Tempe - May 2022

TEMPE EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2 | MAY 10-JUNE 13, 2022

ONLINE AT

Tempe adds hotel rooms as tourismslowly recovers

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

TOURISM MAKING PANDEMIC COMEBACK Tempe Tourism data shows the hotel industry is coming back to pre-pandemic levels.

Ryan Kirby, general manager of the recently opened The Westin Tempe, said opening a hotel in a pandemic was difficult. The hotel made its debut in late August, and Kirby said the hotel was riding the wave of several corona- virus variants halting travel for many. “As a hotel industry, and the world overall, we had to find ways to ride this roller coaster up and down and nav- igate it as best we could,” Kirby said. “We were struggling with occupancy. We would see it at 100% at [Arizona State University’s] parents’ weekend and then down to 30% or 40% occu- pancy the next weekend. Thankfully, I feel like we are rising again and have a bright future.”

ROOMS IN TEMPE

OCCUPANCY

REVENUE

IMPACTS

4

$200M

7.5K

75%

Local experts discuss home appraisal process

$150M

50%

5K

$100M

25%

2.5K

$50M

Q&A

10

$0

0%

0

2020

2020 2021 2019

2019

2021

2019

2020

2021

CONTINUED ON 14

SOURCE: SMITH TRAVEL RESEARCH/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Carless community to open first phase in Tempe this fall

HISTORY OF EARLY TEMPE

CULDESAC TEMPE SET TOOPEN PHASE 1 THIS FALL The community is to be entirely devoid of residential vehicles.

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BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

Phase 1 of a new Tempe community is set to open this fall with about 50 of its 761 residential units—and no residential parking spots for any of them. The Culdesac Tempe community is the first of its kind in Arizona and in the nation, according to company officials, and the company’s priority is “building cities for people, not cars.” Culdesac Tempe is a $170 million project with 761 residential units, 16,000 square feet of retail and 35,000 square feet of amenities on 17 acres. The rest of the residential units will continue to open in phases, according to company officials. Residents will not have private cars or parking spaces, although the retail areawill have parking for retail visitors and resident guests, according to the company. The first phase of the project is set to open this fall with about 50 residential units, a grocery store, a restaurant, coworking space, a coffee shop and a bike shop.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the first edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pflugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMBECK: We so appreciate all the great feedback on our first edition! We are excited to continue to bring you the news you need from your community. My favorite part of our paper is our profiles on local restaurants and businesses. Each month, our editorial team selects a locally owned place in Tempe and tells their story. It’s a great reminder to support our local businesses and restaurants when we can! Beck Marlar, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMALEXA: This issue delves into how tourism in Tempe has changed over the years—especially with the coronavirus pandemic. Our second cover story is about a community being built in Tempe that is intended to be entirely devoid of vehicles. You can expect continued transportation and development coverage from us each and every month. We thank you for reading! Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that affects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

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TEMPE EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Rumble Tempe

The Spaghetti Shack

S. COLLEGE AVE.

KATELYN REINHART/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY SPAGHETTI SHACK

E. APACHE BLVD.

TEMPE

Rural Road, Ste. 207, Tempe. 520-428-5644. www.goodnatureprogram.com

The restaurant will be located at 1617 W. Warner Road, Tempe, in the space that formerly housed a Tilted Kilt. 623-295-4567. www.bonfirektap.com 9 Cession , a Southern-style bistro, is set to open in 2023 at Watermark Tempe, located at 410 N. Scottsdale Road, Tempe. The restaurant will feature patio space and will be located along with a boardwalk situated next to Tempe Town Lake. Website and contact information were not available as of press time. 10 Fatburger & Buffalo's Express , is expected to open soon at Arizona Mills. The restaurant serves burgers and spicy wings, as well as onion rings, fries and real ice cream milkshakes. The restaurant will be accessible through entrance six or seven in the mall to the food court. https://fatburger.com/ 11 Two Hands Corn Dogs is set to open at Arizona Mills. The eatery serves a vari- ety of corn dogs, including the Spicy Dog and the Two Hands Dog. The business will be located in the mall’s food court, according to property ownership group Simon. It is set to open in 2022. www.twohandsus.com NEWOWNERSHIP 12 Big Surf in Tempe sold this spring for about $49 million. Overton Moore Prop- erties purchased the 35.5-acre property, according to a statement from previous owner Velocity Retail Group. The park has been a Valley staple for decades but shuttered due to the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. The park had last been open in 2019, closing before the start of the 2020 season began. It was not imme- diately clear what the new owners had

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4 Panchitas Mexican Food opened in Tempe in February. The Mexican restaurant serves a variety of traditional Mexican dishes ranging from tacos and burritos to breakfast foods. The restau- rant is located at 710 W. Elliot Road, Tempe. 480-219-9144. www.tempe.panchitasrestaurant.com 5 Rumble Tempe , a boutique boxing and fitness studio, opened April 8 in Tem- pe. The boxing classes are group fitness style. Information on pricing and mem- bership is available on the studio website. The studio is located at 430 N. Scottsdale Road, Ste. A-115, Tempe. 602-675-0530. www.rumbleboxinggym.com 6 The Spaghetti Shack opened in Tem- pe in February. The restaurant offers a variety of menu items, including spaghet- ti, meatballs, garlic bread, meatball subs and cheesecake. The restaurant is located at 6340 S Rural Road, Ste. 114 in Tempe. 480-687-2485. www.thespaghettishack.com 7 ViB Hotel , a Best Western product, opened in Tempe in March. The full-ser- vice hotel is located in downtown Tempe at 511 S. Farmer Ave. 480-805-2070.

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TM; © 2022 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

NOWOPEN 1 AGC Go Anime Store & Cafe held a grand opening ceremony April 28. The store and cafe, located at 521 S. College Ave., Unit 111, Tempe, offers food and beverage options and anime-inspired merchandise. Supplies range from themed ramen bowls to figurines. Snack items include stewed skewers, boba tea, and packaged candies www.acg-go.com

2 AutoZone opened a store Feb. 26 at 3136 S. McClintock Drive, Ste. 7, Tempe. The auto parts store has free battery and check-engine light testing and loans tools on-site. 480-741-6993. www.autozone.com 3 GoodNature , a human stool donation center, opened in Tempe on March 17. The facility will pay donors for their stool donations, which are used for scientific purposes. The center is located at 725 S.

www.bestwestern.com COMING SOON

8 Bonfire Craft Kitchen and Tap House is opening a Tempe location this summer. This marks the second location for the restaurant; the first location opened two years ago in Surprise. It serves pizzas, barbecue, burgers and other menu items.

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Bonfire Craft Kitchen and Tap House

COURTESY BONFIRE CRAFT KITCHEN AND TAP HOUSE

planned for the park. The park is located at 1500 N. McClintock Drive, Tempe. www.bigsurffun.com CLOSINGS 13 Hong Kong Asian Diner permanently closed in Tempe at the end of March. The restaurant was located at 9880 S. Rural Road, Ste. 105, Tempe. The Chinese restaurant had been in Tempe for about two decades. 14 Thomasville Home Furnishings in Tempe is closing its doors. The furniture retailer announced the impending closure with signage on the door. The store is having a liquidation sale. An exact closing date was not known as of press time. The store is located at 9959 S. Priest Drive, Tempe. 480-763-5500. www.woodbridgeinteriors.com

Bob and Robin Trick announced the sale of House of Tricks in December.

House of Tricks has been a Tempe staple since the ’80s.

COURTESY HOUSE OF TRICKS

COURTESY HOUSE OF TRICKS

FEATURED IMPACT CLOSINGS House of Tricks , a downtown Tempe restaurant staple for decades, will close its doors after June 25. House of Tricks opened in 1987 in a remodeled 1920s cottage, and in 1994, the restaurant expanded to the house next door. The addition of the second building allowed the restaurant to expand to include two dining rooms and tripled Tricks’ indoor seating capacity. Owners Bob and Robin Trick announced the sale in December. The buildings and

small patio in the front that became, over the years, the place to meet friends, sip wine and eat delicious food.” 480-968-1114 www.houseoftricks.com

property were sold to 101 E. 6th Street LP as of Dec. 15. “As we look forward to this new chapter in our lives, we fully recognize that we could not have built such a successful business without your support and loyalty these many years,” the couple wrote on the restaurant’s website when the sale was announced. “It is with deep humility and gratitude that we thank you for making our lives so full, for sharing your many happy occasions with us, and for embracing our humble beginnings in a vintage cottage with a

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TEMPE EDITION • MAY 2022

TO-DO LIST

May & June events

COMPILED BY KATELYN REINHART

ENJOY COFFEEWITHOFF- ROAD ENTHUSIASTS DESERT RAT OFF ROAD CENTERS

SHOP LOCALWITH THEMADEWITH LOVE MARKET TEMPE MARKETPLACE

MAY 14

JUNE 02-05

Coffee & Crawlers takes place the second Saturday of every month at Desert Rat Off Road Centers. The event features off-road vendors and is a place for enthusiasts to gather around a shared hobby. 8-10 a.m. Free (admission). 4453 S. Rural Road, Tempe. https://facebook.com/ desertratoffroad

Parkway, Tempe. 480-350-2822. www.tempecenterforthearts.com 17 LISTEN TOMUSICAL COMPOSITIONS FROM THROUGHOUT THE CENTURIES Two Arizona State University graduates, Anna Garula and Michelle Kim will showcase their violin and piano skills in a performance at the Tempe Center for the Arts. An online RSVP is required for this concert, and there are a limited number of tickets available. 10 a.m. Free. 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe. 480-350-2822. www.tempecenterforthearts.com 28 ATTEND A FASHION SHOW THAT RAISES AWARENESS FOR CHILD ABUSE Fashion designers from both in and out of state gather to put on retailer Via Moda’s “The Way of Fashion” event. The show will feature 50 models, and a portion of the proceeds will go toward the nonprofit FreeArtsAZ, which aims to support abused and neglected children. 6-10 p.m. $65-$125. Sun Studios of Arizona, 1425 W. 14th St., Tempe. www.facebook.com/viamodafs The Made With Love market connects local vendors with shoppers at Tempe Marketplace. This market is part of the market’s Summer Splash series and will take place indoors next to the splash pad. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free (admission). 2000 E. Rio Salado Parkway, Ste. 1024, Tempe. www.madewithloveaz.com

MAY 10 THROUGH 16

Music duo Aly & AJ will perform in Tempe at the Marquee Theatre. (Courtesy Aly & AJ)

FEATURED EVENT MAY 25 SEE ALY & AJ IN CONCERT AT THE MARQUEE THEATRE The sister duo behind the early 2000s pop hit “Potential Breakup Song” will be performing in Tempe. Their “A Touch of the Beat” tour has taken them across the country as they share their new album “a touch of the beat gets you up on your feet gets you out and then into the sun.” The deluxe version of the album launched early this year and is available on streaming platforms, such as Spotify, Tidal and Apple Music. The original album was released in 2021 and the deluxe version, which launched in February, contains four additional songs.

SEE AN ART EXHIBIT

BEFORE IT CLOSES The “Luster and Light” exhibit at the Arizona State University Art Museum Ceramics Research Center has been on display for the last few months and will conclude on May 16. The exhibit “creates space to reflect on the value of craft and craft-adjacent works in art museum settings,” according to ASU’s website. The exhibit has been on display since November. Fri.-Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 699 S. Mill Ave., Tempe. 480-965- 2787. www.asuevents.asu.edu 11 THROUGH 15 & 18 THROUGH 21 EXPERIENCE HISTORICAL STORYTELLING The one-act musical experience “Assassins,” presented by Stray Cat Theater, tells the dark history of assassinations or attempted assassinations throughout history. The show features music and lyrics from Stephen Sondheim. 7:30 p.m. $20 (general admission). 700 W. Rio Salado

This tour is the duo’s first in two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 6 p.m. (doors open), 7:30 p.m. (concert begins). $30-$199. 730 N. Mill Ave., Tempe 480-829-0607 www.luckymanonline.com

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Find more or submit Tempe events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Tempe Streetcar to begin serviceMay 20

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

ONGOING PROJECTS

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Valley Metro announced Tempe Streetcar service will begin May 20 and rides will be free for the first year. “Streetcar has been a vision in Tempe for more than a decade-adding to the mix of multi-modal transit options and serving a busy downtown core made up of residents, businesses and students,” officials said via the Valley Metro web- site. “Valley Metro, in close partnership with the city of Tempe and our streetcar vehicle manufacturer, Brookville, have worked through the various COVID-re- lated impacts and delays to open up this system safely and reliably, with sufficient testing and inspection.”

Tempe Streetcar is the first modern streetcar line in the Valley. It will serve one of the highest transit ridership centers in the region and connect riders to neighborhoods, business centers and regional events and destinations. Streetcar will travel on Mill and Ash avenues from Rio Salado Parkway and Marina Heights to Dorsey Lane and Apache Boulevard and differs from light rail in that it shares the roadway with vehicle traffic. Vehicles are smaller, with a capacity of 125 people, and travel as a single car. Streetcars will arrive at stops every 15-20 minutes, according to Valley Metro.

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McClintock Drive expansion The city of Tempe is adding a third southbound travel lane on McClin- tock Drive between Del Rio Drive and Broadway Road. The finished project will include three southbound, two northbound, turn and bike lanes. Status: Crews are adding a third southbound travel lane while main- taining bicycle lanes on McClintock Drive, between Del Rio Drive and Broadway Road. Timeline: late 2021-May 2022 Cost: $3.4 million Funding source: city of Tempe

Alameda Drive streetscape improvements

The city of Tempe is embarking on an effort to improve bicycle and pedes- trian conditions on a 3-mile stretch of Alameda Drive between 48th Street and Rural Road. Status: Work has begun to trans- form three miles of Alameda Drive, between 48th Street and Rural Road, into a walkable, bikeable street with landscaping, sidewalk improvements, enhanced street crossings and bike lanes. Much of the on-street work will occur over the summer and into the fall. Timeline: April-winter Cost: $3.1 million Funding sources: CMAQ grant and Tempe Transit Tax

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 4. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT TMPNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

Tempe Streetcar will begin in May.

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TEMPE EDITION • MAY 2022

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Tempe-area school districts

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

NUMBERTOKNOW

Kyrene authorizes issuance and sale of district’s 2017 bond

Tempe Elementary gets vision kits for five of its schools TEMPE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT The Tempe Elementary School District Govern- ing Board approved the donation of five vision screening kits to the district during a meeting April 20. The kits allow the schools to screen students’ vision, an annual occurrence in elementary schools. The kits were donated from the Arizona Department of Health Ser- vices Sensory Screening Program. The kits are valued at just under $2,500. Schools receiving the kits include Arredondo, Frank, Holdeman, Hudson and Thew elementary schools. At the same meeting, the governing board also approved McKemy Academy of Interna- tional Studies to accept a $1,135 donation from DonorsChoose for the purchase of physical educa- tion equipment. The board also approved a $250,000 donation from First Things First Family Resource Center in a grant-renewal agreement.

Union High School District Governing Board accepted a $100,000

The Tempe

MEETINGHIGHLIGHTS TESD The Tempe Elementary School District governing board accepted a donation April 6 from Spread D. Love, a local nonprofit organization, which donated a total of 16 bicycles—eight adult bicycles and eight kids bicycles—to the district to distribute to staff for appreciation events and students who are in need of a bicycle. TUHSD Tempe Union High School District renewed its affiliation agreement with Grand Canyon University to allow internships for college students to work within district schools on April 20. KSD The Kyrene School District approved a new coaching evaluation tool for the district’s teachers and evaluators April 26. donation April 20 of $100,000 to Marcos de Niza High School and $100,000 to Mountain Pointe High School for athletic facilities and physical education programs. Tempe Elementary School District Governing Board May 18, June 8 at 7p.m. 3205 S. Rural Road, Tempe 480-730-7100 www.tempeschools.org Tempe Union High School District Governing Board May 25 at 7 p.m. 500 W. Guadalupe Road, Tempe 480-839-0292 www.tempeunion.org Kyrene School District Governing Board May 10, 24 at 7 p.m. 8700 S. Kyrene Road, Tempe 480-541-1000 • www.kyrene.org MEETINGSWE COVER

KYRENE SCHOOL DISTRICT At a meeting April 12, the Kyrene School District Governing Board approved a resolution authorizing the issuance and sale of Kyrene School District school improvement bonds, Series C. The nearly $117 million bond was approved by voters in 2017, accord- ing to the district. The resolution approved April 12 authorizes the issuance and sale of no more than

$33 million on a tax-exempt or tax- able basis for the purpose of making school improvements. Out of the $116.95 million bond, the district has spent $30.4 million through the 2020-21 school year, according to district officials. Of those dollars spent 89% went to maintaining schools. More information on the bond sale can be found on the district’s website.

KYRENE USDMOST RECENT BONDS

Purpose

Total

% of total

Maintain schools

$26,954,034 $2,205,569 $1,249,483 $30,409,086

89%

Administrative capital

7% 4%

Transportation

Total

100%

SOURCE: KYRENE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TUHSDapproves five newclasses for students

Stop Saying Tomorrow Start today for just $299 The courses include Advanced Accounting Studies, Advanced Criminal Justice Studies, Edu- cation Professions 1, Education Professions 2 and Study Skills 2, according to the Tempe Union High School District agenda. TEMPE UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT The Tempe Union High School District Governing Board approved curriculum adop- tion for the 2023-24 school year during a meeting April 20, which includes the addition of five new courses for students.

The board also approved the change of class description and titles to about 10 other classes and deleted eight other courses, which included classes such as Basic Art, Basic Keyboarding and Basic Foods. The district began the process of deciding on the new classes in December when school sites sent information to their department leads and in January when the first meeting of the teaching and learning department was held, according to the agenda.

TEMPE SCHOOLS RECEIVING KITS: Arredondo Frank Holdeman Hudson Thew

SOURCE: TEMPE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CITY& COUNTY

News from Tempe & Maricopa County

COMPILED BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

NUMBERTOKNOW

Tempe City Council approves resolution for bond sale

TEMPE BOND Tempe voters approved five separate bond questions that provide authorization to issue bonds in these categories and amounts.

The Tempe City Council on April 28 adopted a resolution authorizing the annual action plan for the one-time funding associated with the HOME program received through the American Rescue Plan Act. The program supports efforts to reduce homelessness. $2.27M

$349M Total

Tempe to receive funds for using less ColoradoRiver water TEMPE The Tempe City Council unanimously approved a resolution April 28 and authorized Mayor Corey Woods to sign a multiple-party agreement to provide financial compensation to the city in exchange for reducing its portion of Colorado River water delivered by the Central Arizona Project. The city taking a smaller amount of water from the river will help sustain water levels at Lake Mead. The reduc- tion in water is a preventive measure, according to city documents, to stave off future shortages. TEMPE The Tempe City Council approved a resolution authorizing the sale and issuance of general obligation bonds during a meeting April 28. The amount of the bond issuance is in an amount not to exceed $110 million and will be used to finance capital project program expenditures. The debt service on these bonds will be paid out of the water/wastewater enterprise fund and the general obligation debt service fund. Tempe voters last approved a bond in November 2020. Tempe voters approved five separate bond questions that provide authorization

to issue bonds in these categories and amounts: $134 million for water and sewer improvements, $74 million for street improvements and storm drains; $34 million for public safety, $45 million for park improvements and community services; and $62 million for municipal infrastructure preservation. The total bonding authorization of $349 million was requested and approved by voters. The average tax rate for the bond authorization is $0.68365 per $100 of limited assessed valuation for property tax-supported bonds.

$34 million Public safety $45 million

Park improvements/ community services $62 million Municipal infrastructure preservation $74 million Street improvements/ storm drains

CITYHIGHLIGHTS

TEMPE The Tempe City Council voted April 28 to authorize the city manager or designee to negotiate exclusively with Copa Health Inc. for the lease and development of a mixed-use affordable housing project on four vacant lots consisting of approximately 2.6 acres located at 2320 and 2314 E. Apache Blvd. in Tempe. TEMPE On April 28, the Tempe City Council awarded a two-year contract with three one-year renewal options to SmithCraft Signs to design and install new monument signage for Tempe parks, golf courses, sport complexes and additional sites as needed. The contract is not to exceed $200,000. TEMPE The Tempe City Council on April 28 adopted a resolution to file a lawsuit and seek an injunction to require the owner of West 6 to take measures to prevent residents from throwing or dropping items from balconies. TEMPE The Tempe City Council on April 28 approved an item authorizing $3.5 million for pavement preservation projects across the city of Tempe.

$134 million Water and sewer improvements

SOURCE: CITY OF TEMPE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Rachel Mitchell appointed interimMaricopa County attorney following resignation

MARICOPA COUNTY County pros- ecutor Rachel Mitchell was unanimously appointed

Maricopa County Attorney’s Office for the past 30 years and was most recently the head of the Criminal Division. She will serve in the role through the 2022 general election. She is also running for county attorney in November. Whoever wins that election will maintain the role through 2024. According to Mitchell’s campaign website, Mitchell is a “lifelong conservative,” and her core focuses are justice, experienced leadership and accountability. She received her law degree from Arizona State University.

interim county attorney by the Maricopa County Board of Supervi- sors on April 20. Her appointment fills the vacancy left by Allister Adel, whose run as county attorney ended in her resignation last month. According to a news release, Mitchell has worked for the Rachel Mitchell

Tempe City Council May 26, 6 p.m. 31 E. Fifth St. 480-350-4311 • www.tempe.gov MEETINGSWE COVER

9

TEMPE EDITION • MAY 2022

REAL ESTATE Local experts discuss home appraisal process Maricopa County assessor and team explain role in property taxes It has been just more than two years since Eddie Cook resigned as a Gilbert Town Council member to become Maricopa County assessor. He was elected to a full term in 2020. As valuations have recently been mailed to county property owners, Community Impact Newspaper sat down March 22 to chat with Cook and two of his top executives, Chief Deputy Assessor Dawn Marie Buckland and Alejandra Larios, Cook’s chief of staff, about how the office works. The conversation has been edited for brevity and clarity. A more complete transcript is online at communityimpact.com.

BY TOM BLODGETT

... AN IMPORTANT ASPECT OF OUR BUSINESS IS TOBE EXTREMELY TRANSPARENT, TO PROVIDEFULLDISCLOSURE OF ALL OF OURACTIVITIES HERE ANDBE ABLE TO CREATE AWONDERFUL CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE. EDDIE COOK, MARICOPA COUNTY ASSESSOR

WHAT DOES THE ASSESSOR’S OFFICE DO? Cook: Well, it’s a constitutional position. So in the Arizona Consti- tution, it describes exactly what the assessor does: to fairly and equita- bly and impartially value all taxable property. That’s it; it’s very simple. HOWDO YOU DO THAT? Cook: We have a team of about 300 full-time employees that basically manage 1.8 million [real and personal] parcels of property [and accounts]. ... We look at the fair market value in that area, the type of property it is, and we’ll go through our analysis using our tools to come up with that fair, equitable, impartial calculation. WHAT SHOULD PEOPLE LOOK AT ON THEIR VALUATION CARD FROMTHEMAIL? Buckland: That card is going have a couple of different numbers on there. One is going to be your full value. One is going be your limited property value. It actually shows last year’s valuations compared to this year’s valuations. So the full cash value is an approximation of market value. And we have certain standards to make sure that we stay lower than the market value.

Buckland: If we had an error, right? So if there was a square footage or something along those lines. … Another example of appeal would be you’re looking at this value and you’re like, ‘This doesn’t make sense to me.’ And you pull up some comparable properties. And you’re like, ‘Look at these compara- ble properties.’ ... You can provide us with those comps, and we can look at that and we can say, ‘That’s a good business case, and we can support that.’ Larios: Other options that could be your square footage actually decreased. Let’s say you decided to shrink your property. ... If you decided to knock down that extra room that wasn’t used and make that into a patio instead. Cook: For me, an important aspect of our business is to be extremely transparent, to provide full dis- closure of all of our activities here and be able to create a wonderful customer experience, even during the process of appeals, when a prop- erty owner comes to us and says, ‘Eddie, you made an error with your calculation of my property.’ And the way we like to approach it is, ‘Please bring us a reasonable explanation of why you feel we’re wrong, because we’re not always perfect.’

... So full cash value on average for residential property is about 82% of market value. But the key here is your limited property value because that’s what the tax basis is. So your full cash value is great information. Your limited property value is going back [to 2012’s Proposition 117] … where your limited property value is only [going] to increase by 5% each year … unless something major occurs [like] a vacant parcel of land that you now develop. HOWDOES THIS AFFECTMY PROPERTY TAXES? Buckland: Your property taxes are going to be affected by that limited property value, and the really, really important thing, if we take nothing else away from this, is that you have 60 days to appeal that value. And there may be something that you know of that you could correct with our office. If for whatever reason we have a value that’s too high, we want you to notify our office. … After that 60 days by statute, we can’t accept that anymore. ... Your taxes are going be calculated based on that limited property value. WHAT KINDOF CIRCUMSTANCESWOULD BRING ABOUT THAT APPEAL?

Eddie Cook, county assessor

Dawn Marie Buckland, chief deputy assessor

Alejandra Larios, chief of staff

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HISTORY The origins of early Tempe I f one thing can be said about the early days of Tempe and Tempe’s founding, it would be Smith said. “It took a community effort to do all this stuff.” The canal, Smith said, was the City comes from collaborative beginnings

BY ALEXA D'ANGELO

that it was a community effort, said Jared Smith, curator of history at the Tempe History Museum. “It’s really hard to put a single name on it,” Smith said. “There were definitely a lot of early pioneers that came here to start it. It was pioneers coming from southern Arizona, many of whom had been Mexican residents, and then soon pioneers from across the U.S. were coming to the area.” Smith said Tempe was a good spot to cross the Salt River and move freight. That river crossing point was what drew Charles Hayden to the area, Smith said. “If someone names someone in the early days of Tempe, it’s almost

defining feature of Tempe. It opened up 20,000 acres of farmland south of the Salt River and led Hayden to establish the Hayden Flour Mill around 1874. Tempe then got its name in 1879, Smith said. The next milestone for the city came in the mid-1880s when the Arizona Legislature selected Tempe as the site for the Territorial Normal School—which trained teachers for Arizona’s schools. In this same era, Tempe was a place for cattle shipping and was home to cowboys and saloons, Smith said, something often left out of the city’s history. “It was one of the most important cattle shipping points of the region,” Smith said. “There were saloons down- town, and people

In the late 1890s Native American farmers would bring wheat to be processed at the Hayden Flour Mill. (Photos courtesy Tempe History Museum)

1875 view of the recently completed Hayden Flour Mill.

Mill Avenue, pictured in 1900, was considered the main street in Tempe.

TEMPE TIMELINE The origins of the city of Tempe can be traced back to the 1870s when development of the area around the Salt River began.

1894 The Maricopa County Board of Supervisors incorporates the town of Tempe. Dr. Fenn J. Hart is 1879 The Hayden’s Ferry Post Office is renamed the Tempe Post Office. headquarters on the south side of the Salt River 1870 Charles T. Hayden establishes a store and freighting

1904 view in front of Tempe House saloon. The Tempe House was a place for cattle buyers and sellers.

always Charles Hayden,” Smith said. “He was a freight operator and owned a business in Tucson but was running freight up further north. He became interested in the Tempe area in [the early 1870s].”

“YOUHADAMIXTURE OF FOLKS THATWERE INVOLVED IN THE FOUNDING. IT TOOKA COMMUNITY EFFORT TO DOALL THIS STUFF.” JARED SMITH, CURATOR OF HISTORY AT THE TEMPE HISTORY MUSEUM

1874 Hayden opens his flour milling operation using water from the Tempe Irrigating Canal. 1886 The Territorial Normal School opens in Tempe.

would literally get drunk and shoot their guns in the air. With the proximity to the Normal

School there was concern about corrupting students. That would shape a lot of why the importance of cattle shipping was kind of edited out of the city’s history. ” The city was officially recognized in 1894 by the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors.

Around that time, Hayden and another pioneer, Jack Swilling, took over at the existing canals and renamed it the Tempe Irrigating Canal Co. “You had a mixture of folks that were involved in the founding,”

SOURCE: TEMPE HISTORY MUSEUM/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Charles T. Hayden was one of the early founders of Tempe.

named the first mayor.

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TEMPE EDITION • MAY 2022

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

Small cakes are a staple.

The shop makes two- bite desserts.

ALEXA D’ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ALEXA D’ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Joan and TimO’Connor are the owners of Honeymoon Sweets in Tempe.

COURTESY HONEYMOON SWEETS

ON THEMENU Honeymoon Sweets is open for retail, but customers can also place orders online for sweet treats.

Specialty sweet treats fromHoneymoon Sweets can be found at area hotels and Whole Foods Market. Honeymoon Sweets Bakery brings high-quality ingredients to products made with love W hen Joan and Tim O’Connor opened Honeymoon Sweets, they said they did not expect to become a Tempe staple. A staff of 25 works to make the baked goods fresh daily. ALEXA D’ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ALEXA D’ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Classic chocolate eclairs

Fresh lime curd tart

The bakery does custom cakes and treats and also has a case of two-bite sweets and small cakes and tarts in addition to cupcakes. Joan said it is the quality of the ingredients used that sets it apart. “Chefs appreciate that quality when they taste it,” Joan said. “We use the true products, and you can taste it.” General Manager Alisa Hoppis said everything that comes out of the bakery is made from scratch. “When people come in here or order from us, they know they are getting an all-natural product,” Hoppis said. The bakery has been hit hard by the pandemic, like most businesses. Now two years in, the busi- ness is finding new challenges. “Tim has been driving around in search of card- board; we need so much of it, and we are having trouble getting it,” Hoppis said. Joan said even with the challenges, the business will continue to deliver nothing but the best. “We just keep chug-chug-chugging along,” she said.

Rosette design

Creme brulee tart

The bakery services a variety of major hotels and resorts in the Valley, has its sweet treats in Whole Foods Market and operates a retail shop that is open daily. “I worked in hotels, and so I knew what they were looking for,” Joan said. “I went around with banquet cakes after we opened. It was me, myself and I at the time here. Going to those hotels showed that we had a great product and great service.” In its 26 years, the bakery has expanded beyond Joan’s wildest dreams, she said. The storefront is deceptively small, but beyond the back doors is thousands of square feet of industrial kitchen space. The business employs 25 people and is hiring more bakers and cake decorators. “A lot of people don’t know that we are actually open to the public,” Joan said. “All the time people come to the doors and are surprised.”

COURTESY HONEYMOON SWEETS

Honeymoon Sweets 606 W. Southern Ave., Ste. 1, Tempe 480-517-9520 www.honeymoonsweets.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 7 a.m.-3 p.m., closed Sun.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE GadzooksEnchiladas&Soup Co-owner Aaron Pool dives headfirst into restaurant industry, finds success in enchiladas B efore he became a restaurant co-owner, Aaron Pool said he had a college degree in in addition to meat, and there are toppings available for lovers of all spice levels. Pool said some of his menu items, such as the sweet and BY KATELYN REINHART

business, a “fake it until you make it” attitude and a restaurant name already picked out. Nothing could have stopped him, he said—not even his lack of restaurant experience. Gadzooks Enchiladas & Soup, which has since grown to four locations across the Valley, started as an idea while Pool was studying business at Arizona State University. He knew he wanted to find a niche, he said, and he had always liked enchiladas. Pool said his can-do attitude and naivete were major contributors to the success of the restaurant chain. “Anyone can open a restaurant, but in hindsight I think if a lot of people knew how hard it is they’d

spicy cornbread, have gathered what he calls a “cult following” among restaurant enthusiasts. “Gadzooks has its quirks as a restaurant for sure,” he said. “We’re a little bit different—you can tell even from the name—and I think people see that and enjoy it.” Pool co-owns the restaurant with his brother, Jared Pool, and also serves baked goods from his moth- er’s bakery, Mama Linda’s Bakeshop. Pool first opened Gadzooks Enchila- das & Soup in 2013, and the Tempe location opened in 2019. Pool sees the customizable aspect of the restaurant as one of its most important features. Food is customized by

Tortillas are made in-house as either half corn and half flour or exclusively corn tortillas. (Photos by Katelyn Reinhart/Community Impact Newspaper)

Gadzooks is known for its enchiladas ($14.03) and “festival” tacos ($12.75).

Aaron Pool came up with the restaurant name while at Arizona State University.

ANATOMY OF AN ENCHILADA

never do it,” Pool said. “If you’re not passionate, it’ll wear you down. Success is difficult if you aren’t willing to wear every hat.” It does not hurt that he genuinely

• Cotija cheese • Honey vinaigrette slaw • Jalapeño ranch • Pico de gallo • Lava sauce • Chihuahua cheese

“WE’RE A LITTLE BIT DIFFERENT—YOU CAN TELL EVEN FROMTHE NAME— AND I THINKPEOPLE SEE THAT AND ENJOY IT.” AARON POOL, CO-OWNER

the customer in an assem- bly line with an array of fillings, sauces and toppings

Aaron Pool said he has his enchilada order down to a science.

• Christmas (red and green) sauce • Two enchiladas—short rib filling on one, the other chicken filling

to choose from. Pool

Gadzooks Enchiladas & Soup 505 W. University Drive, Tempe 602-279-5080 www.gadzooksaz.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-8 p.m.

craves the enchiladas that can be created at Gadzooks Enchiladas & Soup. He said he has been eating his go-to order for the last nine years. The Gadzooks Enchiladas & Soup menu features items like tacos, enchiladas, nachos and soup. Fillings include vegetarian options

said Gadzooks Enchiladas & Soup gives people the opportunity to choose their own food adventure. “Gadzooks is a texture and fla- vor-layering restaurant,” he said. “If I can give people advice before they come in, it’s to not get just plain enchiladas because you’ll miss out.”

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TEMPE EDITION • MAY 2022

New hotels in Tempe

Several new hotels have opened in Tempe since the start of the pandemic with one more to be completed by the spring of 2023.

CHANGES IN TAX REVENUE According to data from the city of Tempe, the city saw a large increase in tax revenue from hotels and motels in 2021-22 compared to a big dip in 2020-21.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

W. 5TH ST.

2021-22

Canopy by Hilton Rooms: 198,

2020-21

W. 6TH ST. The Vib Best Western Tempe Rooms: 102, Amenities: Cousins Maine Lobster restaurant, a rooftop lounge and a lobby bar

E. 6TH ST. Amenities: 5,031 square feet of flexible meeting and event space

2019-20

RENDERING COURTESY OF HILTON HOTELS

2018-19

RENDERING COURTESY OF BEST WESTERN HOTELS

E. 7TH ST.

0

$150K $100K

$200K

$250K

$300K

$350K

Hotel/motel tax revenue

SOURCE: CITY OF TEMPE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

of traveler Tempe sees than one might think, Martin said. “I don’t think people get that all our travel isn’t just because of ASU,” Martin said. “People come here for a getaway or an event. ASU does play a role, [but travelers come for a variety of reasons.] Jill Buschbacher, economic devel- opment program manager for the city of Tempe, said the city’s events play such an important role in tourism that with events canceled and postponed during the pandemic, the industry was hit hard. “Events attract so many of our visi- tors to Tempe,” Buschbacher said. “It was difficult during the pandemic.” According to data fromTempe Tour- ism, hotel occupancy fell to 45.6% for 2020 from 73.3% in 2019. The average daily rate for rooms alsodropped about 9% in 2020, according to the data. In 2021, occupancy in Tempe hotels increased to 61.7%, according to the Tempe Tourism data. Buschbacher said tax revenue from tourism has also been picking up.

W. UNIVERSITY DR..

The Westin Tempe Rooms: 290, Amenities: 21,214 square feet of indoor and outdoor event space, Terra Tempe Kitchen & Spirits, Skysill Rooftop Lounge

Omni Tempe Hotel Rooms: 330,

Amenities: 11 suites, four dining outlets, retail, and nearly 36,000 square feet of flexible indoor and outdoor meeting space Opening: 2023

RENDERING COURTESY OF WESTIN HOTELS & RESORTS

RENDERING COURTESY OF OMNI HOTELS

W. 9TH ST..

Makinga comeback Martin said while business travel has not yet come back all the way in Tempe, the industry is doing well despite it. “When business travel comes back, at this point, it will be icing on the cake,” Martin said. Martin said local hotels, espe- cially those near downtown Tempe and Tempe Town Lake, are seeing an increase in interest in their meeting spaces for conferences and that in the last couple months more business travel has occurred nationally and locally. “That is a sign we have turned a cor- ner,” Martin said. There is more diversity in the kind

according to data from Tempe Tour- ism. Visitor volume dropped to 2.8mil- lion from 4.2 million the previous year. “We are a business destination,” Martin said. “Prior to the pandemic, our business stays made up a major- ity of our occupancy. In the pandemic, business travel went way down. But we’ve seen something interesting, and that’s our leisure travel outpacing business travel in pandemic recovery. I think there was pent-up demand for people to get out of their bubble.” Martin said he is optimistic that as events continue to draw people to Tempe and as businesses resume travel and in-person meetings, the local hospitality industry will continue to improve.

CONTINUED FROM 1

The Westin Tempe was one of two new hotels that opened in the last 12 months in Tempe, the other a product of Best Western called The Vib, which opened in March. The Canopy by Hil- ton opened in downtown Tempe in June 2020, and another hotel—The Omni Tempe Hotel—is under construc- tion. By spring 2023, the city will have added about 1,000 new hotel rooms to its existing inventory. Michael Martin, interim president and CEO of Tempe Tourism, said the Tempe hospitality industry was hit hard by the pandemic in 2020, with hotel occupancy dipping across the board. Visitations fell 32.5% in 2020,

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