Northeast San Antonio Metrocom Edition - June 2022

NORTHEAST SAN ANTONIO EDITION 2022

ONLINE AT

HEALTH CARE EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 9  JUNE 11JULY 8, 2022

2022

HEALTH CARE EDITION

SPONSORED BY • University Health

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

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IMPACTS

ZIKAM PHARMACY

13 GRUMPY'S MEXICAN CAFE

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Expanding access

University Health to build three hospitals

Over the past two years, University Health purchased three pieces of land including more than 40 acres in Selma. University Health plans to build new hospitals on each property, expanding its reach.

BY JARRETT WHITENER

As the population in the San Antonio area increases, Uni- versity Health is working to provide health care services to more patients by planning for new hospitals in surrounding cities and expanding its main hospital campus in the San Antonio Medical Center. University Health purchased three pieces of land for a total cost of $41 million with plans to build three new hospitals that will serve areas on the outskirts of San Antonio, one to the northeast, one to the west and one on the south side. Northeast Metrocom cities will be served by a future hos- pital in Selma at the corner of Lookout Road and Retama Parkway. Leni Kirkman, executive vice president and chief mar- keting, communications and corporate aairs ocer, said University Health aims to address population and patient increases with the addition of new hospitals—including one in Selma—and expansions to existing facilities. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the estimated 2021 population for the San Antonio-New Braunfels area is just over 2.6 million, an increase of 35,105 people since July 2020. Kirkman said the goal for the new hospitals is to care for the patients closer to their homes while centralizing all spe- cialized care at the main University Hospital campus in the South Texas Medical Center. Like a wagon wheel, the ag- ship hospital will be the central hub with each new hos- pital a spoke branching out into the community, she said. CONTINUED ON 14

1 NORTHEAST PROPERTY

Acres: 42.5 Cost: $11.6 million

Purchase date: March 30, 2021

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2 WEST PROPERTY Acres: 80 Cost: $13.4 million for the rst property, $5.6 million for the second Purchase date: August 25, 2020, for the rst property, March 30, 2021, for the second 3 SOUTH PROPERTY Acres: 68 Cost: $10.4 million

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A new Selma hospital will bring health care closer to Northeast Metrocom cities.

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410

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New Selma Hospital University Hospital

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University Hospital is the only hospital within the network and is used by area residents who receive specialized care from University Health.

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Schertz Cibolo Selma

Purchase date: Sept. 28, 2021

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SOURCE: UNIVERSITY HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY HEALTH

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THE EXAM ROOM

PRIMARY CARE Living rooms. Bedrooms. Conference rooms. Now they can all be an exam room, thanks to telehealth. Because we know how valuable your time is, we’re changing what it means to “see a doctor.” At University Health, we believe in the power of change. Discover all the new ways you can access care, from telehealth to mobile care and school-based clinics at UHchange.com.

What will you change today?

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 40 hyperlocal editions across three states with circulation more than 2.8 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM JASELLE: In this month’s edition, Reporter Jarrett Whitener follows up with the results from the May 7 election, including the passage of an $18 million bond in Live Oak aimed at repairing and upgrading streets. Plus, several Metrocom cities also saw the election of City Council members. But you don’t have to wait—read about updates as they happen when you visit us online or sign up for our weekly newsletters. Jaselle Luna, PUBLISHER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM TRICIA: Health Care is one of San Antonio’s top industries. As the city continues to grow northward, more care and facilities are needed to serve the growing population. In this month’s front-page story, our editorial team takes a look at University Health’s growth plans, which start with the purchase of land for a new hospital in Selma. Tricia Schwennesen, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

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NORTHEAST SAN ANTONIO METROCOM EDITION • JUNE 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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GARDEN RIDGE

2252

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Frostbite Soft Serve

JARRETT WHITENER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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3009

1103

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2252

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CIBOLO

3 7 8

SELMA

RIPPS KREUSLER RD.

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CORPORATE DR.

SCHERTZ

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EVERYDAY WAY

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The Rooted Fork

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IKEA-RBFCU PKWY.

JARRETT WHITENER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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UNIVERSAL CITY

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WOODLAND OAKS DR.

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LIVE OAK

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First United Bank

JARRETT WHITENER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

1976

9 Edward Jones-Derrick Hall relocated from New Braunfels to 645 Woodland Oaks Drive, Ste. 100, Schertz. Derrick Hall is a financial advisor who assists with saving money for retirement, college or other future needs. The relocation to the Schertz office was on April 12. 210-566-4540. www.edwardjones.com ANNIVERSARIES 10 The Brooks of Cibolo celebrated its one year anniversary on April 26. Located at 816 Everyday Way, Cibolo, The Brooks of Cibolo is a senior living community and the only continuum-of-care center within the city. The facility offers various programs and organizations for residents to participate in while enjoying the ame- nities offered. 210-538-3812. www.civitasseniorliving.com 11 The Rooted Fork , located at 201 N. Main St., Cibolo, celebrated its one-year anniversary May 9. Owned by Cassandra Kearns and Liz Mathis, the Rooted Fork is a breakfast and lunch restaurant in downtown Cibolo that focuses on food, fun and history. 210-455-8570. www.therootedforkcibolo.com 12 Hope Healing Group LLC , located at 510 N. Main St., Cibolo, celebrated its one-year anniversary March 21. Hope

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NOW OPEN 1 Action Behavior Centers on May 30 opened in a new location at 4470 Green Valley Road, Ste. 129, Cibolo. Action Behavior Centers offers applied behav- ioral analysis therapy for those with autism. Center-based training focuses on a combination of Discrete Trial Training techniques and Natural Environment 2 Cibolo Chicks Bookstore celebrated its grand opening June 11. Located at 9330 Corporate Drive, Ste. 702, Selma, Cibolo Chicks Bookstore offers new and used books from all genres. Alongside the books, the store offers reading and writing paraphernalia, including pens, notebooks and more. Future plans for the store include hosting authors and book signing events. 210-263-9207. www.cibolochicksbookstore.com 3 Clippa Cuts Barbershop opened in Rolling Oaks Mall, located at 6909 N. Loop 1604 E., San Antonio, on May 4. The busi- ness took the spot of Mac’s Barbershop on the top floor of the mall. Clippa Cuts offers haircuts for all ages with select days having discounted rates. 830-254-0736. Training. 210-767-3600. www.actionbehavior.com

4 Frostbite Soft Serve and Kind Kitchen opened April 2 during the Schertz Movin’ on Main Event. Frostbite Soft Serve is located at 820 Main St., Ste. A, Schertz, while Kind Kitchen is an anchored food truck in front of the building. Frostbite specializes in dairy-free ice cream with an oat milk base, and all flavors are made in house. The ice cream is vegan friendly with the exception of additional toppings. Kind Kitchen serves grilled sandwiches and more during lunch and dinner hours. 210-577-9749. www.facebook.com/ frostbite.softserve 5 Hotworx , located in The Forum at 14615 I-35 N., Ste. 170, Live Oak, opened in April. Hotworx offers workouts in an infrared sauna environment to encourage detoxification. Members can also take advantage of the Functional Exercise Zone to prepare for the infrared workout. 830-468-9679. www.hotworx.net/ studio/liveoak-selma COMING SOON 6 Kiddie Academy celebrated its groundbreaking on April 28. The new development will be located in the Ci- bolo Crossing development, 17744 Ripps

Kreusler Road. Kiddie Academy focuses on early education with community-based care and attention to health and safety. An opening date is to be announced. 410-515-0788. www.kiddieacademy.com 7 Planet Party will open inside Rolling Oaks Mall in June. Located at 6909 N. Loop 1604 E., San Antonio, Planet Party will offer private party reservations. Planet Party allows families to have safe, private and clean parties with accom- modations, such as a game room, a free play arcade, a toddler zone, rides, moon bounces and more. Party sizes at Planet Party are up to 72 guests, and food, drinks and decorations are not included. 210-535-7096. www.planetpartysa.com RELOCATIONS 8 Mac’s Barbershop relocated from Rolling Oaks Mall after eight years of service. The new location, located at US 281 North and Evans Road, will be in the shopping center beside H-E-B after the business owner finalized a deal with the company. The relocation was announced on April 24, and the new location will open at an undetermined date. 210-307-5829.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TO-DO LIST

June & July events

COMPILED BY JARRETT WHITENER

ENJOY SUMMER WITH SPLASHFEST UNIVERSAL CITY PARK

WATCH A MOVIE IN THE PARK UNIVERSAL CITY PARK

JUNE 18- JULY 30

JUNE 18

Universal City will bring back Splashfest with 17 inatable rides for families to enjoy. Wristbands will allow children age 3 and older to enjoy unlimited activities. Waivers must be signed with the purchase of a wrist band. 2-7 p.m. $5. Universal City Park, 305 North Blvd., Universal City. www.universalcitytexas.com/995

Universal City will kick o its movies in the park series with “Luca” following Splashfest. “Ghostbusters Afterlife” will play July 9, then “Encanto” on July 30. Concessions will be available. Movies begin at sunset. Free. Universal City Park, 305 North Blvd., Universal City. www.universalcitytexas.com/679

Black Rifle Coffee Company was founded in 2014 by Evan Hafer, a former Green Beret in the U.S. Army, and caters to military veterans and first responders.

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL CITY

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL CITY

COURTESY BLACK RIFLE COFFEE COMPANY

JUNE 18 CELEBRATE JUNETEENTH The Juneteenth Family Festival will include a carnival, concerts, a 5K walk/run and more. Perpetual Innovations, the Impact Network and others will host the event, which celebrates the emancipation of African Americans in Texas. 8 a.m.-10 p.m. $30 (carnival day pass), $15-$85 (concerts). Real Life Amphitheater, 16765 Lookout Road, Selma. 210-714-4810. www.reallifeamp.com 17 AND 18 LEARN ABOUT AMATEUR RADIO The San Antonio Radio Club will be hosting the 7th Annual Radio Fiesta in Schertz, bringing together amateur radio operators, vendors and those interested in the hobby. 1-5 p.m. (June 17), 8 a.m.-2 p.m. (June 18). $20. Schertz Civic Center, 1400 Schertz Parkway, Schertz. www.w5sc.org/ radio-fiesta

JULY 04 RUN A FREEDOM RUN 5K The Let Freedom Run 5K is a race along the Schertz Jubilee parade route prior to the parade beginning. Open to all participants, it includes a kids run/fun run alongside a walk for families and others. The race begins at 9:15 a.m. Registration information can be found on the Schertz city website. Schertz Civic Center, 1400 Schertz Parkway, Schertz. 210-619-1635. www.schertz.com/466 04 REVEL IN THE SCHERTZ JUBILEE FESTIVITIES The Schertz Jubilee, the city’s annual Fourth of July celebration, begins with a downtown parade and includes live music, a carnival for kids and fireworks. 9:30 a.m. (parade and carnival) free admission. 6-10 p.m. (nighttime events) $3 poolside at Pickrell Park fireworks show. Tickets are only available online before the event. 210-619-1635. www.schertz.com/466

Healing Group offers acupuncture ser- vices that encourage healing and relax- ation. They specialize in acupuncture for internal medicine, women’s health and psychological well-being. 210-455-1388. www.hopehealinggroup.com RENOVATIONS 13 First United Bank , located at 4917 FM 3009, Schertz, underwent a full reno- vation in April. During the renovation, the FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Black Rie Coee Company will open a location in the Live Oak Town Center, located at IKEA-RBFCU Parkway, Live Oak. An exact address has not been announced. Veteran-owned Black Rie Coee Company oers coee with imported high-quality beans sourced from Guatemala and Brazil. The Live Oak location is set to be completed in early 2023. 385-262-7184. www.blackriecoee.com

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building was gutted and remodeled to include more room for additional services in the future. Independence Title, which was formerly inside the bank, was relo- cated to the building behind the bank and bank managers hope to add mortgage, insurance and other groups in the future. The renovation also included community rooms for the public to use for meetings and a coffee bar and Spend Life Wisely lounge for guests to enjoy. 210-651-4477. www.firstunitedbank.com

Find more or submit Northeast San Antonio events at communityimpact.com/event- calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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NORTHEAST SAN ANTONIO METROCOM EDITION • JUNE 2022

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

COMPILED BY JARRETT WHITENER

ONGOING PROJECTS Schertz City Council adjusts budget to landscape medians During a May 10 City Council meet- ing, the city of Schertz held a first reading for a budget adjustment to landscape 1/2-mile of medians on Cibolo Valley Drive from I-35 to Old Wiederstein Road. As part of the plan, the medians will include low-water plants, a drip irri- gation system and decorative rock. Work will take 12 days to complete. Timeline: TBD Cost: $88,172.99 Funding source: Schertz roadway impact fees

GUADALUPE

NAVIGATING I-35 NEX CENTRAL The I-35 North East Expansion, or NEX, Central project will increase mobility and reduce congestion.

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9.5 MILES of elevated lanes THREE LANES northbound and southbound

430,000 daily drivers by 2044 77% growth in San Antonio by 2050

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200,000 current average daily drivers

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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TxDOT breaks ground on $1.5 billion I-35 NEX Central project, part of statewide Texas Clear Lanes initiative

On May 11, the Texas Department of Transportation celebrated the groundbreaking of the I-35 North East Expansion, or NEX, Central project. The $1.5 billion project is part of Texas Clear Lanes, a statewide initiative to address traffic by increasing mobility, reducing congestion and enhancing safety for drivers. According to Gina Gallegos, TxDOT district engineer for the San Antonio District, I-35 sees an average of 200,000 drivers each day, and that number is estimated to increase to 430,000 daily drivers by 2044. To address the traffic problem, the project will include 9.5 miles of elevated lanes with three lanes going each

direction, northbound and southbound. “This project is critical to address anticipated increases in traffic growth along the I-35 corridor,” Gallegos said. State and metrocom city officials support the I-35 expan- sion project and highlighted the importance of its ability to keep traffic moving. The project area will be from Loop 410 North in Bexar County to FM 3009 in Guadalupe County, and work is anticipated to be completed by 2027. I-35 NEX Central is the first of three planned projects along a 20-mile stretch of I-35 from north of AT&T Center Parkway near downtown to FM 1103, according to TxDOT.

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 20. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT NEMNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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Call me before you need me: 830-584-1177 natascha@reynosoagency.com 6051 FM 3009, Suite 246 Schertz, TX 78154

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Judson, Schertz-Cibolo-Universal City & Randolph Field ISDs

Schertz-Cibolo-Universal City ISD will meet June 21 at 6 p.m. 1060 Elbel Road, Schertz 210-945-6200. www.scuc.txed.net/scucisd Judson ISD will meet June 22 at 6 p.m. 8205 Palisades Drive, Live Oak 210-945-5100. www.judsonisd.org Comal ISD will meetJune 23 at 6 p.m. 1404 N. I-35, New Braunfels 830-221-2000. www.comalisd.org MEETINGS WE COVER Randolph High School girls track and eld athletes won the Class 3A team title at the University Interscholastic League state track and eld championships. The event was held May 12 in Austin. Randolph freshman Taylor Nunez led the way, winning four gold medals in the 100- and 200-meter dash, and long jump, and by anchoring the 400-meter relay. Fellow freshman Briana St. Louis won four medals—one gold, two silver and a bronze. DISTRICT HIGHLIGHTS JUDSON ISD On May 19, the Judson ISD board of trustees discussed the creation of a Fine Arts Academy at Olympia Elementary School. This program would give students an opportunity to explore ne arts outside of a general curriculum. The goal is to have the program available to students by the start of the 2022- 23 school year. SCHERTZCIBOLOUNIVERSAL CITY ISD Superintendent Clark Ealy thanked community and sta members who addressed the trustees about the proposed scal year 2022-23 budget at the regular meeting of the Board of Trustees on May 17. The proposed 1.5% pay increase discussed at the May 3 budget workshop, Ealy said, is a preliminary gure and the minimum that will be recommended to school board trustees before they adopt a budget in August. RANDOLPH FIELD ISD The

Judson ISD approves largest raise in district history

BY JARRETT WHITENER

RAISING WAGES Judson ISD board of trustees increased wages across sta in the largest raise the school district has had to date.

JUDSON ISD The board of trustees on May 19 approved an employee incentive plan that increases wages. According to Superintendent Jeanette Ball, the raise will aect all employees with a one-time incentive or increase. “What we are proposing tonight is probably one of the biggest raises that Judson has done and probably one of the biggest in Bexar County at this point,” Ball said. According to Ball, the salary for teachers would be increased by 6% on the midpoint with a $1,000 incentive. For professionals, which includes assistant principals, accountants, dietitians and other specialists, the raise would be 4% with a $1,000 incentive. Auxiliary, clerical, police and bus drivers each will receive an increase of 6% and a $2,000 incentive. The board of trustees was in full support of the raise, with many board members expressing their gratitude. “A 6% raise, when we rst started this budget process, never did I think we could do it,” Ball said. “Then a 4% [raise] for professionals and 6% for auxiliary, clerical, police and bus drivers I think is something to be proud of.”

TEACHER PAY

*ONE TIME INCENTIVE $1,000* $1,000* $1,000* + + +

0 years: 10 years: 20 years:

$53,712 $57,632 $60,832

$57,362 $61,282 $64,482

BUS DRIVER PAY 0 years:

$15.50/hr $17.02/hr

$16.67/hr $18.16/hr $20.66/hr

$2,000* $2,000* $2,000*

+ + +

10 years: 20 years:

$19.52/hr

AUXILIARY STARTING WAGE CLERICAL STARTING WAGE $14.04/hr Before After

+ $2,000*

$14.93/hr

Before

After

+ $2,000*

$14.96/hr

$15.90/hr

SOURCE: JUDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Steele students raise $3,061 for area nonprot

Comal ISD swears in Jones, Krawczynski

BY TRICIA SCHWENNESEN

associated with high school foot- ball—after Chris Canales suered a severe injury in 2001 that left him paralyzed, the release stated. Visit www.gridironheroes.org for more information.

SCHERTZCIBOLO UNIVERSAL CITY ISD Byron P. Steele High School senior and junior girls raised $3,061 playing in the 15th annual powderpu ag football game, according to a Schertz-Cibo- lo-Universal City ISD news release. Steele Library Aide TJ Mitch- ell, who directs the fundraiser, presented the check on May 18 to Gridiron Heroes founders, Eddie Canales and his son Chris Canales. The Canaleses founded the nonprot—which provides support and resources to people who have sustained catastrophic spinal cord injuries through activities

BY JARRETT WHITENER

COMAL ISD On May 18, Comal ISD canvassed the results of the May 7 election, conrming Amanda Jones and David Krawczynski won the races for Comal ISD seats 6 and 7, replacing Marty Bartlett and Cody Mueller, respectively. For District 6, Jones nished with 659 votes, or 68.72%, to Amber Bracegirdle’s 300 votes, or 31.28%. In District 7, Krawczynski received 1,121 votes, or 58.54%, while 337 votes went to Kaila Stovall, 232 votes went to Orlando “OJ” Dona and 232 votes went to Stephen Gallets.

Steele High School ocials present the check to Gridiron Heroes.

COURTESY SCHERTZCIBOLOUNIVERSAL CITY ISD

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NORTHEAST SAN ANTONIO METROCOM EDITION • JUNE 2022

CITY & COUNTY

News from Cibolo, Live Oak, Universal City & Guadalupe County

Live Oak voters pass $18 million bond, seven city propositions

Cities canvass votes, confirm council members CIBOLO, UNIVERSAL CITY During the May 17 meeting, Universal City City Council canvassed May 7 election results. Universal City Mayor John Williams kept his position after receiving 60.41% of votes, with Adam E. Salyer getting the remaining 39.59%. For three council seats, Steven R. Buck took the most votes at 23.63%. Incumbent Paul Najarian won 21.56%, and Phil Vaughan had 21%. Incumbent Beverly Volle won 20.5% of votes, and Richard K. Edwards won 13.31% of votes. Buck, Najarian and Vaughan, the top vote-getters out of five candidates, were sworn in as council members.

VOTES CANVASSED, COUNCIL SWORN IN Cibolo and Universal City swore in council members after canvassing the votes.

Universal City City Council

Steven R. Buck 23.63% Paul Najarian* 21.56%

Phil Vaughan 21% Beverly Volle* 20.5% Richard K. Edwards 13.31%

LIVE OAK During the May 7 election, the $18 million bond for roads, streets and sidewalks in the city of Live Oak passed with 66.88% of votes. Approval of the bond will raise the interest and sinking tax rate an estimated $0.06 for a total of $0.1604 per $100 valuation. According to Live Oak staff, by 2024, debt payments for the bond passed in 2014 will be completed, resulting in the tax rate decreasing. The rate is expected to go below $0.10 again by 2031. With bond approval, the city could issue the first debt within three months. Seven city charter propositions also passed with majority votes, including Propositions D and F,

which removed provisions that allow the mayor to delay the adop- tion of an ordinance or resolution passed by the council, and pro- vides for the appointment, suspen- sion or removal of the municipal court judge, respectively. $18M BOND APPROVED Live Oak residents voted to approve bond, which will fix streets and sidewalks but increase taxes. $18 MILLION

Cibolo City Council District 2

Victor M. Osorio II 51.9%

Randy Roberts 48.1%

*INCUMBENT WINNERS

In Cibolo, Victor M. Osorio II took the majority of votes for City Council District 2 with 82 votes, or 51.9%, over Randy Roberts’ 76 votes, or 48.1%. Osorio was sworn in May 24, succeeding Steve Quinn, who resigned in September. SOURCES: BEXAR AND GUADALUPE COUNTIES/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15 street/sidewalk projects $0.06 tax rate increase per $100 valuation

SOURCE: CITY OF LIVE OAK/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Universal City City Council approves road improvements

ADDING MEDIANS Universal City will be adding raised medians along Pat Booker Road, which will add to the appearance of the area and help with traffic control.

UNIVERSAL CITY City Council on May 17 held the second reading and discussion for thoroughfare and roundabout improvements at Kitty Hawk Road. The project would be the first phase in providing connectivity from Kitty Hawk through an upcoming but yet-to-be defined commercial development to Loop 1604, according to Universal City Economic Development Corp. staff. A resolution estimated the cost at $349,965. During a May 3 meeting, City Manager Kim Turner said city staff analyzed traffic data for the thoroughfare. Turner said she believes the city is prepared for all levels of traffic in that area. “We ran about four different scenarios,” Turner said. “We ran what [traffic] would be if it was all

hospitals, which has a lot of traffic, or what it would be if it was all multifamily or what it would be if it was mixed-use. Regardless of what happens out there, we are going to have a huge traffic increase.” Council also discussed a resolution for $246,960 that would pay for a right-turn lane from Pat Booker Road to the northbound Loop 1604 frontage road. The funds would also pay for raised medians on Pat Booker between Loop 1604 and Athenian Drive as well as between National and Byrd boulevards, and Byrd and Aviation boulevards. The project for raised medians includes pedes- trian and sidewalk improvements on the south side of Pat Booker Road, which is in line with the Aviation District Master Plan passed in 2020.

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Projects listed under the two resolutions would be funded through the sales tax revenue bond, which the UCEDC passed in December 2020. Final readings will be held at a future meeting.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JARRETT WHITENER

Schertz City Council will meet June 14 and 28 at 6 p.m. 1400 Schertz Parkway, Bldg. 4, Schertz. 201-619-1030. www.schertz.com Cibolo City Council will meet June 14 and 28 at 6:30 p.m. 200 S. Main St., Cibolo. 210-658-9900. www.cibolo.gov Universal City City Council will meet June 21 at 6:30 p.m. 2150 Universal City Blvd., Universal City. 210-659-0333. www.universalcitytexas.com Garden Ridge City Council will meet July 7 at 6 p.m. 9400 Municipal Parkway, Garden Ridge 210-651-6632. www.ci.garden-ridge.tx.us Live Oak City Council will meet June 14 and 28 at 7 p.m. 8001 Shin Oak Drive, Live Oak. 210-653-9140. www.liveoaktx.net MEETINGS WE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS SCHERTZ On May 24, Schertz City Council held a workshop to discuss future plans for the city’s Main Street. This discussion included council direction to staff on redeveloping the area and getting ideas for additional funding.

Germann wins Guadalupe commissioner Precinct 4 runoff GUADALUPE COUNTY In the May 24 Republican runoff in Guadalupe County, Stephen Germann took the most votes with 1,223, or 50.47%, for Precinct 4 commissioner while Joel Hicks received 1,200 votes, or 49.53%. RESULTS BREAKDOWN Winners of the May 24 runoffs will run against a member of the opposite party for contested races in November.

Germann will run uncontested in November and will replace Judy Cope as commissioner for Precinct 4. Germann said he vows to focus on infrastructure and services that help manage the rapid growth the area is experiencing. “I’m completely humbled by the voters in Precinct 4, and I will represent them to the very best of my ability,” Germann said. “We need to manage the growth in the area and look to the future with the growth,” Germann said. “The budget needs to be looked at, and we need to allocate as much as we can to our emergency services.” In the Republican race for U.S. Congressional District 18, Cassy Garcia received 8,482 votes, or 56.96%. Sandra Whitten received 6,410 votes, or 43.04%. In the Democratic race for District 28, incumbent Henry Cuellar took 22,694 votes, or 50.2% while Jessica Cisneros received 22,517, or 49.8%. For the District 15 Democratic race, Ruben Ramirez received 6,020 votes, or 49.9%, while Michelle Vallejo received 6,043 votes, or 50.1%. The winner of this runoff will run against Republican candidate Monica De La Cruz Hernandez in November. All results are unofficial until canvassed.

GUADALUPE COUNTY COMMISSIONER

Precinct 4 (Republican)

Stephen Germann 50.47%

Joel Hicks 49.53%

U.S. CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS

District 18 (Republican) Cassy Garcia 56.96%

Sandra Whitten 43.04%

District 28 (Democratic) Henry Cuellar* 50.2%

Jessica Cisneros 49.8%

District 15 (Democratic)

Michelle Vallejo 50.1%

Ruben Ramirez 49.9%

*INCUMBENT WINNERS

SOURCE: GUADALUPE COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

✦ We Are a Community Dedicated to Seeking God & Serving People Join us Sunday School: 9:00 A.M. Sunday Worship: 10:30 A.M.

Presiding Bishop Michael J. Springs PhD, Dmin+

Holy Communion: Every 1st Sunday River Women’s Day: Every 5th Sunday Wednesday Bible Study: 7:00 P.M. via Zoom Personal ID# (943 373 7269)

Pastor Evangelist Mary L. Springs

5624 Randolph Blvd., San Antonio, TX 78233 210-773-4430 • TheRiverSA.Com • msprings@satx.rr.com

9

NORTHEAST SAN ANTONIO METROCOM EDITION • JUNE 2022

2022

HEALTH CARE EDITION

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSOR

The one constant over the last 100+ years has been change itself. And through it all, University Health has been constantly changing, growing and discovering new ways to heal the people of San Antonio and South Texas. We exist to improve their health, and to advance the practice of medicine. Today, we're a network of over 25 outpatient locations oering primary and specialty care, and a nationally recognized academic hospital that is one of San Antonio's most preferred. We change lives by improving the health of our community—through compassionate patient care, innovation, education and discovery. At University Health, we believe in the power of change. Because that’s where healthier begins. Learn how we’re helping more people change their health for good at UHChange.com.

SILVER SPONSOR

TO READ ALL COMMUNITY IMPACT GUIDES AND SEE REGULAR TOPIC UPDATES,

At Modern Touch Dentistry, we provide quality dental care to Schertz and the surrounding community. With more than 10 years of experience, Dr. Ghanizadeh and Dr. Marashi deliver all the services you need, from Implant Surgery with IV Sedation to Cosmetics, Children's Dentistry, Periodontics, Endodontics, Invisalign, and Oral Surgery.

ANNUAL COMMUNITY  HEALTH CARE REAL ESTATE  EDUCATION COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. VISIT

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

Local health care data and information

COMPILED BY TRICIA SCHWENNESEN

COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH

TRACKING VACCINATIONS Bexar County vaccinated a higher percentage of people than the state average. Data is up to date as of May 19.

These rankings of all counties statewide are updated annually but include data from previous years. The factors listed are not comprehensive.

PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTS AGE 5+ FULLY VACCINATED

TOTAL VACCINES ADMINISTERED

BEXAR COUNTY

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE:

• LENGTH OF LIFE • QUALITY OF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

GUADALUPE COUNTY COMAL COUNTY

3,320,550 239,192

69.29%

64.85%

223,044

58.31%

2022 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS OUT OF 244 COUNTIES

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

HEALTH CARE EMPLOYMENT TRENDS HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT Bexar County saw the greatest decline in health care employment over the past two years.

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICALCARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMICFACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

HEALTH OUTCOMES

18 16 34 20 26 39 27

19 10 13

38 44 82 17 43 24

Length of life Overall Quality of life

Sept. 2019

Sept. 2020

Sept. 2021

2-year change -2.2%

2-year change -2.1%

2-year change -4.6%

HEALTH FACTORS

8 8

Overall

Health behaviors

12 11

Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

136 146

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

198

110

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES

2022 HEALTH CARE EDITION

COMPILED BY TRICIA SCHWENNESEN

14

15

KEY

Oers COVID19 testing T Hospitals

Retail clinic R

Urgent care center U

Emergency room E

Oers COVID19 vaccines V

Oers u vaccines F

HOSPITALS 1 Methodist Hospital Northeast Trauma level: IV NICU level: N/A Total number of employees: 1,000 Number of beds: 116 www.sahealth.com/locations/ methodist-hospital-northeast/ ERS, URGENT CARE & RETAIL CLINICS Cibolo 1 Medpost Urgent Care Cibolo U F 513 Cibolo Valley Drive, Ste. 101 2107145600 www.carespot.com/ Number of jobs available: N/A 12412 Judson Road, Live Oak 2107577000

Live Oak

Little Spurs Pediatric Urgent Care

Texas MedClinic

4 Concentra Urgent Care U F 12702 Toepperwein Road, Ste. 120 2106534420 www.concentra.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5p.m., Sat.-Sun. closed San Antonio 5 Methodist ER Converse E T V F 6402 Mallard Meadow 2107578010 www.sahealth.com/locations/ methodist-er-converse Hours: 24/7 6 Methodist ER Nacogdoches E T V F 13434 Nacogdoches Road 2107575434

COURTESY LITTLE SPURS PEDIATRIC URGENT CARE

COURTESY TEXAS MEDCLINIC

13 Walgreens R T V F

detail/baptist-emergency-hospital-schertz Hours: 24/7 9 CVS Minute Clinic R T V F 2693 FM3009 8663892727 www.cvs.com/minuteclinic Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m - 7:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.- 1p.m., 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-1p.m., 1:30 p.m - 4:30 p.m. 10 CVS R T V F 5334 FM1103 2106726596 www.cvs.com/store-locator/ schertz-tx-pharmacies/ 5334-fm-1103-schertz-tx-78108/storeid=11045 Hours: Mon-Fri. 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 11 Quality Urgent Care-Schertz U T V F 6032 FM 3009, Ste. 120 2108784033 www.qualityurgentcareofamerica.com Hours: 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily 12 Schertz Cibolo Emergency Clinic U T 4825 FM 3009, Ste. 200 2102021123 www.schertzhealth.com Hours: 24/7

3801 FM 3009 2105663245

www.walgreens.com/locator/walgreens- 3801+fm+3009-schertz-tx-78154/id=5963 Hours: Sun.-Sat. 8 a.m.-1 p.m., 1:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Selma 14 Little Spurs Pediatric Urgent Care U T 15069 I35 Frontage Road, Ste. 116 2106564878 www.littlespurspedi.com Hours: Mon.-Fri 9 a.m. - 8:30 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 15 Texas MedClinic Selma U T V F 8341 Agora Parkway 2106595533 www.texasmedclinic.com Hours: 24/7 Universal City 16 FastMed Universal City U T F 902 Kitty Hawk Rd, Suite 110 2106590889 www.fastmed.com/urgent-care-centers/ universal-city-tx-walk-in-clinic-kitty-hawk-road Hours: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Mon-Fri.; 9 a.m. - 5p.m. Sat-Sun

medpost-urgent-care/cibolo-tx/ Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5p.m. 2 NextCare Urgent Care Cibolo U T F 791 FM 1103, Ste. 125 8302402615 www.nextcare.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8a.m.-8p.m., Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-6p.m. 3 Physicians Premier Emergency Room U E F 580 Cibolo Valley Drive, Suite 137 2102513545 www.mdpremier.com/cibolo-emergency-room Hours: 24/7

www.sahealth.com/locations/ methodist-er-nacogdoches/ Hours: 24/7 Schertz 7 Access MedClinic Schertz U T 1264 FM 78, Suite 115 2103525966

www.accesstotalcare.com/ access-medclinic-schertz Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily 8 Baptist Neighborhood Hospital-Schertz E T F 16977 I35 N. 2105728400 www.baptisthealthsystem.com/locations/

15 People with Hearing Loss is looking for participants to test the latest advanced hearing technology by San Antonio Custom Hearing To participate, you must have difficulty hearing and your hearing must fall in the range for the hearing aid. Participants will be asked to evaluate latest hearing solution for 30 days (risk-free). If you are satisfied with the improvement in your hearing and wish to keep the instrument, you may do so at tremendous savings. Please set your appointment now, this event ends 6/30/22. Participants will be entitled to a $25 H-E-B Gift Card.

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1996 Schertz Pkwy Ste. 104 Schertz, TX 78154 SCHERTZ

SAN ANTONIO

(210)268-8229 1919 Oakwell Farms Pkwy Ste. 254 San Antonio, TX 78218 9

11

NORTHEAST SAN ANTONIO METROCOM EDITION • JUNE 2022

New to the Neighborhood Welcoming New Patients

645 Woodland Oaks Dr., Suite 200, Schertz, Tx, 78154 Call for Appointment: 210-810-3690

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• Family Dentistry • Cosmetic Dentistry • Dental Implants • Smile Makeover

• IV Sedation • Invisalign • Emergency Dental Treatment • All-on-4, Implant Denture

Dr. Hoda Ghanizadeh Dr. Iman Marashi

Providing the highest quality of clinical care and personalized service in a warm and compassionate atmosphere.

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Zikam oers specialized over-the-counter products that can only be sold by a licensed vendor.

Zikam Pharmacy 17323 I-35 N., Ste. 100, Schertz 210-310-3132 www.zikamrx.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sun. closed progression of bacteria growth Men’s and Women’s Pure Pack: multivitamin on-the- go pack tailored for men or women; one of the top- selling products at Zikam SPECIALIZED PRODUCTS Zikam Pharmacy owner Abdhul Nassor complements his services by also selling specialized over-the-counter products found through licensed vendors. Ortho molecular products OrthoMune: immune health supplement that supports the body’s immune system to combat illness Vitamin D: 50,000 [international unit] Vitamin D3,a. megadose of Vitamin D3 taken once a week Zikam pharmacy products Maximum relief rub: 5,000 mg CBD—a chemical found in the Cannabis sativa plant— that is organically certied and contains ingredients to help with pain relief CBD tincture: broad-spectrum CBD product meant to help with sleep, anxiety and more Pure encapsulations PureDefense: supports immune function and upper respiratory health by prohibiting the

BUSINESS FEATURE

Pharmacist Abdhul Nassor opened Zikam Pharmacy in Schertz in 2019. (Photos by Jarrett Whitener/Community Impact Newspaper)

Zikam Pharmacy Full-service neighborhood pharmacy puts a focus on community P harmacist Abdhul Nassor’s goal was to Nassor said the Schertz location was slow at rst, but the COVID-19 pandemic created a need for hard- to-nd medical supplies so he focused his eort on nding them. “When the pandemic hit, we wanted to be a BY JARRETT WHITENER

bring neighborhood pharmacies back to San Antonio communities. To that end he began Zikam Pharmacy with his partner Alexander Oguamanam in 2014. “The idea was to bring back the old hometown pharmacy, where you can talk to the pharmacist whenever you want and call them whenever you need them,” Nassor said. Nassor studied at The University of Toledo in Ohio, which is where he roomed with his partner. “Alex owns the pharmacy in Bulverde,” Nassor said. “When we graduated, we made an agreement that whoever opens a pharmacy rst, the other person should join it. So that is what I did.” Nassor attributes Zikam’s success to the one-on- one service and dedication to community. “My major satisfaction of the pharmacy is our abil- ity to know our customers,” Nassor said. “We know what you are on, what you take and where your kids are going to go to college. We want to be sponsors in the community.” With the success of the original location in San Antonio, Zikam expanded in 2019 to Schertz, which is the location Nassor owns and operates.

resource for the people,” he said. “No one else could nd the masks that we had or the supplies we had. We made it a goal to be a reservoir for the commu- nity, for the local police and re department as well.” The surge in pandemic supplies shifted Zikam’s focus to personal protective equipment and COVID- 19-related products, including vaccinations. Zikam provides medicine for all, including fami- lies and pets, and oers medical equipment, such as walkers, and over-the-counter care for customers. “Any remedies you can think of, we pretty much have,” Nassor said. “We are a fully stocked phar- macy. We also do compounds, so we can make pretty much anything the doctors want us to make.” Nassor said he hopes to see Zikam expand to multiple locations across the San Antonio area. “We live in this community,” Nassor said. “We are a small business that is here for this community, and we are big enough to support people’s needs. We want to be involved in this community and provide the high-quality service that people deserve.”

3009

35

N

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

Suzanne Basey, M.D. • Dr. Suzanne Basey is joining Kinder Haus Pediatrics June 2022 • Insurances Accepted: Aetna, BCBS, Christus, Cigna, Humana, PHCS, United Healthcare, Tricare Select Amy Garcia, M.D.

5700 Schertz Pkwy Ste 140 Schertz, TX 78154 | (210) 566-1533 | www.kinderhauspediatrics.com

13

NORTHEAST SAN ANTONIO METROCOM EDITION • JUNE 2022

CONTINUED FROM 1

To help manage growth and patient capacity, University Health purchased three pieces of land and began construction on a new addition to University Hospital intended to serve women and children. The new addition, which University Health is calling a hospital, will oer specialized care and is set to open in summer 2023. Amenities for maternity

10

16

410

N

Benets for parents • A dedicated OB-GYN emergency department • Large, private labor and delivery suites • The highest level neonatal intensive care unit connected to the labor and delivery unit • Private inpatient rooms • Space for family members to stay overnight • A sleeping suite for mothers who return to the NICU to breastfeed babies

300 beds for women, babies and children

900 space parking garage

ADDITIONAL shell space for future growth

12 stories

SOURCE: UNIVERSITY HEALTH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“A lot of people who need a hospi- tal, patients who come to our doctors close to our homes, a lot of them need a surgery or need to have a baby, and it is a routine delivery because they are healthy young women,” Kirkman said. “This idea of a hub and spoke would put hospital services closer to people’s homes.” According to Director of External Communications Elizabeth Allen, University Hospital, located in the South Texas Medical Center, is the only hospital in the University Health. It is a Level 1 trauma center focused on specialized care. As a more immediate solution to overcapacity at University Hospital, ocials said they set aside $700 mil- lion for a women’s and children’s hos- pital, which is set to open in 2023. “The need involves the growth we are seeing across San Antonio, Bexar County and several adjacent coun- ties,” Kirkman said. “It is one of the fastest-growing areas in the country, and [University Health] have been growing signicantly over the past couple of decades.” Keeping up with growth To remedy issues with the increased population and patient capacity, Uni- versity Health purchased the three pieces of land over the last two years to build new hospitals and give those in suburban San Antonio a facility

closer to home. The west side property was made in two purchases totaling $19 million and the south side property was $10.4 million. University Health acquired the 42.5-acre Selma property for $11.6 million. Hospital ocials said there is no estimated completion time for any of the hospital projects. According to Senior Public Rela- tions Specialist Andrea Wazir, Univer- sity Health is conducting a study to determine which hospital project is the highest priority before beginning construction. “Generally, we have looked at growth in the county, including the northeast corridor, to consider future needs,” Wazir said. “We will be able to better plan for the future by purchas- ing the land now.” According to Kirkman, the planned hospitals will be focused around rou- tine doctors and emergency care. According to Kirkman, using the locations outside of the city will allow University Hospital to keep up with patient intake and focus on those who need more specialized care and services, which helps the hospital care for all patients. Selma City Administrator Johnny Casias said he believes a new hospital will help the city keep up with growth while providing care for those in the Northeast Metrocom area.

the hospital. “We opened up the Sky Tower in 2014 because we were bursting at the seams at the time,” Kirkman said. “When we opened up in 2014, we felt like we were on good footing for the next several years. Almost as soon as we opened it up, we were experienc- ing the hospital being very close to being full.” This problem escalated when the COVID-19 pandemic began as the hos- pital had trouble supplying beds for the numerous patients that were in need of care. To give more room for inpatient care, the women’s and children’s hos- pital at University Hospital will pro- vide an additional 300 beds dedicated to women, babies and children. According to a University Health release, University Hospital is South Texas’ rst Level IV maternity cen- ter, meaning the hospital is uniquely prepared for high-risk deliveries and complications. According to Kirkman, the addition of this wing provides room to care for the women and children in San Anto- nio and the surrounding cities who use University Hospital. With the inclusion of the women’s and children’s hospital, University Hospital will have an estimated 1,016 rooms throughout the campus. The project is estimated to nish in summer 2023 and will serve as the

The new hospital will also spur growth and further economic devel- opment, Casias said. “A new hospital is needed in this area to keep pace with the phenome- nal growth that has occurred and the growth that will continue for many years,” Casias said. “This I-35 corridor is one of the fastest-growing corridors in the nation, and this future hospital will bring both the care and the job opportunities that are needed in this corridor.” At capacity Having specialized services and equipment, University Hospital sees an average of 565 patients per day, which is a 50% increase since 2010. In 2021, University Hospital had 30,134 inpatient discharges resulting in a 51% increase in inpatient discharges between 2010 and 2021. University Health also oers patients the CareLink program, which oers more aordable hospital bills to those under the federal pov- erty guidelines. With this program, University Hospital attracts those in search of medical care who cannot aord traditional medical expenses. According to Kirkman, University Hospital has faced problems with capacity since 2008, when the deci- sion was made to invest in the Sky Tower, which provided an additional 35 surgical suites and 420 rooms to

14

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