Lake Travis - Westlake Edition | June 2021

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Road to

45% 50%

TRAVIS COUNTY

HAYS COUNTY WILLIAMSON COUNTY GUADALUPE COUNTY COMAL COUNTY

recovery Since mid-December, access to the COVID-19 vaccine, along with the state’s

All adults in Texas become eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

MARCH 29

40%

35%

30%

25%

Weekly vaccine allocations ended as availability increased, and children 12-15 were cleared to get the Pzer vaccine.

MAY 10

20%

Large-scale vaccination hubs open throughout Texas.

JAN. 11

collective levels of immunity, has grown. The chart to the right indicates those who are fully vaccinated, and numbers are updated as of June 3.

15%

10%

5%

0%

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEBRUARY 2021

MARCH 2021

APRIL 2021

MAY 2021

JUNE 2021

JANUARY 2021

LAUREN CANTERBERRYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Comparing options The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted three COVID-19 vaccines emergency use authorization, a status given to drugs and vaccines with the potential to diagnose, treat or prevent illness during public health emergencies when there are no existing, formally approved alternatives.

Central Texas communitycomes together todriveupvaccination rates BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE & AMY RAE DADAMO

such as Kendra’s COVID Coaches have played an integral role in connecting tens of thousands of Central Texans with vaccine appointments. Incoming requests to the groups have dwindled across April and May, however, and the groups’ approaches changed. Kendra said her team has shifted their focus to reaching resi- dents who may be willing to get a vac- cine but lack the urgency, time and access to obtain one. In a survey conducted by Sendero Health Plans across eight Central Texas counties at the end of 2020, 64% of respondents said they would get a COVID-19 vaccine if they had the opportunity, and only 5.5% of respon- dents gave an unequivocal “no.” Convincing those residents in the gray area is the goal for Central Texas health authorities, volunteer

Kendra Wright received early access to the coronavirus vaccine in January as an essential caretaker to her elderly father. Walking out of the appointment, Wright said she felt immediate relief. “It was like this weight was lifted that I didn’t even know I had,” Wright said. “I instantly wanted everyone to feel that way.” She began by helping a dozen Bee Cave community members nd appointments and was soon ooded with messages. In late January, Wright launched Kendra’s COVID Coaches—one of sev- eral Central Texas volunteer groups working to aid the region in the pursuit of reaching herd immunity, or the sta- tus at which a community at large will have collective protection against a virus. Since January, grassroots groups

MRNA Vaccine

Traditional Vaccine

For the last several decades, mRNA, or messenger RNA vaccines, have been studied and used for illnesses, such as Zika and rabies. An mRNA vaccine teaches cells how to make a protein that triggers an immune response. One often cited benet of an mRNA vaccine is that it does not put the actual COVID-19 virus into a person’s body.

JOHNSON & JOHNSON 1 dose, traditional nonreplicating viral vector technology, similar to u vaccine Approved for age 18 and up FDA recommended a pause from April 13-26 due to a rare side eect. The FDA now says it is safe to use. Traditional vaccines dier from mRNA vaccines in that they are produced by growing a weakened form of an actual virus in a laboratory, which is then injected to create an immune response.

PFIZER

2 doses, mRNA technology Approved for age 12 and up Has requested formal approval by the FDA

Moderna

2 doses, mRNA technology Approved for age 18 and up

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, JOHNSON & JOHNSON, MODERNA, PFIZER, U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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