

86.5%

28 Winstead

4.2% 1.3% 16.4% 0.7% 3.5% 5.7% 5.6% 0% 84.5%

DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGRAPHICS

HIGH SCHOOLS 201819 DATA

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201819 DATA 29 Brentwood 30 Fairview 31 Grassland 32 Heritage 33 Legacy*

40 Brentwood 41 Centennial

1.1% 0.2% 6.9% 0.3% 11.6% 3.6% 3.6% 0.2% 80.6% 8.1% 1.9% 8.4% 0.8% 5.1% 13.6% 18% 0.5% 62%

42 Fairview 43 Franklin

14.3% 0.5% 14.7%

0.8% 1.3% 2.9% 7.5% 0%

87.4%

0.5% 0.2% 6.3% 0.5% 12.8% 3.2% 3.1% 0.2% 80.2% 14.9% 0.4% 10.4% 0.4% 0.7% 4.1% 6.9% 0.2% 87.7%

2.5% 0.9% 7% 0.7% 5.9% 3.4% 6.5% 0.1% 83.3%

44 Independence

2.9% 0.5% 9.3% 0.8% 3.5% 4.9% 9% 0.4%

81.4%

2.4% 0.4% 7.9%

0.4% 5.1% 3.7% 3.4% 0.3%

87%

45 Nolensville

3% 2.3% 9.3% 0.7% 7% 9.3% 7.3% 0.2% 75.4%

3.8% 0.5% 10.9% 0.3% 4.1% 7.7% 10.7% 0.4% 76.8%

46 Page

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.6% 0.4%

8%

0.8% 5.1% 3.5% 3.8%

0.3%

86.5%

47 Ravenwood 48 Renaissance

34 Mill Creek

0.8% 0.8% 5.8%

0.5% 16% 6.7% 4.7% 0.2% 72%

2.4% 1% 5.3% 0.4% 7.6% 6.8% 4% X0% 81.2%

35 Page

6% 0% 12.7% 3% 1.8% 3.6% 6% 0% 85.5%

1.7% 0.5% 6.6%

0.3% 9.1% 3.8% 3.7% 0.3%

82.7%

49 Summit

36 Spring Station

1%

4.5% 0.2% 11.4%

2.7% 5.5% 7.9% 0.2% 82.7%

4.3% 0.7% 10.5% 0.2% 3.2% 5.9% 8.6% 0.3% 81.8%

37 Sunset

1%

3% 7%

0.3% 15.3% 7.3% 3.4% 0.5% 73.2%

38 Thompsons Station

3.4% 0.5% 13.9% 0.4% 4.3% 3.8% 7.7% 0.5% 83.4%

*SCHOOLS WERE NOT OPEN DURING 201819 SCHOOL YEAR. SOURCES: FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT, WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

39 Woodland

0%

1.7% 6.3% 0.5% 18.9% 3.8% 5% 0.1% 71.7%

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Public Education Edition 2020

2 0 2 0  2 1 S C H O O L B O U N D A R I E S WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS

29

31

100

39

431

37

31

96

30

34

12

431

96

65

33

22

10

35

31

8

100

16

27

26

840

7

23

31

38

9

13

15 14

19

96

32

18

MIDDLE SCHOOLS

4

21

36

25

431

12

28

96

65

20

6

N

31

840

24

5

11

40

2

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

431

431

100

31

17 1 3

47

96

43

N

41

48

45

42

FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 7

96

65

46

44

840

31

HIGH SCHOOLS

31

49

431

5

65

6

8

3

N

2

96

2 0 2 0  2 1 S C H O O L B O U N D A R I E S

TOTA L S T UD ENT S 3,349 SOURCE: FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TOTA L S T UD ENT S 40,000+ SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

431

1

4

N

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Private school guide 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

L E A R N I N G L O S S Limiting Focus on literacy

screenings, a national study conducted in May by Successful Practices Network and the Center for College & Career Readiness with data from 1.6 mil- lion students showed that between the end and the beginning of the school year, students typically lose between 20%-36% of their gains in reading. Compounded with school closures from the coro- navirus, that loss in learning could be higher than average this year, according to Stuart Udell, the study’s author and the CEO of Achieve 3000, an online learning platform based in New Jersey. “We think learning loss by back-to-school may be up to a high of 49%, which translates to about ve months of learning loss,” Udell said. Mary Decker, associate director of teaching and learning for FSSD, said while the district regularly administers screening assessments to determine if students need additional support, this year, the dis- trict is working harder to reach students who are at risk of falling behind. “[Teachers] will use diagnostic assessments as well as universal screener results to determine when more intensive interventions are indicated, should some students demonstrate signicant learning loss,” Decker said. Additionally, the state department of education has launched multiple platforms to support students and teachers in online learning, including Best For All Cen- tral andtheTennesseeFoundational SkillsSupplement. Assessing learning loss Statewide, educators are already reporting that learning gaps for students are higher this year than in years past, particularly in younger students, according to Tennessee Department of Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn. Those gaps are adding to issues stu- dents had before the pandemic began, she said. “We’ve had an early literacy crisis for years,” Schwinn said in an Aug. 20 press brieng. “Just over one third of our students are procient in reading in elementary school, and our districts have been work- ing incredibly hard to ensure that students continue to grow and accelerate in their literacy development even during times of school building closures and in this important time of [returning] to school.” Early literacy is also a focus for educators locally, Decker said. Even before the pandemic hit, improve- ment in reading was a top goal identied in the district’s Reach 2024 Strategic Plan, a ve-year road- map to improve the district. The most recent data from testing in 2019 show English Language Arts scores from TNReady for grades 3-8 were typically the lowest of all subjects. Statewide, between 24.6% and 28.8% of students scored “on-track” for prociency in ELA. The district average score forWCSwas between 62.4%and 69.5%, while FSSD’s average scores were between 40.7% and 59.8%. FSSD ocials said they hope to bring that score up to 75% in the next few years. “In light of the spring 2020 extended school closure, FSSD educators are focusing even more intensely on literacy skills since research shows that thosewho lack reading prociency are at risk for long-term academic diculties and lifelong challenges,” Decker said.

Educators have said literacy is a top concern as students—particularly those in younger grades—see losses in reading knowledge over the summer, which may be compounded by coronavirus closures.

A nationwide study conducted by Successful Practices Network and the Center for College and Career Readiness shows how students have been aected by school closures caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

On-track scores

In a normal school year, students in grades 3-6 typically lose 20% of gains in reading , while students in grades 7-12 lose 36% .

The latest data from TNReady shows students across grades in Williamson County are scoring higher than the state average ; however, English Language Arts scores are lower than other subjects.

Potential learning loss could total as much as 49% from the start of school closures to the start of the school year.

24.6%-28.8%

State average

Williamson County Schools 40.7%-59.8% Franklin Special School District 62.4%-69.5%

The achievement gap between low-income and high-income students could increase by as much as 18% if schools do not ensure equal access to learning opportunities.

SOURCES: ACHIEVE 3000, SUCCESSFUL PRACTICES NETWORK, THE CENTER FOR COLLEGE & CAREER READINESSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

There are a number of district and state resources to help provide supplemental opportunities for online learning.

R E S O U R C E S T O K N O W

Best for All Central In August, the Tennessee Department of Education debuted Best for All Central, an online learning platform for students and teachers with free resources for professional development for teachers and video lessons for students.

Franklin Special School District Return to Learn 2020

FSSD has created a web page where families can nd information about technology resources and troubleshooting for online learning issues as well a community resource directory for mental health support, child care, and clothing and food assistance.

www.bestforall.tnedu.gov

https://fssd.org/covid19

Tennessee Foundational Skills Supplement

Technology status page Williamson County Schools has compiled a resource page for parents and students to visit to check on technology and internet outages for specic online tools.

The TDOE has also launched a phonics-based program for students in pre-K through second grade to help students become more procient readers.

https://openedx.tneducation.net

www.wcs.edu/domain/1347

Fighting state-mandated testing While local student assessments are already underway, one question looming large for many administrators this year is whether districts will administer state-required assessments, including the TNReady exam. During the 2019-20 school year, assessment requirements were waived as part of Public Chapter 0652, which was passed by the Tennessee Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Bill Lee. The Legislature has chosen not to waive the requirements again. In response, in August, the boards of education for WCS and FSSD passed resolutions calling for the state to waive testing and other assessment require- ments for the 2020-21 school year. WCS Superintendent Jason Golden sent a request to Lee in July calling for the state to waive testing requirements, which Lee denied. This time, the board is sending the resolutions to the Tennessee School Boards Association. During the Aug. 17 WCS school board meeting, District 6 Board Member Jay Galbreath said the

expectation that the district will have to complete state testing has left only weeks for teachers and students to prepare for the tests this fall. “We’re having to pace ourselves based on only being able to have [a short time] of preparation for the test, and we have to do our whole scope and sequence based on that. Plus, we’re making up [for having] missed virtually nine weeks of last year, … whereas if we knew that we weren’t going to have testing, we could space everything out,” Galbreath said. Golden said while he understands the need to assess student prociency, the district does not receive data on student results from the state until months later, when it is too late to intervene. “By the time this data gets in for us, we’re well past the need,” Golden said. Anna Lotz contributed to this report.

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15

FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

“WHENPEOPLE COME IN, THEY MAYHAVE SOMETHING INMIND, AND THEN, WHENYOU START LOOKINGAT DIFFERENT PIECES, YOUDECIDE TOGOA TOTALLY DIFFERENTWAY, SO IT KINDOF ‘SPARKS’ YOUR IMAGINATION.” RJ CHESNA, MANAGING PARTNER OF SPARK: AN ART STUDIO

FIRST LOOK

Lynn Harnen and RJ Chesna opened Spark: An Art Studio in late August at Hill Center Brentwood. (Photos byWendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Spark: AnArt Studio Sister-brother team aims to encourage creativity at new Brentwood studio M anaging partners Lynn Har- BY WENDY STURGES

Spark: An Art Studio oers a wide variety of colored glass for guests to use to create collages.

Each piece costs between $54-$67 to make for adults, and prices for chil- dren start at $28. Prices are dependent on the size of the piece and the types of materials used, Harnen said. Spark also features art that is already made by Chesna for purchase as well as embroidered tea towels, totes and jewelry from Eleven Graces, a local artisan. Harnen said the studio has a number of safety measures in place to help limit the spread of coronavi- rus, including plexiglass barriers in between seating and glove and mask requirements for customers. While the studio accepts walk-ins, Spark also accommodates private events and parties. In the future, Harnen said the studio will also host event nights and classes. Customers age 21 and older can bring a bottle of wine or other beverages to enjoy while making their mosaics, Harnen said. Harnen and Chesna said the mosaic process helps people who think they may not be artistic bring out their creative side. “We always recommend that people take their time, look around and get inspired by the art that’s all over the studio to see what they’d like to do,” she said.

nen and RJ Chesna are the faces behind Brentwood’s newest make-your-own art studio, Spark: An Art Studio. Harnen and Chesna, who are also sister and brother, opened Spark in late August at Hill Center Brentwood. Inside the studio, customers will nd a wide selection of glass and tile pieces in an array of colors and shades—the medium for a hand- crafted art piece to take home. The pieces are used to create mosa- ics, which are pictures or patterns made by arranging small pieces. Harnen said the studio was inspired by Chesna’s mosaic tile art. “When people come in, they may have something in mind, and then, when you start looking at dierent pieces, you decide to go a totally dierent way, so it kind of ‘sparks’ your imagination,” Chesna said. Art pieces aremade by arranging colored glass into a pattern on a canvas or board, a process that takes about two hours. After that, resin is poured over the art and allowed to cure for 24 hours. When the pieces are set, the customer can return to pick up their piece from the studio’s gallery wall, Harnen said.

CREATE ANART PIECE Spark: An Art Studio oers a place for customers to create a handmade piece of art with the following steps. Choose a canvas or wood background. Choose a stencil, if using. Collect glass pieces. 1 3 2

Spark also carries a small selection of gifts and home decor items.

4 5 6 7

Use pieces to create a mosaic. Carefully give the piece to Spark employees. Spark employees cover the piece

in a nontoxic epoxy resin. Resin sets for 24 hours. Pick up the piece after 24 hours pass.

Also available at Spark are ready-to- buy pieces and a display wall where customers can pick up their pieces.

8

V D .

Spark: AnArt Studio 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 110, Brentwood 615-483-9847 www.sparkartbrentwood.com Hours: Wed.-Sat. 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m., closed Mon.-Tue.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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