Gilbert - May 2022

GILBERT EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 9 | MAY 10-JUNE 13, 2022

ONLINE AT

Town Council approves sale of streets bond

C & J ANTIQUES AND GARDEN

IMPACTS

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ISABEL'S AMOR

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Town looks ahead to next phases of Gilbert Regional, Desert Sky parks Though residents excitedly greeted the opening of Gilbert Regional Park and Desert Sky Park in 2019, the two giant parks remain largely blank canvases withmore acreage untouched than developed. BY TOM BLODGETT Bike & Skate Park Undeveloped Open/Sports Field Building/Play Structure Lake Sports Court

BIG PLANS Gilbert Regional Park has 64 developed acres, and the town has developed a concept for the remaining 208 acres.

But after receiving input from residents, town offi- cials have presented in different forums this spring an updated look at what the parks might become in the next few years. The 272-acre Gilbert Regional Park, 64 acres of which have been developed, could include a multitude of uses: ballfields, a climbing area, action sports, community areas, and a nature zone with hiking trail loops and con- nections, according to the plans. The park already is the future home to one public-pri- vate partnership, the Cactus Surf Park, which should CONTINUED ON 12

gilbertaz.gov

Shaping a new tomorrow, today.

Trailhead Rendering

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Shaping a new tomorrow, today.

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PHOTO AND RENDERINGS COURTESY TOWN OF GILBERT

FAST RESPONSE Gilbert is exceeding its goals on response times to urgent calls as measured in response within defined time frames.

Ambulance data shows improved response, costs

“I wasn’t supposed to make it,” he said. “I’m in a very rare club.” The town is hoping Mohatt’s experience is one it can replicate for more Gilbert residents over time. Getting faster response times throughout the town was a main argument the town made for taking ambulance service in town out of the private sector and under control of Gilbert Fire & Rescue Depart- ment in 2021. Now, nine months into the town running the ser- vice, early data indicates the town is doing just that: providing faster service and doing it at a lower cost than was previously being achieved. CONTINUED ON 14

9 min.

20 min.

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BY TOM BLODGETT

100% 100% goal

95.2% 90% goal

100% 95% goal

Kevin Mohatt was dead for 10 minutes. With his car right in the middle of the intersection of Higley and Warner roads Feb. 14, the 59-year-old Gilbert resident had experienced a massive heart attack. But nearby motorists, police and Gilbert paramedics revived the frequent hockey player and fifth-degree black belt. He is back on his feet today.

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the first edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pflugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: Gilbert Regional Park and Desert Sky Park proved upon their openings in 2019 how much Gilbert residents love their parks. That makes it exciting to see what is in store in future years from those parks. You can check out the plans in our front-page story this month. Amy Lawson, PUBLISHER

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FROMTOM: Town officials made a business case for Gilbert Fire & Rescue taking over ambulance service locally. Now that it has been nearly a year, enough data is in to evaluate the claims they made then. We review how it has been going in one of our front-page stories. Tom Blodgett, EDITOR

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GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Smoothie King

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TOM BLODGETT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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beers on tap, a variety of canned beers, and some red and white wines. The space has a patio and can host live music or other events. 480-572-1033. www.valleytaproom.com 5 Winsupplies of Gilbert opened May 2 at 1019 N. Colorado St., Ste. 104, Gilbert. It sells HVAC supplies and equipment. 602-338-9313. www.winsupplyinc.com COMING SOON 6 100% Chiropractic anticipates opening a clinic at 1805 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 101, in mid-June. It is a national chain of full-service wellness clinics that offer chiropractic care, massage therapy, stretch therapy and a line of nutritional supplements. www.100percentchiropractic.com 7 Dignity Health East Valley broke ground April 21 on the Mercy Gilbert Medical Center Medical Office Building III, a 45,000-square-foot medical office building at 3477 S. Mercy Road, Gilbert, that will be home to its graduate medical education programs. The two-story medical office building is expected to be completed in spring 2023. www.dignityhealth.org/arizona 8 Square One Concepts plans to open a location of Famous 48 Tavern at 1026 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert, in late fourth quarter 2022. The sports bar also has a Scottsdale location. 480-361-4933. www.famous48.com 9 Mici Handcrafted Italian anticipates opening a location at 5498 S. Pow- er Road, Gilbert, in the summer. The family-owned chain of Italian restaurants serves a menu of dishes made with real,

whole ingredients without hormones or nitrates. No opening date has been announced. www.miciitalian.com 10 Mobility City is planning to open a franchise at 885 E. Warner Road, Ste. 103, Gilbert, in late May or June. It offers assisted and independent living mobility products, rentals, equipment sanitization or service. 480-892-2545. https://mobilitycity.com 11 Mr. Zeke’s will open a restaurant this summer at 1422 W. Warner Road, Ste. A100, Gilbert. The original restaurant opened in the Lakeside-Pinetop area in 2019 and serves breakfast, lunch and dinner menus featuring American and Mexican favorites. No opening date has been announced. www.mrzekesrestaurant.com 12 Rayoog Café is anticipating opening in late May or June at 78 N. Cooper Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert. The restaurant will serve a menu of Mediterranean breakfast and lunch items. 323-742-0757. www.rayoogcafe.com 13 Rock This Town Records plans to open in mid- to late May at 732 E. Warner Road, Ste. 101, Gilbert. It will be an inde- pendent record store that specializes in

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E. HUNT HWY. NOWOPEN 1 Hi, skin opened April 20 at 2050 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 102, Gilbert, in the SanTan Village Mall. It offers personalized skin care through custom- ized facials, expert advice and product recommendations. 602-836-4519. www.hiskin.care 2 Next Level Soccer opened May 1 at 740 S. Cooper Road, Gilbert. It is an indoor, high-level youth soccer training facility. 480-417-9303. www.nextlevelsoccer.com

HUNT HWY. 3 Smoothie King opened March 28 at 5482 S. Power Road, Ste. 102, Gilbert. The sixth Valley location of the Coppell, Texas-based company sells blended smoothies made with whole fruits and organic vegetables and without food coloring, artificial flavor, preservatives or added sugar. It also has sports beverages, energy bars, vitamins and supplements. 480-716-0100. www.smoothieking.com 4 Valley Taproom opened March 21 at 75 E. Rivulon Blvd., Gilbert, in the Rivulon development. It offers 30 local craft

vinyl records. 602-824-8484. www.rockthistownrecords.com EXPANSIONS

14 The Northrop Grumman Corp. ex- pansion at the satellite manufacturing fa- cility at the Gilbert campus opened April 22. The expansion adds 120,000 square feet to the existing 135,000-square-foot facility at 1721 W. Elliot Road, Gilbert, nearly doubling the site’s production capacity to meet the company’s backlog

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TO-DO LIST

May-June events

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

MAY 12 THROUGH JUNE 25 SEE A GENERATIONALMOVIE COME TO LIFE ON STAGE Kevin Bacon’s star-turn in 1984’s “Footloose” comes to the stage in a musical with songs like the title track, “Let’s Hear it for the Boy” and “Almost Paradise.” The story has Ren moving with his mother to a small town where dancing is prohibited. 7:30 p.m. (Wed.-Sat.), 4 p.m. (Sat.). $26-$42. Hale Centre Theatre, 50 W. Page Ave., Gilbert. 480-497-1181. www.haletheatrearizona.com 10 THROUGHMAY 30 EXPLORE LOCAL QUILTS AT ANNUAL EXHIBITION HD South hosts its 17th Annual Art of Quilting Show with an exhibit from the American Quilt Study Group, which will include more than 25 framed center/medallion quilts. The quilt show will also feature more than 100 quilts on display throughout the museum made by local artisans. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. (Tue., Thu., Sat.). Free with museum admission. HD South, 10 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. 480-926-1577. www.hdsouth.org

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Famous 48 Tavern

Liberty Market

TOM BLODGETT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TOM BLODGETT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

REMEMBER FALLEN ONMEMORIAL DAY

MAY 30

of satellite orders. 480-813-3546. www.northropgrumman.com/who-we- are/business-sectors/space-systems 15 O.H.S.O. Brewery at 335 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert, is constructing a recreation area known as The Park on the half-acre north of the brewpub. The grass-lawn venue will include a giant TV and a live music stage, 50-seat bar, concessions and a retail shop. It will be free and open to the public. Brewery officials hope the space will open about July 1. 602-900-9004. https://gilbertpark.my.canva.site RENOVATIONS 16 Liberty Market reopened its dining room April 26 from a closure in January to remodel the American fare restaurant at 230 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. It mod- ernized the interior, added booth uphol-

stery, upgraded lighting and acoustics, upgraded kitchen equipment to allow for more menu options and added a bar. 480-892-1900. www.libertymarket.com 17 Matty G’s at 3733 E. Queen Creek Road, Gilbert, reopened in March as a fish-and-chips, drive-thru-only restau- rant. It previously had been a traditional Matty G’s Steakburger & Spirits with a dining room that had sports-themed decor. 480-534-7302. https://matty-gs.com CLOSINGS 18 B Gastrobar announced its closing and sale by the Buschtetz family April 6. The restaurant at 1422 W. Warner Road, Ste. A100, Gilbert, served an eclectic American menu. The family still operates Copper & Logs in Gilbert and Cuisine & Wine Bistro in Chandler.

HD South, the town of Gilbert and its Veterans Advisory Board, and American Legion Post 39 are collaborating on the town’s Memorial Day event. The event will include a flag and wreath ceremony, the battlefield cross, the POW/MIA table, a performance by a local band and remarks from local Gilbert dignitaries. The guest speaker is military widow Sharri Detharidge. Guests are encouraged to bring a lawn chair. 8:30 a.m. Free. Park University, 92 W. Vaughn Ave. 480- 926-1577. https://hdsouth.org

Find more or submit Gilbert events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REGIONAL PROJECTS

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Val Vista Drive/Eastern Canal bridge repair

Funding sources: town of Gilbert, Marico- pa Association of Governments, develop- er contributions 3 Val Vista Drive intersection improvements The town of Gilbert is modifying intersec- tions to improve traffic congestion and safety in left-turn lanes. The next two intersections scheduled for the improve- ments are on Val Vista Drive at A Guadalupe Road and B Ray Road. Status: Design on those intersections is complete. Construction at Val Vista Drive and Ray Road started March 15 and is anticipated for completion in May. Construction at Val Vista Drive and Gua- dalupe Road was anticipated to start the first week of May as of press time. Traffic is reduced to one lane each way near the intersection. Timeline: January-May Cost: $8.23 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert, state grant 4 Tankersley water line replacement This traffic-impacting project replaces and upgrades the water mains, individual water services and fire hydrants of the former Tankersley Water System in the area generally located between Green- field and Higley roads, and Pecos and Frye roads.

Status: The contractor completed pipeline construction on Elgin Street and 166th Street from Fairview Street to Hig- ley Road. Roads remain open during this work; however, a flagman may be in place to assist in managing traffic. Trenched areas are covered with steel plates during off-work hours to protect the work zone. Timeline: September 2021-September 2022 Cost: $6.16 million Funding source: town of Gilbert COMPLETED PROJECTS 5 Recker/Warner roads reclaimed water vault enhancements Crews constructed an enhanced re- claimed water vault at the intersection of Recker and Warner roads to eliminate the need for staff to stop traffic to operate valves in the intersection. Status: Paving was scheduled for the first week of May with traffic control to be removed May 6 as of press time. Timeline: November 2021-May 2022 Cost: $715,000 Funding source: town of Gilbert

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Crews will reconstruct the bridge deck on Val Vista Drive over the Eastern Canal. To accommodate safe crossing in the future, the project includes a High Intensity Acti- vated Crosswalk, also known as a HAWK, that can only be activated by pedestrians or trail users to stop Val Vista Drive traffic and safely cross. Status: Construction started April 18. Val Vista Drive traffic is reduced to one lane in each direction, shifted away from the work zone. The Eastern Canal/Santan Vis- ta Trail access is closed at Val Vista Drive, Williams Field Road and Ray Road. Timeline: April-August Cost: $2.89 million

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East Germann Road is being widened to six lanes. The project also includes Lind- say Road improvements. Status: The project will continue the construction work on Germann Road through the end of May. The last phase of construction on Lindsay Road will begin in the middle of June. Timeline: October 2020-July 2022 Cost: $27.43 million

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 3. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT GILNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TOWN&EDUCATION

News from Gilbert, Gilbert Public Schools, Higley USD & Chandler USD

COMPILED BY TOM BLODGETT

MEETINGSWE COVER Gilbert Town Council May 17 and 24, 6:30 p.m. 6860 S. Power Road, Gilbert 480-503-6871 • www.gilbertaz.gov Gilbert Public Schools board May 17, 6 p.m. June 7, 6 p.m. 140 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 480-497-3300 www.gilbertschools.net Higley USD board May 11, 5 p.m. June 8, 5 p.m. 2935 S. Recker Road, Gilbert 480-279-7000 • www.husd.org Chandler USD board May 11, 7 p.m. June 8, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com Follow us on Twitter: @impactnews_gil SCHOOLHIGHLIGHTS GILBERTPUBLIC SCHOOLS After the governing board voted to give employees a 2% pay raise and up to $1,500 as a retention stipend, the board voted April 5 to bump the raises another 1%, giving all employees a 3% raise on their base pay, plus the retention stipend. HIGLEYUSD The governing board gave tentative approval April 20 to a $26.64 million unrestricted capital budget for fiscal year 2022-23. Final approval will come in June. However, the tentative approval will allow the district to prepare for its summer capital projects. CHANDLERUSD District students took home roughly one-third of the state’s award- winning projects at the Arizona State Science and Engineering Fair, Superintendent Frank Narducci told the district governing board April 13. Additionally, CUSD students represent 36.8% of the students qualifying for the International Science and Engineering Fair.

Town Council approves sale of streets bonds after Arizona Supreme Court turns away lawsuit appeal

GILBERT Town Council voted 4-0 April 12 to approve the issuance of up to $200 million of the $515 million in bonds that voters approved in the November election. The action came after the Arizona Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal April 5 on a lawsuit challeng- ing the town’s bond election from last fall, clearing the way for the town to proceed on bond sales. The court denied a petition for a review of a special action decision from the Court of Appeals in the case of Torgeson v. Adelman/Town of Gilbert. Gilbert resident Jim Torgeson initially filed suit against the town for removing at least 57 of his anti-bond campaign signs that the town said were illegal. Judge Jay Adelman ruled

against Torgeson, and the Court of Appeals did not take up his appeal. Town spokesperson Jennifer Harri- son said by email the town is grateful for the court’s quick decision, which allows Gilbert to stay on track with its original timeline to sell the bonds. “We are excited to move forward in this process and utilize these vot- er-approved bonds to provide critical infrastructure improvements for the community,” Harrison said. At council, Håkon Johanson, Gilbert finance and management services director, said the town with its bond consultants found that $200 million was the right amount to start getting projects under way. Johanson also noted smaller amounts could cost the town more in interest and additional fees.

BOND PURPOSES Gilbert’s streets, transportation and infrastructure bond has five goals that were defined in the ballot question.

$106M Road construction

$214M Safety and congestion

$68M Technology

$515M approved by voters $200M for sale to start

$49M Multimodal investment

$78M Redevelopment

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Arizona attorney general’s office finds openmeeting lawviolation

GILBERT Mayor Brigette Peterson and Council Member Scott Anderson were found to have violated Arizona’s open meeting law in an email discussion about the town logo’s placement on the Public Safety Training Facility. The finding comes from the Arizona attorney gen- eral’s office in a letter April 14 fromAssistant Attorney General Katherine Jessen to the Gilbert Town Council and

Town Attorney Christopher Payne. As a remedy, Jessen directed the violation letter’s contents be shared with the public at an upcoming council meeting and that any statement read to the public then must be approved by the attorney general’s office. Arizona’s open meeting law requires meetings of public bodies be conducted openly. In the Gilbert case,

Peterson emailed the council May 17, 2021, asking for their thoughts on the spending of funds for putting the logo on the PSTF exterior and whether that was an appropriate use of town funds. Anderson replied to all in the email. Anderson acknowledged the violation in a statement to Community Impact Newspaper. Peterson said she would withhold comment until council meets May 17.

The town logo appears on the Public Safety Training Facility.

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The garden, designed by Jones’ husband, a landscape contractor, was always part of the store’s plan.

BUSINESS FEATURE

Claire Jones said quality pieces and stories behind them attract her to include items in her inventory.

PHOTOS BY TOM BLODGETT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

C& J’s Antiques andGarden Owner takes pride in having store in historic Heritage District house C laire Jones unabashedly loves having her business in the Heritage District. It is serendipitous, really: Jones operates Pinto, started the antique store. Her sister—who is the J of C & J’s—still lives back east, but she and other family members scout for items for display in the store. BY TOM BLODGETT

THIS OLDHOUSE The home that is now C & J’s Antiques and Garden comes from about 1920, when the town of Gilbert was incorporated. Much of the structure, including the fireplace, mantle and kitchen, is original in the 795-square- foot-bungalow.

C & J’s Antiques and Garden from an old house, built in about 1920, in nearly 800 square feet on Gilbert Road that became used for professional offices sometime in the 1980s. She bought the home in 2005. “It’s hard to imagine any other business ever operating out of a building like this, but you know, it works great for me,” Jones said. She points to a view of the Gilbert Water Tower from the garden space out back as well as the Byzantine Catholic church that rings its bells behind her property. “My business is all about being in the Heritage District,” she said. “I just love that.” So much so that when the real estate market crashed in 2008, she sold her home and down- sized so she could hang on to the shop. Jones said the district was much different in 2005, before most of the restaurants a little further north had arrived. Originally from New Jersey, Jones had spent most of her working life in retail on both coasts. She and her sister, Joanne

The garden concept was always part of it, too, as Jones’ husband is a landscape contractor. She said people love the Mexican pottery and planters and other items back there. She also has some outside vendor spaces for when the weather is cool enough. Her store has evolved as the district has, she said. It’s more of a mix of antique and vintage items blended with newer ones. “That’s the nature of the whole industry,” she said. “So I call it ‘antique boutique.’” Her customers, she said, are also a blend of dedicated antique and vintage enthusiasts and more casual boutique shoppers here on vacation. “In the antique vintage world, it’s all about memories,” Jones said. “The most common thing people say to me when they walk into my shop, and especially in the kitchen, they’ll say, ‘Oh, this reminds me of my grandmother’s house.’ That’s part of having an experience here. … I think that that’s what antique vintage things do. They remind us of things along our journey.”

C& J’s Antiques andGarden 40 N. Gilbert Road, Gilbert 480-539-0401 www.facebook.com/cjsantiquesandgarden Hours: Wed.-Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sun.-Tue.

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MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY HD SOUTH, the Veteran’s Advisory Board, the Town of Gilbert, and American Legion Post 39 PRESENTS

Free Event Open to the public

Guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs. HD South will be open for free following the event from 10a m- 2 pm .

PARK UNIVERSITY 92 W. VAUGHN AVE

MONDAY, MAY 3 0 8 :30am

For more information, please call (480) 926-1577.

92 W. Vaughn Ave Gilbert, AZ 85233 hdsouth.org

a flag and wreath ceremony • the battlefield cross • the POW/MIA table performance by a local area band • remarks from local Gilbert dignitaries guest speaker for the event is Sharri Detharidge

9

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2022

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May 19 | 6:00PM May 16 | 6:00PM ALA San Tan Valley Elementary in Cafeteria 34696 N. Village Ln., San Tan Valley, AZ 85142 ALA Signal Butte Elementary in Gymnasium 22512 S. Signal Butte Rd., Queen Creek, AZ 85142

April 21 | 6:00PM ALA Ironwood Elementary in Gymnasium 850 W. Combs Rd., Queen Creek, AZ 85140 April 25 | 6:00PM ALA San Tan Valley Elementary in Cafeteria 34696 N. Village Ln., San Tan Valley, AZ 85142

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ALA Gilbert North HS in Cafeteria 1070 S. Higley Rd., Gilbert, AZ 85296

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10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Isabel’s Amor T he Vasquez family already had established their Someburros restaurants in the Valley, growing from one Tempe restaurant in 1986 to 16 today, when the idea for something else came to them: a neighborhood cafe. With that cafe, Tim Vasquez said the family wanted to honor their grandmother Isabel, whose recipes were used to start Someburros, but who died just a couple months before the first one opened. “I’ve always just had a special place in my heart and appreciation for her,” owner Tim Vasquez said. “So that’s when we decided [to] open a little bit more of an upscale Mexican food place. We found an old, tattered recipe book with her recipes in it, things that aren’t on the menu at Someburros. We kind of recreated those.” Add in a craft cocktail menu

BY TOM BLODGETT

Family of local Someburros restaurants honors grandmother at more upscale neighborhood café

Vasquez said. “We have a saying here: ‘En esta casa, todo esta hecho con amor,’ which means, ‘In this house, everything is made or done with love.’ And we took that from her because that’s the way she lived her life.” Vasquez said he wants staff to treat every customer as if they are family or a friend dining in their house. He welcomes it being the place to go for a girls night out or after a Little League game or for buddies coming off the golf course. “Those are super nostalgic moments,” Vasquez said, recalling memories from his own childhood. “And sometimes when I eat the food, it takes me back there, and that’s what’s amazing about food, how it can just trigger those emo- tions like that.” When a bakery shop next door went out of business in the pandemic, Vasquez expanded last in a high-traffic area, its location tucked back from the street keeps it something of a secret, he said. “I think it’s a little hidden gem in the area,” he said. “Usually only people know about it because they’ve had friends that have come here and enjoyed it. But I love it.” year with needed additional kitchen and dining space. But despite being

The Three Amigos Tacos plate ($17) includes one carne asada, one carnitas and one shrimp taco. (Photos by Tom Blodgett/Community Impact Newspaper)

NANA’S LEGACY Isabel’s Amor includes a wall of family photos that honor the one- time matriarch of Tim Vasquez’s family, Isabel.

The Carnitas plate ($17) features tender pork slow-braised in citrus and spices.

“... THAT’S WHAT’S AMAZING ABOUT FOOD, HOW IT CAN JUST TRIGGER THOSE

and a little space at Val Vista Drive and Williams Field Road with a patio, and Isabel’s Amor opened in Novem- ber 2013. Vasquez called

The Carne Asada plate ($21) has grilled marinated steak with green onions.

EMOTIONS. ... ” TIM VASQUEZ, OWNER

Isabel’s Amor 1490 E. Williams Field Road, Ste. 101 Gilbert 480-290-7060 www.isabelsamor.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

Isabel an amazing lady known for her work ethic and cooking. Her dream was to open a restaurant, which she and her husband did in 1972 with Poncho’s in south Phoenix. “She just cooked with her heart,”

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5052 S. Power Road, Suite 107 Gilbert, AZ 85212 www.theapplexchange.com

11

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2022

DESERT SKY PARK Desert Sky Park is considered more of a fitness-themed park.

was giving the residents amenities they wanted and needed, Carmona said. “It’s that blend of making sure that when you go to a park like Regional, that it really can fill everybody’s inter- ests,” he said. Carmona said the No. 1 request from the public was a dog park. “It’s truly a regional-size dog park,” he said. “It’s one that I think will fill a lot of needs for the dog parks in the community.” That community area also includes a “backyard” area convenient for a barbecue with a ramada and family games, he said. Another highly requested amenity was the action sports zone, which will bring a skate park and a pump track—a circuit of rollers, banked turns and features for cyclists that is designed to be ridden by “pumping,” or generat- ing momentum by up and down body movements instead of pedaling. The action sports area also could have a vendor-run climbing center with ropes and a challenge course. The town’s sports field assessment also was considered here with the inclusion of six softball and four base- ball fields. Like Desert Sky, those will have plaza space among the fields where, for example, food trucks can serve families attending a tournament. Carmona also noted the inclusion of a nature area at the south end of the park for more passive recreation. “The addition of a nature area was one of the ones that wasn’t as widely utilized before, but because of that area that’s at the very south of the park, it has a really nice element to createmore of that nature space for trails, almost like a mini-riparian,” he said. Anderson, credited as the father of Gilbert’s Riparian Preserve, had hoped some of the land would be preserved in a manner that could further connect to nearby areas. Anderson said he is happy with the plans. gilbertaz.gov Sensory Pathway Treehouse

Championship Field

1,000 Spectators Integrated Shade Structure Flexible Space for Events

5

4

gilbertaz.gov

Shaping a new tomorrow, today.

3

E. WILLIAMS FIELD RD.

6

Sensory Playground

DESERT SKY PARK

2

N

1

RENDERINGS COURTESY OF TOWN OF GILBERT

AMENITIES Lake 1

Championship field Plaza area Sensory playground

4

Ninja-style playground Fields

2 3

5

6

Shaping a new tomorrow, today.

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Making use of open space Gilbert Regional Park sits on a flood control plain that the town acquired from Maricopa County in 2015. The tract includes 47 acres of “high and dry” land. The first 30 acres, which make up the project’s Phase 1, were built there. The parkland still has flood con- trol requirements. Changes in those requirements as well as how much high and dry land is available has affected planning, Carmona said. Those also are reasons why the town went back to citizens, holding public and special interest group meetings and surveying residents online with the chance for them to give comments. The aim was to make sure the town

Those fields could put a significant dent into the town’s projected sports field needs, officials said. It also will have more trail space, a plaza for food trucks and vendors serv- ing tournaments, and additional play- ground equipment. The parks could cost $237 million to build out, accord- ing to town estimates, with money coming from different sources. A new master plan—built upon the old plan, community input and the sports field assessment—is expected to go before council later this year, but Parks and Recreation Director Robert Carmona stresses even that is flexible. “What we want to make sure is that because trends change that we left some of these areas flexible,” he said.

CONTINUED FROM 1

begin construction later this year. The park has two other smaller areas where the town is looking for a private part- ner to develop. “I think the public’s going to be pretty happy with [the park plans],” said Council Member Scott Anderson, who was also a former parks director for the town. “It’s a good balance. A lot of different users can find something in that park. And I think that’s what the real strength of that park is.” The 115-acre Desert Sky Park, meant to be more of a fitness park, will put more multiuse ball fields into play, including a showcase field for champi- onship play, according to town plans.

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PARK USAGE Even with the uncertainty of the pandemic, Gilbert Regional and Desert Sky parks remained in demand in 2021.

COST AND FUNDING Gilbert’s initial estimates for building out the parks are considered flexible by town officials.

$164M Total

Gilbert Regional Park Desert Sky Park 1,004 1,202 170 1,354

$9M Land sales

Court/field reservations

$155M Bond or other

Ramada reservations

$73M Total $10M Development fees

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“That south section that’s more of what they refer to as kind of a riparian area is someplace that I thought that we might be able to see if we could attract a wildlife rehab facility or some- thing like that,” he said. “Something like that would draw attention to that area. And then eventually I know that staff is looking at ways of making a con- nection to the riparian area across Hig- ley Road [from the park] there.” The park’s Phase 1 and Phase 1B also included two levels of playgrounds; a splash pad; and beach volleyball, bas- ketball, tennis and pickleball courts plus a lake, an amphitheater and a Great Lawn for events. Carmona said the event space has been utilized for regional events, such as March’s Boots in the Park concert, which drew a sell- out crowd of 10,000 attendees with about 3,000 from out of state. Carmona said the town intends to continue to do some big events like that but not go overboard. “I think the important thing for us is finding that balance,” he said. “We want to make sure it’s a Gilbert com- munity park but then also understand- ing that people are very interested in it The town’s 2014 sports field needs assessment showed Gilbert was at a deficit in having enough fields to meet the youth sports demand for its young population. More than any place else, Desert Sky Park stands to take a bite out of those needs. Four multipurpose fields all across Arizona.” Sportsfieldneeds

opened in 2019, and it has space for another 12 available to develop. The fields are collegiate-sized and of a high quality with a sand base on them, Carmona said. That allows them to be more durable than other fields. Carmona said the most positive feedback thus far has been on lighting with LEDs that keep the light down on the field without light pollution affect- ing the neighborhoods. “That’s another one of those con- cepts of trying to be the best neighbor possible,” he said. Making one of the fields into a cham- pionship field also is being explored, officials said. “That will targeted for about a thou- sand spectators or so with that inte- grated shade and space for special events—nothing to rival any of the larger stadiums, but just something that we think would be well utilized,” Carmona said. Also in response to public comment, the plan also calls for parking through- out the park so people can find space near whichever field they are assigned, Carmona said. Beyondfields, the park could include another trailhead into the community and a sensory playground. “One of the things we’d like to add between Regional and Desert Sky both is the concept of some of the sensory trail areas and just more sen- sory areas to make sure that we are having those areas for people with all abilities to be able to experience and make sure that we have more inclusive parts,” Carmona said.

$63M Bond or other

Gilbert Regional Park

Desert Sky Park

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Stop Saying Tomorrow Start today for just $299 “We’re in the early stages where [the parks department] is looking to update master plan documents and some pre- design information so that we can get better information on what the com- munity needs and is looking for and better cost information that we can Paying thebill Cost estimates for the park build- outs are $164 million for Gilbert Regional Park and $73 million for Des- ert Sky Park, according to town plans. “We’re very early on, and we’re in a period of inflation and everything else,” Carmona said. “I know those [fig- ures] would be somewhat fluid, too.” To date, the town already has spent $32.6 million on Gilbert Regional Park’s phases 1 and 1B and $19.6 million on Desert Sky’s opening. The town has about $10 million in system development fees set aside from Desert Sky Park and an estimated $9 million coming from a land sale at Greenfield andChandler Heights roads, according to the town. That leaves an estimated $218 mil- lion to be funded in some manner. One potential source, officials acknowl- edge, is a parks bond.

take to council in the upcoming years as we continue towork on this project,” Budget Director Kelly Pfost said. “But bonds [are] one of the things we’re looking at.” Pfost said the town will use other monies first and bonds only as a last resort. Still, the gap between availablemon- ies and what costs might end up being is pretty large, Pfost said. Saving up suchmoneywould require a lot of time, so a bond may make the most sense. It would allow the parks to be completed and the money to still be paid out over time. Town Council would make that call sometime in the future. “We’ll have to see what happens with property values and the town, what happens with the timing of need for the [$515 million] transportation bonds [passed in November],” Pfost said. “And if we can, we do try to keep it at the $0.99 [secondary property] tax rate, try to maintain that stability and consistency for citizens.”

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13

GILBERT EDITION • MAY 2022

COVERAGE THROUGHOUT TOWN While American Medical Response met its 90% goal for response in 8 minutes, 59 seconds or less throughout Gilbert, the town noted areas where that was not achieved. Early data shows the town has improved response in most areas.

data is limited at this point as the town is early in the life of the service, which expanded to townwide coverage July 26. However, Jobusch expressed satisfaction with those early results. “What we are seeing is that the response times are outstanding,” he said. Jobusch noted that the town’s goal was to respond to critical calls in fewer than nine minutes 90% of the time and in fewer than 15 minutes 95% of the time. But not only is the town hitting under the nine-minute mark 95% of the time, it has yet to have a call response in excess of 15 minutes. Gilbert’s data showed AMR previously hit the 90% require- ment of its CON. However, Gilbert ocials expressed unhappiness that the northeast corner and southern portion of town were under a 90% rate. Gilbert substantially raised the mark in the northeast from 78% to 100%, though the south remains a virtual wash at 86% on only 14 calls through Feb. 1. Assistant Fire Chief Bob Badgett said that was too few calls to really gauge there. “We’re seeing [90%-plus] pretty consistently across the town,” Jobusch said. Even if an area begins to lag, Jobusch said the town is in posi- tion to adjust. “That’s kind of the beauty of us running this service inter- nally,” he said. “We can adjust to

those issues pretty quickly.” Financialmeasures The town projected over eight years—the typical life of an ambulance—the service would earn $35.3 million in revenues against $30.05 million expenses, plus another $2.49 million in startup costs. That would leave $2.76 million in net revenue, which could then be reinvested in replacements, according to the town’s nancial plan. To fund the startup costs, the town borrowed $3 million from its general fund with plans to replenish it over nine scal years. Jobusch said the early nan- cial results have been good. “The revenue is where we projected it to be, and actually a little bit better,” he said. “I think over time, we’ll be able to pay back that debt that we had to the general fund, the money we bor- rowed to start this service. And then we can manage the ongoing operations cost as well.” Gilbert Budget Director Kelly Pfost conrmed the revenues as healthy enough thus far to set the town on a path to repaying the internal loan and to build a healthy repair-and-replace fund. Pfost said the town anticipated revenues to start slowly because of the lag from service to billing to receiving the amount owed. Nonetheless, the town’s accounts show Gilbert turning a positive cash ow by September and since then, with the exception of

Station No. 10: AMR 92% Gilbert 96%

60

Station No. 2: AMR 78% Gilbert 100%

CONTINUED FROM 1

Station No. 3: AMR 92% Gilbert 97%

The Gilbert Fire Department reported it is responding in fewer than nine minutes on 95.2% of sirens-and-lights ambulance calls, well above the 90% thresh- old required by its Certicate of Necessity—the plan approved by the Arizona Department of Health Services that allows an entity to provide service in a geo- graphic area. Furthermore, the depart- ment’s base billing rate is $84 less per transport than in neigh- boring cities with the service or with private provider American Medical Response, which previ- ously serviced Gilbert. Still, the change from a pri- vately-provided service to a pub- lic one was a contentious issue in some quarters when the change was made, and critics remain skeptical of the benets despite the early results. “It’s still pretty early, but hon- estly, there were no surprises,” said Vice Mayor Aimee Yentes, who voted against the service. “I think the information we’re going to get is going to validate what point [the town] wants to be made.” Improved response times Fire and Rescue Department Chief Jim Jobusch admits the

Station No. 7: AMR 91% Gilbert 97%

202 Station No. 1: AMR 92% Gilbert 96% Station No. 6: AMR 97% Gilbert 91%

Station No. 4: AMR 97% Gilbert 97%

Station No. 5: AMR 96% Gilbert 95%

BILLING RATES Gilbert’s base rate for ambulance

Station No. 8: AMR 90% Gilbert 93%

Station No. 9: AMR 92% Gilbert 94%

transportation, as approved by the

Arizona Department of Health Services, is less than what the Phoenix Regional Rate Group, which includes AMR and cities such as Phoenix, Tempe and Mesa, charge. Gilbert has not decided whether to increase that rate this year.

Station No. 11: AMR 87% Gilbert 86%

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

FY2022-23 proposed Current rates

$913

Gilbert

$1,013

Phoenix Regional Rate Group

$997

$1,107

0

SOURCE: TOWN OF GILBERTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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