Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth Edition

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORTWORTH EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 4  AUG. 26SEPT. 23, 2020

ONLINE AT

Northwest ISDapproves bond, tax rate elections

Higher Education Guide 2020

ENROLLMENT DECLINING

BY IAN PRIBANIC

Residents inNorthwest ISDwill be asked inNovem- ber to approve four school bond propositions totaling $986.6 million along with a request to increase the district’s maintenance and operations tax rate. “We discussed pushing [the bond] toMay, but we’re already behind,” said Tim McClure, NISD assistant superintendent for facilities. “Some older schools that were identied in the long-range planning com- mittee call for replacement, and we’ve asked to move those up in the schedule.” District ocials expect zero tax impact to occur as CONTINUED ON 19

Tarrant County College fall enrollment has gone down signicantly from previous years, including a slight decrease at campuses in the Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth area.

Northwest campus

Northeast campus Other campuses

2018 Year (Fall semester) 2018

TOTAL:

8,860 8,842

49,881

13,146 12,807 11,387

27,875 27,972

49,621

2019 2020

8,543

20,737

40,669

0 10k 20k 30k 40k 50k

TAX RATE ELECTION V O T E R  A P P R O V A L

Classes were set to begin Aug. 24 at the Tarrant County College of Aviation, Transportation and Logistics. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

Students enrolled

SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Northwest ISD voters will decide for or against ve propositions in November, including a change to the district tax rate.

COVID19pandemic creates uncertainty Area colleges prepare for decrease in fall enrollment numbers

$

Current tax rate:

Proposed tax rate: $1.4663 per $100 valuation

$1.42

BY IAN PRIBANIC

have invested in new options for students while increasing safety measures and maintaining a ex- ible approach to class scheduling and instruction. “Students have been so resilient,” said Denesia Razo, director of workforce programs for the avi- ation school at TCC Northwest Campus at Alliance CONTINUED ON 16

per $100 valuation

Students and educators at local universities, such as Tarrant County College and the University of North Texas, are facing a number of obstacles as they prepare for the 2020-21 academic year. Due to the public health crisis surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, institutions of higher learning

EARLY VOT I NG : OCT. 1330 ELECT I ON DAY: NOV. 3

SOURCE: NORTHWEST ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2020 Guide ducation HIGHER

MARKET SNAPSHOT

IMPACTS

BEAR CREEK RUNNING CO.

21 ANTON'S AFRICAN CUISINE

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

A FRIENDLY NEWFACE

IMPACTS

6

HigherEducationGuide2020 Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 8 Hwy. 377 construction continues CITY& COUNTY 9 Latest local news NEWS REPORT 11 PPP loans save local jobs

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Ana Erwin, aerwin@communityimpact.com EDITOR Ian Pribanic GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ellen Jackson ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Arlin Gold

FROMANA: Are you confused by the new face in your favorite community paper? My name is Ana, and although I am new to leading this paper, I’ve been a reader and a Keller resident since we launched this edition in 2019. My husband and I are raising our daughter here, and my husband has worked in Keller ISD for the last 7 years. I have been leading our Grapevine-Colleyville-Southlake team for four years, and I have been with Community Impact since 2013. The last few months have been hard on most of us as we have adjusted to working from home and handling child care and medical care for our loved ones. We understand the toll this takes, and we are committed to doing our part by continuing to provide our readers with fact-based, relevant information that helps you make the best decisions. I would love to hear from you. Email me at aerwin@communityimpact.com. Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 6822231418 PRESS RELEASES KRNnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

INSIDE INFORMATION Local colleges at a glance NEWS REPORT Keller ISD oers dual credit

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 15

New businesses 7

College campuses 3

Bond propositions 5

NEWS REPORT

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UNT Health Science center helps community amid pandemic BUSINESS FEATURE

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

1171

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377

156

114

35W

BYRON NELSON BLVD.

ROANOKE

MadiJaks

PNC Bank

INTERMODAL PKWY.

3

OAK ST.

PHOTOS BY IAN PRIBANIC/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

817-965-0648. www.facebook.com/ madijaksroanoke 4 A new addition to Old Town Keller, Keller Chophouse opened Aug. 14 at 124 S. Main St., Keller. The steakhouse restaurant is set in the former location of Texas Blue. Keller Chophouse is part of the Mercury Chophouse brand and fea- tures a similar menu to the Fort Worth lo- cation, including a variety of prime steaks and classic dishes, such as short ribs and roasted rack of lamb. 817-336-4129. www.mercuryfw.com 5 A new Whataburger location opened Aug. 17 at 3052 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth. It is the second Whataburger restaurant in Northeast Fort Worth along with a Presidio Town Crossing location at 2209 N. Tarrant Parkway, Fort Worth. Whataburger features a variety of menu items, including burgers, chicken, fries and breakfast options. 210-476-6000. www.whataburger.com 6 The city of Fort Worth Golden Triangle Library opened Aug. 18 at 4264 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth The 15,000-square-foot library is expected to house more than 50,000 items for check- out and training. Construction of the library was approved by voters as part of the city’s 2014 bond program. 817-392-1234. www.fortworthtexas.gov/ library REOPENINGS 7 After a four-month hiatus due to COVID-19 restrictions, The Local Wa- tering Hole reopened in early August at 1632 Keller Parkway, Ste. 100, Keller. The establishment features a sports bar

and kitchen and has a wide selection of craft beer, a dog-friendly patio area and Sunday brunch specials. 817-431-3203. www.thelocalwateringhole.com COMING SOON 8 A PNC Bank Alliance location is coming soon to the Presidio Crossing shopping center in Northeast Fort Worth. The bank will occupy the former building of El Pollo Tropical at 8900 Tehama Ridge Parkway, Fort Worth. Crews are currently performing exterior and interior work with a targeted completion date in the fourth quarter of 2020. PNC Bank locations offer a wide variety of financial services, including personal savings and checking accounts. 888-762-2265. www.pnc.com 9 A Living Spaces Furniture store is coming soon to the North City shopping center at the southwest corner of I-35W and North Tarrant Parkway. The store is expected to open in 2021 and will anchor the new 300-acre development, along with other retail options, office space and a 12,000-square-foot food hall. 877-266-7300. www.livingspaces.com RELOCATIONS 10 Medical provider Northeast Tarrant Internal Medicine Associates relocated in June to 8740 Medical City Way, Fort Worth. NETIMA was previously located at 3100 N. Tarrant Parkway, Ste. 104, Fort Worth. NETIMA comprises nine separate physicians who practice at three locations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, including two locations in Euless. 817-358-5500. www.netima.org

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PARK VISTA BLVD.

KELLER HASLET RD.

TIMBERLAND BLVD.

E. BLUE MOUND RD.

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TEHAMA RIDGE PKWY.

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KELLER

MEDICAL CITY WAY

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

NOWOPEN 1 A Keller Premier Eye Care location opened June 22 at 900 S. Main St., Ste. 351, Keller. Keller Premier Eye Care offers comprehensive vision care services, such as eye exams and eye disease and dry-eye treatments. The business also offers a variety of contact lenses and glasses frames. 817-527-9800. www.kellerpremiereyecare.com 2 New Orleans-style daiquiri shop Who Daq? Daiquiris opened July 17 at 2021 820

Rufe Snow Drive, Ste. 201, Keller. The shop has a variety of flavored daiquiris for customers, such as margarita, strawberry and the Hurricane. It also serves food including po’boy sandwiches, seafood baskets and salads. 817-849-2252. www.thedaiquirishoppe.com 3 Women’s apparel and accessories store MadiJaks officially opened in down- town Roanoke on Aug. 1. The boutique is located at 400 S. Oak St., Ste. 110, Roanoke. It offers a variety of clothing, shoes and jewelry options for women.

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ANNIVERSARIES 11 Italian restaurant Café Sicilia cele- brated its first anniversary in March. The restaurant is located at 8849 Davis Blvd., Ste. 100, Keller, and features classic Ital- ian dishes, such as pizza, ravioli, linguine and eggplant parmigiana. 817-379-1572. www.cafesicilia.com 12 Vintage and modern collectible toy store Empire Toys celebrated one year in business April 6. The store, located at 136 S. Main St., Keller, features a wide variety of merchandise from popular brands, such as “Star Wars,” “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” and “Jurassic Park.” 682-593-8279. www.theempiretoys.com 13 Groggy Dog Sportswear celebrat- ed its first anniversary July 8 at 750 S. Main St., Ste. 127, Keller. The business offers promotional products, including screen-printed T-shirts, embroidered caps and pins. 817-697-8080. www.groggydogonline.com IN THE NEWS 14 Stein Mart Inc. announced Aug. 12 FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN A Cigars International retail store opened July 22 in Northeast Fort Worth. The store is located at 12853 Cabela Drive, Fort Worth, near the Cabela’s outdoor sports store. It is the second Cigars International retail location in Texas. The cigar superstore features more than 1,000 cigar brands, a full-service bar, indoor and outdoor lounges, a state-of- the-art ventilation system and more, according to the company’s website. 484-281-1001. www.facebook.com/ cifortworthsuperstore

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that it has voluntarily filed for bank- ruptcy, as it does not have “sufficient liquidity” to continue operations. A press release from the company said it expects to close “a significant portion, if not all” of its stores and has launched a store closing and liquidation process. Stein Mart has 281 stores in 30 states, including a Keller location at 1610 Keller Parkway, Keller. 817-741-4737. www.steinmart.com CLOSINGS 15 A Potbelly sandwich shop in the Presidio Crossing shopping center closed in July. The shop, located at 8901 North Freeway, Ste. 101, Fort Worth, served a variety of sandwiches, soups, salads and more. 817-566-0974. www.potbelly.com 16 Keller-based steakhouse Texas Blue closed July 11. The steakhouse was located in Old Town Keller at 124 S. Main St., Keller. The restaurant featured an American steakhouse theme and served from-scratch meals complete with locally

sourced produce. 817-431-5188. www.facebook.com/texasblue

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

BY IAN PRIBANIC ONGOING PROJECTS

JAMES ST.

One-way trac patterns began Aug. 10 on city side streets. (Ian Pribanic/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Hwy. 377 construction continues in Roanoke

MAIN ST.

projects throughout the city in order to create a more comfortable pedestrian environment. The city denes Complete Streets as those areas with transportation infrastructure and public access ways that are designed to enable safe, accessible, comfortable and convenient access for all people and travel modes. The city rst adopted a Complete Streets policy in 2016. “Adopting a Complete Streets policy was an important step in improving equity, safety and public health, but now the real work is occurring,” District 9 Council Member Ann Zadeh said in a city news release. According to the National Safety Council, there has been a 35% increase in pedestrian deaths nationwide since The Texas Department of Transporta- tion began construction in June on a more than 1-mile portion of Hwy. 377 in Roanoke. The road improvement project stretches 1.12 miles from Henrietta Creek Road north of Byron Nelson Boulevard to James Street and includes reconstruc- tion and widening of Hwy. 377 from a two-lane rural road to a four-lane di- vided roadway with raised medians and sidewalks, according to TxDOT. TxDOT ocials announced in August that one-way trac patterns would begin Aug. 10 on a number of city side streets. Streets impacted by one-way signage include Bowie Street, Crockett Street, Denton Street, Houston Street, Main Street, Rusk Street and Travis Street. “Trac will be in this one-way cong- uration until late 2020,” city spokes- person Morgan Roundy said. “Message

HENRIETTA CREEK RD.

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boards have been placed to alert drivers of the new trac pattern.” TxDOT ocials are requesting that driv- ers remain aware when traveling through work zones. More information on TxDOT roadwork projects is available at www.drivetexas.org. Timeline: June 2020-2023 Cost: $33.7 million Funding source: Texas Department of Transportation

HOW ITWORKS Complete Streets policies aimfor fewer deaths The city of Fort Worth has committed to a number of Complete Streets

2009, and pedestrian deaths have increased from 12% to 16% of all trac-related fatalities in that time. Fort Worth recorded a 10-year high in 2018, with 38 pedestrian deaths; however, the city had just 23 fatalities and 136 injuries in 2019, which represents the fewest number of each since 2014. FORTWORTH PEDESTRIANACCIDENTS Fatalities Injuries

200 150 100 50 0

Year

SOURCE: CITY OF FORT WORTH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF AUG. 19. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Keller, Roanoke and Northeast Fort Worth

COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC

DATE TOKNOW

AUG. 26

Celebrate Roanoke event canceled

Keller approves dates for November election KELLER City Council on Aug. 4 unanimously approved a resolution to hold elections for mayor and City Council Places 5 and 6 as part of the general election on Nov. 3. The resolution also sets early vot- ing dates for the city from Oct. 13-30. Voters have until Oct. 23 to request a mail-in ballot from the Tarrant County Elections Administrator. According to the resolution, early voting “by personal appearance” will be conducted at the Tarrant County Election Center, 2700 Premier St., Fort Worth, and Keller Town Hall, 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller. Voters can cast Election Day ballots at Keller Town Hall. Additional polling places will be added at a later date.

In a special meeting held

Aug. 3, the KISD board of trustees voted unanimously to delay the start of the school year, along with in- person instruction, until Aug. 26. The board also opted to create early release days on Aug. 26-28. “We need more time for our teachers and sta,” KISD Superintendent Rick Westfall said. “Academic development is being set aside in preparation for safety measures.” Westfall noted that Tarrant County Public Health orders delayed in- person instruction until Sept. 28, but the Texas Education Agency shifted its guidance so as not to support school closures. KISD teachers and sta returned Aug. 10, and a delayed start to in-person and virtual instruction will provide the district more time to gather relevant information, Westfall said. “We want in-person instruction … when we can keep ourselves, our families and our students safe,” said Keller ISD teacher Brian Ketcham. Fort Worth City Council Meets at 7 p.m. three times each month on Tuesdays. www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third MEETINGSWE COVER Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. www.roanoketexas.com Keller ISD Meets monthly; dates, times and locations may vary. www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets monthly at 6:30 p.m.; dates may vary. www.nisdtx.org Tuesday of each month. www.cityoeller.com Roanoke City Council

ROANOKE After weighing options for more than a month, city ocials on July 28 made the decision to cancel the city’s annual Celebrate Roanoke event. According to city ocials, there are concerns about COVID-19 case counts rising in Denton County as well as the potential monetary commitment for a large-scale event. Celebrate Roanoke, normally held in October, costs upward of $130,000 each year, City Manager Scott Campbell said. “After reviewing a few dierent scenarios for a virtual program, the direction was to cancel the event for October,” Campbell said. “Plans [are] to apply those expenses to bolster our live Christmas event the rst Saturday in December.” The city is expected to release details on the “new” Roanoke Christ- mas festival in the coming months,

city spokesperson Morgan Roundy said. The reallocation of funds from Celebrate Roanoke is expected to make the December Christmas event “bigger and better than ever,” she said. “We appreciate [the public’s] patience as we navigate through these dicult times,” she said. The cancellation of Celebrate Roa- noke follows cancellations of other large-scale events in the area, such as GrapeFest in Grapevine. The issue with large gatherings is whether o- cials can enforce “safe and eective social distancing,” Roundy said. “For the most part, major cities, such as Dallas and Fort Worth, have walked away from doing these major events,” Mayor Scooter Gierisch said. “I hated to cancel the Roa- noke Roundup and Fourth of July celebration.”

ON THE BALLOT The city of Keller will hold its election on Nov. 3. Here are the candidates:

FortWorth police chief set to retire

transforma- tive for our community.” During his tenure, Kraus helped to lay the groundwork for a “more accountable and transpar-

Mayor: Tag Green Mark Mathews Armin Mizani City Council Place 5: Stephen G. Humenesky Chris Whatley (I) Michael Mitchell City Council Place 6:

FORTWORTH The city announced July 27 that Police Chief Ed Kraus will retire at the end of the year. Kraus was appointed police chief in Decem- ber 2019. He is a 28-year veteran of the Fort Worth Police Department. “Fort Worth has been incredibly blessed to have Chief Kraus at the helm of our police department,” Mayor Betsy Price said in a city news release. “His servant’s heart has been what the City of Fort Worth needed during these unprecedented times, and his leadership has been

Ed Kraus

ent” department, Price said. The mayor also pointed to the chief’s work with the Oce of the Police Oversight Monitor, which was established in June, and his assis- tance in establishing a third-party panel for review.

Brian Campbell Ross McMullin Mujeeb Kazi David A. Tashman

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

GOVERNMENT Denton County allots CARES Act funding

FOLLOWING the funds

Allocation of Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act funds in Denton County has led to the creation of programs such as the Denton County Operational Plan for Economic Normalization, or OPEN, and the Denton County Coalition of Agencies to Restore Essential Services, or CARES.

$147M in CARES Act funds for Denton County

$45M reserved for or distributed to municipalities at a rate of $55 per capita, excluding residents in parts of Fort Worth and Dallas

Texas counties received a total of $3.2 billion in aid from the CARES Act.

Denton County is among the 12 counties and six cities in Texas with a population of 500,000 or more that were eligible to receive funds directly from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.

BY LIESBETH POWERS

Denton County is distributing $147 million in funding from the Coro- navirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act to those hit hardest by the coronavirus pandemic. The county focused these fed- eral funds in areas of high-need, including housing assistance, food programs, local businesses and nonprofits, according to Director of Community Relations Dawn Cobb. This funding must be spent by Dec. 31, she said. Many have been helped so far, Cobb said, but the demand for assistance remains high. “Here we are, four and a half months into [the pandemic],” Cobb said. “And it’s serious. And a lot of people have been affected.” When CARES Act funds were introduced in early May, between $30,000-$35,000 in assistance from the county was handed out each week, Cobb said. Denton County earmarked $20 million for one of its largest recog- nized needs: housing assistance. The county then tapped the United Way of Denton County to distribute funds. United Way used its own funds to assist with eviction prevention in March and April before shifting to distributing county funds, United Way CEO Gary Henderson said. This amount doubled in June and then increased to $159,000 for the

$40M

for the county’s ongoing expenses, personal protection equipment and public health

for local business grants, including $2.2M in existing business grant program funds $24M

The county has awarded $32 million in business grants during Phase 2, exceeding initial projections. It's unclear how the increase will affect funding for other eligible programs, officials said. More than 400 grants of up to $10,000 were awarded during the first phase of Denton County OPEN.

was earmarked for a housing assistance program. $20M

This began with $30,000-$35,000 in weekly assistance; it doubled in June and increased to $159,000 in late July.

$10M

Denton and Lewisville have seen a 40%-60% increase in food requests.

for food assistance programs

Denton County works with the North Texas Food Bank and the Tarrant Area Food Bank.

$6M in estimated expenditures to date on COVID-19

A few drive-thru food options may be added in West Denton County.

$2M to support local nonprofit efforts

Roughly $2 million has been awarded to 35 local nonprofits as of July 28.

SOURCE: DENTON COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

funds run low, the county can adjust its allocations. County officials do not anticipate running out of resources by year’s end, she said. As of Aug. 19, the county has allo- cated $35.1 million in funds for small business grants to more than 1,300 businesses through the second phase of Denton County’s Operational Plan for Economic Normalization. The amount exceeds the county’s initial projection and will impact

funding for other areas, Cobb said. Based on guidance from the governor’s office, Denton County also chose to distribute $45 million in CARES Act funding to its cities. Each city is allowed to use those funds for COVID-19-related expenses. At the end of May, new federal guidelines also allowed cities to use CARES Act funding on payroll for public safety and health employees as well, Joski said.

week of July 20, Henderson said. “We know the volume of need is going to only increase throughout the summer and into the fall,” he said. The county set aside $2 million for nonprofit efforts and charged United Way with helping to distribute those funds through an online portal called Denton County Cares. County Director of Administration Shannon Joski said officials are monitoring need so that if grant

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DATA&REFERENCE PPP loans allow local businesses to retain almost 20,000 jobs

BY IAN PRIBANIC

in response to its initial refusal to release detailed PPP loan data. At the federal level, the SBA has administered more than $518 billion in loans as of July 17. Texas busi- nesses have received $40.7 billion in PPP loans, second among U.S. states only to California, which received $67.5 billion. According to John Arensmeyer, CEO of the national small business advocacy group Small Business Majority, one of every four small businesses in its network reported receiving a lower amount than

data from the SBA. Three Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth-based businesses received PPP loans in the $5 million-$10 million range: 2020 Communications Inc., GDC Technics LLC and Recaro Aircraft Seating Americas LLC. An additional nine area businesses received PPP loans in the $2 mil- lion-$5 million range; however, the vast majority of loans—more than 68%—were in the $150,000-$350,000 range. Data was released July 6 by the SBA after the administration was sued by 11 media organizations, including The New York Times and Associated Press ,

an accurate representation of the program. “Serious questions remain about whether PPP funds were equitably distributed to minority-owned busi- nesses, and there is an alarming rate of small-dollar loans,” Arensmeyer said. Jack Flagler contributed to this report. Editor’s note: Community Impact Newspaper, headquartered in Pfluger- ville, and Community Impact Printing were recipients of Paycheck Protection Program funding.

In March, the U.S. Congress authorized a total of $659 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program—as part of the larger Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economics Security Act—to help combat the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and to assist businesses with job retention and other expenses. In the Keller-Roanoke-Northeast Fort Worth area, a total of 258 businesses have received more than $70 million in PPP loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration, ranging individually from $150,000 to more than $5 million, according to

requested; he said the data is a “far cry” from

7,404 total jobs retained

9,208 total jobs retained

1000

TOP 5 INDUSTRIES RECEIVING FEDERAL AID “Professional, scientific and technical services” was the top industry in terms of Paycheck Protection Program loans received in Keller, Roanoke and Northeast Fort Worth. Loans were distributed across more than 20 industries. Here are the top five in each of the three cities.

RATE OF RETENTION The PPP loan has requirements that employers retain employees. See a local breakdown to the right.

386 BUSINESSES ROANOKE:

2,893 total jobs retained

500

KELLER: 968 BUSINESSES

888 BUSINESSES NORTH FORT WORTH:

Number of loans received

L

0

Professional, scientific and technical services Health care and social assistance

75

COVERING AWIDE RANGE

R

143

The majority of businesses received loans in the amount of $50,000 or less, and loans in the $10,000-$25,000 range were most common among local businesses.

71

103

34

400

51

87

North Fort Worth

Accommodation and food services

Keller

Roanoke

300

92

36

39

Construction

100

200

37

Other services (except public administration)

93

133

100

122

0

Retail trade

$100K- $150K

$50K- $100K

$150K- $350K

$350K- $1M

$1M- $2M

$2M- $5M

$5M- $10M

$1K- $10K

$10K- $25K

$25K- $50K

Less than $1K

LOAN AMOUNTS

SOURCE: U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

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2020 Guide ducation HIGHER

Highlighting KELLER, ROANOKE, AND FORTWORTH Higher Education Guide 2020

COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC

CAMPUS CLOSEUP

Here are the demographics for student enrollment from three universities that saw high enrollment by Keller ISD and Northwest ISD graduates in 2018. White African American Hispanic Asian Other International

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE Northeast Campus (Hurst)

FALL 2019

Student enrollment

7.51% 0.71% 4.64% 29.67% 43.38% 14.08%

Here is a look at educational attainment among residents age 25 and older. EDUCATEDPOPULATIONS

11,800 Total enrolled

KELLER

Less than ninth grade Ninth-12th grade, no diploma High school graduate (includes equivalency) Some college, no degree Associate degree Bachelor’s degree Graduate or professional degree

18.5% 7.4% 37.1% 19.5% 13.4% 1.4% 2.7%

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE Northwest Campus (Fort Worth)

FALL 2019

Student enrollment

5.44% 0.52% 4.12% 40.24% 39.47% 10.21%

7,838 Total enrolled

ROANOKE

FORTWORTH

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

18.1% 7.0% 26.3% 11.1% 28.9%

21.2% 6.9% 19.1% 9.4% 25.1% 9.1% 9.2%

FALL 2019

Student enrollment

6.76% 6.81% 3.26% 24.91% 43.65% 14.62%

39,192 Total enrolled

2.9% 5.7%

SOURCE: 2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

114

EDUCATION

BYRON NELSON BLVD. Higher Education Guide 2020 35W

ROANOKE

INTERMODAL PKWY.

Keller ISD renews dual credit instruction options for students

OAK ST. ONE COURSE, TWICE THE CREDIT 170 Keller ISD's four high schools oer dual credit courses with Tarrant County College.

OTTINGER RD.

T PKW

PARK VISTA BLVD.

Keller High School

Central High School

Timber Creek High School

Fossil Ridge High School

KELLER HASLET RD.

BY IAN PRIBANIC

courses are expected to attend class on the scheduled days.” According to KISD ocials, demand for TCC dual credit courses remains high, especially for courses that are part of the core curriculum or technical pathways. The latest agreement between the district and TCC aords students additional opportunities to earn certications in three pathways: aviation technology, paralegal, and professional pilot. “Our dual programs are on track to do well this year,” said Jennifer Flem- ing, KISD director of postsecondary readiness. “We are unique in that we have many embedded professors on our campuses…with credentials to teach at the college level.” Additional courses oered under the district’s dual credit program include English, history and economics.

Keller ISD board of trustees renewed the district’s dual credit agreement with Tarrant County College in July in order to give KISD students a chance to earn both college and high school credit while still enrolled in high school. The agreement ensures that TCC and KISD will approve program requirements for students so that course credits count toward academic requirements for high school and count as credit hours for post-sec- ondary degrees or certicates. “A student may enroll in academic courses for college credit before they graduate from high school,” the district said in a statement. “Students may receive both high school and col- lege credit for successful completion of required courses oered through the district partnership university. Students enrolled in dual [credit]

TIMBERLAND BLVD.

PATE ORR RD.

E. BLUE MOUND RD.

FORT WORTH

Y.

NG LE B L

N

35W

HICKS RD.

HERITAGE TRACE PKWY.

KELLER

287

N. TARRANT PKWY.

HOWDUAL CREDIT COURSES CAN

THOMPSON RD.

N

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. BENEFIT STUDENTS: • Expand academic options for college-bound students

WHAT DUAL CREDIT COURSES ARE AVAILABLE AT TCC?

• Provide college credit • Reduce cost of college tuition

WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

• English III • English IV • U.S. History • U.S. Government • Economics

• Aviation

Technology • Professional Pilot • Paralegal

SOURCES: KELLER ISD, TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION

Higher Education Guide 2020

Health Science Center at Fort Worth helps local community

Sta and students from the UNT Health Science Center at Fort Worth have supported the local community throughout the coronavirus pandemic. A N SWE R I N G T H E C A L L

SOURCES: UNT HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER, CITY OF FORT WORTH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

500 viral transport vials donated 3,000+ free COVID-19 tests administered 7,350 face masks donated to the city

BY IAN PRIBANIC

public resources began to dwindle, Price said. “Virus transmission grew sub- stantially over a short period of time outpacing available public health resources,” Price said. “Faculty and students rose to the occasion by quickly assisting in the development and implementation of a robust com- munity testing program.” “We’ve had great support from members of the re and police depart- ments,” HSC President Dr. Michael Williams said. The testing sites have provided real- world experience and opportunities that would not have been available in the classroom, added Chris Aden, a fourth-year student at the Health Sci- ence Center. Many students were in the midst of clinical rotations at local hospitals when they were informed that those rotations would be put on hold due to the pandemic, he said. “When the call came and the oppor- tunity was given to us to ll a need in this community, we jumped at it,” Aden said. “We needed [that opportu- nity] as much as the city needed us.” Students were involved in the test- ing site process from beginning to end, he said. “It was an opportunity to learn things that we aren’t able to learn in a textbook or the classroom,” Aden said. “We’re grateful for the opportu- nity and humbled the city would ask for our help. Our university stands ready to help in the future.” A number of professors at the HSC

Since the start of the COVID-19 pan- demic, students and faculty at the University of North Texas Health Sci- ence Center in downtown Fort Worth have continued to oer support for the city of Fort Worth and Tarrant County in a number of ways. Most notably, an all-volunteer force from the Health Science Center set up and operated multiple coronavirus testing sites for city and county per- sonnel, including the rst one in the city of Fort Worth in March. In addition, students and faculty have dedicated thousands of volun- teer hours toward community treat- ment and research, and the school has donated thousands of personal protective items in order to combat the spread of the novel coronavirus, Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price said. The mayor proclaimed Aug. 4 as University of North Texas Health Sci- ence Center at Fort Worth Apprecia- tion Day. “The rst testing site we set up to test police, re and health care work- ers came fromour partners at the UNT Health Science Center,” Price said. “The city and residents are grateful for [their] eorts.” The Health Science Center is made up of six schools that serve graduate stu- dents specializing in patient-centered education, research and health care. As the number of conrmed cases of COVID-19 began to grow in Tar- rant County—from just a few cases in mid-March to more than 1,000 cases by mid-April—the number of available

5 , 480

volunteer hours provided by sta and students

Courtesy UNT Health Science Center

When the call came and the opportunity was given to

us to fill a need in this community, we jumped at it.

CHRIS ADEN, SENIOR, UNT HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER

Fort Worth City Council proclaimed Aug. 4 as UNT Health Science Center at Fort Worth Appreciation Day. (Courtesy University of North Texas)

have focused their research eorts on the eect of COVID-19 on specic populations, such as adolescents and those with preexisting health conditions. Studies have also compared the eects of COVID-19 with similar dis- eases like tuberculosis. In addition, Associate Professor of Biostatics and Epidemiology Rajesh

R. Nandy is using data analytics and research to study the overall impact of COVID-19. “Even though the total number of statewide daily new cases [has] sta- bilized or may be showing signs of decline, there are counties where we still observe growth in the average number of daily, new reported cases,” Nandy’s report said.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2020

CONTINUED FROM 1

PREPARING FOR FALL

COLLEGE BOUND

THINGS TO KNOW FOR STAYING SAFE ON CAMPUS TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE

Tarrant County College and the University of North Texas had the greatest number of Keller ISD and Northwest ISD graduates who stayed in Texas and chose to attend their schools in the fall in 2018, the latest data available showed.

• Students and sta are expected to observe social distancing practices that are outlined on facility signs. • Administrative oces, including admissions and nancial aid, have been temporarily relocated to one central location at each campus to allow more space for social distancing.

• Masks are required. • Visitors, faculty and students on university property must adhere to cleaning, disinfection and hygiene etiquette as laid out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

TCC Northeast campus

University of North Texas

TCC Northwest campus

HERITAGE PKWY.

100 150 200 250 300 350

317

35W

1

2

WESTPORT PKWY.

N

158 149

1. TCC AVIATION CENTER

2. TCC CORPORATE TRAINING CENTER The corporate training center provides customized workforce training for Tarrant County businesses and helps local entrepreneurs start, build and grow businesses.

112

69 65

0 50

The Erma C. Johnson Hadley Center of Excellence for Aviation, Transportation and Logistics oers two- year associate degrees and certicate programs for professional pilots and aviation maintenance.

KELLER ISD NORTHWEST ISD

For more information, contact the TCC information center at 817-515-8223 or email asktcc@tccd.edu.

SOURCES: TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD, TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Airport. “Students are geared toward their goal and want to be as ecient as possible in their time with us. That’s something that’s been really wonderful to see.” With a wide range of students, from working professionals to recent high school graduates, the aviation school, like many North Texas colleges, tran- sitioned the majority of its lecture classes online in the spring. The school has also had to adhere to additional regulations put in place by the Federal Aviation Administra- tion, Razo said. “We’ve had to not only work in our college parameters but alsowith those federal agencies. We actually shut the program down in the spring,” Razo

in the fall. Similarly, one in every six col- lege-bound seniors out of roughly 500 surveyed in a national poll taken by Art & Science Group LLC said they were considering not attending a four- year college or university as a full- time student. “In times of disruption, we see a lot of impact, particularly to our com- munity colleges, in terms of the ini- tial decline in enrollment,” said Ray Martinez, deputy commissioner for academic aairs and workforce edu- cation with the Texas Higher Educa- tion Coordinating Board. One consideration for many stu- dents is that colleges have shifted a number of classes to an online format.

said. “But you can’t learn to y an airplane unless you’re in an airplane, and you can’t learn to x one unless you’re around those components.” Students were able to complete ground courses, or lecture courses, during the spring closure, and student pilots were back in the sky as of June 1, she said. The college has also worked with students and realigned degree path- ways to help as many students as pos- sible graduate on time, Razo said. Fall enrollment A study by SimpsonScarborough of roughly 1,000 students in the U.S. pre- dicted a 10% decline in rst-time, full- time students at four-year institutions

“It’s too early to know how keeping most of our programs, except a hand- ful of technical programs, online will impact fall enrollment, if at all,” TCC Executive Director of Communica- tions Suzanne Groves said. That online shift has also created new perceptions for students about their post-COVID-19 learning environ- ment, according to Christopher Long, assistant professor of K-12 science education at UNT. Long surveyed 230 students from the UNT education department during the spring semester. “Students felt, before the break, like they were part of the class,” he said. “After the break, they kind of lost that feeling.”

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