Cy-Fair Edition | June 2021

CYFAIR EDITION

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 10  JUNE 330, 2021

ONLINE AT

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Beverly Thomas has lived in Riata Ranch for 16 years and said while she never quite knows what to expect from her property appraisal from year to year, she does know it will always increase. Her Cypress home’s valuation has risen nearly 28% since 2017. “The problem is that the appraisal district has an open domain to raise your appraisal every year, and every year they raise it to the max that they’re allowed by law—no matter what the marketplace says,” she said. “An issue for me is I’m retired and live on Social Security. My house was paid for, but every year they raise the value of my house so much that … it’s almost like you could be taxed out of your house that you paid for.” CONTINUED ON 34 BY MATT DULIN, DANICA LLOYD & HUNTER MARROW Harris County home appraisals draw record-high protests

DEMAND OUTPACES SUPPLY The supply of full-time registered nurses is projected to grow by 27.7% between 2018-32, but the demand is set to rise 46.8%.

Cy-Fair hospitals, educatorsattempt to keep upwith nursing shortage

SUPPLY ANDDEMANDOF GULF COAST REGISTEREDNURSES

Projected demand

Projected supply

Percentage of demand unmet

21.9%

19.9%

0 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 100,000

18%

16.2%

BY DANICA LLOYD

14.6%

12.9%

Hospitals in the Houston area and across the country reported higher rates of turnover and sta burnout as nurses faced heavier workloads and treated critically ill COVID-19 patients, according to a study from the U.S. Oce of Inspector General. At the same time, local educa- tors training the next generation of nurses said programming was temporarily paused, already-lim- ited capacities in clinical programs became even more restrictive and graduations were delayed. But hospitals across the state have faced nursing shortages since long before the pandemic. The Texas Department of State CONTINUED ON 28

11.4%

10.2%

More than 63,000 homeowners in unincorporated Harris County protested their property appraisals in 2019. Curbed taxes

2020 2022 2024 2026 2028 2030 2032

2018

UNMET DEMAND FOR RNS

1

1 Panhandle: 0% 2 North Texas: 14.7% 3 East Texas: 17.9% 4 Central Texas: 19.8%

5 Gulf Coast: 21.9% 6 South Texas: 6.7% 7 Rio Grande Valley: 27.2% 8 West Texas: 4.2%

2

3

Unincorporated Harris County

4

8

of homeowners protested for a 1.71% median reduction in property value

21%

5

6

7

Jersey Village

of homeowners protested for a 4.2% median reduction in property value

36%

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCE: JANUARY ADVISORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HEALTHCARE EDITION 2021 SPONSORED BY • America’s ER • Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital • Lone Star College

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JUNE 2021

Communities built around you.

Spring Cypress & Grant Rd.

Barker Cypress & Tuckerton Rd.

99 & Telge Rd.

Other Caldwell Communities:

Though unique in their own way, all of our communities have one thing in common; an extraordinary sense of true togetherness. Find the life you’ve always wanted in a Caldwell Community.

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We’re dedicated to bringing out in every student.

Everybody has one. A gift. An aptitude. A calling. At Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District, we consider it our greatest responsibility to allow your child or teen to discover where they excel, and then help them build a firm foundation for success. While their individual gifts may vary, our commitment to them doesn’t. We provide a rich curriculum that allows children and teens to learn, excel, succeed and lead, ultimately preparing them to enter the workforce or college.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMEMILY: Every June, we are proud to deliver our annual Health Care Edition right to your mailbox. In this issue we take an extensive look at our area’s medical trends, current statistics and local hospital listings. Our health care services are expanding to accommodate population growth as Houston Methodist recently acquired 106 acres along Hwy. 290 near Skinner Road and will soon be adding its ninth hospital to the Cy-Fair community. Emily Heineman, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMDANICA: Life in Cy-Fair looks more like it did prepandemic every month, and the light at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel is denitely in sight. We would not be where we are today without local health care workers, who have been stretched beyond typical workloads for more than a year. Our front-page story this month explains how hospitals and educators are working to mitigate nursing shortages and meet the region’s needs. Flip to Page 28 to learn more. Danica Lloyd, EDITOR

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BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

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Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/newsletter DAILY INBOX CORRECTION: Vol. 12, Issue 9 On Page 28, a project to widen Cypress North Houston Road between Jones and Perry roads will be sent out for bids in the third quarter. A timeline has not been set for the extension of Cypress North Houston to FM 1960. Project cost is to be determined.

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CYFAIR EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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EJ’s Pizzeria

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COURTESY EJ’S PIZZERIA

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enchiladas and tamales. Breakfast is available on weekends. The fami- ly-owned business is also known for its homemade tortillas and a full bar menu. The original location continues to oper- ate at 11500 Louetta Road, Ste. 1800, Cypress. Catering and online ordering services are available. 832-334-5483. www.juanitasrestaurant.com 5 Poke Yana opened in early April at 17400 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. 130, Cypress. The eatery offers a selection of customizable poke bowls, salads and burritos. Diners can choose their own protein, vegetable mix-ins, sauces and toppings. Protein options include ahi tuna, tofu, barbecue eel, spicy salmon, steak, grilled chicken and shrimp. Other ingredients, such as cucumber, mango, avocado, red onion, kale, spicy mayo, honey teriyaki sauce, wasabi, seaweed salad, pickled ginger and wonton crisps can be added to dishes. 832-653-6389. www.pokeyanacypress.com 6 A new Mexican eatery opened April 20 at 10750 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. 101, Cypress. Tacarbon Authentic Mexican Grill offers breakfast, lunch and dinner and serves tacos, burritos, tortas and quesadillas. Weekend specialties include pozole, menudo and barbacoa tacos, among other dishes. The restau- rant features party packs to feed large groups as well as handmade flour and corn tortillas. 281-758-5184 7 The Church of Jesus Christ of Lat- ter-day Saints opened a new location of Deseret Industries thrift store and do- nation center April 15 at 8625 FM 1960, Houston, near Hwy. 249 where Sports Authority was formerly located. The store carries a variety of products for

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 The second location of family-owned butcher shop Stone Cold Meats opened to the public April 30 at 13125 Grant Road, Ste. 1800, Cypress. Founded by Ami and Sean Stone, the business specializes in all proteins—in- cluding brisket, pork belly, filet mignon, fajita chicken, stuffed whole chickens, applewood smoked bacon and pork ribs. The Cypress store will also feature a full-service deli, according to officials. The original shop is located on Main Street in League City. 281-456-3200. www.stonecoldmeats.com

2 Officials with EJ’s Pizzeria launched a ghost kitchen concept out of Creekwood Grill, 12710 Telge Road, Cypress, in mid- May. Ghost kitchens exclusively offer delivery service rather than a dine-in experience. EJ’s Neighborhood Pizzeria and Italian Eatery was originally located at 12312 Barker Cypress Road, Cypress. Initially the eatery will deliver pizzas for dinner Thursdays through Sundays. www.facebook.com/ejspizzeriatexas 3 The Market , a home decor, gift and DIY shop based in Tomball, opened a second location in mid-April at 16326 Mueschke Road, Ste. E4, Cypress.

This location offers DIY supplies, project workshops, and a selection of gifts and home decor items. Customers can find products from brands including Annie Sloan and Iron Orchid Designs, among others. The shop is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 281-650-4099. www.themarkethomedecor.com 4 Juanita’s Mexican Kitchen opened a second location May 3. Located at 29110 Hwy. 290, Ste. 500, Cypress, the eatery offers an extensive selection of Tex-Mex favorites, including nachos, tortilla soup, quesadillas, fajitas, tacos,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

3

12

The Market

Lambeau’s Sports Bar & Grill

COURTESY THE MARKET

COURTESY LAMBEAU’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

the home and family. Deseret Industries provides job training and career help for local community members through career and technical education and business partnerships. Employment resources, services and development counseling services are available on-site. 346-214-7453. www.deseretindustries.org 8 Nurse practitioners Schwanna Fortenberry and Regine Patillo opened Ultimate Drip Therapy and Wellness on May 5 at 9945 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. 200, No. 26, Cypress. The IV hy- dration therapy and vitamin injection wellness spa offers services designed to increase energy, boost immune systems, improve endurance and performance for athletes, enhance weight loss and improve chronic disease symptoms. 346-299-1512. www.ultimatedriptherapy.com 9 Sulcata Psychiatry opened June 1 in The Work Lodge at 118 Vintage Park Blvd., Ste. W609, Houston. Sulcata Psychiatry offers a variety of services including psychiatric evaluation, diag- nosis and treatment planning; follow-up treatment and medication management; cognitive testing; genetic pharmacology testing; and medical laboratory testing. 281-747-8588. www.sulcatapsychiatry.com 10 Beauty Marx held a grand open- ing May 17 at 17440 FM 529, Ste. 115, Houston. The studio offers lash ex- tensions, full-body waxing and brow tinting. 281-861-4804. www.facebook.com/beautymarxstudios 11 Michelle Esposito opened her facial studio May 1 at the Guest House Salon Suites, 15103 Mason Road, Bldg. D-1, Ste. 204, Cypress. My Skin by Michelle offers customized facials including

green peel treatment, which is an herbal treatment that works like a traditional chemical peel without downtime. Esposito said she has more than 20 years of experience as an esthetician. 713-904-1068. www.myskinbymichelle.com COMING SOON 12 Two local couples plan to open a sports bar in mid-July at the former location of Masones Pub & Grill at 13131 Louetta Road, Cypress. Masones relocated to Northpointe Bouelvard in Tomball in April. The name of the new eatery, Lambeau’s Sports Bar &Grill , was inspired by the names of those involved in the partnership: Jess and Shannon Bon- neau, along with Travis and Lucy Lamber- ton, the owners of LT’s Sports Bar & Grill on Barker Cypress Road. The owners said they want to create a new local hangout spot, and the menu will highlight quality sports bar fare with fresh ingredients. www.facebook.com/lambeaus 13 Rita’s Cantina Mexican Kitchen is expanding with a second location this summer at 14960 Hwy. 290, Houston. The original location in Pinehurst serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. Menu items include fajitas, seafood, enchiladas, quesadillas, tacos and other Tex-Mex favorites. The bar serves margaritas, cocktails, wine and beer. 346-570-4983. www.ritascantinamxkitchen.com RELOCATIONS 14 Danny Enneking relocated his busi- ness Houston Scanning from the Wil- lowbrook area to 12837 Louetta Road,

Cafe ZunZun opened Memorial Day weekend on Telge Road in Cypress.

DANICA LLOYD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Joel Castellanos and Pascale Petronin celebrated the grand opening of Cafe ZunZun at 12716 Telge Road, Cypress, on May 27, including a ribbon-cutting with the Cy-Fair Houston Chamber of Commerce. Castellanos and Petronin founded the business in 2014 and sold organic coees and teas at farmers markets and online before opening the brick-and-mortar location. The European-style coee shop and roastery was constructed with sustainable materials. Ocials said the ZunZun bird Cypress, on May 1. The business digitizes video tapes, printed photographs, 35 mm slides, photo albums, prints of all sizes, audio tapes, LPs and film reels in all sizes. In addition to putting content from these formats onto flash drives, external hard drives or cloud-based services such as Dropbox or iCloud, Enneking said he also provides photo restoration, slide- shows, rush services and valet services. 832-461-1182. www.houstonscanning.com 15 Officials estimate The Texas BBQ Lab will be opening a new location at 13251 Jones Road, Houston, the second weekend in June. The Jones Road loca- tion is approximately 2 miles from the original location on Grant Road, which will close once the new location opens. The Texas BBQ Lab is inspired by eastern North Carolina-style cooking, where

is the world’s smallest hummingbird and is known to pollinate coee plants in the Castellanos’ home country of Cuba. 281-914-4906. www.cafezunzun.com

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whole-hog barbecue will be the main staple. The restaurant offers an assort- ment of brisket, chicken and ribs as well as catering options. 713-253-9979. www.thetexasbbqlab.com ANNIVERSARIES 16 The Backyard Grill is celebrat- ing 20 years of business this June at 9453 Jones Road, Houston. Mark McShaffry owns the local eatery, which offers lunch, dinner and weekend brunch. Menu items include burgers, chips and queso, wings, sandwiches, chicken fried steak, tacos, fajitas, steak, quesadillas and seafood. The restaurant also has a full bar, including an extensive craft beer list. Catering is also available. 281-897-9200. www.thebackyardgrill.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

June events

Playhouse 1960 is hosting several two-week summer camp productions in June. At the end of each camp session, there will be two public performances. Production options include “The Wizard of Oz” and “Camp Rock: The Musical” from June 7-18, and “Frozen Jr.: The Musical” and “Into the Woods Jr.” from June 21-July 2. Times vary. $275 per camper with $50 nonrefundable deposit. 6814 Gant Road, Houston. 281-587-8243. www.playhouse1960.com/summer- camps (Courtesy Playhouse 1960) Juneteenth, the day Texans learned President Abraham Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation to free all slaves, will be celebrated in Hermann Park at Miller Outdoor Theatre in Houston. The event featuring Grammy Award-winning blues musician Bobby Rush aims to raise awareness of African American heritage and will be livestreamed online. 8-10:15 p.m. Free. 6000 Hermann Park Drive, Houston. 832-487-7102. www.milleroutdoortheatre.com (Courtesy Miller Outdoor Theatre) 14 THROUGH JULY 23 ATTEND SUMMER CAMP Cy-Fair ISD hosts four weeks of Camp Captivate, featuring specialty camps for students in grades K-8. Camp topics include technology, arts and crafts, STEAM, foreign language, cooking and sports. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $150 per week. Smith Middle School, 10300 Warner Smith Blvd., Cypress. 281-807-8900. www.csd.net/summercamps 23 DONATE BLOOD The Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center will host a blood drive and an opportunity to get tested for COVID-19 antibodies. Appointment slots can be claimed online ahead of time. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Berry Center, 8877 Barker Cypress Road, Cypress. 281-467-2882. www.commitforlife.org 24 CARE FOR YOUR BRAIN Avanti Senior Living at Towne Lake, as part of its lunch and learn community education series, will host a seminar on dementia and caring for the brain. Noon-1 p.m. Free. Avanti Senior Living at Towne Lake, 17808 Lakecrest View Drive. http://townelake.avanti-sl.com 25 THROUGH 27 TUNE INTO THE HOUSTON FIBER FEST The annual festival typically held at the Berry Center is going virtual for the second consecutive year, featuring online classes, a virtual vendor hall and door prizes. The organization is known for promoting ber arts in the Greater Houston area, including knitting, crochet, spinning and weaving. Free. www.houstonberfest.com

our business is covid born and thanks to you, our amazing community, we have been able to not only provide for our family, but offer opportunities of employment to many others. what started with just a husband and wife, has grown into a team of over 15 team members, an office right here in cypress and over 500 amazing clients. we handle projects of all scopes and sizes. from small tasks like installing fans or chandeliers in your beloved home, to powering stadiums with led lighting and back-up generation. there is no project too large or small for us. we want to be who you call for all your electrical and lighting needs. we just want to be your favorite electricians

JUNE 0718, 21JULY 02

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JUNE 19

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JUNE 04 THROUGH06, 1112 GO SEE A PLAY

Playhouse 1960’s main stage production of “Gypsy” is loosely based on the 1957 memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee, focusing on her mother, Rose. The show contains some mature subject matter. Playhouse 1960 requires ticket purchasers to wear a mask, and the theater will limit capacity to 50%. 8 p.m. (June 4-5, 11-12), 3 p.m. (June 6). $18-$21. Playhouse 1960, 6814 Gant Road, Houston. 281-587-8243. www.playhouse1960.com 10 PLAY BINGO Great Heights Brewery hosts bingo as part of Brew:30 Taphouse’s lineup of community events. The local craft beer destination has a patio area as well as an indoor taproom with 30 rotating taps. The Backyard Grill on Wheels food truck will be on-site serving up burgers, tacos, sandwiches and more. 6:30-9 p.m. Free (admission). Brew:30 Taphouse, 15914 Telge Road, Cypress. 281-516-9315. www.brew30taphouse.com 11 GRAB SOME FRIDAYNIGHTBITES The Bridgeland community in Cypress hosts Friday Night Bites, a family- friendly event featuring an extensive selection of food trucks. Attendees are encouraged to bring blankets or lawn chairs and enjoy dinner, dessert and entertainment. 6-10 p.m. Free (admission). Lakeland Village Center, 10519 Fry Road, Cypress. 281-304-5588. www.bridgeland.com

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CYFAIR EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Barker Cypress Road intersection improvement

NORTHPOINTE BLVD.

GREGSON RD.

Harris County Precinct 3 is completing signal work, medians and permanent striping on an additional southbound left turn lane on Barker Cypress Road at the Queenston Boulevard intersection. Timeline: anticipated completion in July Cost: $815,748 Funding source: Harris County Precinct 3 2 West Road widening Ocials are constructing two lanes to complete a four-lane concrete boule- vard from Woodson Terrace Drive to Greenhouse Road, including intersection reconstructions and tie-ins to the new main lanes. Timeline: anticipated completion in August Cost: $1.87 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 3 3 Gessner Road extension Burnside Services Inc. has been issued a notice to proceed with construction eorts June 7 on an extension of Gessner Road from West Road to Fallbrook Drive as a four-lane concrete boulevard with drainage accommodations. Harris County Commissioners Court awarded the bid in late January. Timeline: construction to begin in early June Cost: $10.3 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4 4 Louetta Road extension Harris County Precincts 3 and 4 are work- ing on a joint project to extend Louetta Road from Stablewood Farms Drive to Telge Road as a four-lane concrete boule- vard with twin bridges over Cypress Creek. Timeline: anticipated completion in March 2022 Cost: $8.8 million Funding sources: Harris County Precinct 3 (west of creek), Harris County Precinct 4 (east of creek)

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UPCOMING PROJECTS 5 Cypress North Houston Road improvements Harris County Precinct 4 plans to widen Cypress North Houston Road from Jones Road to Perry Road and later extend Cypress North Houston from Perry Road to FM 1960. The scope includes improved drainage accommodations and trac signal installations at Misty Moss Drive, Autumn Mills Drive and FM 1960. Timeline: Phase 1 is set for bid solicitation in the third quarter of 2021; Phase 2 is con- tingent upon future project development Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4

6 North Eldridge Parkway widening Proposed improvements include widen- ing North Eldridge Parkway from Spring Cypress Road to Westlock Drive to a four- lane concrete boulevard section with trac signalization at Westlock Drive and Gregson Road. The project is in the design phase. Timeline: bid solicitation planned for third quarter of 2021 Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4 7 FM 1960 improvements The FM 1960 improvement project between Centereld Drive and Cutten Road in the Willowbrook area was delayed a third time. It includes adding left turn

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 18. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CYFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. project was set to bid in January 2018, then set to bid in June 2021, and now util- ity conicts delayed the bidding date to December. Construction will begin in early 2022 and take 28 months to complete. Timeline: rst quarter 2022-second quarter 2024 Cost: $18.8 million Funding sources: federal, state lanes at cross streets, lengthening all turning lanes, and adding a thru lane east- and westbound from the Willowbook Mall center entrance to Cutten Road. The

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CYFAIR EDITION • JUNE 2021

CITY& COUNTY JerseyVillage elects Bobby Warren formayor

“DEMOCRACY IS NOT A SPECTATOR SPORT. IT IS A PARTICIPANT SPORT, AND WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO PARTICIPATE TO THE

GIVE US ONE HOUR to impact your child's future

BY EMILY JAROSZEWSKI

JERSEY VILLAGE Jersey Village residents elected Bobby Warren as mayor with 74% of voters’ support in the May 1 election. The former oil and gas compliance manager and council member has served on the City Council since 2017. Warren said he welcomes feedback from Jersey Village citizens. “Democracy is not a spectator sport,” Warren said at the May 10 coun- cil meeting. “It is a participant sport, and we encourage you to participate to the fullest extent.” In addition to Warren’s victory, Sheri Sheppard, who previously served on the council from 2012-18, and Michelle Mitcham, a local small-business owner and wife of outgoing Mayor Andrew Mitcham, each won their respective City Council races May 1. Warren encouraged council

FULLEST EXTENT. BOBBY WARREN, JERSEY VILLAGE MAYOR

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members and residents to engage in dialogue so community concerns can be addressed. “I urge everyone on council to make a commitment ... really engage with

people,” he said. “If you get emails or you get phone calls, whatever the case may be, I denitely encourage you to take that chance to engage with citizens and to answer their questions and to learn more about their position just as much as they’re trying to learn more about what’s going on with their City Council.” $750Mrequested for county oodmitigation

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left out because the formula used by the Texas GLO to determine which grant applications would be awarded funding, was discriminatory against large, urban areas. At the Harris County Commission- ers Court meeting May 25, more than 50 residents voiced their opposition to the Texas GLO’s decision for nearly six hours; the court subsequently passed a slate of measures, likewise opposing the decision. The following day, Bush announced his request for a direct allocation to Harris County. “I have heard the overwhelming concerns of Harris County regarding the mitigation funding competition,” Bush said in a statement. “The federal government’s red tape requirements and complex regulations are a hall- mark of President Biden’s administra- tion. I am no stranger to standing with the people of Texas as we ght against the federal government. As such, I have directed the GLO to work around the federal government’s regulations and allocate $750 million for mitiga- tion eorts in Harris County.”

HARRIS COUNTY Texas General Land Oce Commissioner George P. Bush requested May 26 a $750 million direct allocation to Harris County for ood mitigation eorts from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, according to a news release. The request comes less than a week after the Texas GLO informed Harris County and city of Houston leaders that neither entity had been awarded any Hurricane Harvey ood mitigation funds. The Harris County Flood Control District submitted $915 million in grant applications last October anticipating federal funds earmarked in 2018 for ood mitigation eorts following Hurricane Harvey in 2017. However, Harris County and city of Houston ocials learned May 21 that neither entity would be receiving any money from the rst round of funding allocated by the Texas GLO. Harris County ocials said they believed the entities were

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

News from Jersey Village & Harris County

QUOTEOFNOTE “ ASWEMOVE FORWARD, PARTICULARLYWITH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND TRYING TOREALLY MARKET THE CITY, THAT’S GOING TOBEMY FOCUS IS TO TRY TOGET OUT THERE AND BE ANAMBASSADOR FOR THE CITYAND TOPUT THE BEST FACE FORWARD THATWE CAN TOATTRACT BUSINESSES THAT FIT THE CHARACTER AND THE NEEDS ANDWANTS OF OUR COMMUNITY.” BOBBY WARREN, NEWLY ELECTED MAYOR OF JERSEY VILLAGE OTHERHIGHLIGHTS HARRIS COUNTY The Cy-Fair Fire Department is the rst re department in Texas to be recognized as a Comprehensive Clinical Management Program by the Texas Department of State Health Services. The CCMP is a comprehensive evaluation of a department’s onboarding, training and clinical management processes, ocials said. The designation, which is valid for the next four years, certies the Cy-Fair Fire Department exceeds state standards for clinical and education management. HARRIS COUNTY Harris County Precinct 3 ocials held a grand opening May 27 for the new community center on Clay Road, which is named after the precinct’s former commissioner. The Steve Radack Community Center replaced Bear Creek Community Center, which was damaged beyond repair in Hurricane Harvey. The facility features a 4,000-square- foot community hall and a lounge area to accommodate exercise classes, games, seminars, lectures and community meetings. HARRIS COUNTY President Joe Biden announced in late April his intent to nominate Harris County Sheri Ed Gonzalez as the new director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Gonzalez was rst elected Harris County sheri in 2016. Jersey Village City Council Will meet at 7 p.m. June 21 at Jersey Village City Hall, 16327 Lakeview Drive, Jersey Village 713-466-2100 www.jerseyvillagetx.com Harris County Commissioners Court Will meet virtually at 10 a.m. June 8 713-755-4000 www.harriscountytx.gov MEETINGSWE COVER

JerseyVillage postpones commitment to newCityHall construction contract

BY DANICA LLOYD

building and an oce building should break ground this summer. Construc- tion of City Hall would commence later this summer, Brookstone Vice President Ryan Busking said. Jersey Village purchased 23.3 acres of land in August 2018 using $5.25 mil- lion in city reserves with the intention of selling the land to the developer. Collaborate founding principal Saul Valentin said he anticipates closing on land sales in the coming weeks. Council Member James Singleton said he would not vote on the City Hall contract until the city receives some of that money from land sales. “I have every intent to build City Hall right here. ... I’m just not willing to be rst, and I would like somebody else taking this ride with me,” he said. While council members were adamant against proceeding until

JERSEYVILLAGE Jersey Village City Council decided to take no action May 10 on an agenda item that would have the city manager enter a construction agreement for the new City Hall planned at Hwy. 290 and Jones Road. Council members agreed it would be best to wait to enter the agreement with contractors at Brookstone until other businesses have committed to building in Village Center, the 43-acre mixed-use project. The develop- ment is expected to feature retail, restaurants, oce space, a hotel, an apartment complex, green space and the new City Hall, which council members said they did not to be the rst building constructed there Ocials with Collaborate, the devel- opment company behind the Village Center project, have said a wellness

Jersey Village City Hall is located on LakeviewDrive. DANICA LLOYDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City Hall proposed location

290

N

ESDNo. 11 executive director previews MobileHealth Services other businesses move forward, the increasing cost of building materials is driving up construction costs. Accord- ing to city documents, Jersey Village budgeted $8 million for the project, and the guaranteed maximum price is now just over $10 million.

Harris County lowers COVID19 threat level

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

HARRIS COUNTYCOVID19LEVEL The system indicates the extent of coronavirus spread risks. Current level laws, rules and regulations, includ- ing local business and workplace guidelines. of stalling or moving backwards remains very real.” Under the new threat level, unvaccinated individuals should continue to wear face coverings or masks and practice social distanc- ing, the release states. However, those who are fully vaccinated may resume activities without wearing a mask or physically distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal or territorial

HARRIS COUNTY Ahead of Memorial Day weekend, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo announced the county’s COVID-19 threat level would be lowered from “signicant” to “moderate”—the system’s second-lowest threat level. This is the county’s lowest coronavirus threat level since the indicator was implemented nearly a year ago. As previously reported by Com- munity Impact Newspaper , Hidalgo lowered its coronavirus threat level May 18 for the rst time since last June from “severe” to “signicant.” According to a May 28 press release, the new threat level signies a moderate, but controlled, level of COVID-19 in Harris County, meaning there has been a further demon- strated reduction in transmission of the virus, and the local health care system is within capacity. “This is an important and encouraging, but still fragile, mile- stone in our ght against COVID- 19,” Hidalgo said in a statement. “Our community is doing what it needs to do to move the needle in the right direction, but the threat

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

HARRIS COUNTY Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11’s new ambulance service, Mobile Health Services, is set to debut Sept. 4 when the district’s contract ends with current service provider, Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services, according to Doug Hooten, executive director of ESD No. 11. The district broke ground on its new 43-acre campus May 7 on Stueb- ner Airline Road in Spring. Hooten said the rst phase of construction is expected to wrap up by Aug. 16. In addition to the new campus, ESD No. 11 will also purchase 40 new ambulances, which are expected to be on-site by Sept. 1. Hooten said ESD No. 11 Mobile Health Services will have 28 ambulances staed and deployed during peak times and 18 ambulances staed and deployed during slower times of the day. Ten of those ambulances will be perma- nently housed at local re stations throughout the district’s 177-square- mile service area, he added.

SEVERE Stay home stay safe SIGNIFICANT Minimize all contacts MODERATE Stay vigilant MINIMAL Resume normal contacts

1 2 3 4

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CYFAIR EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Cy-Fair ISD & Lone Star College-CyFair

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

Cy-Fair ISDanticipates $41.3million shortfall in 2021-22 before raises Officials in Cy-Fair ISD are bracing for a $41.3 million budget shortfall in 2021-22. On top of this deficit, a 1% salary increase for all employees would cost the district another $8.2 million, CFISD Chief Financial Officer Karen Smith said at a May 10 board of trustees meeting. CFISD anticipates more than $1 billion in expenses in the upcoming fiscal year and $992.7 million in reve- nue—56.8% of which would come from local property taxes while 41.4%would come from the state. The board is set to approve next year’s budget, including potential employee pay raises, June 24. They adopted a $39.8 million deficit budget in 2020-21, and Smith said by the end of April, the district had incurred more than $119 million in pandemic-related expenses. Outcomes of the 87th legislative session and the availability of federal funding intended for pandemic recovery could reduce the shortfall depending on how

85 Cypress Lakes HighSchool students graduatewith associate degrees As hundreds of Cypress Lakes High School students walked across the Cy-Fair FCU Stadium stage May 29 to receive their high school diplomas, 85 of them also earned a two-year associate degree from Lone Star College-CyFair. These students are from the inaugural cohort of College Academy, a dual-credit partnership between Cy-Fair ISD and the local community college campus that launched in fall 2017. They were also included in Lone Star College-CyFair’s virtual graduation ceremony May 14, which celebrated 2,690 graduates, of which 1,941 earned associate degrees, according to a press release. Since its launch, CFISD’s College Academy has expanded to all 12 high schools districtwide. Those who complete the program are able to enter the workforce with their two-year college degree or transfer to a four-year university as a junior.

AN UN BALANCED BUDGET After a year packed with unplanned expenses due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Cy-Fair ISD is expecting another significant budget shortfall in 2021-22.

REVENUE  EXPENSES 

$992.7M

SHORTFALL

$1.034B $41.3M

SOURCE: CY-FAIR ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

much funding the state will allocate to districts and how they will be allowed to spend it, Smith said. Addressing learning loss and accounting for an enrollment decline from previous projections are being considered in this budget. Officials project an enrollment of 116,105 students—down 1.2% from 2019-20. Smith called this a conservative estimate which is largely dependent on the return of pre-K and kindergarten students. An estimated 6% year-over-year increase in taxable property values will lead to a tax rate compression. State legislation passed in 2019 mandated tax rate compression any time property values increase more than 2.5%. Smith said the district should find out what the tax rate will be in early August.

Cy-Fair ISD to launch virtual learning programpending legislative approval

DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY Cy-Fair ISD is planning to launch its own virtual school in 2021-22. Students must meet eligibility criteria, including:

Be in grades 4-12

Students living in the district’s boundaries who are entering grades four to 12 in 2021-22 could have the opportunity to attend Cy-Fair ISD virtual school in the coming school year, Chief Academic Officer Linda Macias said at the May 10 board meeting. The tuition-free, full-time virtual school would be a new standalone school in the district. Macias said this program is only a proposed plan at this time, and officials will

not launch it if state lawmakers do not approve full funding of virtual learning for public school districts. CFISD virtual school would feature the district’s curriculum and limited opportunities for electives, dual-credit, Advanced Placement, and career and technical education pathways. This program requires an application process for admission, and students could apply for admis- sion during a three-week window ending June 1.

Live within the district’s boundaries Have a class average of 80 or better in all coursework Have a 90% or higher daily attendance rate from the previous school year Additional considerations may include behavior history and prior academic success in a virtual learning environment.

Cy-Fair ISD board of trustees The next meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. June 24 at 10300 Jones Road, Houston, and will be livestreamed at www.cfisd.net. Lone Star College System The next meeting is scheduled for 2 p.m. June 3 and will be livestreamed via WebEx. www.lonestar.edu/trustees MEETINGSWE COVER

SOURCE: CY-FAIR ISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REGIONAL REPORT Biomedical corridorgrows

LIFE SCIENCES BOOM Life sciences—which include the biomedical industry—is one of six key areas for the Greater Houston Partnership, a regional economic development group spanning 12 counties, Chief Economic Development Officer Susan Davenport said.

WHAT IS BIOMEDICAL?

The CETA’s mission includes rural economic development across its member area, which ranges from the Greater Tomball Area Chamber of Commerce to the city of Marlin, CETA Treasurer Tana Ross said. While the organization’s heart is rural economic development, Ross said, the CETA SOURCES: CENTRAL EAST TEXAS ALLIANCE, GREATER HOUSTON PARTNERSHIP/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • Nutrients and supplements • New construction materials • Detergents and natural solvents • Personal care and hygiene • Energy sustainability The biomedical industry includes various fields, according to the Central East Texas Alliance: • Clean air and water solutions • Vaccines and antibiotics • Disease control • Pest control and herbicides • Plant and animal breeding, health

BY ANNA LOTZ

The life science and health care footprint in the Houston region is THATOFHOUSTON’S ENERGY INDUSTRY. GREATER THAN

The Houston region includes more than 1,750 LIFE SCIENCES COMPANIES, HEALTH CARE FACILITIES AND RESEARCH INSTITUTES.

While Hwy. 249 has taken shape in Tomball and Magnolia, a regional economic development group has been working behind the scenes to attract development to the corridor from Houston to Waco. When fully complete, Hwy. 249 will stretch fromHouston to Navasota with Hwy. 6 continuing on to Waco. As the two highways will essentially connect the Texas Medical Center—the largest in the world—with Baylor University in Waco, the Central East Texas Alliance has dubbed this stretch the “Texas Biomedical Corridor,” CETA President Johnny McNally said. “Texas A&M [University] is a huge hub right in the middle of that route,” McNally said. “We may not have the university in our communities that’s kicking off the research and such, but we have other things that can support that effort.”

The GHP hopes to bring about in potential life sciences investment to Houston. $735 M

The GHP anticipates 6,000 TO 7,000 NEWHEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL SERVICES JOBS in the Houston region in 2021.

These companies employ 320,000WORKERS.

shifted its focus in 2019 from the I-45 corridor to the biomedical corridor. The biomedical field ranges from clean air and water solutions to per- sonal care and vaccine development. Tomball and the surrounding area tout multiple biomedical businesses. “We have the infrastructure in

place for growth, and then we have the talent to go along with that and the space,” said Torrey Adams, the Greater Houston Partnership’s senior director of life sciences. “That gives the Houston region very much of a leg up in terms of being able to embrace growth in the life sciences arena.”

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JUNE 2021

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