Plano June 2020

PLANO EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 6, ISSUE 9  JUNE 19JULY 23, 2020

Plano health eld charts a newpath BY DANIEL HOUSTON & LIESBETH POWERS Most hospitals, doctor’s oces and dental practices throughout Plano have suered sharp declines in revenue while adapting to a series of economic and pub- lic health realities that could leave a per- manent imprint on the North Texas health care industry. In the early weeks of March, patient vis- its dropped by more than half in the South Central region of the United States, which includes Texas, according to a study con- CONTINUED ON 14

After the number of patient visits dropped by 57% between March 1-19, the South Central part of the United States, which includes Texas, is leading the way in patients returning to their care providers. STEEP DROP INVISITS

South Central (East & West)

North Central (East & West)

Mountain

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

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SOURCES: HARVARD UNIVERSITY, PHREESIACOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

Plano protesters march to support police reform On the last day of May, a fewdozen people met at a hastily organized rally at the ag- pole of the Plano Municipal Center to pro- test prominent instances across the country of police violence against black people. Organizer Cheryl Jackson said it was the “most organic, purest moment” that she can recall happening in her life. Within a few days, calls for change to the nation’s policing practices grew louder in the city, and organizers drew some of the largest protest crowds Plano has seen in years. As thousands marched June 7 through historic downtown, protesters held up signs and called out the names of black men and women who have died in police custody, including George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Although Plano has not been the site of any of these recent cases of police violence, the protests have also shined a spotlight on the Plano Police Department and the steps it has taken in recent years to restrict use of force, such as requiring ocers to wear body cameras. Police Chief Ed Drainwas there for several CONTINUED ON 18 BY DANIEL HOUSTON & LIESBETH POWERS

Peaceful protesters marched June 2 along Parker Road as part of a rally to oppose prominent instances of police violence against black people across the nation.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

COMMITTED TO LISTENING FROMLEANNE: Over the last few weeks, unrest began to overflow in communities across the country. Anger spurred by a long list of injustices toward black Americans seemed to reach a boiling point, pushed over the proverbial edge by the killing of Minneapolis resident George Floyd. Community Impact Newspaper is a hyperlocal news outlet. How do

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com EDITOR Daniel Houston REPORTER Liesbeth Powers GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Autin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rebecca Anderson, Stephanie Burnett METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pflugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve.

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we cover this national story from the perspective of Plano residents? How do we make sure local voices are being heard and how do we give our readers information that is actionable during this time? There is a popular saying: “Do not listen with the intent to reply, but with the intent to understand.” On June 2, we were there at a march on Parker Road among 1,500 people doing just that—listening and learning to capture the voices of the neighborhood and to share them with you. Our coverage in this edition is just a small window into this ongoing discussion in our community. Going forward, we feel it is imperative to commit to continue listening first. We want to hear from you, and we want to have conversations with organizations and individuals who can help us connect our readers with resources to better understand and to act. Please reach out to me directly at llibby@communityimpact.com with story ideas, recommendations of groups we should talk with and ways we can grow in our coverage. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

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PLANO EDITION • JUNE 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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NOWOPEN 1 Neres opened June 12 at 3045 W. 15th St., Plano. The indoor playground for kids has a Nerf battle zone, inatables, food and a party space. Neres also has more than 300 rentable toy weapons. 972-599-3333. www.neres.net 2 USPharmaceutica opened its pharmacy and drugstore at the end of April at 5969 Dallas Parkway, Plano. The business provides immunizations, nutrition consults and medication therapy management. Sta also creates custom, compounded drugs designed to meet the needs of individual pa- tients. Because the ingredients are customized, compounded medications are not FDA-approved. 972-853-9259. www.pharmacompoundia.com RELOCATIONS 3 Sweet Home Bath + Body is relocat- ing to a larger space in downtown Plano. The shop is expected to open in the new space July 1 at 1610 J Ave., Plano. Sweet

Home also expects to include more home essentials, a new men’s line and more bath products. The space includes indoor seating, an outdoor space and a private parking lot. 903-347-3427.

at 3670 Mapleshade Lane, Plano. The retirement and assisted-living com- munity is now known as Anthology of Plano and oers from-scratch meals, high-touch care and many social activ- ities for its residents. 972-964-8444. www.anthologyseniorliving.com IN THE NEWS 6 Plano-based J.C. Penney led for bankruptcy protection May 15, a move the company said would help it navigate the dicult business climate during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Before the ling, the company had already an- nounced plans to furlough more than half of its hourly workforce as well as some employees at the company’s corporate headquarters at 6501 Legacy Drive, Pla- no. 972-431-1000. www.jcpenney.com 7 Cinemark announced a multiphased reopening of its movie theaters that will begin June 19, three months after the Plano-based company closed nationwide in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Cost cuts during the closures included

furloughs of some sta at its headquar- ters at 3900 Dallas Parkway, Ste. 500, Plano. It also laid o more than 17,500 hourly employees in the U.S. Employees were being invited back as part of the reopening, but numbers were unclear. 800-246-3627. www.cinemark.com 8 Jack Carter Pool will reopen June 29, according to a June 8 release from the city of Plano. The pool will be open to the public through Aug. 9; after that, it will move to a weekend-only schedule until Labor Day in early September. Starting June 27, guests will be able to make res- ervations for one three-hour shift. There will be three shift options each day, and each shift will be limited to 250 people. 972-208-8081. www.plano.gov 9 StoryBuilt , a real estate developer, expects to build seven single-family homes as part of its Royal’s Bend com- munity. The homes will be located near I Avenue and 17th Street near Haggard Park and downtown Plano. Homes will average 2,600 square feet with three- and four-bedroom plans. 214-301-4098. www.storybuilt.com

www.sweethomebath.com ANNIVERSARIES

4 The Chamberlain Ballet , located at 1404 Gables Court, Ste. 101, Plano, is celebrating its 35th anniversary this year with an online auction. The dance company had originally scheduled an anniversary performance in April but was unable to hold it due to coronavi- rus-related restrictions. Chamberlain Ballet was established in 1984 and became a semiprofessional company during its 10th season. 214-412-8589.

www.chamberlainballet.org NEWOWNERSHIP

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON & LIESBETH POWERS

DISASTER? ARE YOU ONE STORM AWAY FROM

The market oers grocery items, including dairy, fresh meat and produce, as well as an artisan bakery and a specialty coee bar. (Courtesy Green Vine Market)

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FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Green Vine Market opened June 5 at 1804 K Ave., Plano, after holding an open house event earlier in the week. The market oers grocery items, including dairy, fresh meat and produce, as well as an artisan bakery, a cake section, a specialty coee bar and a service counter to order custom portions of meats. Also at Green Vine is a kitchen area with a rotating hot and cold menu. Roughly two items on the menu will change each week, owner Nedal Hammad said. The store was completely renovated to t all of these features, Hammad said. The market is located inside what used to be Terry’s El Mariachi

Supermercado, a building smaller than a full-size grocery store. “We don’t have the space of a 50,000-square-foot store,” Hammad said. “We’re more of a neighborhood store that will serve our community around us.” More information on Green Vine as well as coupons and options for online ordering can be found at www.greenvinemarket.com. 972-942-0808

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Construction is expected to begin later this year on the playground and the volleyball and basketball courts at Russell Creek Park. (Courtesy city of Plano) FEATURED IMPACT RENOVATION

include the park’s sand volleyball courts and its basketball court as well as other site work. The public park is located at 3500 McDermott Road, Plano, just north of Skaggs Elementary School.

The city of Plano is preparing to renovate the playground and other recreational features at Russell Creek Park. The renovations are expected to cost roughly $1.2 million and could begin as early as the end of September, according to construction documents led May 28 with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. In addition to the playground work, the renovations are expected to

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RESTORE HAS NEW HOURS! 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday restorecollincounty.com

Timeline: June 2020-June 2021 Cost: $3.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 4 Alma Road project A project to repair pavement on Alma Road began in May. Crews were expected to work on southbound lanes through June between Parker Road and Park Bou- levard before switching to the northbound lanes. One lane will be closed at all times during the project, with an additional lane closed on weekdays during the day. Timeline: May-August Cost: $800,000 Funding source: city of Plano 5 Coit Road project Crews were making pavement and side- walk repairs on two stretches of sidewalk on Coit Road. One portion of the project was active between A Wyeth Drive and Spring Creek Parkway, while another was between B McDermott and Hedgcoxe. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an additional lane closed during the day on weekdays and some Saturdays. Timeline: January 2020-late 2021 Cost: $6.4 million

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Jupiter Road project

HOW CAN YOU HELP? Make a donation by mail or online: HABITATCOLLINCOUNTY.ORG/DONATE 1 Donate furniture and certain household items to our Restore. CALL 972-544-5875 TO SCHEDULE PICKUP. 2

An extensive project to repair pavement and sidewalk on Jupiter Road began in early January. The project, which will eventually stretch from 14th Street to the northern city limits, will affect north- bound and southbound lanes this month between 18th Street and Park Boulevard. One lane will remain closed at all times in construction areas, with an additional lane closed during most daytime hours on weekdays and some Saturdays. Timeline: January 2020-summer 2021 Cost: $500,000 Funding source: city of Plano 2 Parker Road project A section of Parker Road is being affected by a new six-month construction project that will ultimately stretch from Indepen- dence Parkway to Preston Road. Con- struction will affect the roadway in both directions over the next month, primarily from Coit Road to Preston. One lane will be closed at all times, with an additional lane shut down during the day on week- days and some Saturdays. Timeline: May-November Cost: $1.5 million Funding source: city of Plano 3 Plano Parkway project A new project on Plano Parkway was expected to begin in June. The full project will extend from Preston Road to the Dallas North Tollway, with the earliest part starting between Winding Hollow Lane and Preston Road. One lane will be closed at all times, with an additional lane closed during the day on weekdays and some Saturdays.

We appreciate your support! Together, we are better. Together, we will get through this. And together, we will build back.

Funding source: city of Plano 6 Hedgcoxe Road project

A project continues for another month to repair pavement on Hedgcoxe Road between Independence Parkway and Coit Road. Crews were expected to continue work through the end of July. One lane will be closed at all times during the proj- ect, with another closed weekdays during the day. Timeline: March-July Cost: $800,000 Funding source: city of Plano

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 1. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ENTERTAINMENT Citing health, organizers cancel balloon festival for second time

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

necessary.” The festival was also canceled at the last minute in 2018 as a dreary Friday evening weather forecast evolved into an unexpected down- pour that ooded the park grounds and made holding the festival event impossible. Prior to 2018, organizers had occasionally suspended parts of the festival, Via said at the time. But never before had it been forced to cancel all operations. This year, festival organizers are still preparing a number of virtual and socially distanced activities, including a virtual option to run a half-marathon, 10K, 5K or 1K. Partic- ipants in these distanced races will receive a 10-year commemorative nisher medal and a T-shirt. Organizers will also release a video highlighting some top moments in the ballooning festival’s history.

Organizers have canceled the Plano Balloon Festival for the second time in three years, citing concerns for the “health and safety” of attend- ees and participants. The hot air balloon festival, originally planned for late Septem- ber, has been a prominent xture in North Texas for more than four decades. Organizers said June 11 they were “extremely mindful” of the large numbers of balloon pilots, out-of-town residents, volunteers and contractors who would have descended on Plano’s Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve if the event had gone on as scheduled. “While we are saddened to cancel this year’s event, we feel the safety of all involved is of the utmost importance,” PBF Executive Director Jo Via said in a statement. “This decision is not easy, but it is

The Plano Balloon Festival had been scheduled for late September before organizers canceled it for the sake of the health and safety of participants. (Courtesy Plano Balloon Festival)

The Plano Balloon Festival partners with other local nonprots and community volunteers each year. The organization estimates that more than $3 million has circulated back into the community as a result of these eorts. Each year, the Plano Balloon Festival aims to attract 100,000 visitors over a three-day span, and each year, the festival is one of the best-attended annual events in Plano. To meet the parking needs of visitors, the festival requires the use of ve separate parking facilities, including at the Collin College Spring Creek Campus, the Oak Point Recreation Center, the Plano Event Center and two nearby churches. $3MILLION 100,000 5 PLANOBALLOONFESTIVAL

SOURCE: PLANO BALLOON FESTIVALCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Plano Planning & Zoning Commission Meeting

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The Plano Event Center site will also be discussed during this meeting.

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PLANO EDITION • JUNE 2020

FIND UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION ON THE CITY’S SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS AND PLANO.GOV/COVID19

C O V I D - 1 9 I M P A C T

Most of us will be fine. But, if we allow the virus to spread, people who don’t have to could get very sick or die.

HOW CAN I HELP? If you’re looking for opportunities to help your neighbor, consider making a donation or volunteering with a local nonprofit during this time. Much like small businesses, nonprofits are experiencing financial pressure in the wake of COVID-19, as well as reduced volunteer capacity. Support from the community bolsters their ability to continue responding to local needs. SIGN UP FOR BI-WEEKLY SENIOR CARE CALLS

30 % No Symptoms

56 % Moderate Symptoms

10 % Hospitalization 4

% Hospitalization + ICU

DO YOU NEED HELP? Many have felt the financial impact of COVID-19, and the City and local nonprofits are here to help. The City’s Homelessness Prevention Program provides rental and utility assistance to low-income Plano residents at risk of homelessness. To apply, contact the Assistance Center of Collin County at 972-422-1850, option two. Other vital social service programs are continuing to serve Plano residents during the COVID-19 outbreak, including food pantries, shelters and transitional housing programs. Find answers and connect with local service providers on the City’s COVID-19 resources page: share.plano.gov/COVID-19Resources

CITY OF PLANO COVID-19 HOTLINE 9 7 2 - 94 1 - 592 2 Staffed Mon - Fri, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Our bi-weekly Senior Care Calls are here to help you feel connected as you limit your social interaction. City staff will call to ask how you’re doing, to answer your questions and to connect you to community resources if you need them. Sign up for a call: surveymonkey.com/r/SeniorCall .

Voicemails left after hours will be responded to the next business day.

You don’t have to wait for us to call you if you need help now. Contact our call center at 972-941-5922 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday-Friday. If someone calls claiming to be with the City of Plano and asks for your personal financial

R E S O U R C E S AVA I L A B L E • Food Resources • Housing and Utility Resources • Mental Health Resources • Business Resources

information or asks to enter your home, hang up and call Plano Police Department non-emergency number at 972-424-5678 to report it.

I N F ORMAT I ON IS ACCURATE AS OF JUNE 8, 2020

Listen to the City’s monthly podcast at insideplano.com Sign up for weekly news update from the City of Plano at plano.gov/news

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Keep your mind and body busy while practicing social distancing. Visit the City’s Facebook page every Sunday for your online guide: facebook.com/cityofplanotx HOP ONLINE FOR THINGS TO DO AT HOME The day-by-day guide provides

WE’RE BETTER TOGETHER If we work together, fewer of our friends and family will be affected by the coronavirus. Hospitals won’t be overloaded and lives will be saved. Learn more at texas.gov/covid19

DO YOUR PART TO KEEP PLANO SAFE!

the social page and a short description to help you add some routine back to your life. Some activities are:

PRACTICE SOCIAL DISTANCING If you must go out, avoid public spaces and keep your distance (about 6-feet).

6’

PLANO ARTS & EVENTS – Learn to paint, share your student’s art in a virtual exhibit, watch a mini concert PLANO PARKS & RECREATION – Take an exercise class, make a lava lamp PLANO POLICE – Become aware of the latest scams, get safety tips PLANO PUBLIC LIBRARY – Enjoy a ARTS & EVENTS

KEEP HANDS CLEAN Use soap and water for 20 seconds or use 60% alcohol hand sanitizer.

storytime, join a read-along, get tech tips SUSTAINABILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION – sharpen your recycling skills, learn the science of solar NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES – Join BEST Breaks with your neighbors

CLEAN AND DISINFECT Disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces often.

STAY HOME WHEN SICK Call your doctor if you have fever, cough or shortness of breath.

Continue learning online with Plano Public Library. Access digital newspapers, e-magazines, Lynda.com, watch films through Kanopy and much more. Planolibrary.org Discover ways to stay connected with your neighbors while staying at home at planoneighborhoods.org Explore one of our 85 parks in a socially responsible way to cure Cabin Fever. Find your new favorite at planoparks.org

DON’T SPREAD GERMS Don’t touch your eyes, nose or mouth. Cover a cough or sneeze using your elbow.

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PLANO EDITION • JUNE 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Plano

DATE TOKNOW

Plano ISD creates task force, prepares for 202021 year

JUNE 29

parents, students and sta of deci- sions and plans for the upcoming year, and it will continue to send out regular parent communica- tions, the update said. The district is also working to plan face-to-face and at-home learning options for students after receiving mixed feedback so far from its May 2020 family and community survey. As of June 3, the district plans to follow its adopted calendar for the 2020-21 school year. In the case of a prolonged closure, the district will revisit the calendar, according to the update. “Our greatest hope is that we will all return to our campuses on August 12 to resume school as normal with the addition of health and safety measures,” the update said. PISD TASK FORCE 5 CORE AREAS • safety and operations • learning and teaching • training • human resources and health services • technology and information

Early voting begins June

Plano City Council Meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Monday of the month. Meetings are held at 1520 K Ave., and they can be streamed at www.plano.gov/210/plano-tv. Agendas are available at the city website. www.plano.gov Plano ISD board of trustees Expected to meet June 23. The board has been holding meetings in recent months via video conference, which can be streamed at www.pisd.edu/pisdlive. Agendas are available at the district website. www.pisd.edu MEETINGSWE COVER 29 for the July 14 primary runo election. Voters will choose the runo winner in one Republican race—401st district judge—and four Democratic races. The Democratic races include U.S. senator, U.S. representative for District 3, Texas railroad commissioner and state representative for District 67. For sample ballots, voting locations and more information, visit www.collincountytx.gov/elections.

July 4reworks to be seen fromfarther away The reworks will take place at a higher altitude. (Courtesy city of Plano)

BY LIESBETH POWERS

PLANO ISD The school district shared its key priorities in planning for the 2020-21 school year as well as the creation of a planning task force in a June 3 update to parents. “While the future related to the COVID-19 virus remains uncertain, planning for the fall is underway,” the email to parents said. The task force’s mission will include developing a “return to instruction plan” as well as identifying training needs for sta and protocols for safely returning to school in the fall. The creation of the task force is in addition to the district research- ing and collaborating with the Texas Education Agency, according to the district. PISD will be adding a space to its website dedicated to informing

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

PLANO The city will hold its Fourth of July reworks display while taking coronavirus-related precautions. The city will raise the altitude of the reworks display to allowmore residents to view them from their homes, vehicles or neighborhoods, the city said in a June 9 news release. The patriotic pyrotechnics, usually launched near a mass gathering at Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve, will instead be launched nearby from Lavon Farms, which will be closed to the public. Music will be broadcast on radio station KLAKFM (97.5).

With so much change and uncertainty, Whitley Penn is here for you. We will guide you through any tax, audit, strategic consulting, transaction advisory, risk advisory, or forensic litigation valuation services needs you may have, regardless of your financial situation. Contact a Whitley Penn advisor today. Relationships. results.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

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Health CareDirectory 2020

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON & LIESBETH POWERS

Data and information on health care trends in Plano

CORONAVIRUS CASE ANALYSIS More than 1,500 cases of the new coronavirus have been conrmed by test in Collin County since the beginning of the pandemic. Here is how they break down. NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES PER WEEK CASE BREAKDOWN AS OF JUNE 10

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT PLANO

HOWHEALTHY IS YOUR COUNTY?

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors considered not listed below.

Collin County

March 8-14 8 March 15-21 23 March 22-28 99 March 29-April 4 76 April 5-11 140 April 12-18 84 April 19-25 132 April 26-May 2 114 May 3-9 119

Active cases 20.6%

2.31% Deaths

Total cases: 1,597

78

Collin County

HEALTH OUTCOMES:

380

• LENGTHOFLIFE • QUALITYOFLIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

77.08% Recoveries

121 TOLL

75

PGBT TOLL

N

Recoveries per 100,000 residents in Plano: 129.3

Deaths per 100,000 residents in Plano: 3.5

2020 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS (out of 244 counties*)

HEALTH FACTORS:

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crime • PHYSICALENVIRONMENTFACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

1 1

Health outcomes

CASES BY AGE

Length of life

May 10-16 118 May 17-23 119 May 24-30 169 May 31-June 6 192 June 7-10* 103 * MOST RECENT INFORMATION AS OF THIS PAPER'S PRINT DEADLINE

0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80+

36

3 1 3 2 2

82

Quality of life Health factors Health behaviors

258

271

324

276

Clinical care

172

66 70

Socioeconomic

145

Physical environment

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, COLLIN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENTCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

* RANKINGS WERE NOT AVAILABLE FOR 10 OF THE 254 COUNTIES IN TEXAS.

11

PLANO EDITION • JUNE 2020

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOSPITALS

Health Care Edition 2020

Information on local hospitals in Plano

• Trauma level: Level IV • NICU level: N/A • Total employees: 799 • Total beds: 72 • New programs, expansions: 24/7 emergency room, cardiology, cancer and blood disorders, epilepsy, gastroenterology, orthopedics and sports medicine at the Children’s Health Andrews Institute

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON 1 Baylor Scott & White Medical Center—Plano 4700 Alliance Blvd., Plano 4698142000 www.bswhealth.com/plano • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total employees: 792 • Total beds: 160

SRT TOLL

3

4 Medical City Plano 3901 W. 15th Street, Plano 9725966800 www.medicalcityplano.com

• Most common treatments: brain and spine services, scoliosis treatment, weight-loss surgery, digestive disease, general surgery, cancer treatment, orthopedic care 2 Baylor Scott & White The Heart Hospital—Plano 1100 Allied Drive, Plano 4698143278 www.bswhealth.com/locations/the-heart- hospital-plano/ • Trauma level: N/A • NICU level: N/A • Total employees: 1,009 • Total beds: 116 • Most common treatments: cardiovascular care, including minimally invasive procedures, open heart surgery, electrophysiology, vascular surgery and research 3 Children’s Medical Center Plano 7601 Preston Road, Plano 4693037000 www.childrens.com

W. SPRINK CREEK PKWY.

• Trauma level: Level I • NICU level: Level III • Total number of employees: 2,000 • Number of beds: 513 • Most common treatments: trauma care, emergency care, stroke, orthopedic,

DNT TOLL

PLANO

W. PARKER RD.

5

cardiovascular interventions 5 Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano 6200 W. Parker Road, Plano 9729818000

W. PARK BLVD.

4

www.texashealth.org/plano • Trauma level: Level II • NICU level: Level IV • Total employees: 1,755 • Total beds: 338 (hospital), 48 (Seay Behavioral Health Center) • Most common treatments: total joint replacement, trauma care, cardiovascular care, neuroscience, spine care, women’s services

W. 15TH ST.

2

W. PLANO PKWY.

1

PGBT TOLL

PGBT TOLL

N

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PLANO EDITION • JUNE 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

HEALTH INA PANDEMIC

have an expanded place in the health industry going forward. Rise of telehealth For many private health practices, a shift to online health assessments and appointments was at rst a necessary step, but during the process, several longer-term benets became clear. At Village Health Partners, a group practice in Plano that oers primary care services, roughly 95% of appoint- ments were converted to telehealth visits between March and early June. This change allowed Village Health to avoid furloughing sta and main- tain employment for the majority of its workforce, Business Development Director Jazmin Saenz said. Virtual appointments allow for easy follow-up visits and medication rells, Saenz said, and they will likely be used as patients request them. At My EyeLab, telehealth has been part of the company’s practice for years, but it has become particularly valuable in the age of the coronavirus, said John Raner, the company’s Dallas representative. “So, [with] your conventional eye

CONTINUED FROM 1

ducted by Harvard University and health care company Phreesia. Patient visits have gradually risen since then but were still more than 20% below normal levels as of mid-May, the research found. This drop in visits is just one of several factors that have negatively aected the nancial health of local hospitals, according to Stephen Love, president and CEO of the Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council. “While I can’t comment directly on the nancial operations of our hospi- tals, let me just tell you this: I know from experience, COVID-19 has been a severe nancial hit to all hospitals,” Love said June 3. As non-coronavirus patients steered clear of hospitals and doctors at higher rates in the early weeks of the pandemic, health providers were required by the state to cancel a num- ber of nonessential surgeries and were forced to conduct more appointments via video. According to Plano health provid- ers, some of these new methods may

Private medical practices have been hit hard across the country by a decline in visits during the pandemic. Here is how two Plano oces have adjusted.

VILLAGE HEALTHPARTNERS:

of all appointments since March have shifted to telehealth visits 95%

patients seen per day in February

patients currently being seen daily

• Had administered more than 400 drive-thru COVID-19 tests as of April • Has reopened oces for minor procedures and physicals

SOURCE: VILLAGE HEALTH PARTNERSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MIGHTY OAKS COUNSELING&WELLNESS: new referrals since mid-March 15 •

• Has adjusted schedule from 28 P.M. to 10A.M.6 P.M. to accommodate work- and school-from-home schedules and to allow for breaks between appointments

Will resume some in-person sessions in July with

standard visits formerly 30MINUTES

5MINUTE check-in visits

SOURCE: MIGHTY OAKS COUNSELING & WELLNESSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Health Care Edition 2020

Right there with you. Whatever comes.

"I KNOWFROMEXPERIENCE, COVID19 HAS BEENA SEVERE FINANCIAL HIT TOALL HOSPITALS." STEPHEN LOVE, PRESIDENT AND CEO, DALLASFORT WORTH HOSPITAL COUNCIL

exam, the doctor is usually within 6-7 inches of your face, and they’re that close to every single patient who comes through, which increases your risk of exposure,” Raner said. “Using our telemedicine system, we elimi- nate that risk entirely.” Mighty Oaks Counseling and Well- ness moved its entire mental health practice online in mid-March. In the rst few weeks of using telehealth, the group saw about 55% of its typical patient load and gained 15 new clients, according to Director Sara Carlson. This amount of growth is typical, but the referrals were dierent in that they were teens and adults instead of children, Carlson said. Because situations surrounding the virus can cause anxiety and stress, she expects her practice will continue to see more referrals, and as regulations loosen, the mental health practice is being cautious in moving back to in-person visits, she said. The main drawback Mighty Oaks has seen with telehealth is that it seems to bemore tiring for counselors. “It takes a lot more energy to read facial expressions and hear every- thing and see and, you know, try and keep people engaged,” Carlson said. Struggling hospitals seek aid While private practices have been aected by the economic climate of the pandemic, there have been early signs that hospitals have suered nancially as well. Ahead of next year’s session of the Texas Legislature, Love said the DFW Hospital Council plans to promote the expansion of Medicaid as the state’s health system deals with substantial revenue losses incurred during the coronavirus pandemic. The group of North Texas hospitals is now in talks with state lawmakers to lobby for the expansion of insur- ance for low-income Texans under the Aordable Care Act, Love said. Because health insurance is tied to employment for many Texans,

the widespread layos seen in Texas may lead to fewer people having the insurance they might need to cover medical expenses, Love said. Hospi- tal revenue was also heavily aected by early executive orders in March that required medical facilities to postpone elective surgeries, Love said. These nonessential procedures, which were allowed to continue in April, aect a hospital’s bottom line. Health systems in the area had already incurred additional costs to purchase protective equipment for their employees as they prepared for a rise in the number of cases caused by the highly infectious virus. Although the DFW Hospital Coun- cil declined to share nancial infor- mation for its member hospitals, at least one major Texas health system has taken action to address the loss in revenue. Baylor Scott & White Health announced it planned to lay o 1,200 employees and furlough an undeter- mined number more in response to a “drastic drop in visits.” The layos represented 3% of the hospital system’s total workforce, according to a May 26 statement. Despite heavy revenue losses, there are signs that BS&W hospital trac is beginning to recover. As of late May, hospital admissions in the Baylor Scott & White system had returned to 92% of pre-corona- virus levels, according to the release, and operating room cases were back to 97%. In the meantime, government pro- grams intended to assist hospitals have not fully closed the dierence between revenue and expenditures, Love said. “There’s still quite a gap,” he said. Anna Herod contributed to this report.

Heart attacks don’t stop in a pandemic. Ask David. David Hines doesn’t remember his heart attack. That’s not unusual for someone who’s suffered one. What he does remember is the life-saving clinical care and unwavering compassion he received from Texas Health. David’s doctors and nurses were prepared with safe, reliable care in the midst of this pandemic. It’s the same high level of care we deliver across North Texas every day. And, as always, we have protocols in place designed around your safety.

Watch David’s story and others at TexasHealth.org/WithYou.

Doctors on the medical staffs practice independently and are not employees or agents of Texas Health hospitals or Texas Health Resources. © 2020

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

15

PLANO EDITION • JUNE 2020

A variety of halal meats are on display at Horizon Specialty Market and Bakery.

BUSINESS FEATURE

Aisles are lined with groceries at Horizon Specialty Market and Bakery in Plano. (Photos courtesy Horizon Specialty Market and Bakery)

Horizon SpecialtyMarket &Bakery When foot trac slowed, store owner brought food to customers W hen the rst coronavirus-related BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Before the coronavirus forced Patel and other business owners to nd creative ways to address the challenges of life in a pandemic, Horizon had already made a name for itself in the community by oering a wide variety of foods from Mediterra- nean, Middle Eastern and South Asian countries. “Our niche is the halal market,” Patel said. “We are [a] 100% halal market, so our standard has to be really, really high when it comes to meat and groceries in general.” Even though revenue has been higher now than it was when the pandemic began, the store has still had its share of diculties to overcome, Patel said. “One of the challenges I faced was getting prod- ucts here,” Patel said. “Bringing products here, there were weeks where I didn’t have any rice.” Like other grocery stores, Horizon also had to gure out how to continue operating as a business while complying with safety guidelines from health authorities to protect customers and employees. “We’re a small business,” Patel said. “Our goal is to be part of the community.”

closures shut down Plano restaurant dine-in areas in March, Vaishal Patel’s specialty food store initially saw an uptick in customers. But a few weeks later, that inux of foot trac at Horizon Specialty Market and Bakery had slowed substantially, Patel said. “In April, I saw people weren’t coming to shop anymore,” said Patel, the store’s owner. “I really went to people’s houses door to door, like, in my personal car.” Patel reached out to his core customers by email, plus an additional audience via Facebook, to let them know that Horizon would deliver groceries. The store soon received dozens of emails with interest in the service. To save money on delivery, instead of hiring another company, he made the trips himself. Most people receiving groceries had no idea they were being delivered by the owner of the business, Patel said.

A worker prepares sh to be sold at Horizon Specialty Market and Bakery in Plano.

Horizon SpecialtyMarket &Bakery 2901 W. 15th St., Plano 469-782-2595

www.horizonmarket.com Hours: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. daily

W. PARK BLVD.

W. 15TH ST.

N

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