Georgetown | October 2020

TRANSPORTATION Proposedmobility bond seeks to increase capacity of Georgetown roads Residents could vote on a tax increase in May

SURVEYINGRESIDENTS These responses were collected from Georgetown residents via an online survey that was live July 15-Aug. 15.

WHERE to SPEND

REACH vs. RESPONSE RESPONSE

BY SALLY GRACE HOLTGRIEVE

bond to be resident driven. City Council appointed 16 people to the Mobility Georgetown 2021 Citizen Advisory Committee at its July 14 meeting. The committee is meeting August through December and will provide the nal recommendations and more opportunities for public feedback before the election is called. A digital survey was live July 15-Aug. 15, and the aimwas to determine residents’ priorities for transportation projects and how they felt about a bond in general. Sta and the advisory committee are working through responses to help identify and prioritize projects for the bond election. Once the committee identies those projects, public feedback will be sought again. The next round of public engagement is scheduled for November. The last transportation bond was approved by voters in 2015 for $105 million to build, design and plan trans- portation projects. As of June, ocials said the city was on track to nish 10 years’ worth of projects in seven years.

Georgetown residents may be voting for or against a mobility bond in the May 2021 election. The bond would aim to advance the city’s connectivity and safety by upgrading streets, bridges, sidewalks and other mobility projects, George- town sta said. “The city needs to issue bond debt because it doesn’t have funding in its annual budget to pay for these signicant capital investments,” sta explained as part of initial outreach about the potential bond. “For exam- ple, constructing new roadways costs $1.5 million per lane mile.” Sta also explained that voter-ap- proved bonds usually result in an increase to property taxes so the city can generate the revenue needed to cover the costs of the projects—a $0.01 increase in property taxes in George- town yields $9 million. Property tax increase as a result of the bond would depend on the length of the bond and the projects chosen, so city ocials have stated they want the

Of the following choices, each respondent was asked to choose their rst transportation spending priority.

The opportunity to provide feedback on the proposed bond was shared in English and Spanish and through social media posts; targeted emails; and about $4,000 spent in advertising in newspapers, on the radio and on Facebook.

Roads & intersections

survey responses 516 s r r s s s 516

331

149

54 51 10

Would you support a potential property tax increase through a bond package? No Yes

70

Something else Bicycle infrastructure Sidewalks Public transit

367

PRESENT vs. FUTURE Respondents were asked to rank their answers on a score of one to ve, with ve being the highest value. This graphic compares the average ranks.

TOP priorities Respondents ranked mobility bond categories in order of importance out of a total of eight, with eight standing for the most desired. The results are the average of those rankings.

Which mode of transportation do you use most often?

Manage congestion on high-travel roadways Improve trac light timing along major roads

Driving alone Walk

Public transportation

Carpool Bike

Improve safety

Improve city connectivity through smaller, local projects

0

1

2

3

4

5

Which mode of transportation would you like to use more often?

Enhance existing streets

Driving alone Walk

Increase travel choices

Build or expand thoroughfares to provide corridor mobility

Carpool Bike Public transportation

Improve the look of streets

0

1

2

3

4

5

0

1

2

3

4

5

9

GEORGETOWN EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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