Heights - River Oaks - Montrose Edition - May 2020

HEIGHTS RIVEROAKS MONTROSE EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2  MAY 6JUNE 2, 2020

ONLINE AT

Citywide census eort looks to boost response throughoutMontrose

Artists get creative, pull together to endure economic downturn Stuck inside, Houston arts community reaches out

BY MATT DULIN

If only 1% of the Houston population is under- counted in this year’s census, the city stands to lose as much as $250 million in federal support over the next 10 years, according to estimates by local ocials. One area where an undercount could occur is in Montrose, where renters account for 66% of residents, compared to 45% of the city as a whole, according to census estimates. Moreover, 29% of residents have moved in the past ve CONTINUED ON 18

ViolinistMayuGreenhalgh performs fromartist Allan Rodewald’s rooftop patio at a drive-by art exhibit held in FirstWard. (Courtesy Amber Slaughter. Photo Illustration by Community Impact Newspaper sta)

EVERY DOLLAR COUNTS CENSUS PARTICIPATION FUNDS PROGRAMS The census plays a role in determining how much federal funding is allocated to a range of programs. In scal year 2015-16, over $59 billion in tax dollars was returned to Texas based in part on census gures, including:

Medicaid

$23.7 BILLION

He began experimenting with publicly available mask designs and tweaking them based on feedback frommedical professionals. Since March, he estimates he has 3D-printed over 1,000 masks, face shields and mask clips, which he gives to medical workers for free. Ideally, he said he would be able to get his masks, which are built to national standards, ocially endorsed by local hospital systems, but for now he is content with occasional donations. In the meantime, he said, he could also supply rst responders and even restaurant workers. For now, this is the only gig in town, so it has his full attention.

BY MATT DULIN

$7.24 BILLION Federal student loans and Pell grants $5.31 BILLION Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Medicare $4.65 BILLION Highway planning and construction $3.3 BILLION

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron “Watching the news and then hearing from friends who are hospital workers and hearing their horror sto- ries ... for some of them it’s a matter of not if, but when they themselves will get infected. The bravery over there, I can’t imagine,” said Ridings, a photographer by trade whose contracts with DC Comics and Warner Bros. conventions dried up as social distancing took eect. “I had to do something.” In Tré Ridings’ art studio in the restored Jeerson Davis Hospital building in First Ward, a 3D-printing side hustle has become what he said feels like a moral obligation.

SOURCE: GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Keeping the lights on 8.6%

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of Greater Houston-area small-business owners surveyed projected their business would survive for six weeks or less without government assistance.

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