Gilbert Edition | June 2020

GILBERT EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020

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VOLUME 2, ISSUE 10  JUNE 24JULY 28, 2020

Telemedicine steps forward during crisis

Telehealth was on the rise in the United States prior to the coronavirus pandemic, according to data from studies. But the virus, and subsequent stay-at-home orders, thrust telemedicine into the spotlight for patients and doctors.

IMPACTS

4

HOWTELEMEDICINE WORKS

April 2020 poll of 2,201 adults found that TELEMEDICINE USE

Telemedicine can range from phone calls with doctors to video chats.

VOTER

Real-time, audio-video communication that connects physicians and patients in dierent locations

Technologies that collect

Apps and wearable devices that can remotely monitor patients’ blood pressure and weight

Verbal/audio- only and virtual check-ins via patient portals, messaging technologies

had used telehealth.

images and data to be transmitted and interpreted by physicians later

23%

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PHYSICIAN WILLINGNESS

Telehealth adoption was rising prior to the coronavirus, but experts say the virus caused physicians to adopt the service at an even higher rate than anticipated.

PATIENT WILLINGNESS

VOTER GUIDE

8

Not willing

According to data from American Well, 66% of Americans are willing to see a doctor via video. Americans 66% Parents with children under 18 72% Ages 45-54 72% Over 65 53%

Willing

Unsure

2020

HEALTH

2015

2019

69%

20%

57%

31%

EDITION CARE

12%

11%

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY THE NUMBERS

The adoption of telemedicine has shifted since the coronavirus began, with virtual health care interactions expected to top 1 billion this year. March telehealth visits surged 50% amid the coronavirus pandemic. The number of general medicine visits analysts expect to see in 2020 is up from the 36 million initially thought. 1B 50% 200M

HEALTH CARE

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SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

SOURCE: AMERICAN WELL COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: CNBCCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Technology helps local practices during pandemic, but future remains unclear

BY TOM BLODGETT

telemedicine could be practiced proved critical in this growth burst, doctors said. Doctors are being allowed to use telemedicine in ways they previously had not and getting paid for it for the rst time. “I think that the rapidity and the orderliness of which the transforma- tion has taken place, it’s really been inspiring,” said Dr. Ronald Weinstein, director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program run from the University of

Arizona. “I think people realize the time had come, and they were set to go.” The future, however, is less certain. While continued growth is expected and many providers see telemedicine as one component of a permanently changing health care landscape, whether expanded services or pay- ments will be allowed to continue when the governor-ordered medical emergency is over is unknown.

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Telemedicine has been a line of service in the health care industry for several years, but the coronavi- rus pandemic has ignited exponential growth in the past three months. That growth could be seen in Gil- bert throughout the pandemic, when practices and hospitals implemented or expanded their oerings. The waivers that temporarily relaxed federal regulations that previously dened how and where

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