Gilbert Edition | June 2020

GILBERT EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 10  JUNE 24JULY 28, 2020

Telemedicine steps forward during crisis

Telehealth was on the rise in the United States prior to the coronavirus pandemic, according to data from studies. But the virus, and subsequent stay-at-home orders, thrust telemedicine into the spotlight for patients and doctors.

IMPACTS

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HOWTELEMEDICINE WORKS

April 2020 poll of 2,201 adults found that TELEMEDICINE USE

Telemedicine can range from phone calls with doctors to video chats.

VOTER

Real-time, audio-video communication that connects physicians and patients in dierent locations

Technologies that collect

Apps and wearable devices that can remotely monitor patients’ blood pressure and weight

Verbal/audio- only and virtual check-ins via patient portals, messaging technologies

had used telehealth.

images and data to be transmitted and interpreted by physicians later

23%

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PHYSICIAN WILLINGNESS

Telehealth adoption was rising prior to the coronavirus, but experts say the virus caused physicians to adopt the service at an even higher rate than anticipated.

PATIENT WILLINGNESS

VOTER GUIDE

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Not willing

According to data from American Well, 66% of Americans are willing to see a doctor via video. Americans 66% Parents with children under 18 72% Ages 45-54 72% Over 65 53%

Willing

Unsure

2020

HEALTH

2015

2019

69%

20%

57%

31%

EDITION CARE

12%

11%

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY THE NUMBERS

The adoption of telemedicine has shifted since the coronavirus began, with virtual health care interactions expected to top 1 billion this year. March telehealth visits surged 50% amid the coronavirus pandemic. The number of general medicine visits analysts expect to see in 2020 is up from the 36 million initially thought. 1B 50% 200M

HEALTH CARE

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SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CNBCCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Technology helps local practices during pandemic, but future remains unclear

BY TOM BLODGETT

telemedicine could be practiced proved critical in this growth burst, doctors said. Doctors are being allowed to use telemedicine in ways they previously had not and getting paid for it for the rst time. “I think that the rapidity and the orderliness of which the transforma- tion has taken place, it’s really been inspiring,” said Dr. Ronald Weinstein, director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program run from the University of

Arizona. “I think people realize the time had come, and they were set to go.” The future, however, is less certain. While continued growth is expected and many providers see telemedicine as one component of a permanently changing health care landscape, whether expanded services or pay- ments will be allowed to continue when the governor-ordered medical emergency is over is unknown.

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Telemedicine has been a line of service in the health care industry for several years, but the coronavi- rus pandemic has ignited exponential growth in the past three months. That growth could be seen in Gil- bert throughout the pandemic, when practices and hospitals implemented or expanded their oerings. The waivers that temporarily relaxed federal regulations that previously dened how and where

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION Local road projects TOWN& EDUCATION Gilbert and local school district news 2020LocalVoterGuide

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Tom Blodgett GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Gavagan METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth, aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

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FROMAMY: Each June at Community Impact Newspaper , we dedicate our pages to health care topics. This year, however, it seems especially tting that we are providing you health updates during a time when businesses and individuals are still feeling the impacts of the coronavirus and policies around the virus. I hope you enjoy the pieces of information we’ve provided in this edition. Please also check regular updates on this and other topics at communityimpact.com. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

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VOTER GUIDE

8

Candidates on August ballot

HealthCareEdition

HEALTH CARE

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Listings, briefs on health industry BUSINESS FEATURE Cynshine Yoga, Pilates &More

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FROMTOM: I am a dyed-in-the-wool history bu. I have loved visiting HD South and the Gilbert Historical Museum, and I am especially excited to be the editor here as Gilbert reaches its centennial. It’s so unfortunate that this month’s 100th birthday for the town, falling July 6, comes in such a summer as this one, but it is, after all, historic in its own right. I look forward to the town unveiling its centennial celebration video (see Page 5). Tom Blodgett, EDITOR

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GILBERT EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Dip—the Wax Spot

Surf City Sandwich

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W. RAY RD.

COURTESY DIP—THE WAX SPOT

COURTESY SURF CITY SANDWICH

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RELOCATIONS 9 Club eNRG Barre-Cardio opened June 13 at 8495 S. Power Road, Ste. 103, Queen Creek, just across the Gilbert border. It offers a Barre-inspired cardio workout that is low-impact and high-en- ergy in a group fitness environment for 75 minutes. 480-793-4464. https://clubenrg.com ANNIVERSARIES 10 HQ Workspace celebrated its first anniversary June 10 at h. The family coworking space offers private offices as well as open coworking space. It includes a family center with a nursing area and a changing station so people can work and not be far from children. 480-718-0551. www.hqworkspace.com 11 The Meeple’s Board Game Cafe marked its first anniversary June 15 at 3821 E. Baseline Road, Ste. J-140, Gilbert. It has a menu with hot dogs, salads and desserts, and a board game library. 480- 590-0860. www.themeeplescafe.com NAME CHANGE 12 The Brass Tap at 313 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert, closed June 15 as it prepares to rebrand as Da’Bayou Creole Kitchen . The music, food and drinks will reflect Creole culture. The reopening is expected to happen in July. 480-268-9557. www.brasstapbeerbar.com/gilbert

Gilbert. It specializes in-full body waxing for men and women, provides eyebrow and lash tinting services, and carries a line of natural facial product. 480-276- 9428. https://gilbertwaxbar.com 5 Prescribed Health and Beauty opened June 8 at 2680 S. Val Vista Drive, Ste. 140, Gilbert. Dr. Leila King Peterson serves patients of all ages with compre- hensive health care, including well-child checks, annual exams and pap smears, diagnosis of illness, care for chronic dis- eases and cosmetic injections. 480-865- 2655. http://prescribedhealth.org 6 Surf City Sandwich opened June 1 at 5482 S. Power Road, Gilbert. It offers artisan handcrafted sandwiches with cre- ative flavor combinations. The shop has a sister location in Soquel, California. 480- 687-4411. www.surfcitysandwich.com 7 WoodBarn BBQ opened April 24 for takeout and delivery and now has dine-in at 23670 S. Power Road, Ste. 101, Queen Creek, across the border from Gilbert. The brick-and-mortar version of the food truck has smoked brisket, pork, turkey, sausage and ribs. 480-988-6451. https://woodbarnbbq.com COMING SOON 8 Joe’s Auto anticipates opening a repair shop on Guadalupe Road just east of Cooper Road in mid- to late July. It will be the eighth location in metropolitan Phoenix for the complete auto care shop. https://joesautoaz.com

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E. WILLIAMS FIELD RD.

E. CHANDLER BLVD.

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E. PECOS RD.

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E. GERMANN RD.

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

HUNT HWY.

E. HUNT HWY.

NOWOPEN 1 Cryoshift Cryotherapy opened June 11 at 3755 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 107, Gilbert. The boutique wellness center has whole-body and local cryotherapy, Nor- maTec pulse recovery systems, infrared sauna and cryo slim tone sculpt. 480- 207-1435. https://gilbert.cryoshift.com 2 Dip—the Wax Spot opened May 11 at 979 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 218, Gilbert. The salon specializes in brow and Brazil-

ian waxing but does perform full-body waxing. 480-818-9165. https://dipwaxspot.com 3 Downtown Gilbert Healthcare opened March 16 at 323 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 119, Gilbert. It offers chiropractic care, medical weight loss, drug rehab, hormone optimization, acupuncture and personal training. 480-219-6354. https://downtowngilberthealthcare.com 4 Gilbert Wax Bar anticipated opening in June at 5340 S. Power Road, Ste. 102,

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Gilbert’s “Main Street”—now Gilbert Road—is shown in the years immediately after incorporation in 1920. (Courtesy HD South)

WoodBarn BBQ

COURTESY WOODBARN BBQ

GILBERT CELEBRATES CENTENNIALWITHONLINE VIDEO BROADCAST

CLOSINGS 13 Blue Adobe Santa Fe Grille made its temporary closure from March into a permanent closure at 884 E. Williams Field Road, Gilbert. The restaurant called itself an “American Grille” influenced by the cooking of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The Scottsdale location remains open at 10885 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd., 14 Sweet Tomatoes permanently closed its 97 national locations of its soup and salad bar restaurants May 8, including one in the Gilbert Gateway Towne Center at 4928 S. Power Road, Gilbert. 480-333- 0022. https://sweettomatoes.com Scottsdale. 480-314-0550. https://blueadobegrille.com

for our community, we still have much to celebrate,” Daniels said by email. “Since we can’t come together in person due to COVID-19, I am looking forward to throwing Gilbert a virtual birthday party so that we can take a moment to recognize our past, present and future as we begin the next 100 years.” The show can be seen at www.gilbertaz2020.com from July 6. Additionally, 212 Ice Cream will celebrate the birthday with free hand- rolled premium ice cream from 1-9 p.m. only at the store at 1551 E. Elliot Road, Gilbert.

The Hay Shipping Capital of the World during World War I, Gilbert is all grown up today. Now America’s largest town by population, it was named after a man, William “Bobby” Gilbert, who once owned the land the railway was built upon but never lived here. The town incorporated July 6, 1920, and will celebrate its centennial this July 6 virtually because of the coronavirus pandemic. For the centennial, the Gilbert Digital Communications team is shooting a video inspired by Some Good News,

the YouTube show created by John Krasinski, the actor most known for his role on “The Oce.” Krasinksi sold the low-budget web series to ViacomCBS in May. Gilbert’s production will include performances by local artists, surprise celebrity appearances, interviews with prominent Gilbert community members, and feel-good hometown news stories. Mayor Jenn Daniels will host the show. “Gilbert ocially turns 100 years old on July 6, and while our centennial year has brought some challenging times

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GILBERT EDITION • JUNE 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

ONGOING PROJECTS

Construction set for pedestrian bridge over railroad tracks onWesternPowerline Trail

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E. APPLEBY RD.

E. OLIVE AVE.

RD.

BY TOM BLODGETT

of a mile on either side of the bridge are set to be included in the project. Union Pacic and the Arizona Department of Transportation are joining with the town on the project. Gilbert is contributing $1.33 million in funds from its capital improvement projects and general funds. A Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality grant of nearly $2.83 million from the Federal High- way Administration also will be applied to the project.

Construction on a bridge to allow pedestrians to cross the railroad tracks on the Western Powerline Trail in Gilbert began in early June. In preparation, the Vaughn Avenue Basin, about one-third of a mile west of Gilbert Road, was closed May 25. It will remain closed through the end of con- struction, which is scheduled to be complete in February. The trail will remain open, and improvements to it for one-eighth

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

S. LONG MEADOW DR.

E. RIGGS RD.

Gilbert Road repaving The town of Gilbert will repave a 1.5-mile stretch of Gilbert Road from Olive Ave- nue, south of Guadalupe Road, to Long Meadow Drive, north of Warner Road—a stretch that includes the Heritage District. Status: Gilbert Road will remain open for travel with trac shifted away from the work area, maintaining at least one lane in each direction. Police ocers and/or aggers will be on-site to assist with the

Val Vista Drive widening The town is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road to Riggs Road to three lanes in each direction with raised, landscaped median islands and isolated left-turn lanes. Status: Val Vista Drive is closed between Appleby Road and Chandler Heights Road through July 21. There is no access to or through the Val Vista Drive and Ocotillo Road intersection. Detour signs are in place to direct travelers. Timeline: March 2020-July 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town funds, Mar- icopa Association of Governments funds

Western Powerline Trail

management of trac. Timeline: May 21-July 1 Cost: $1.25 million Funding source: town of Gilbert

WESTERN CANAL

VAUGHN AVENUE BASIN

W. VAUGHN AVE.

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 15. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GILNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TOWN&EDUCATION

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

News from Gilbert, Gilbert Public Schools, Higley USD & Chandler USD

SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS

On heels of protests, Gilbertmayor calls for town to listen

GILBERTPUBLIC SCHOOLS The governing board unanimously approved May 26 the issue and sale of $40 million in school improvement bonds. The bonds will be used in the areas of security, technology and facilities/maintenance, Business Services Assistant Superintendent Bonnie Betz said. HIGLEYUSD The district announced June 3 it plans to reopen schools July 27 with increased safety precautions against the coronavirus. Remote learning will be an option for families who do not feel ready to return. CHANDLERUSD Superintendent Camille Casteel said in a letter to parents June 4 that the district will continue to stand against racism and advocate for the equity of all people. Gilbert Public Schools Board June 30, 6 p.m. July 28, 6:30 p.m. 140 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 480-497-3300 www.gilbertschools.net Higley USD Board June 24, 5:30 p.m. July 15, 5:30 p.m. 2935 S. Recker Road, Gilbert 480-279-7000 • www.husd.org Chandler USD Board June 24, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com Gilbert Town Council does not meet in July. Follow us on Twitter: @impactnews_gil MEETINGSWE COVER

GILBERT Mayor Jenn Daniels on June 2 called for the town to be lis- tening to people of color and anyone who has been treated unfairly. “As a community, we emphasize kindness on a very regular basis,” Daniels said. “And I want to make sure that as a community, we are doing our best listening right now. I think there are a lot of statements and things being made and said that could be benecial to us as a community.” Daniels’ remarks at the close of the council meeting came in the wake of nationwide protests after the May 25 death of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis police custody. While Gilbert has had no violent protests, Daniels encouraged town leaders to listen to employees and

community members and included herself as one who would benet. “I have a lot to learn, and I want to take time to listen and to hear the messages that are being sent to us,” she said. “So I would encourage the community to reach out to us as a council and make sure that we hear your voice.” The town later organized “listening space” forums on June 11, 16 and 18 for residents to speak with Gilbert Police Department members, town sta and representatives from Gilbert’s school districts. Daniels also thanked Gilbert Police Department and public safety workers for their work and hoped they would remain safe through this time. “We don’t always get it right, but

Gilbert Mayor Jenn Daniels addresses council members and residents June 2.

we want to and we desire to,” Daniels said. The town kept the iconic Gilbert Water Tower dark the night of Daniels’ remarks in support of the #BlackoutTuesday movement. Peaceful protests subsequently were held in town June 6-7.

Gilbert Public Schools preparing three back-to-school scenarios GILBERT PUBLIC SCHOOLS A district task force is preparing three back-to-school scenarios for the 2020-21 school year with a preference for in-person learning, ocials told the governing board May 26. “We miss our students,” said Barbara Newman, the district’s teaching and learning executive director. “We want to be back with them. And so while the normal has not clearly been dened for us, we do want to be sure that

everyone knows that we are committed to being back with our kids.” Newman said the committee will determine how that looks based on state guidance. The task force is also looking at a hybrid model, per- haps with some students on campus while others work remotely, and an online-only model. The task force plans to give a recommendation to the governing board on how the district will proceed at the board’s June 30 meeting. However, Superintendent Shane McCord said, even then, the district must be prepared to “turn on a dime” based on events with the coronavirus pandemic.

State gives town more than $29 million in relief aid GILBERT Gilbert was among the local governments receiving coronavirus relief and recovery dollars as part of a plan unveiled May 27 by Gov. Doug Ducey. Among nearly $600 million in funding, the plan includes $441 million in direct, exible funding to local cities, towns and coun- ties that did not receive direct funding earlier this year from the federal government. Gilbert will receive $29.17 mil- lion based on its 2019 population. “That money can only be

April unemployment in town reaches record high GILBERT Unemployment in town jumped to a record 11.3% in April, according to statistics from the Arizona Commerce Authority. The 156.82% jump fromMarch, TOWNUNEMPLOYMENT Gilbert’s unemployment rate had been relatively steady until the coronavirus pandemic hit town in mid-March. 12%

used on public safety-related expenses,” Gilbert Mayor Jenn Daniels said in her weekly video message May 27. “I will be working directly with our council to ensure that we are using those dollars so that they can meet the needs of our community now and in the future.” The plan allows cities, towns and counties that did not receive direct funding from the U.S. Treasury as part of the Corona- virus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, to receive a direct allocation from the state. The resources will come from a new fund established by the governor’s oce, the AZCares Fund.

when the authority measured unem- ployment in the town at 4.4%, is the largest jump in the 30 years of statistics the authority publishes. The previous highest unemployment rate in town was 7.3% in June 2011. The authority’s statistics show 16,033 town residents unemployed among a labor force of 142,455. April was the rst full month of business closures in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, with Gov. Doug Ducey’s “Stay home, stay healthy, stay connected” order in place from 5 p.m.

11.3%

8%

4.4%

3.3%

3.1%

4%

0

Jan.

Feb.

March April

SOURCE: ARIZONA COMMERCE AUTHORITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

March 31 until May 15. Gilbert’s 11.3% unemployment rate is the lowest among the state’s munici- palities with more than 50,000 people in the 2019 U.S. Census estimates.

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GILBERT EDITION • JUNE 2020

CANDIDATE Q&A

Private school guide 2020

Get to know the candidates running in local August elections

DATES TOKNOW

WHERE TO VOTE

V O T E R COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

Maricopa County voters can choose any voting location and time that works for them. Voters can visit www.locations. maricopa.vote to find a nearby location. County voters can request a one-time ballot to be sent by mail to their residence or mailing address on file, or to a temporary mailing address for the Aug. 4 primary election and Nov. 3 general election at www.request.maricopa.vote. Voters may also sign up there for the permanent early voting list.

JULY 6 Voter registration deadline JULY 8 Ballots mailed; in- JULY 29 Last day to mail back ballot AUG. 4 Primary, town election person voting available

Here is candidate and voting information for the Aug. 4 town election. Follow election edition coverage at communityimpact.com.

Incumbent

Mayor (Vote for one)

What makes you qualified for the role of mayor?

What is your top priority or initiative for council to address?

LYNNE KING SMITH

My 20-plus years of executive experience in Gilbert business and work on national corporate boards has uniquely prepared me for the role of Gilbert Mayor. I have the relationships and knowledge to represent Gilbert—statewide, regionally and here in our community with our staff, council and most importantly, our residents. My family’s two decades living here have given me an appreciation for Gilbert’s history and sense of community, which will inform my perspectives as we work for a strong future for Gilbert. I have started and run my own small businesses and worked in positions of responsibility in several industries, including legal, publishing, education, and construction. I understand budgets and operations from the perspectives of laborer, leader, and everything in between. I serve on nonprofit and corporate boards. I love our town and want to help keep Gilbert ‘Gilbert.’ I hold a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s degree in negotiation and dispute resolution. During my time as a member of the Town Council, our town has experienced a tremendous amount of growth. As a member of the council, I helped make the right decisions that kept taxes low, while increasing the services that made Gilbert one of the most desirable places to live. As mayor, I will continue this track record of success. This has been my full-time job and I will continue that commitment as mayor.

We are not doing enough to support small businesses in Gilbert. As Mayor I will ensure we do all we can to ensure they have every possible measure of support and the help needed to recover, build and grow, well into and past 2021. I guided my company through the 2008 recession, and what we are dealing with now will require us to adapt and be innovative in our thinking and approach to long term economic growth. I will bring the leadership necessary to see Gilbert through a strong recovery. The top priority for the Council should always be to operate within its proper limits while fulfilling its obligations to residents. The power to tax, a power the town holds, comes with a heavy responsibility to ensure that government doesn’t grow beyond its proper scope. As a rule of thumb, government should minimize taxes and regulations. Also, Gilbert is an attractive place to call home for so many because we have a reputation as a family-friendly town with low taxes. I will work to preserve this in Gilbert. 2020 has seen many changes in our town, state and country. My top priority will be working with local business leaders to ensure a quick economic recovery and stability. As our town has grown, so have traffic levels. I remain committed to addressing growth and continuing to plan for the full build-out of our town and this will be one of my top priorities.

Occupation: business owner Relevant experience: general manager, ETIX; founder/CEO, Ticketforce 2003-19; founder, Thrive Coworking for Women; principal, Gilbert Project (Bldg. 313); founder/ partner, ilegal modern cocktail kitchen https://lynnekingsmith.com MATT NIELSEN Occupation: business executive Relevant experience: I have never run for any political office. http://votemattnielsen.com

BRIGETTE PETERSON

Occupation: N/A Relevant experience: Gilbert Town Council member, vice mayor, Gilbert Planning Commission member, vice chair, chair; Gilbert Leadership alumna, board member, chair; regional and local committees/boards. www.votebrigettepeterson.com

Four-year termcouncil member (Vote for two) (continued on 9)

What makes you qualified for the role of town council member?

What is your top priority or initiative for council to address?

SCOTT ANDERSON

I have served as either a staff or council member for about 30 years. My understanding of the processes, policies and function of local government is extensive. Over the next few years, experience will be needed as the council deals with the current economic crisis as well as social unrest. Historical perspective and visionary thinking will be necessary in the future and I believe I bring both to our decision-making.

We will need to address a weakened economy and the means to maintain our community as prosperous for all going into the future. This is why I believe our City of the Future initiative is more important now than ever. We will be measuring how Gilbert can continue with a strong economy, be prosperous for all and maintain an exceptional built environment. We will be sharing metrics with the community to show our progress on our goals as we progress toward build out.

Occupation: Gilbert Town Council vice mayor Relevant experience: 25 years Gilbert Planning Director and Parks Manager for Riparian Preserve. www.scott4council.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2020 Local Voter Guide

Voters also will decide whether to adopt the 2020 General Plan. Go to www.gilbertaz.gov/generalplan for more information.

Four-year termcouncil member (Vote for two) (continued from8)

What makes you qualified for the role of town council member?

What is your top priority or initiative for council to address?

TYLER HUDGINS Occupation: small-business owner Relevant experience: small-business owner, chairman of the Gilbert Redevelopment Commission for downtown Gilbert, General Plan Advisory Group Member for the 2020 General Plan Update https://votehudgins.com

This is my hometown. I have been engaged in the town for the past 12 years. I started regularly attending Town Council meetings at 17 years old. I have learned how the town works in various capacities. I have run my business in downtown Gilbert for seven years and will bring business perspective to council. I served on the Gilbert Redevelopment Commission for downtown Gilbert as chairman. Our commission drafted and approved a 10-year Redevelopment Plan. Lastly, I worked on the Gilbert General Plan Update for 2020.

My top priority is to increase economic development and bring more jobs to Gilbert. Many residents have to commute two hours each day to work. What would happen if they could commute within the town? What could they do with some of that two hours? Perhaps spending more time with family, friends, neighbors, and volunteering to list a few. They could also do more of their lunch meetings within the town and spend their tax money locally.

BUS OBAYOMI Occupation: digital consultant

I have worked as a legislative aide and served on various community board member for youth and education. I currently work as a project manager in technology company. I also was a member of Gilbert Leadership Class XXV.

My major initiative is building bridges within communities in Gilbert and holding our town council to be fiscally responsible. Develop initiatives that will provide further services to our seniors in Gilbert. I also plan to champion issues that involve youth advocacy and greater support for our schools (public schools, charter schools, and private schools).

Relevant experience: legislative aide; service on various community boards for youth and education; Gilbert Leadership alumnus. https://voteobayomi.com

KATHY TILQUE Occupation: president/CEO, Gilbert Chamber of Commerce Relevant experience: 32 years as an advocate for business www.facebook.com/ktilque2020

As a proven leader, I have served and been recognized at local, regional, and national boards/commissions as a thought-leader, business advocate, and implementer. I have served on dozens of Gilbert stakeholder groups developing standards, zoning, general plans, bonds, regulations, budgets, and tax policies. To council I will bring institutional knowledge, the ability to identify unintended consequences, and a steady, reasoned opinion on strategic investments for the future.

I support Gilbert’s “City of The Future” efforts and will make decisions that ensure our community is financially stable and vibrant at build-out and beyond. I will advocate for data-driven decisions to ensure Gilbert, unlike many other communities, is not forced to rebuild themselves after dramatic economic downturns. Under my watch, Gilbert will not leave us vulnerable to future catastrophes. Financial stability, well-considered use of tax dollars, and a pro-business environment will be top priorities for me.

Two-year council termmember (Vote for one)

What makes you qualified for the role of town council member?

What is your top priority or initiative for council to address?

LAURIN HENDRIX

As an Arizona State Legislator, I participated in balancing the state budget. As a member of the Maricopa County Community College District board of trustees, I have participated in creating a balanced budget four times, several during recessionary periods and all significantly larger and more complex than the Gilbert budget. I have been a self-employed business owner most of my life. My fiscal experience in balancing large budgets combined with my experience as a Gilbert resident will be valuable to the Gilbert Town Council. Relatability, compassion for people, and integrity are some qualities that make me stand out. My 24 years as a Navy officer and my background in nuclear power operation and maintenance gives me an advantage in leadership skills and technical knowledge. However, I am just someone who grew up in Tempe, served my country, and retired in Gilbert. I don’t have a big- money campaign machine, but I do have a good pair of shoes and a listening ear that allows for me to meet with the residents of Gilbert and be their voice.

My top priority is to maintain the high quality of life that Gilbert residents enjoy today. This is something that all council members should strive for. We enjoy our clean parks, our tree-lined streets, a very low crime rate, our qualified and professional first responders, our beautiful downtown that attracts visitors, our modest traffic, our theaters, and our top quality hospitals. My top priority is to continue the great work of prior council members in a financially responsible way. Strategic development and maintenance of infrastructure that encourages robust economic growth and increased revenues for small and large businesses is vital to Gilbert’s long-term sustainability. We must also employ innovative solutions in cost effective ways to complete build-out while maintaining our small-town character. Additionally, I believe that it is important to make Arizona attractive to Veterans. It’s time that we bring them home, recognize them, employ them, and embrace the unique set of skills that they bring to our town.

Occupation: business owner/manager Relevant experience: Arizona Legislature; Maricopa Community College Board trustee and president; boards and committees service of various charitable organizations; lifetime of self-employment. https://votelaurinhendrix.com

BILL SPENCE

Occupation: retired U.S. Navy nuclear engineering officer Relevant experience: council member www.bill4gilbert.com

Some answers have been edited for length. Read full Q&As and get more primary election information at communityimpact.com .

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GILBERT EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE BRIEFS

Health Care Edition 2020

Industry news in Gilbert

Gilbertmedical practices get relief funds

Organizationmoves expanded health care center toGilbert

W. SAN ANGELO ST.

87

BY TOM BLODGETT

overwhelming bipartisan support in March. The Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhance- ment Act similarly passed in April. The average aid received in Gilbert was $59,175.63 while the median was $9,810. Grants ranged from $246 to $1.16 million. Fifteen practices received more than $100,000 with two getting more than $1 million. Payments from the funds are being distributed by the Department of Health and Human Services through the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Medical practices in Gilbert received nearly $8.23 million in relief from dierent federal funds made available in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, according to Centers for Disease Control data. The practices were of all dierent types with 139 receiving funds as of May 29, according to the CDC. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act, intended to address the economic fallout of the pandemic in the United States, passed in Congress with

W. GUADALUPE RD.

BY TOM BLODGETT

N

The Jewish Family & Children’s Service has expanded with the opening of the JFCS East Valley Healthcare Center in Gilbert. By relocating its behavioral health services fromMesa to the new 30,000-square-foot Gilbert location at 880 N. Colorado St., JFCS—a nonprot, non-sectarian organiza- tion that provides behavioral health, health care and social services to all ages, faiths and backgrounds—oers behavioral health and primary med- ical care services in one location. “The impact of COVID-19 cer- tainly threw us a curveball,” said Robert Ouimette, co-director of the JFCS East Valley Healthcare Center, in a release, “but JFCS remains steadfast in its commitment to

continuing all care services as well as health and family programs that are so important to our community.” The new JFCS East Valley Health- care Center opened in January and oers primary care services that include physicals, wellness exams and immunizations. Its behavioral care services include individual and group therapy. In addition to oering compre- hensive services on-site and via telehealth appointments, JFCS has a community-based team including therapists, clinicians, child case managers, youth and family spe- cialists, and family support partners who support clients in providing wellness and treatment services.

TOP RECIPIENTS These Gilbert practices received the most money from the federal government under one of its relief programs targeted to health care providers. SOURCE: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HOSPITALS ANDURGENT CARE FACILITIES

Information on local medical care facilities in Gilbert

6 Banner Urgent Care 1641 E. Guadalupe Road, Gilbert 4808275670 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com 7 Banner Urgent Care 641 W. Warner Road, Gilbert 4808275680 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com 8 Banner Urgent Care 1660 N. Higley Road, Ste. 104, Gilbert 4808275600 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com 9 Banner Urgent Care 3126 S. Higley Road, Ste. 109, Gilbert 4808275780 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com 10 Banner Urgent Care 3160 E. Queen Creek Road, Gilbert 4808275790 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com 11 Dignity Health Urgent Care in Gilbert 1501 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 4807284100 www.dignityhealth.org/emergency-care 12 Gateway Urgent Care 920 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert 4804990201 http://gatewayuc.com 13 Good Night Pediatrics 861 N. Higley Road, Ste. B101, Gilbert

• Private rooms: 177 • Operating suites: nine • Private treatment rooms: 37 2 Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center 2946 E. Banner Gateway Drive, Gilbert 4802566444 www.bannerhealth.com/banner-md- anderson/locations/gilbert/banner-md- anderson-cancer-center-gilbert • Number of beds: outpatient only 3 Mercy Gilbert Medical Center 3555 S. Val Vista Drive, Gilbert 8442547423 www.dignityhealth.org/arizona/locations/ mercygilbert • Trauma level: III • NICU level: II • Number of beds: 198 Free-standing ER 4 Dignity Health AZ General Hospital Emergency Room-Gilbert 4760 E. Germann Road, Gilbert 4804945000 https://azgeneraler.com/locations/gilbert Urgent cares 5 Banner Children’s Urgent Care 1355 S. Higley Road, Ste. 104, Gilbert 4808275770 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com

TRAUMA LEVEL ARI ZONA

3

LEVEL I

• Comprehensive trauma facilities

LEVEL I I

• Major trauma facilities

LEVEL I I I

• Advanced trauma facilities

Mercy Gilbert Medical Center

LEVEL IV

TOM BLODGETTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

• Basic trauma facilities

4808139600 www.goodnightpeds.com/locations/gilbert-az/ east-valley 14 Health First Urgent Care 888 S. Greeneld Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert 4808921300 www.healthrsturgentcare.com 15 MedPost Urgent Care of Gilbert 2487 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 108, Gilbert 4808991341 www.medpost.com/location/gilbert-az 16 NextCare Urgent Care 6343 S. Higley Road, Gilbert 4807482712 www.solvhealth.com

SOURCE: ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

Hospitals 1 Banner Gateway Medical Center 1900 N. Higley Road, Gilbert 4805432000 www.bannerhealth.com/locations/gilbert/ banner-gateway-medical-center • Trauma level: IV • NICU level: II

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GILBERT EDITION • JUNE 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

EXPANSION OF TELEMEDICINE

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT AND ALEXA D'ANGELO DESIGNED BY DAMIEN HERNANDEZ

In a survey of 4,000 adults by American Well, a majority of were interested in video visits.

FUTUREOF VIDEO VISITS

The coverage of telemedicine was expanded under an executive order from Gov. Doug Ducey and in similar orders from the federal government due to COVID-19, but the use of telemedicine across the medical eld was already becoming more popular prior to the pandemic.

CONSUMER INTEREST IN SEEING PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR OVER VIDEO

increases. Weinstein said robotics, articial intelligence, automation and tele- health will drive medicine in the future. “The rush is on,” Weinstein said. “Now that everyone is telemedi- cine-enabled, what else can they do to streamline patient care? I think that’s where the exciting activity is going to take place.” Atimeof growth Telemedicine has enjoyed steady growth despite the regulations that limited the way it could be used. “Telemedicine was waiting in the wings for a long time,” said Weinstein, who also is president emeritus of the American Telemedicine Association. “After all, last year there were 37 mil- lion cases done in the United States. It’s not that it wasn’t there. But now it jumps up to probably, I’ve estimated, a billion cases this year.” Weinstein noted that two of the larg- est private telemedicine providers, Teladoc and AmWell, have reported up to 30-fold increases in visits through the pandemic. OF THOSE WILLING TO HAVE VIDEO VISITS, THEY WANT THEM FOR: Prescription rells 78% 50% 60% 52% Birth control Chronic care management Hospital follow-up care

Somewhat interested Very interested Not very interested Not at all interested

EXECUTIVE ORDER

17%

The governor’s executive order is aimed at protecting Arizonans and high-risk populations. The order provides the following: requires insurance companies and health plans to cover out-of-network providers, including out-of-plan laboratories and telemedicine providers; waives all copays, coinsurance and deductibles for consumers related to COVID-19 diagnostic testing and decreases copays for telemedicine visits; implements consumer protections, including prohibiting price-gouging on COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment-related services; and requires symptom checks of health care workers and visitors at skilled nursing facilities, nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

44%

18%

21%

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Uncertain future The federal actions, executive orders andwaivers all have a shelf life to them. Ducey’s order is to the declared end of the state’s health emergency, which had not happened as of mid-June. Holmes said Desert Shores would have to invest in a more HIPAA-com- pliant platform for continued use, but that only makes sense if the practice continues to be reimbursed. “The fear is that some of the insur- ance companies may end it with the primary care doctors but oer it with their own telemedicine docs,” she said. “That really interrupts the medical home. We know our patients.” Weinstein said he thinks telemedi- cine is here to stay now that its poten- tial has been seen. “Theoretically we can fall o the cli,” he said. “But that’s very unlikely to happen.” Instead, Weinstein, who said he was the rst resident physician in the U.S. to rotate to a telemedicine service in 1968, said he sees a changed landscape for health care. He even predicts that the big-box hospital of today may be a thing of the past as remote medicine

Potential unleashed Political response to the pandemic greatly increased what was available to patients. Federal ocials loosened restrictions in March and April related to the Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act, or HIPAA, a 1996 federal law that governs the ow and security of health care information. In Arizona, Gov. Doug Ducey signed an executive order March 25 that required insurance companies to expand telemedicine coverage for all services that would normally be cov- ered for an in-person visit. Weinstein said these directives allowed telemedicine service to urban areas, telemedicine directly into peo- ple’s homes, use of smartphones at workstations for telemedicine and interstate licensure for providing telemedicine. “The waivers were crucial, and by making those waivers, all of the things for which enormous pressure had been evolving over the years became a pos- sibility,” Weinstein said.

Most critically, Weinstein said, the waivers allow physicians to be reim- bursed in these areas. Weinstein said usually one to two billing codes are added per year relating to telemedi- cine; in the past three months, 80 have been added. Being able to be reimbursed for pro- viding telemedicine services pushed Desert Shores Pediatrics to add it in March, Dr. Christie Holmes said. “We actually have looked at it in the past,” she said. “The main reason why we had not fully instituted is we weren’t going to be paid for it. The insurance companies really are not paying for telemedicine, and that obvi- ously is a huge hindrance for us.” With the waivers and lessened restrictions, the practice was able to quickly implement the service, which she credits for helping keep the busi- ness aoat. She said perhaps 60% of the clinic’s visits in March and April were through telemedicine, though that has lessened since then.

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87

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W. Elliot Rd.

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