Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | October 2021

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HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMBARB: I am so excited that fall is nally here! Temperatures are cooler, and all around you will see homes being decorated for the holidays. Speaking of holidays, do you need help with family dinner ideas? On Page 12, read how Cajun Turkey Company can take the stress out of preparing a holiday meal. Or for a yummy breakfast idea, check out Kolache Donuts Bakery and its custom designs (see Page 13). Barb Delk, GENERALMANAGER

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY KATHAMBARI RAMKUMAR, SAMANTHA VAN DYKE & VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

Businesses that have recently opened, are coming soon or relocating

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COURTESY MACY'S INC.

COURTESY JALISCO RESTAURANTE

NOWOPEN 1 To Chris Moreno and his parents, Enrique and Alma Moreno, their new Alma Mexicana Restaurante “represents Mexican soul,” he said. The restaurant opened Sept. 21 at 2321 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 405, Flower Mound. It oers fajitas, enchiladas, tacos, burritos and more, according to its website. Vegetari- an options are available. 469-464-3455. www.almamexicanarestaurant.com 2 Clean Eatz opened its rst Texas location Sept. 30 at 2201 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 101, Flower Mound. It oers cafe items for delivery or takeout. The menu includes salads, burgers, wraps, bowls, atbreads and smoothies. It also has weekly meal plans. 972-355-3289. www.cleaneatz.com

3 2 Sistah’s Gifts and More , an Afro-centric art and home decor shop, opened Sept. 1 at 1116 S. Stemmons Free- way, Ste. 128, Lewisville. Sisters Janet Dirden and Carolyn Blackmon opened up the shop as a way to bring more diversity to the area and to make Afro-centric art more accessible, Dirden said. A phone number and website are not yet available. 4 Cut Creaters Salon Suites opened Sept. 2 at 701 S. Stemmons Freeway, Stes. 240 and 250, Lewisville. Cut Cre- aters is a collection of rentable private salon suites that will feature hairstylists, barbers, braiders and makeup specialists. The business also has a cigar lounge, a daiquiri bar, a recording studio and a pho- to studio. A grand opening event is set for 4 p.m. Oct. 24. 469-240-0510. https://tinyurl.com/pzehzzbs

5 RockPointe Church opened a second Flower Mound location at 500 Parker Square Road in June. The new church oers three Sunday services as well as several dedicated ministry groups, according to a press release. The central campus is located at 4503 Cross Timbers Road in Flower Mound. 469-322-0313. www.rockpointechurch.org 6 Mobile Kangaroo opened July 12 at 2451 Lakeside Parkway, Ste. 140, Flower Mound. The authorized Apple repair shop specializes in quick repairs of Apple products, such as iPhones, Apple watches and MacBook computers. 214-513-2444. www.mobilekangaroo.com 7 Tropical Smoothie Cafe opened its newest location Sept. 17 at 2840 Flower Mound Road in Flower Mound. This is the

franchise’s 1,000th location, according to a town of Flower Mound news release. The cafe features a variety of smoothies, including Strawberry Chia Lemonade and Peanut Paradise. The cafe also serves wraps, sandwiches, quesadillas, bowls and atbreads. 469-314-2400. www.tropicalsmoothiecafe.com 8 Crumbl Cookies opened a new store- front Sept. 16 at 2550 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 108, Flower Mound. Crumbl Cookies oers a variety of unique cookie avors that change weekly. 469-240-1038. www.crumblcookies.com Fetch Pet Care , an at-home pet care service, opened Oct. 1 in Flower Mound and will serve surrounding cities as well. Pet owners can set up a consultation and

              

          Regular price $1299 per system November appointments available! Book before Thanksgiving!

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This Greektown pizza has olives, red onions, feta cheese, spinach and tomatoes. COURTESY MOTOR CITY PIZZA

FEATURED IMPACT RELOCATION Motor City Pizza is relocating from a pop- up location to a permanent storefront at 1425 FM 407, Ste. 600, Lewisville. The restaurant has been preparing a variety of traditional Detroit-style pizzas, salads and potato chip-crusted chicken strips since October 2020 out of a shared catering space for carryout only at 1305 S. Hwy. 121 Business, Lewisville. “I grew up in Detroit and always missed the pizza,” owner Greg Tierney said. “When the pandemic hit, I noticed more and more Detroit pizza places opening up, and I had been wanting to do the same for years.” At its new location that opened Oct. 8, schedule services such as puppy sitting, dog walking and overnight care through the Fetch Pet Care app. 469-453-5377. www.fetchpetcare.com/owermound COMING SOON 9 The new Market by Macy’s will open at the Highlands of Flower Mound shopping center Oct. 29. This will be the third store outside of a mall setting in the Dallas-Fort Worth area for Macy’s Inc., according to a Sept. 27 news release. It will sell apparel for men, women and children and oer home and beauty items as well as gifts. The store is located at 6101 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 500, Flower Mound. A phone number is not yet avail- able. www.macys.com 10 A new location of PetBar Inc. will be opening in early November at 4610 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 100, Flower Mound. Owners Russ and Linda Smariga are plan- ning to open three franchise locations of the pet spa business. They have signed a lease to occupy space in the future Lan- tana Town Center in Bartonville, he said. A third location is still to be announced. The business provides concierge-level pet grooming and washing services. Member- ships are also available. 877-826-9969. www.petbarinc.com

Motor City Pizza will initially do only carryout orders from 4-9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Tierney said once the restaurant gets settled in, there will be indoor seating, a bar and extended hours. 972-654-6276. www.motorcitypizzatx.com

4401 Long Prairie Road Suite 400 • Flower Mound (940) 800-2020 www.visionpartnerstexas.com

MOCCASSIN TR.

OFFICIAL SMOOTHIE DALLAS COWBOYS OF THE

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11 Club4 Fitness has signed a lease with the Flower Mound Crossing shop- ping center, which is located at 2600 Flower Mound Road at the intersection of Long Prairie Road, according to a Sept. 21 news release. Club4 Fitness oers members access to health and tness equipment, personal training, group exercise classes, small-group training, cycling, tanning, red-light therapy, hydromassage and kids care programs, according to the release. Club4 Fitness is expected to open in the rst quarter of 2022, the release stated. A phone number is not yet available. 12 Jalisco Restaurante moved from its previous location at 1019 Fox Ave., Lewisville, to 136 W. Main St. in Old Town Lewisville. Owner Rudy Ibarra said moving gave the restaurant more room and a better location. Jalisco oers a variety of authentic Mexican dishes and drinks, including pozole, empanadas and nopal tortillas. The restaurant opened at the new Old Town location July 31. Park- ing is available behind the restaurant. 972-420-8411. www.facebook.com/ jaliscofamily www.club4tness.com RELOCATIONS

Cowboys Smoothie NEW

AVAILABLE AT DFW AND SAN ANTONIO AREA SMOOTHIE KING STORES FOR LIMITED TIME ONLY

Buy 1Smoothie, Get 1 Free (2 nd smoothie must be of equal or lesser value)

FREE EXTRA OR ENHANCER (with purchase of a smoothie)

FLOWER MOUND,TX 75028 3701 Justin Rd. Suite 110 (214) 513–9491

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd. Ste 110

Some restrictions may apply. Valid only at particpating locations. Excludes Extras and Enhancers. Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on 32oz smoothies on Fridays. Must surrender original coupon to receive offer. Photocopied or altered coupons will not be honored. limit one per person. No cash value. Sales tax extra. ©2020 Smoothie King Franchisees, Inc. FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd. Ste 110

EXPIRES: 10/31/21 EXPIRES: 1 0

EXPIRES: 10/31/21 1 0

© 2021 Smoothie King Franchises, Inc.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

TODO LIST

September, October & November events

COMPILED BY KATHAMBARI RAMKUMAR

23 DIVE INTOA PUMPKIN EXTRAVAGANZA Flower Mound Community Activity Center is hosting a glow-in-the-dark Pumpkin Dive at the indoor pool. Children may pick a pumpkin from the oating patch and decorate it with provided supplies. Open to all ages. Children ages 3-5 and nonswimmers must have adult in the water with them. 6-8 p.m. $8-$10. Preregistration is required. 1200 Gerault Road, Flower Mound. www.ower-mound.com/specialevents NOVEMBER 05 EAT, DRINKAND SHOP LOCAL Main and Mill Association hosts First Fridays in Old Town Lewisville, featuring food, drinks, demonstrations, yard games and local artisans. 6-9 p.m. Free. Main Street and Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St., Lewisville. www.mainandmillassociation.com/rst-fridays 06 GET CREATIVEWITH SIDEWALK CHALK To celebrate November Arts Month, the town of Flower Mound will host a Chalk the Walk art contest at Heritage Park. Artists of all ages and skill sets are welcome. Prizes will be awarded by age group. Noon-3 p.m. Free. 600 Spinks Road, Flower Mound. 972-874-6000. www.ower-mound.com/specialevents 07 CELEBRATEVETERANSDAYAT THE PARK Flower Mound High School’s football stadium will host a Veterans Day tribute and picnic with free hot dogs, cake and lemonade. A ceremony includes a parade of Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and ROTC units in uniform. 1-3 p.m. Free. 3411 Peters Colony Road, Flower Mound. 972-874-6276. www.ower-mound.com/specialevents

SEPTEMBER 24 THROUGHOCT. 23

IMMERSE YOURSELF INWESTERNART The Lewisville Grand Theater’s Education Wing Gallery is displaying artwork inspired by the Western world that features landscapes, animals and fashion. Tue.-Sat. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Free. 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. 972-219-8446. https://tinyurl.com/yxvamyk9 OCTOBER 16 GOONANOWL PROWL Guides will lead participants on a night hike to listen for owls and other wildlife at the Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area. The event is open to those ages 7 and up. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20 per person. 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. Reservations are required. 972-219-3550. https://tinyurl.com/6xcm7twr 16 DRESS UP YOUR CHILDRENAND DOGS Kids and dogs are invited to dress up for the Boo Bash costume contest in the center court at Music City Mall Lewisville. Candy, popcorn and dog treats will be handed out. 2-4 p.m. Free. 2401 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville. 972-315-3641. https://tinyurl.com/r422dfda 19 BRUSHUP ON YOUR TRIVIA Herg Group DFW hosts Tuesday night trivia at The Brass Tap in Highland Village. Seating is rst come, rst served. 7-9 p.m. Free. 4151 Waller Creek, Ste. 130,

OCT. 16

HONORING THE FALLEN 1701 SHOAL CREEK, HIGHLAND VILLAGE

The TXFallenPD Tribute Event has a full day of activities planned at The Shops at Highland Village. A 5K run/walk starts at 8 a.m. Vendor booths and live music start at 11 a.m. There will also be a kids zone, a citizen honor bike ride, a rst responder honor bike ride, a kid ride with an ocer, and a police obstacle course. Headline band Incognito performs at 4 p.m. The event will raise money for the Texas Police Chiefs Association Fallen Ocer Fund in honor of Highland Village Police Sgt. Dennis Oliver, who died in October 2020. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Free (admission). $40 (registration for 5K run/walk and citizen honor bike ride). 1701 Shoal Creek, Highland Village. www.txfallenpd.com (Courtesy city of Highland Village)

Highland Village. 972-317-3227. https://tinyurl.com/mvncak47

Find more or submit Lewisville, Flower Mound or Highland Village events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY SAMANTHA VAN DYKE & VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

NEWPROJECT

ONGOING PROJECT

NEWGOZONE Starting in January, part of Castle Hills will be included in the service area for the GoZone on-demand rideshare service. Learn more at www.dctagozone.net. Highland Village/ Lewisville Zone Business 121 North

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CastleHills to get GoZone service SOURCE: DENTON COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Three new trac signals to be added The city of Lewisville awarded a contract Sept. 13 to add three new trac signals as part of the city’s 2020 Trac Improvements project. They will be located at the intersection of A SH 121 Business and Hunes Boulevard, the intersection of B Justin Road and Summit Avenue, and the intersection of C Old Denton Road and Magic Mantle Drive. Timeline: September 2021-spring 2022 Cost: $839,968 Funding source: city of Lewisville

Edgeeld Trail reconstruction Work is underway to reconstruct Edgeeld Trail from Wood Creek Drive to Timber Valley Drive. Crews will also make sidewalk and pedestrian ramp im- provements. The project also includes replacing the failing storm main line along Edgeeld Trail. The construction contract was awarded in June. Timeline: June 2021-February 2022 (construction) Cost: $1.41 million Funding source: dedicated sales tax revenue

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

Lewisville and Denton. Once Castle Hills is annexed and becomes a part of Lewisville, a half- cent sales tax will also be collected from that area for DCTA operations. The public transit service to Castle Hills is expected to cost about $200,000 per year, according to infor- mation from the DCTA. That cost will be covered by the sales tax revenue collected in Castle Hills, according to Lewisville Mayor TJ Gilmore, who is also a DCTA board member.

The Castle Hills community will have access to the new GoZone on-demand rideshare service starting in January. The board of directors for the Den- ton County Transportation Authority voted unanimously Sept. 23 to move the service launch up by two months. It was originally set to start in March. The DCTA is funded primarily by a half-cent sales tax collected by its member cities, Highland Village,

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF OCT. 5. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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$104,000 IN TEACHER GRANTS AWARDED THIS SEMESTER

Since 1990, corporate partners and local donors have trusted the Lewisville ISD Education Foundation to bridge the gap between the school district and an invested community of families and residents. LEF achieves this through scholarships, teacher grants, fellowships, employee awards, and special projects, helping the district and community grow into the next phase of innovative learning and limitless opportunities.

STAY CONNECTED! www.lisdef.com

BUI LDING COMMUNITY, ENRICHING EDUCATION.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

CITY&SCHOOLS Local officialsapproveproperty tax rates forfiscal year 2021-22

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

CHANGING TAX RATES Property tax bills combine the rates for the city, school district and county where residents live along with any special districts. Here are rates per $100 valuation in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village: FY2020-21 FY2021-22

DENTON COUNTY A new fiscal year started Oct. 1 for local gov- ernments. As part of that process, elected officials had to plan their spending for the year as well as set their property tax rates. The Denton County Commissioners Court approved a slightly higher tax rate during its Sept. 21 meeting. Lewisville ISD plans to spend more money this fiscal year despite Highland Village both voted to keep their property tax rates the same. But because property values have increased countywide, that same rate will generate more money for the cities to spend on a variety of priorities. Flower Mound Town Council, meanwhile, voted to lower its overall property tax rate by 7.22%. lowering its property tax rate. The cities of Lewisville and

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Denton County

$0.224985 $0.233086

Lewisville ISD

$1.3473 $1.3085

Oct 23

SOURCES: DENTON COUNTY, HIGHLAND VILLAGE, FLOWER MOUND, LEWISVILLE AND LEWISVILLE ISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER $0.443301 $0.443301 Town of Flower Mound $0.4365 $0.4050 City of Highland Village $0.56302 $0.56302 City of Lewisville

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Lewisville ISD considers architect to design bus yard if land sale fails

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uses, according to town documents. The Flower Mound Town Council tabled the zoning vote Oct. 4, leaving the fate of the property sale up in the air. Should the zoning request be denied, LISD Superintendent Kevin Rogers said the district will consider using the land as a bus yard. The district has three bus yards, one in The Colony and two in Lewis- ville. Rogers said adding another bus yard would save the district nearly half a million dollars in operating costs per year.

We also offer senior care, and we’re accepting Medicare and Medicare Advantage plans.

LEWISVILLE ISD The board of trustees discussed selecting an archi- tect for a potential bus yard on land the district owns as an alternative in case plans to sell the land fall through. The property, located near Vickery Elementary School between Wager Road and Blue Sky Lane, was pur- chased years ago by the school district for a potential school site, but is no longer needed for that use, according to a statement by the school board. Lewisville ISD accepted a bid from housing developer Rembert Enterprises. That firm proposed using the 22.75 acres to build 54 detached single-family homes in the $700,000 price range, according to a letter of intent filed with the town of Flower Mound. This would require approval from the Flower Mound Town Coun- cil to change the zoning of the land from designated estate residential use to medium density residential

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

NUMBER TOKNOW

$2,500

The proposal would create four event districts: the Old Town Enter- tainment District, the Mall District, the Castle Hills Community District and the Bill Weaver Arena. Special events in these districts would not be subject to the cap of two special events per year and 180 days between events. “We have a proposal to waive the application fee for special events in these four zones,” McGinn said. Another proposed change is that areas outside of the four districts would no longer have to wait 180 days between special events. That gap would be cut to 90 days. How- ever, areas outside the four zones would still be limited to two special events per year. The city is working on a rental policy to allow more events at the arena. The changes would also let Castle Hills continue offering its regular events once annexed.

The Texas Book Festival has

FOUR ZONES FOR ENTERTAINMENT Lewisville is proposing to establish four entertainment districts that would be exempt from city restrictions on the number of events allowed each year. The goal is to encourage more events in these areas. 1 Mall District 2 Castle Hills Community District 3 Bill Weaver Arena 4 Old Town Entertainment District

Lewisville City Council Meets at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 18 and Nov. 1 at 151 W. Church St. www.cityoflewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 6 p.m. Oct. 18, Nov. 1 and Nov. 8 at 1565A W. Main St., Lewisville. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. Oct. 18 and Nov. 1 at 2121 Cross Timbers Road. www.flower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 6 p.m. Oct. 26 and Nov. 9 at 1000 Highland Village Road. www.highlandvillage.org MEETINGSWE COVER City Manager Paul Stevens said the master planning documents, some of which haven’t been updated since the mid-’90s, are crucial to establishing the city’s long-term vision. About 78 acres of undeveloped land is left in Highland Village. He said a big focus will be updating the FM 407 Corridor and Amenity Plan and enhancing public spaces. awarded a $2,500 grant through its Collections Enhancement Grant Program to the Flower Mound Public Library. The library plans to use the money to expand its Hindi language collection and establish an Urdu language collection, according to a Sept. 20 memo to Town Council. HIGHLIGHTS LEWISVILLE ISD High school graduation ceremonies will return to the University of North The graduation ceremonies will occur within the North Texas Coliseum, also known as the Super Pit, on May 29 and May 30. The university has hosted 22 years of LISD graduation ceremonies dating back to 1973 and most recently served the district in 2019. HIGHLANDVILLAGE The city will start to update its long-standing comprehensive and master planning documents with the hiring of an outside consulting firm for $465,017. City Council unanimously approved a resolution for the contract at the Sept. 28 meeting with the McAdams firm. Comprehensive and master plans are meant to act as long-term guides for city staff and usually focus on future growth, priorities, services and development. Texas campus in the spring following a Sept. 13 vote by the LISD board of trustees.

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Special event changes proposed

BY STEPHEN HUNT

Council meeting presentation by Chris McGinn, director of neighbor- hood and inspection services, and James Kunke, community relations and tourism director. A vote on the proposed changes will be considered at a future council meeting.

LEWISVILLE The city is proposing updates to its special events ordi- nance to allow for more events and encourage use of certain areas. The ordinance was last updated in 2007, according to an Oct. 4 City

Lewisvillemixed-use project OK’d

$15Mplanned on streets, parks

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

would match what is offered with the existing townhomes along Chambers Drive. Developers also received approval for a variance for parking to accept 222 spaces in the commercial area to reflect the differing uses. The city’s ordinance, which is based on square footage, would have required another 16 spaces, the staff memo stated.

FlowerMound hires newfire chief FLOWERMOUND The town announced the hiring of its new fire chief, Paul Henley, who has 19 years of fire service, most recently as fire chief in Corsicana. LEWISVILLE City Council approved a zoning request Sept. 20 that paves the way for 18 town- homes and a commercial center to be built on vacant land at the northwest corner of MacArthur Boulevard and Lewis Drive. According to a city staff memo, the 121 MacArthur project includes townhomes on 1.53 acres and about 37,200 square feet of commercial space on 4.68 acres fronting MacArthur. The commercial areas will include restaurant, retail and office uses, the memo stated. As part of its approval, council granted a variance request to allow front-entry garages for the townhomes. Those front entries BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

BY ERICK PIRAYESH

HIGHLAND VILLAGE The city is looking to spend over $15 million on a variety of street, park and utility maintenance projects. Highland Village is seeking to use certificates of obligation, a type of financing tool to issue debt that does not require voter approval. City Council approved a mandate at its Sept. 28 meeting that will start the process of acquiring the money. Assistant City Manager Ken Heerman said more information about the projects will be shared on the city’s website before the money is issued in December. “The timing is perfect because we have some expiring debt we can match up,” Heerman said at the meeting. “So we can issue this new debt with no effect on our tax rate.” As part of this effort, Highland Vil- lage also plans to refinance $15.263 million in existing debt, which will save the city about $1.2 million. With the certificates of obligation, the city intends to use about $8 million for street and drainage projects, and $6 million for various park improvements.

ROUND GROVE RD.

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Henley’s first day in Flower Mound will be Oct. 18, according to an Oct. 6 news release. “We had 47 well-qualified appli-

Paul Henley

cants, and Chief Henley rose to the top,” interim Town Manager Debra Wallace said in the release.

9

LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

GUIDE V O T E R G U I D E

COMPILED BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH & JISHNU NAIR

D A T E S T O K N O W Oct. 18 First day of early voting Oct. 22 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked) Oct. 29 Last day of early voting

During early voting, Denton County voters may cast ballots at any polling location in the county. On Election Day, Denton County voters must vote at their assigned precinct location. Learn more at www.votedenton.gov. W H E R E T O V O T E SOURCES: DENTON COUNTY ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATION; BRANDON ROTTINGHAUS, UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Nov. 2 Election Day Nov. 2 Last day to receive ballot by mail (or Nov. 3 if carrier envelope is postmarked by 7 p.m. Nov. 2 at location of election)

P R O P O S I T I O N S O N T H E B A L L O T Voters will nd eight propositions to amend the state constitution on their ballots Nov. 2. Brandon Rottinghaus, the University of Houston’s political science chair, broke down each proposition. Proposition 1 Rodeo raes Proposition 3 Religious services This decides whether state or local governments can limit religious services. Proposition 4 Judicial eligibility This decides whether judicial candidates must have 10 years of legal practice,

Proposition 6 Essential caregivers This decides whether residents in certain nursing or care facilities have the right to designate an essential caregiver who cannot be prohibited from visiting. Proposition 7 Homestead tax limitation for surviving spouses of people with disabilities This decides whether spouses over 55 years old can receive limitations on homestead property taxes if their deceased partners had disabilities.

Proposition 8 Homestead tax exemption for surviving spouses of armed service members This decides whether spouses can receive full or partial exemptions on homestead property taxes if their deceased partners were armed service members Local measure City of Lewisville Proposition A This decides whether the city of Lewisville may issue $95 million in general obligation bonds to construct and improve public safety facilities for police, re and emergency services.

including as a state or county judge, and whether candidates who had their legal license revoked at any point should be disqualied. Proposition 5 Judicial conduct This decides whether the Texas Commission on Judicial Conduct can investigate, receive complaints on or disqualify judicial candidates.

This decides whether professionally sanctioned rodeo organizations can host raes for charity through their foundations. Proposition 2 County infrastructure bonds for blighted areas This decides whether counties can authorize bonds to fund development in blighted or underserved areas.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE RayWatson

BY SAMANTHA VAN DYKE

New economic development director looking to bring more hotels, oce spaces to town Ray Watson was announced as the town of Flower Mound’s new director of economic development in July and started in his new role in late August. He has worked in economic development for 20 years, both with other cities and towns as well as with companies as a consultant. Watson shared how he plans to help the town develop as he takes on this new role. Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

TELLMEALITTLE BITABOUT YOURBACKGROUNDAND EXPERIENCE INECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. I spent 10 years doing economic development for dierent cities and regional development groups. And then the last 10 years I’ve been in private sector consulting doing it for the companies’ side of it. WHATDOESADIRECTOROF ECONOMICDEVELOPMENTDO? I’m really in charge of promoting the [town’s] economic growth and stability. So, I’mworking with companies that are existing to do business retention and expansion. ... It’s a means of helping companies to expand, grow or basically just stay healthy in the community. The other part of [the role] is attracting new busi- nesses to the community that are not currently in the community. The main goal is to understand what’s available, property-wise, and thenmatching that up with the appropriate businesses. HOWDOYOUSTAYTRUE TO FLOWERMOUND’S CLOSEKNIT FEELWHILEALSOBRINGING IN ECONOMICOPPORTUNITIES? [I stay true to that by] basically just understanding what the community

wants as a whole and what ts with the community. We’ve lived here for 10 years and understand the commu- nity and what makes it special. WHATKINDOF BUSINESSES ARE YOU LOOKINGTOBRING TOTOWN? The main [types of businesses] that we’re looking at are hotels and oce spaces, and [we are] looking at corporate headquarter relocations to the area. One of the things that we have to deal with is that Flower Mound has become a very expensive place to live. So, therefore, if you want the benet of companies coming here, then you’re going to have to have headquarter facilities in order for them to actually have employ- ees living here. That’s kind of the direction we’re looking at right now. [We’re] also looking at high-end retail, restaurants, hotels and stu like that that actually t the area and make it a better place to be. ARE YOUACTIVELY SEEKING OUTBUSINESSES TOBRINGTO FLOWERMOUNDORDOTHEY OFTENAPPROACHTHE TOWN? Both. There are companies that are coming here on their own and that want to be in the region, and

Ray Watson has worked in economic development for the last 20 years, helping towns and consulting with companies. (Samantha Van Dyke/Community Impact Newspaper)

then we also are actively seeking out companies. HOWDOYOUGOABOUTDETER MININGWHATBUSINESSES THE TOWNNEEDSANDHOWTO ATTRACT THEM? A lot of that is done by talking with the public at dierent events and meetings. The key is to be an ambassador for the city in the business world and to make sure that corporations understand that there’s an opportunity here for them to be involved in a really great community. [The goal is also] to put Flower Mound in front of those businesses. ARE THEREANYAREASOF TOWNTHATYOUAREACTIVELY WORKINGTODEVELOPMORE? Yes, [I am looking to develop] the Lakeside [Parkway]/[FM] 2499 corri- dor between Gerault [Road] and [the]

Lakeside development, and then also the western edge of the [town] where the [Flower Mound] Ranch develop- ment is being proposed as well as out to [I-]35. The goal is to identify both corporate and retail [businesses] that t the nature of that area out there that can be sustainable, both for the developers and for the community. WHATDOES FLOWERMOUND HAVE TOOFFERTHAT SUR ROUNDINGTOWNSAND CITIESDONOT INTERMSOF ECONOMICDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES? I think for what we have left as far as developable land goes, we’re grow- ing at the speed that we’re supposed to be growing at. When you look at what Flower Mound has to oer to a corporation or to a business, it really is a high-end net wealth per family unit, and just a really great place to be.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE Cajun Turkey Company Business features Southern Louisiana-inspired cooking W hat started as frying turkeys for family and friends during football games has over the years become a successful Cajun food company, owner Billy Howell said. Cajun Turkey Company sells Southern Louisi- ana-inspired items such as crawsh, gumbo and its featured Cajun fried turkey. The menu has expanded over the years to include chicken, sausage, casse- roles, appetizers and Texas barbecue. Howell originally worked in the apparel industry. He said the idea of selling turkeys started as a joke but soon turned into a legitimate business. Howell said he cooked over 600 turkeys out of his garage that sold over the holiday season in 1994. A storefront was opened in Dallas the follow- ing year. As his customer base grew, Howell said he tripled his business within the rst three years. In 2018, the company moved to Lewisville. “It was the best move I’d ever made,” he said. Howell said he has collaborated for several years on catalogs with Neiman Marcus and William Sonoma for their Thanksgiving editions. Food is available for pickup at the Lewisville store. Orders may also be ash frozen and shipped around the country. Customers are advised to place orders early for the holidays. Howell said the company is adding a second name this year–Bayou Cajun Foods–to reect the more than 100 dierent Cajun products it sells. “We are so much more than just turkeys,” he said. The business posted about $1 million in sales last year but will always be called Cajun Turkey Company, he said. “I get so many emails from customers that say, ‘Thanksgiving wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without your turkey,’” he said. BY KAUSHIKI ROY

Cajun Turkey Company in Lewisville also uses Bayou Cajun Foods in its branding. (Photos courtesy Cajun Turkey Company)

TOPSELLING DISHES TO TAKE HOME: 1 The Spicy Cajun Fried Turkey ($74.95) weighs 9-11 pounds and can feed up to 10 people. 2 The Crawsh Queso ($25.95) is a popular side that comes in a boil bag so it can be heated on the stove in a sauce pan lled with water. Each two-pound bag feeds about 8-10 people.

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Cajun Turkey Company 708 Valley Ridge Circle, Ste. 22, Lewisville 972-318-0307 https://cajunturkeyco.com Hours: Tue.-Fri. noon-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun.-Mon. closed

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Billy and Dee Howell own Cajun Turkey Company, which moved to Lewisville in 2018.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

Kolache Donuts Bakery oers pine cones, twists, cinnamon sugar cake donuts, old fashioned buttermilk donuts and many more types.

Kay Kim enjoys the creative element of designing custom cookies and donuts for customers.

PHOTOS BY KAREN CHANEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Kolache Donuts Bakery Owners bring decades of experience to Highland Village shop A fter a brief stint with retirement, Hueng and Kay Kim decided relaxing and travel- ing were not for them. it in their collection of 400-plus pieces. In addition to the frequently requested alphabet and number cutters for individual messages, they also have palm trees, dinosaurs, trucks, amingos, tutus, music notes, graduation caps and so much more. Kay said her work day typically starts at 1 a.m. when she makes the kolache dough. BY KAREN CHANEY

KolacheDonuts Bakery 2930 Justin Road, Ste. 400, Highland Village 972-966-1464 www.facebook.com/KolacheDonutsBakery Hours: Tue.–Sun. 5 a.m.–noon, closed Mon. TOP SELLERS SAUSAGE ROLLS: small $1.19 each; with jalapeno $1.29 each; jumbo $2.29 each FRUIT KOLACHES: $1.29 each Flavors: apricot, apple, cherry, blueberry, peach, raspberry, pineapple coconut and more GLAZED DONUTS: $7.50 per dozen CUSTOM DONUTS: About $1.89 each (includes design) CUSTOM COOKIES: $2.29-$2.99 each There is no charge to make custom cutters, but patrons should order three days in advance. If the cutter already exists, order one day in advance.

The Kims owned and operated a popular donut shop in Oklahoma for 20 years. After a two-year break, the couple bought Kolache Donuts Bakery in Highland Village in 2019. “We really missed the customers,” Kay said. “I missed being creative and designing.” The couple chose to locate in Highland Village because they have family in Coppell. “This business was similar to what I was used to, and the place is beautiful,” Kay said. Before opening the shop in Oklahoma, Hueng worked in a bakery, and Kay was a orist. Since Hueng had bakery experience, he originally took on the role of custom decorator. “I realized I could do it and took it over, and customers were happy,” Kay said. When customers request a custom cookie or donut design, Kay draws the design, and Hueng makes the metal cutter if they do not already have

“While kolache dough is rising, my husband slow cooks the donuts,” she said. “Some places use hot water. We slow cook them.” When the shop rst opened, most of the cus- tomers were from nearby neighborhoods. Now they have customers from Flower Mound, Denton, Frisco and Lantana as well. Kay said she is grateful to her customers for posting rave reviews on social media, particularly during COVID-19. She reports that business has doubled since they bought the bakery. “During COVID[-19], business stopped. … I’m crying. I couldn’t even pay rent,” Kay said. “But then, customers on social media said, ‘Let’s go over there,’ and a lot of customers came and helped me and made me stand out. My business grew up.”

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • OCTOBER 2021

Fire departments are evaluated in four areas: water supply, emergency communications system, fire department and community risk reduction. RatingforHighlandVillage Category Maximum score 2005 rating

CONTINUED FROM XX Continuedfrom1

a nearly 6.3% decline in total calls between fiscal years 2018-19 and 2019-20 due in part to the pandemic, according to city budget documents. But calls for service are back up. “We’ve seen a 23% increase in our calls this year and a 37% increase in our overlapping calls,” Thomson told council. Overlapping calls occur when the department is out on a call when it receives a new call for service. To obtain a higher rating, the ISO recommends the fire department add 12 employees to staff a second fire engine, Thomson said. The cost is about $1 million a year, according to discussions. “That is a huge pill to swallow,” Mayor Charlotte Wilcox said. In 2005, when the department was last evaluated, it had part-timers and volunteers available to staff a second fire truck, Thomson said. That is no longer the case. Since 2016, the Highland Village Fire Department has had 22 full-time employees. In addition to the fire chief, the department has an assistant chief, a deputy chief and an adminis- trative coordinator. The other 18 are split into three shifts to respond to calls. Each shift has a captain, a driver

a rating from 1 to 10, with 1 being the highest. The rating reflects “a com- munity’s overall capability to prevent and suppress structure fires,” accord- ing to the company’s website. When Highland Village was last reviewed in 2005, it received an ISO score of 2. Thomson told the council he expects an ISO rating of 3/3x this year. The split rating is because some properties are more than 1,000 feet from a fire hydrant. The chief told the council that additional data has been submitted to the ISO, which could change the city’s score to a 3. Thomson said he has enough per- sonnel to staff one fire engine and one ambulance at a time. He cited a recent example when his crew was participating at a McAuliffe Elemen- tary School pep rally. Firefighters had to interrupt the event to respond to a vehicle fire, the chief said. “We do not have the staffing ade- quately to respond to those larger, more complex incidents,” Thomson told the council. Calls for service have increased about 20% between fiscal years 2005- 06 and 2019-20, according to city statistics. The fire department saw

2021 rating

Fire department Water supply

50 40 10 5.5

41.57 36 (-3.27 divergence*) 7.52 -

27.94 40 (-8.82 divergence*) 8.15 3.49

Emergency communications Community risk reduction

81.82

70.76

Total points:

105.5

* DIVERGENCE SCORES DEDUCT POINTS DUE TO LOWER SCORES IN THE FIRE DEPARTMENT CATEGORY.

An ISO rating is between 1 and 10, with 1 being the best. The rating helps guide companies setting insurance premiums for residential and commercial properties. In Texas, 74 of the 2,844 fire departments reviewed have an ISO rating of 1. This chart shows how many departments are at each rating. WhatisanISOrating?

Points to ISO ratings

2021 ratings

2005 Highland Village ranking

ISO rating

Points 90 or more 80-89.99 70-79.99 60-69.99 50-59.99 40-49.99 30-39.99 20-29.99 - 10-19.99 0-9.99

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8b † 9 10

= = = = = = = = = = =

2021 Highland Village ranking

0

200

400

600

† CLASS 8B IS FOR COMMUNITIES THAT HAVE SUPERIOR FIRE PROTECTION SERVICES BUT LACK THE WATER SUPPLY FOR A HIGHER RATING. SOURCES: ISO MITIGATION, CITY OF HIGHLAND VILLAGE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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