Cy-fair Edition - January 2021

CYFAIR EDITION

2021

ONLII NE AT

A N N U A L C O M M U N I T Y G U I D E

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 5  JAN. 7FEB. 3, 2021

TOP STORY TO WATCH IN 2021

Fightingon

SHAWN ARRAJJCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Business owners across Cy-Fair nd ways to stay aoat during the coronavirus pandemic

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD

normal life, and we have more opportunity to meet the community and introduce ourselves,” she said. “I feel like people just don’t know about us [because] we’re new to this area.” Whether they opened their small business in 2020 or have been around for decades, entrepre- neurs across the community have struggled with operations throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and many were forced to lay o sta or close their doors completely.

The Texas Workforce Commission reported at least 60,000 Cy-Fair residents led initial claims for unem- ployment insurance from mid-March through the end of November. According to estimates from the Greater Houston Partnership, the overall region lost more than 350,000 jobs in March and April and has only recovered a little over half of those since. “Some [businesses] closed temporarily; unfortu- nately, some of them closed permanently. That’s the CONTINUED ON 26

Julia Servetnik and her husband, Chun Yin Wong, are hopeful they will see their new business grow in 2021 after what she said was the most stressful year of her life. The couple opened Cavity Patrol Pediat- ric Dentistry on Fry Road midpandemic after battling construction cost increases, delayed inspections and the challenge of nding employees. “There’s a lot of talk about the vaccines. Hopefully that can be successful; everybody can go back to their

2021

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TRANSPORTATION

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IMPACTS

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

6

Now Open, Coming Soon &more

FROMEMILY: Happy New Year! We hope you enjoy this special issue, our Annual Community Guide. We’ve recapped the top stories from 2020, and we share insight and updates on the stories we will be watching in 2021. We look forward to a great year as our team continues to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses. Thank you for your loyal readership, and we look forward to seeing you out and about in Cy-Fair. Emily Heineman, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Emily Heineman, eheineman@communityimpact.com SENIOR EDITOR Shawn Arrajj SENIOR REPORTER Danica Lloyd GRAPHIC DESIGNER Stephanie Torres ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Karen Nickerson METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

ANNUAL COMMUNITY GUIDE COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT

9

Cy-Fair data and demographics DINING LISTINGS New restaurants opened in Cy-Fair in 2020 EDUCATION Cy-Fair ISD ocials address education gaps amid pandemic

12

17

FROMSHAWN: This has been a dicult year for most, if not all, of us, from business owners dealing with the uncertainty of whether they will survive the pandemic to families going through the pain of losing loved ones. However, the year ended on a hopeful note with coronavirus vaccine distribution now underway in Houston and across the U.S. Our front-page story takes a look at how the business community is feeling headed into the new year, while the rest of our January edition hits on several other big stories we expect in 2021. Shawn Arrajj, SENIOREDITOR

DEVELOPMENT

21

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Village Center advances toward groundbreakings

Local sources 28

New businesses 7

Local private schools 13

News updates for the new year 14

2021 PRIVATE SCHOOL GUIDE

GUIDE

29

Private schools in the Cy-Fair area

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CYFAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

5 Versace opened Nov. 14 in the Houston Premium Outlets mall at 29300 Hempstead Road, Cypress. The international fashion design store offers fashion and lifestyle products including haute couture, accessories, jewelry, watches, eyewear, fragrances and home furnishings. The shop is located in Unit 943, next to DKNY. 346-400-5005. www.versace.com 6 A soft opening was held for Airi Ramen in December, and owners with the new restaurant said they are planning a grand opening celebration for Jan. 20. Located in the Fairfield Town Center at 28404 Hwy. 290, Ste. G19, Cypress, the eatery specializes in authentic Japanese ramen while offering other Asian-inspired items, such as buns and dumplings. The venue also features a full bar. 832-653-7786. www.airiramen.com 7 Officials with The Port of Peri Peri announced a new location opened Dec. 10 at 10850 Louetta Road, Ste. 700, Houston. This eatery is known for its open-flame-grilled chicken basted with signature sauces made from African bird’s eye chiles mixed with fresh herbs and spices. In addition to chicken, The Port of Peri Peri also offers lamb chops, salads, burgers, pitas and wraps as well as several vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. 832-843-6092. www.myperiperi.com Bryan and Keri Campbell opened Fetch Pet Care , a pet service franchise, on Nov. 1. The business offers services such as daily dog walking, pet sitting and overnight care. Although based in Tomball, Fetch Pet Care services the northwest Houston area, including Tomball, Magnolia, Cypress, Spring and The Woodlands. 832-862-2044. www.facebook.com/fetchofnwhouston COMING SOON 8 A new location of Nothing Bundt Cakes is slated to open in late January or early February at 9822 Fry Road, Ste. 170, Cypress. The bakery offers bundt cakes in various sizes and flavors, including classic vanilla, chocolate chip, red velvet and pe- can praline in addition to rotating season- al flavors. www.nothingbundtcakes.com

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Tumble 22, an Austin-based eatery, opened its fourth restaurant in Vintage Park in the former location of PDQ at 10723 Louetta Road, Houston, in late November. Inspired by Nashville hot chicken, the menu offers chicken tender bites, jumbo chicken tenders, chicken sandwiches and bone-in chicken with five heat level options, from Wimpy to Cluckin’ Hot. The menu also offers a selection of salads, sides and desserts as well as family meal options. 281-547-6300. www.tumble22.com

2 Austin-based Tiff’s Treats opened its newest store at the Cypress Crossing shopping center, 13126 FM 1960, Ste. 145, Houston, in mid-December. The bakery specializes in fresh-baked cookies, brownies and frozen treats. Baked goods are packaged and delivered warm upon request, and party packs are available for large groups. The Cypress Crossing location will hold a drive-thru grand opening celebration on Jan. 9 benefiting Lily’s Toy Box. 346-249-6500. www.cookiedelivery.com 3 Basketball training center Shoot 360 opened Dec. 12 at 13018 Brittmoore Park Drive, Houston. The basketball training

facility allows athletes of all ages to test, train and track their shooting abilities through the use of interactive gaming technology, expert coaching, workouts and evaluations. 832-838-4360. www.shoot360.com/houston 4 Escape Nail & Lash Studio opened Nov. 20 at 8540 Hwy. 6 N., Ste. B, Houston. Services include manicures, pedicures, spa care, waxing, eyelash enhancements and facials. The business also offers some services for children, including manicures, pedicures and nail polish changes. 281-550-9929. www.escapenaillashstudio.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD

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9

The Port of Peri Peri

Visage Salon & Day Spa

COURTESY THE PORT OF PERI PERI

COURTESY VISAGE SALON & DAY SPA

9 Owners with Visage Salon & Day Spa on Louetta Road said they are aiming to open a second location around mid-2021 at 17820 West Road, Houston. Construc- tion is underway on the new building, owner Lee Pham said. Upon completion, the business will offer both spa and hair services. 281-379-1772. www.visage-salon-spa.com 10 Officials with the The Howard Hughes Corp. announced Nov. 19 that construction has begun on a 5,200-square-foot Timewise Food Store and Exxon gas station at the intersection of Tuckerton and Mason roads in Bridgeland. The shop and gas station, which are being constructed by Landmark Industries, are set to open next spring. www.landmarkindustries.com 11 Owners with a new local drive-thru coffee spot called Mudslinger’s are targeting the second week of February for an opening at 14123 Grant Road, Cypress, near the Spring Cypress Road intersection. Once open, the shop will serve specialty coffee, tea, infused energy drinks and breakfast/pastry items. Owner Jacki Arnic said she is looking to hire an assistant manager and baristas. www.mudslingershtown.com EXPANSIONS 12 A new location of Village Medical is open as of Dec. 9 at the Walgreens location at 12314 Jones Road, Houston, near the Cypress North Houston Road intersection. Dr. Clive Fields will serve as chief medical officer. Services include physical exams, treatment of illness or injury, management of health conditions

and health education. The clinic also of- fers virtual visits, access to the Walgreens Pharmacy, same-day appointments and access to an on-site laboratory. 713-461-2915. www.villagemedical.com ANNIVERSARIES 13 Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital , located at 18220 Hwy. 249, Houston, celebrated its 20th anniversary this December. The full-service, acute- care hospital first opened in December 2000. The 52-acre campus offers a full slate of health and wellness services, including emergency care, cardiology, orthopedics, sports medicine and women’s services. 281-737-2500. www.houstonmethodist.org 14 CHI St. Luke’s Health The Vintage Hospital , located at 20171 Chasewood Park Drive, Houston, celebrated its 10th anniversary Dec. 10. The facility features 106 licensed inpatient beds and has more than 500 credentialed providers and approximately 450 employees. 832-534-5000. www.stlukeshealth.org CLOSINGS 15 The Vintage Park location of Texadelphia, located at 126 Vintage Park Blvd., Bldg. B, Houston, closed in December. The Austin-based eatery first opened in March 2019 and specialized in offering a Texas twist on Philly cheesesteaks. In addition to cheesesteaks, the bar and grill also offered wraps, sandwiches, burgers and salads. www.texadelphia.com

Starling at Bridgeland is slated to open by summer 2022.

RENDERING COURTESY THE HOWARD HUGHES CORP.

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON The Howard Hughes Corp. announced Dec. 16 construction of Starling at Bridgeland , a new multifamily housing development in the community, is slated to begin by the end of the month and wrap up by summer 2022. Ocials in a press release said the development will sit on 15.2 acres at the intersection of Bridgeland Creek Parkway and Bridgeland High School Drive and be part of Bridgeland Central, the future 900-acre town center. “We are excited to add another luxury multifamily option to Bridgeland, providing upscale for-lease housing in what will become Bridgeland Central,” said Heath Melton, who serves as the executive vice president of residential master-planned communities for The Howard Hughes Corp. “Our goal is to promote an active, healthy lifestyle and provide our residents with walkable communities in natural settings, with expansive open green space and sought-after urban shopping and dining amenities.”

With 358 units planned, one-, two- and three-bedroom oor plans will be available, all featuring smart thermostats, keyless entry, quartz countertops, walk-in closets and modern appliances. The plan also includes an indoor tness center, a shaded outdoor tness center, a walking and jogging path, and a resort- style pool, according to a press release. Residents who are building homes in Bridgeland will have the option of signing short-term leases at Starling at Bridgeland, and long-term leases are available for those seeking a low- maintenance, active lifestyles, such as college graduates and empty nesters. www.bridgeland.com

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CY-FAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT

Data and analysis on the local community

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

CYFAIR

The population of Cy-Fair increased by nearly 12% in the past ve years, outpacing the growth rate of Harris County. The median household income, the median age and education attainment in Cy-Fair are all higher than those of the county and the state as a whole. These statistics are based on the boundaries of Cy-Fair ISD, which is primarily located in unincorporated Harris County but also includes the city of Jersey Village.

*HISPANICLATINO IS NOT A RACE, BUT THE HISPANICLATINO PERCENTAGE BELOW MAY INCLUDE MULTIPLE RACES LISTED. THE OTHER RACES LISTED, HOWEVER, DO NOT INCLUDE HISPANICLATINO RESIDENTS. SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2019 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY CYFAIR ISD

Cy-Fair

Harris County

POPULATION CHANGE

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

AGE ANALYSIS

Texas +8.3% +11.8% +8.8% Five-year change

0-19

20-39 40-59 60-79 80+

$72,402

2014

1.7%

30.2%

27.6%

27.5%

13%

$79,864

2019

29.3%

30.5%

25%

13.1%

2.1%

$53,822

2014

Median age

34.8 33.5

Texas 34.6

$61,705

2019

EDUCATION LEVEL

LARGEST EMPLOYMENT SECTORS** 1 Management occupations 2 Sales and related occupations 3 Oce and administrative support occupations 4 Educational instruction and library occupations 5 Business and nancial operations occupations

LOCAL DEMOGRAPHICS*

34.1% 36.9% 16% 0.1% 10.7% 0.1% 0.4% 1.7%

42.9% 29.6% 18.6%

Hispanic or Latino

White

High school diploma or higher achieved

88.3%

81.4%

Black or African American

American Indian or Alaska native

0.2% 6.9% 0.1% 0.2% 1.5%

Asian

Native Hawaiian or other Pacic Islander Some other race Two or more races

Bachelor’s degree or higher achieved

37.4%

31.5%

**EMPLOYMENT FOR AGE 16 AND OLDER

est. 1978

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CYFAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SHOPPING

Retailers that opened in 2020

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD 2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

Houston Premium Outlets brought on several new tenants this year, including designer brands oering discounted merchandise. LOCAL HOT SPOT 29300 Hempstead Road, Cypress 281-304-5820 www.premiumoutlets.com/ outlet/houston

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OPENED IN 2020 UGG

832-739-9383 www.ugg.com Lucchese Bootmaker www.lucchese.com Versace 346-400-5005 www.versace.com Marc Jacobs 346-261-0261

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www.marcjacobs.com Bath & Body Works 832-952-3492 www.bathandbodyworks.com Karl Lagerfeld Paris 346-332-0568 www.karllagerfeldparis.com

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6 Dick’s Sporting Goods 16343 FM 529, Houston 281-656-4028 www.dickssportinggoods.com 7 The Lego Store 1568 Willowbrook Mall, Houston 281-970-6609 www.lego.com JEWELRY 8 The Garden Hen 10142 Jones Road, Unit 5B, Houston 832-683-5135 www.the-garden-hen.com 9 Jack Yacoubian Jewelers 14100 Spring Cypress Road, Cypress 281-251-0408

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

This list of retailers that opened in 2020 is not comprehensive.

CLOTHINGSHOES 1 Burlington 28930 Hwy. 290, Cypress 346-280-8032 www.burlington.com 2 The Rustic House Boutique 18922 Fenske Road, Cypress 832-725-5270 www.therustichouseboutique.com DISCOUNT STORES 3 Five Below 28802 Hwy. 290, Ste. D-01, Cypress

832-402-1814 www.vebelow.com

FOODBEVERAGE 4 Don Tomate Meat Market 17835 Grant Road, Cypress 281-783-6800 www.dontomatecypress.com HOBBIES 5 The Comic Vault 15210 West Road, Houston 832-220-6509 www.thecomicvault.com

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CYFAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

DINING

Restaurants that opened in 2020 or are coming in 2021

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HOUSE & HAHL RD.

18 Lan Hai Asian Restaurant 17575 Hwy. 249, Houston 832-604-8088 www.lanhaiasianrestaurant.com $ K 19 Pho Bo 2 12312 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. 1000, Cypress 281-758-5269 www.phobohouston.com $ K CAFEBAKERY 20 Cafe Zun Zun 12716 Telge Road, Cypress www.cafezunzun.com COMING SOON 21 Coco Crepes, Waes & Coee 9945 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. 125, Cypress 281-758-5311 www.cococrepes.com $ B 22 Just Love Coee Cafe 13727 Sunset Canyon Drive, Ste. 400, Tomball 281-547-6984 www.justlovecoeecafe.com $ B K 23 Sleek Creperie & Cafe 28610 Hwy. 290, Cypress 281-213-2108 www.sleekchocolatiercafefaireld.com $ B K 24 Southern Maid Donuts 9212 Fry Road, Cypress 281-304-2226 $ B 25 Vogue Bubble Tea & Coee Bar 7025 Fry Road, Ste. 100, Cypress 832-427-5857 www.facebook.com/voguecoeebar $ CAJUN 26 Poppa’s PoBoys 16823 Mueschke Road, Cypress 832-998-6657 www.poppaspoboys.net $ $ K DESSERT 27 Cinnaholic 28920 Hwy. 290, Ste. H11, Cypress 346-379-8110 www.cinnaholic.com $

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Average entrees: $ Up to $9.99

$$ $10-$19.99

$$$ $20 or more

B Breakfast/brunch

H Happy hour

K Kids menu

6 Hippo Burgers 8110 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Houston 832-478-5176 www.hippoburgers.com $ K 7 In-N-Out Burger 7611 FM 1960, Houston 800-786-1000 www.in-n-out.com $

12 Senate Avenue Brewing 16000 Dillard Drive, Ste. F, Jersey Village 832-295-3188 www.senateave.com $$ H K 13 The Toasted Yolk 27008 Hwy. 290, Ste. 100, Cypress 281-304-2935 http://thetoastedyolk.com $$ B K 14 Tumble 22 10723 Louetta Road, Houston 281-547-6300 www.tumble22.com $ H ASIAN 15 Airi Ramen 28404 Hwy. 290, Ste. G19, Cypress 832-653-7786 www.airiramencypress.kwickmenu.com $$ H K 16 Bao Bros. Bistro 8574 Hwy. 6 N., Houston 832-674-8343 www.baobrosbistro.com $ 17 Chiba Hot Pot 12426 FM 1960, Houston 281-653-9883 www.facebook.com/chibahotpot $$$

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

AMERICAN 1 1101 Southern Kitchen 12020 FM 1960, Ste. 100, Houston 832-604-7238 www.1101southernkitchen.com $$ B 2 Black Bear Diner 19823 Hwy. 290, Houston 346-277-9027 www.blackbeardiner.com $$ B K 3 Cheerz Daiquiris To-Go 12925 FM 1960, Ste. A, Houston 713-389-5565 www.cheerztogo.com $$ B 4 Dog Haus Biergarten 8422 N. Hwy. 6, Houston 832-427-1284 http://coppereld.doghaus.com $ H K 5 First Watch 9915 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. 170, Cypress 346-396-4402 www.rstwatch.com $$ B

8 Jolene’s Wings & Beer 20030 Hwy. 290, Houston 713-597-5347 www.jolenes.com $ 9 Little Kitchen HTX 16000 Dillard Drive, Ste. A, Jersey Village 832-295-3020 www.littlekitchenhtx.com $$ B

10 Pronto Southwest Grill 13110 FM 529, Ste. 4, Houston 833-320-1150 www.prontosouthwest.com $ H K 11 Roy’s Breakfast and Lunch 20220 FM 529, Ste. 170, Houston 832-683-4894 www.facebook.com/roysbreakfast $ B K

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

www.pollobravoexpress.com $$ 43 Taquerias Estilo Mexico 10730 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. F, Cypress 281-758-5456 http://taqueriaestilomexico.mobile bytes.com $ B K SEAFOOD

21350 FM 529, Ste. 100, Cypress 281-815-7833 www.pizzaguerrin.com $$ 37 Rosati’s Pizza 9814 Fry Road, Ste. 120, Cypress 832-402-1100 www.myrosatis.com $$ MEXICAN 38 Galiana’s Tex Mex & Agave Bar 24110 Hwy. 290, Ste. 500, Cypress 832-653-6853 www.galianastexmex.com $$ B H K 39 Juanita’s Mexican Kitchen 29110 Hwy. 290, Ste. 500, Cypress www.juanitas.us COMING SOON 40 Mexpozole Restaurant 6871 N. Fry Road, Ste. 112, Katy 832-835-7584 www.mexpozolerestaurant.com $ B K 41 Mex Taco House

$ B 31 My Protein Grill 16718 House & Hahl Road, Ste. M, Cypress 832-220-6043 www.myproteingrill.com $ B 32 Nekter Juice Bar 9915 Barker Cypress Road, Ste. 165, Cypress 281-304-2903 www.nekterjuicebar.com INDIAN 33 Kurry Walah 12714 Grant Road, Cypress 832-698-4966 www.kurrywalah.com $$ ITALIAN 34 Center Court Pizza & Brew 138 Vintage Park Blvd., Bldg. F, Ste. L, Houston 832-761-7806 www.ccpizzabrew.com $$ H K 35 Crust Pizza Co. 11550 Louetta Road, Ste. 1000, Houston 281-547-7698 www.crustpizzaco.com $ K 36 Pizza Guerrin

33

44 Crab Heads Cajun Boil 9630 Jones Road, Houston 832-912-4953 www.crabheadscajunboiltx.com $$ H 45 Crafty Crab 17460 Hwy. 290, Houston 832-856-5656 www.craftycrabrestaurant.com $$ H 46 El Capitan Seafood and Mexican Grill 17519 N. Gessner Road, Houston 832-604-6537 www.elcapitanseafood.com $$ H K 47 Sabor Seafood 18955 Hwy. 249, Houston 832-869-4833 www.saborseafood.com $$ H THIS LIST IS NOT COMPREHENSIVE.

Kurry Walah

STAFF PHOTOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

28 Ti’s Treats 13126 FM 1960, Ste. 145, Houston 346-249-6500 www.cookiedelivery.com $ EUROPEAN 29 Athena Greek & European Kitchen 13250 FM 529, Ste. A, Houston 832-328-5494 www.athenasgreekkitchen.com $$ K HEALTH FOODS 30 Division One Nutrition 17960 FM 529, Ste. B, Houston 281-256-5319 www.facebook.com/donenutrition

25410 Hwy. 290, Cypress www.mextacohouse.com COMING JANUARY 42 Pollo Bravo Express 6871 N. Fry Road, Katy 832-427-6102

13

CYFAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

Ranked number one in the nation for cancer care by U.S. News &World Report.

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

TOP TRANSPORTATION STORIES OF 2021

Construction on high-speed rail could start in 2021 Ocials with Texas Central, the company seeking to build a 240- mile high speed rail line connecting Houston to Dallas, are aiming to start construction on the project in 2021. A state appeals court ruled Texas Central ocially qualied as a railroad At the same time, state Rep. Steve Toth, RThe Woodlands, has preled a bill that will be taken up during the 2021 Texas legislative session, which will begin Jan. 12. If passed, House Bill 114 would BY SHAWN ARRAJJ Looking toward 2021 Ocials with Texas Central want to start construction on a high-speed rail project in 2021, but several sources of opposition remain.

restrict state agencies from issuing permits to private high-speed rail entities unless they have obtained all necessary federal permits for the construction. At the federal level, the company is in the process of getting a permit from the Surface Transporta- tion Board. In the meantime, Texas Central ocials said the company is moving forward. The $20 billion construction project is slated to start in 2021 with the train fully operational by 2026. Texas Central did not respond to request for comment for this article. In an October virtual meeting hosted by the High Speed Rail Alliance, Texas Central Vice President Travis Kelly said the next big step is to nish the design process. “We’re looking at giving that notice to proceed hopefully in the rst half of next year,” he said.

company in May, which allows the company to move forward with eminent domain proceedings, which could be needed to acquire some of the parcels of land where the railroad will be built. The plainti in the case—James Miles, a landowner who has refused to sell his land to Texas Central— appealed to the Texas Supreme Court on Dec. 11. In his ling, Miles argued Texas Central does not meet the denition of a railroad company in the Supreme Court will see the truth of how Texas Central is attempting to circumvent the law,” said Kyle Work- man, president of Texans Against High Speed Rail, an opposition group supporting Miles in the suit. Texas Transportation Code. “We are condent the Texas

A case Texas Central won in 2020 has been appealed to the Texas Supreme Court regarding whether the company qualies as a “railroad company.” If the court rules against Texas Central, they would not be able to use eminent domain. TEXAS SUPREME COURT

HOUSE BILL 114

Filed by state Rep. Steve Toth, R-The Woodlands, the bill would restrict state agencies from entering right of way agreements with private entities unless the entity has obtained all necessary federal approvals for the construction of a high-speed rail project.

SOURCES: TEXAS LEGISLATURE, TEXANS AGAINST HIGH SPEED RAIL, TEXAS CENTRALCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

METROadds parking at transit center

Harris County seeks feedback on equity in transportation in unincorporated areas

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

2021, said Libby Bland, senior planner with the urban planning and design rm Askura Robinson. The plan will focus on six key topics: equity in access, safety, health, climate resil- ience, funding and decision-making. “We’re really focused on achieving equity with respect to race and ethnicity,” said Kelsey Walker, senior associate with Trac Engineers Inc. “We’re also really interested in making sure that our transportation system serves people in communi- ties at the lower end of the income distribution.”

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

Harris County is seeking feedback on equity in transportation as part of its ongoing countywide transpor- tation planning eort. The document will serve as a guide for future transportation projects, programs and policies for unincorporated Harris County through 2040. It will address all parts of the county’s transportation system—including capital, oper- ating and maintenance activities for all transportation modes—and is slated to be completed by early

The Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County opened more than 200 new parking spaces Dec. 1 at the Northwest Transit Center. Located at the nexus of Hwy. 290 and Loop 610, the new parking lot increases the number of parking spaces from 256 to 461. The lot was constructed as a part of a $17.9 million improvement project that increased the number of bus bays from 12 to 20 across two platforms. A building that will feature a METROR- ide Store and public restrooms is still under construction and is slated to open in 2021. The center connects to 15 bus routes, including routes to the Downtown Transit Center and to the Northwest Park & Ride in Cy-Fair.

H OW T O B E H E A R D

Fill out a survey on transportation needs in the county at www.hctxtransportationequity.com.

Submit questions or comments to the Harris County Engineering Department by emailing harrisctp@eng.hctx.net.

15

CYFAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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EDUCATION

Education news to follow

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

TOP EDUCATION STORIES OF 2021

COVID19 presents concerns of learning gaps in Cy-Fair ISD

experiences and learning resources found in the homes of their more au- ent peers,” Macias said. “Books and other instructional resources are many times lacking in these homes along with support because the parents may be working two or three jobs.” This achievement gap is being addressed through virtual tutoring support and through the addition of “closing-the-gap time” for all students. Macias said after students missed out on several weeks of planned instruction in the spring 2020 semester due to COVID-19, the district also tweaked the fall semes- ter’s curriculum to cover instruction that might have been overlooked. Macias said CFISD parents will have a choice between the two learning options through the end of the 2020-21 school year, but decisions regarding learning options beyond that have not been made. District ocials said they are hopeful for the success of the COVID-19 vaccine in 2021. Macias said it is ultimately in students’ best interest to be receiving instruction on campuses to help close the gap.

NOT ONLYWOULDA VACCINEMINIMIZE ILLNESS, BUTWE KNOWTHAT SCHOOLS ARE BENEFICIAL FORACADEMIC AND SOCIALEMOTIONAL HEALTH, ANDGETTING ALL OF OUR STUDENTS BACK IN SCHOOLS IS IMPORTANT FOR LONGTERMSUCCESS.

BY DANICA LLOYD

virtual students. “Additionally, our teachers have had to learn this new mode of instruction which has included additional training, lesson planning and preparation, and extended work hours,” she said. “Our teachers have done an outstanding job adjusting to the remote approach and supporting all of their students.” These unique learning options allow on-campus students to transi- tion to virtual instruction if needed due to illness or quarantine, as Macias said it is essential for students to ensure minimal absences to main- tain positive academic outcomes. Macias said the pandemic has caused a learning gap that presents a concern for all students but espe- cially for the economically disadvan- taged population. “Economically disadvantaged stu- dents struggle because they lack the

In a year when Cy-Fair ISD parents had the choice to send their children to school in person or enroll them in the new remote learning option, CFISD Connect, district ocials said both learning platforms presented their own challenges. While students generally perform better in the traditional in-person instruction setting, Chief Academic Ocer Linda Macias said classrooms may not have always had sucient technology devices as remote students were given priority when it came to technology distribution. On top of ensuring all CFISD Con- nect students had adequate internet access and technology devices to use at home, Macias said keeping students engaged while learning from home—sometimes while parents were at work—was a challenge. Many teachers juggled both in-person and

LINDA MACIAS, CYFAIR ISD CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER

“A widely distributed vaccine is one of the most important tools for ending the pandemic,” Macias said. “Not only would a vaccine minimize illness, but we know that schools are benecial for academic and social/ emotional health, and getting all of our students back in schools is important for long-term success.”

Newadministration building, arts center slated to open by end of 2022 Design plans for a new administra- tion building and a new visual and performing arts center are nearing completion, with both facilities slated to open by the end of 2022 in Cy-Fair ISD. PBK Architects is overseeing the design process of these new projects, the board of trustees approves a contract in April. The all-inclusive arts facility is designed to host band, orchestra, dance and other ine arts program- ming with a seating capacity of up to 1,500 in the auditorium. BY DANICA LLOYD VISUALANDPERFORMING ARTS CENTER ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

In addition to the two-balcony auditorium, there will be a small theater that seats up to 200, a dance studio, a visual arts room and spaces for art displays in the lobby. Additionally, the district’s ne arts oces will be located in this facility, ocials said. Next door, the new administration building has been designed with eciency in mind. Areas designated for public access, such as the board- room and conference center, are in a separate wing from district oces, and employees will have separate entrances from the public for security purposes. Employee oces will be organized by department throughout

which were both included in the $1.76 billion bond program that passed in 2019. Ocials at the time said the arts center would cost an estimated $46.6 million and that the administration building would cost about $65.9 million. Both facilities will be located on the same 26-acre property o Hwy. 290 next to Cy-Fair High School. O- cials with PBK Architects said this is an ecient use of the site, which will have approximately 1,050 parking spaces between the two facilities. The construction process for the site is slated to kick o in May after

RENDERINGS COURTESY PBK ARCHITECTS

Construction time: 19 months

Construction time: 18 months

Estimated cost: $46.6M Seating capacity: 1,500

Estimated cost: $65.9M Boardroom capacity: 250

“The pandemic has not created any major delays in projects cur- rently under construction or in design,” district ocials said in a statement. “We have experienced minor delays on a few projects, but we have been able to work with our contractors to get back on schedule.”

the building’s ve stories. Other construction projects taking place throughout CFISD include campus security enhancements, furniture replacements, baseball and softball eld improvements, band tower replacements and new propane tanks at transportation centers.

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CYFAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&COUNTY

Updates on the biggest issues facing local entities

2 0 2 1 S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

TOP HARRIS COUNTY AND JERSEY VILLAGE STORIES OF 2021

HarrisCountyallocatesall CARES Act fundswithhopemore is coming

CARES ACT BREAKDOWN Harris County ocials allocated all $427 million in funding the county received from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, including $241 million on community programs and $163 million on public improvement programs.

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS: $241M

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

been allocated, the county has iden- tied about $572 million in expenses that the $427 million could end up going toward, Berry said. “I think we are in as good of shape as we possibly can be,” Berry told commissioners. “We have a base plan that uses the $427 million and backup plans should we have any issues.” At the Dec. 15 meeting, Berry and several precinct commissioners said they are hoping to see more COVID- 19 relief funding from the federal government. The $900 million stimulus package included direct funding for individuals, low-income communities and small businesses, but did not include funding for state or local governments to disperse. At the Dec. 15 meeting, Precinct 1 Commissioner Rodney Ellis noted around 700,000 people have applied to the county’s direct assistance program since it was rst launched, suggesting there are still many unmet needs among county residents. “I hope additional money is coming,” he said.

As of mid-December, Harris County ocials said they were on track to allocate the entirety of the $427 mil- lion provided by the federal govern- ment in March from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. When U.S. Congress passed the CARES Act, portions of relief funds were allocated to state and local governments across the U.S. with the caveat that they had to be used by Dec. 31. Any unspent after that would need to be given back to the U.S. Treasury Department. However, that deadline was extended to Dec. 31, 2021, as a part of a new $900 million stimulus bill passed Dec. 21. Of the $427 million allocated to Harris County, about $22.1 million was not allocated as of the most recent data update Dec. 17. At a Dec. 15 meeting of the Harris County Com- missioners Court, Budget Director Dave Berry said there were multiple avenues by which the remaining money could be spent. Including money that has already

$33.25M: Rental assistance programs

$32.3M: Small-business relief fund

$67.58M: Direct assistance program

$48.71M: Student digital services

$6.22M: Community spread survey program

$28.24M: Small-cities support

$4.72M: Childcare assistance program

$11M: Small business loan program

$1M: Court eviction services

$2.18M: Domestic violence assistance fund

$2.31M: COVID-19 workforce development program

$4M: Census services

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT: $163M

$31.5M: COVID-19 relief fund program

$20.5M: COVID-19 materials and supplies

$17.33M: COVID-19 election plan

$44.07M: Public health department testing, contact tracing and other programs

$3.48M: Emergency technology needs $8.63M: General fund reimbursements

$7.94M: Jury/jail projects to support distancing

$4.45M: NRG Emergency Shelter

$9.9M: Employee hazard pay

$2.55M: Inmate care

$8.1M: Food bank, recovery centers, other

$5M: Respite facility for homeless

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY BUDGET OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Study advances on development of countywide use-of-force policy

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

nationwide to determine commonal- ities and best practices, prompting a review of the sheri’s oce policy. “The [sheri’s oce] has a big organization, so they need to look at all the dierent elements to make sure that they are well in the changes they’ve made,” Garcia said. “I know that their policy process isn’t a simple one, but I applaud them for working through this and acknowl- edging some improvements.” Ana Yanez-Correa, deputy director with the county Justice Administra- tion Department, said the next steps involve conducting community engagement to rene the policy and for the sheri’s oce to get through the legal review.

A study is moving forward in Harris County to establish a stan- dard use-of-force policy across law enforcement agencies that fall under the county’s purview, including the Harris County Sheri’s Oce and the eight constable oces that cover the county. The study was rst put into motion in June following the death of George Floyd, a man who died May 25 while in police custody in Minneapolis. At a Dec. 15 Harris County Com- missioners Court meeting, Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia said the study looked into more than 100 dierent use-of-force policies

An eort to widen White Oak Bayou is one of several ood mitigation projects that are moving forward in Jersey Village, according to a series of Nov. 30 announcements.

SHAWN ARRAJJCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Floodmitigation projects tomove forward in JerseyVillage area following grant award

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

building an earthen barrier around a portion of the Jersey Meadow Golf Course. When combined, the two projects will reduce damages from a 100-year storm by $757,580, according to city estimates. With the $4.2 million grant secured, the city will fund the remaining $1.7 million of the $5.9 million project.

The city of Jersey Village is set to receive roughly $4.2 million in grant money from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to advance two ood mitigation projects within city limits. The projects involve making drainage improvements on Wall Street and adjacent streets and

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CYFAIR EDITION • JANUARY 2021

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