Heights - River Oaks - Montrose | Nov. 2020

HEIGHTS RIVER OAKS MONTROSE EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 7  NOV. 1DEC. 4, 2020

ONLINE AT

Tracking Houston police reform

On Sept. 30, Mayor Sylvester Turner’s police reform task force released a 150-page report of recommendations for the Houston Police Department. Community Impact Newspaper is tracking progress in a multi-part series.

Goal from task force

1+ year SOURCE: MAYOR SYLVESTER TURNER’S TASK FORCE ON POLICING REFORMCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

90 days or less 6-12 months

Community policing: Engagement and recruitment Independent oversight: Misconduct investigations Power dynamics: Transparency with the public Crisis intervention: Mental health initiatives Field readiness: Training, ocer wellness Accountability: Clear ocer expectations

IMPACTS

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I45 comment deadline extended

TRANSPORTATION

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49% view HPD positively or very positively.

30% view HPD negatively or very negatively.

83% of 7,302 respondents support improvements or changes to the HPD.

Citywide survey

Police contract takes new focus ahead of deadline Editor’s note: This article is the rst in a series exploring police reform eorts in Houston. BY EMMA WHALEN and the nationwide protests that fol- lowed, public scrutiny of law enforce- ment policies reached a new level. Sylvester Turner’s police reform task force. “Being a part of this committee, we knew the results could be a matter of life or death.” Six months after Floyd’s death, one

BIANCA RIVERA

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“People are watching in a way that they haven’t before,” said Carla Brai- ley, the co-chair of Houston Mayor

After Houstonian George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis police custody

CONTINUED ON 16

Barred fromopening, some watering holes playing it safe

“I’MGOING TO LISTEN TO THE EXPERTS. I’MNOT INA HURRY TOPUT MY PEOPLE IN HARM’SWAY.” BRAD MOORE, OWNER OF BIG STAR BAR

REAL ESTATE

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BY MATT DULIN

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Weeks after Gov. Greg Abbott announced county judges could allow bars to reopen without food service, some local owners were not exactly chomping at the bit. “I’mnot a science guy…but I ama trust-in-science guy,” said Brad Moore, the owner of Big Star Bar in the Heights, Grand Prize in the Montrose area and others. “I’m going to listen to the experts. I’mnot in a hurry to putmy people in harm’s way.” CONTINUED ON 19

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HEIGHTS - RIVER OAKS - MONTROSE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMKRISTINA: One of the many eects of COVID-19 has been on our local businesses. In this edition we spoke to some local bars that have been forced to shift their oerings or stay closed amid the pandemic. Their determination to keep their employees and customers safe is admirable. Kristina Shackelford, ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

MARKET TEAM SENIOR EDITOR Matt Dulin CITY HALL REPORTER Emma Whalen SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMMATT: We return to the matters of police reform, a ashpoint this summer that we will spend the next few months unpacking for our readers. Houston has produced an impressive-looking report oering direction, but what will come to pass? That is the question we will begin to answer in our front-page story this month. Matt Dulin, SENIOR EDITOR

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more CITY& COUNTY

13 News fromHouston and Harris County INSIDE INFORMATION 14 Coronavirus updates

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

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7.6% 3

Local sources

New businesses

14-day average positivity rate as of Oct. 19

Transportation projects

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact

Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens

Our local teams tailor campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their nancial goals. Our products ADVERTISEWITHUS

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Residential market data IMPACT DEALS

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CORRECTION: Volume 2, Issue 6 The front-page story “A growing Timbergrove seeks drainage solutions” contained an error. The City Park tax increment reinvestment zone does not wish to be annexed by the Memorial Heights TIRZ. However, it does want to annex more land into its own boundaries. The sample ballot has been republished to correct errors in the previous version.

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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T. C. JESTER BLVD.

W. 20TH ST.

W. 19TH ST.

Hurts Donut

W. 11TH ST.

COURTESY HURTS DONUT

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UESNER ST.

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COMING SOON 9 Eyes on the Heights , a new locally owned and operated optometry practice, is expected to open this fall at 2401 N. Shepherd Drive, Ste. 110, Houston. The practice will serve the Greater Heights area with primary eye care services, eye exams, glasses and contact lenses. www.eyesontheheights.com 10 A new 1980s-themed diner, Hungry Like The Wolf , is working to open by the end of the year at 920 Studemont St., Houston. From the name inspired by the Duran Duran hit to the interior design scheme, the concept offers a throwback to the decade, including a weekend brunch where guests are encouraged to wear their best ‘80s attire. www.hungrylikethewolfhouston.com 11 The Seafood Connection , a Char- lotte, North Carolina-based restaurant specializing in fresh seafood and secret sauces, has signed a lease for its first Houston location at 507 Westheimer Road in the Montrose area, according to a news release from Davis Commercial. An opening time frame was not immediately available. 980-859-1194. www.seafoodconnectiontogo.com EXPANSIONS 12 The real estate firm Compass opened a permanent office at 4200 Westheimer Road, Houston, in September and has announced plans to open new of- fices in The Woodlands, the Heights and in the Memorial area in 2021. Compass has handled $1.3 billion in transactions in Houston this year as of Sept. 1 and is No. 1 in market share by active listing dollar volume in the Houston area, according to a news release. 832-899-4788. 13 The Christian Community Service Center , a coalition of 39 area churches providing social services, has moved into the new J. Dean Robinson Building on the W.T. & Louise J. Moran Campus, 3434 Branard St., Houston, after about a year of construction. “In the new building, we look forward to rededicating ourselves to our mission of serving the poor, hungry, disabled and otherwise needy while respecting their religious, ethnic or cultural differences,” Executive Director Michelle Shonbeck said. The building will offer expanded spaces for the CCSC’s programming, including its food bank, www.compass.com IN THE NEWS

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 The new Target store in the Shep- herd Square Shopping Center, 2075 Westheimer Road, opened Oct. 25. The store replaces a former Randalls grocery store footprint with 63,000 square feet and is the chain’s first “small format” store in Houston. The store includes typ- ical Target offerings, including grab-and- go grocery items, a Starbucks and a CVS Pharmacy. The location also supports curbside and in-store pickup options. www.target.com 2 Hurts Donut , a Springfield, Missou- ri-based chain, moved its location orig- inally located in the Katy area to 5801 Memorial Drive, Houston, and opened Oct. 22. The chain is known for its wide variety of doughnuts with toppings such as breakfast cereal and bacon. The store is open 24 hours. The chain also operates an “Emergency Donut Vehicle” that offers pop-up service at various locations. 346-387-9900. www.hurtsdonutco.com 3 The fitness-focused coffee shop Active Passion , 802 Usener St., Hous- ton, opened Oct. 22. The shop offers a traditional coffee shop experience, including locally roasted coffee drinks as well as teas, with an eye toward serving the health and fitness community with

healthy meal options and post-workout mocktail drinks, bike racks with locks, a bike service station, community events and group activities. www.myactivepassion.com 4 Robot Noodle , a new restaurant by Delicious Concepts Group, has opened at 1221 W. 11th St., Houston, taking over the former space of Blackbird Izakaya, the group announced Oct. 7. The restaurant offers dine-in and carryout services for its customizable bowls, which feature a selection of proteins, vegetables, rice or noodles with a choice of sauce. Other menu options include pad thai, fried rice and ramen, among other items. Orders can be placed through the Roovy app. Delivery options will also be available. www.robot8noodle.com 5 The River Oaks Theatre , 2009 W. Gray St., Houston, reopened for the first time Sept. 9 since being closed in March because of COVID-19. The theater is oper- ating with capacity limits, seating policies and mask requirements. As of mid-Octo- ber, it was offering one or two screenings per day for three films. 713-524-2175. www.landmarktheatres.com 6 A new bar, Permission Whiskey & Service Co. , located at 2920 White Oak Drive, opened with full service in early October. The bourbon-focused bar has

hundreds of American whiskeys behind the bar as well as cocktails and wine by the glass, along with a wine-bar styled food menu with charcuterie, cheese and oysters. www.permissionwhiskey.com 7 Dual concepts from Atlanta-based restaurateurs, Lifting Noodles and Poke Burri , opened in August at 2503 Bagby St., Houston. Lifting Noodle offers a slate of ramen dishes, while Poke Burri has creative takes on poke, such as burritos, doughnuts and pizza featuring cuts of fish. 346-867-6405. www.liftingnoodlesramen.com 8 SoClutch Group’s latest bar and restaurant concept, The Sporting Club , opened Oct. 22 at 5102 Washington Ave., Houston. The lounge and restaurant offers an 8,000-square-foot space featuring a 2,400-square-foot retractable roof, an interior that draws on garden-like elements, exposed brick and an open floor plan. Houston chef E.J. Miller, formerly of Coppa Ristorante, Riel and International Smoke, serves as executive chef. The bar program was created in collaboration with the local bar experts Ladies of Libation; it offers frozen and house cocktails, botani- cals, beer and wine as well as party-sized orders of 10 batch-made cocktails in a

minikeg. 832-206-8944. www.soclutchgroup.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Giorgetti, the Italian luxury furniture designer, has ocially opened its eponymous midrise in Upper Kirby, according to an Oct. 5 news release. The seven-story, 40,000-square- foot midrise oers 32 condominium residences with custom interiors outtted with Giorgetti designs alongside other Italian-made features. The project represents an eort by Douglas Elliman Texas, Mirador Design Group and Stolz Partners, a Georgia-based real estate rm, to bring the Italian brand into the real estate business. “Everything from the building’s location to its xtures and nishes within have been inspired by the brand, enabling us to create a unique, rened setting. Each residence is like an original work of art,” said Jacob Sudho, the CEO of Douglas Elliman Texas, in a news release. The property is 50% sold with residences ranging from 2,700 to 6,800 square feet and outdoor living areas ranging from 500 to 2,000 square feet. Residences start at $1.9 million. 713-600-5062. www.giorgettihouston.com

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Robot Noodle

Residences at Giorgetti feature handcrafted Italian furniture.

COURTESY ROBOT NOODLE

PHOTOS COURTESY GIORGETTI

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The midrise has 32 condominiums.

Residences offer outdoor living areas.

Christian Community Service Center

COURTESY CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTER

employment and vocational training initiatives. The nonprofit’s $14.2 million capital campaign for the building is $1.1 million shy of its goal, according to the news release. www.ccschouston.org

The project broke ground in 2018.

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HEIGHTS - RIVER OAKS - MONTROSE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES TxDOT completes environmental impact

COMPILED BY EMMA WHALEN & MATT DULIN

North Houston Highway Improvement Project

PROPOSED PROJECTS

T H

Segment start dates

Number of displacements in project area

Construction could begin by the end of 2021 and last into the late 2020s.

study of I-45 project The Texas Department of Transpor- tation’s environmental impact study published Sept. 25 is one of the final stages of the planning process for the highly scrutinized I-45 improvement project, which has been over a decade in the making. The project proposes rerouting and expanding the highway through the East End while abandoning its path through Midtown. It also calls for an expansion of the highway though much of the Northside. The comment deadline was extended fromNov. 9 to Dec. 9 after advocates seeking to mitigate impacts on Black and Hispanic communities in the East End, Northside and Fifth Ward pushed for more time. “The FEIS is 8,189 pages across three volumes. That would be impossible to read in the 30 days,” said Oni Blair, the director of transportation equity advocacy group Link Houston. “At first glance, we don’t see any major changes, especially ones of the magni- tude that Mayor Turner identified.” TxDOT Houston District Engineer Eliza Paul said, however, the agency will continue to communicate with local officials and residents. “We look forward to continued coordination with the public on the development and refinement of the proposed [North Houston Highway Improvement Project], which is a very important project for the region that will enhance safety and mobility for

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Segment 1: 2025 or later Segment 2: late 2023 Segment 3: late 2021

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Single-family residential

Multifamily residential

West Alabama paving and drainage A segment of West Alabama Street from Weslayan Street to Buffalo Speedway is scheduled for recon- struction and improvements in 2021, including new drainage and side- walks. The project is in the design phase, according to Houston Public Works. Timeline: spring 2021-TBD Cost: $15.87 million Funding source: city of Houston

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SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

all users,” Paul said in a statement accompanying the report. Some suggestions to enhance the project, such as park space on top of caps where the highway will move underground, are not funded by TxDOT but could be taken up by a group of city and county government agencies that formed from a subset of the Houston Galveston-Area Council’s Transportation Policy Committee. Representatives of Harris County, the Harris County Flood Control District, the Metropolitan Transpor- tation Authority of Harris County and surrounding counties are working through those suggestions via an agreement known as a memorandum of understanding. “This is an opportunity to look

a little differently at an extremely complex project ... and come up with something that the entire region can benefit from,” said Joe Zimmerman, the mayor of Sugar Land and member of the H-GAC committee. Advocacy groups are eyeing the pro- cess closely, noting the representatives tasked with drafting the MOU repre- sent areas outside the project area. “Any working group ... should not include an overwhelming majority of members who do not represent the neighborhoods, people and businesses along the project corridor,” a Link Houston memo stated. The next crucial steps are TxDOT’s record of decision and approval from the Texas Transportation Commission to seek out construction contracts.

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Shepherd-Durham reconstruction A project slated for Shepherd and Durham drives between Washington Avenue and Dickson Street is nearing completion of its design phase, which includes plans to add drainage, curbs, sidewalks, driveways, lighting and un- derground utilities. The next step for the city is to solicit bids for a potential construction start in early 2021. Timeline: fall 2021-TBD Cost: $13.17 million Funding source: city of Houston

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF OCT. 28. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT HRMNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4 | JOIN US ONLINE TO HEAR FROM THIS TWO-TIME NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | WWW.JOHNCOOPER.ORG/SIGNATURES

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN

in the county. VOTER GUIDE 2020

WHERE TOVOTE Harris County residents can cast a vote at any voting center

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

SAMPLE BALLOT

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3 R Bert Richardson* D Elizabeth Davis Frizell Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 4 R Kevin Patrick Yeary* D Tina Clinton Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 9 R David Newell* D Brandon Birmingham LOCAL U.S. House District 2 R Daniel Crenshaw* D Sima Ladjevardian L Elliott Scheirman

U.S. House District 7 R Wesley Hunt D Lizzie Fletcher* L Shawn Kelly U.S. House District 9 R Johnny Teague D Al Green* L J ose Sosa U.S. House District 18 R Wendell Champion D Sheila Jackson Lee* L Luke Spencer I Vince Duncan Texas House District 137 D Gene Wu* L Lee Sharp Texas House District 148 R Luis La Rota D Penny Morales Shaw

Texas State Board of Education District 6 R Will Hickman D Michelle Palmer L Whitney Bilyeu HARRIS COUNTY District attorney R Mary Nan Human D Kim Ogg* County attorney R John Nation D Christian Dashaun Menefee Sheri R Joe Danna D Ed Gonzalez*

County tax assessor- collector R Chris Daniel D Ann Harris Bennett* L Billy Pierce Harris County Department of Education, At-Large Place 5

L Matt Sterett G Katija “Kat” Gruene Supreme Court, Chief Justice R Nathan Hecht* D Amy Clark Meachum L Mark Ash Supreme Court, Place 6 R Jane Bland* D Kathy Cheng Supreme Court, Place 7 R Je Boyd* D Staci Williams L William Bryan Strange III Supreme Court, Place 8 R Brett Busby* D Gisela D. Triana L Tom Oxford

NATIONAL

President R Donald J. Trump* D Joseph R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins U.S. Senate R John Cornyn* D Mary “MJ” Hegar L Kerry Douglas McKennon G David B. Collins STATEWIDE Texas Railroad Commission

R Bob Wolfe D Erica Davis

Harris County Department of Education, At-Large Place 7

R Don Sumners* D Andrea Duhon

R James “Jim” Wright D Chrysta Castañeda

GUNS LOCK UP YOUR SAVE A LIFE

For Free Gun Locks contact CommunityOutreach@dao.hctx.net

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Houston ISD

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN

The Houston ISD board of trustees meets for agenda review at 5 p.m. Nov. 5 and for a regular meeting 5 p.m. Nov. 12. Meetings are streamed at www.houstonisd.org/livetv MEETINGSWE COVER choice application window closes on Nov. 6, about a month earlier than previous years. Information on school choice options and application forms can be found at www.choosehisd.com. Nov. 6 SEPT. 28 The district launched a COVID-19 dashboard showing total case counts among students and staff on a campus-by-campus level. As of Oct. 28, there had been 114 cases among HISD staff and 49 cases among students. The dashboard can be viewed at houstonisd.org/covid19dashboard. SEPT. 24 Three schools were recognized with a National Blue Ribbon Schools award this year. Memorial Elementary, the High School for Law and Justice, and the Young Women’s College Preparatory Academy are all HIGHLIGHTS OCT. 8 The board of trustees approved a $1.2 million construction High School. The facility will be located in southwest Houston on Riceville School Road. The bond-funded project is slated to be completed by mid- 2021. OCT. 1 The district began allowing in-person fan attendance at high school football and volleyball games. Each student contract for rebuilding the agricultural farm for Lamar athlete was limited to five tickets, the district said. first-time recipients. The honor recognizes academic achievement and closing achievement gaps. DATE TOKNOW The first phase of the school

Texas EducationAgency cites HISDover special ed faults

HOUSTON ISD A Texas Education Agency investigation has found “sig- nificant, systemic and widespread” shortcomings in Houston ISD’s handling of special education. In a Sept. 29 report, the agency recommended TEA Commissioner Mike Morath appoint a conservator to oversee improvements with authority to “effectuate necessary change” across district barriers. “Decentralization of power to individual campuses is listed in each report as a major issue in the District preventing central administrative

Texas Supreme Court hears takeover case HOUSTON ISD The Texas Supreme Court heard oral arguments Oct. 27 in a case which will determine whether the Texas Education Agency can move forward with replacing the Houston ISD board of trustees. HISD trustees sued the agency seeking to block the takeover, which they argued was being unfairly implemented. A Travis County court granted the injunction in January, freezing the TEA’s enforcement action. In April, a state appeals court ruled the lower court should not have granted the injunction but allowed it to remain in place until all appeals could be exhausted. If the Supreme Court upholds the appeals ruling, the TEA may proceed with appointing a board of managers. current information provided in the district’s response. Further, several of the years in question were years in which TEA itself illegally imposed an 8½ percent limit on the identification of special education students,” the statement reads. The board of trustees approved $17 million in special education funds Oct. 8, a move the district said was already planned. The funds will go toward new support staff for speech pathology, mental health specialists, occupational and physical therapists, and technology specialists.

staff frommaking corrective actions,” the report states. “Area superinten- dents do not hold principals account- able for special education services, and non-special education adminis- trators often view providing special education services as a burden.” In a statement, HISD officials refuted the findings. “We are disappointed with the out- come of the investigation and believe it is factually and legally incorrect. Much of the report is devoted to years-old information from old reports and does not address more

41%of parents opt for in-person classes

HOUSTON ISD The district welcomed back about 41% of students for in-per- son learning Oct. 19 and within days had to close campuses amid reports of COVID-19 cases. The district later revised its closing policy to only close campuses after multiple cases are reported. Overall enrollment sits at over 196,000, about 5% below HISD’s target enrollment of 207,000. Meanwhile, almost half of the 105,000 laptops, tablets and hot spots ordered by

In-person learning by school 10%-20% 20%-40% 40%-58%

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of elementary school students 49% of middle school 41% of high school 26% Average in Heights-River Oaks-Montrose

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SOURCE: HOUSTON ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

the district had been deployed, and every student who has

requested a device has received one, officials said.

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HEIGHTS - RIVER OAKS - MONTROSE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Houston & Harris County

Houston City Council meets weekly at 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays for public comment and 9 a.m. Wednesdays for regular business at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. Harris County Commissioners Court will next meet at 10 a.m. Nov. 10. MEETINGSWE COVER include requiring preregistration, capping in-person services at 25% capacity, taking temperatures of congregants and requiring masks. Oct. 5: The Houston Health Department began oering a free COVID-19 training course for food service industry managers. Restaurants that successfully complete the training will receive a decal to display, according to the health department. NUMBERS TOKNOW 29% of registered voters cast a ballot in the rst week of voting in 2020 compared to 25% of registered voters in the rst week of 2016. 721,711 Number of votes cast in the rst week of early voting in Harris County CITY HIGHLIGHTS Oct. 21: Houston ocially adopted its Climate Action Plan, which includes the creation of a new Oce of Sustainability to oversee its implementation. Oct. 16: Members of Houston’s Health Equity Task Force, formed in April, developed a series of guidelines for Houston’s places of worship, some of which began reopening Oct. 18. Recommendations

City Council approves lower tax rate amid calls for further reductions

BY EMMA WHALEN

“I am concerned about the people who are struggling now and want to do anything we can to help ease that burden on them,” said Council Member Amy Peck, who rst raised the issue in a letter to constituents Oct. 13. State Senate Bill 2, passed in 2019, requires cities to obtain voter approval if total revenue fromproperty taxes is more than 3.5% higher than the previous year. An exception to that, however, allows cities to set a tax rate that results in up to 8%more revenue if a state of emergency is declared. The city is also subject to its own voter-approved revenue cap, which limits the tax increase to raise nomore

than 4.5%more revenue year over year, or a percentage based on ination and population growth, whichever is lower. City Controller Chris Brown con- rmed the adopted tax rate complies with both the state and local revenue caps. Mayor Sylvester Turner said a lower rate would result in a reduction in tax revenue that would lead to cuts to the police and re departments, which account for 60% of the general fund, according to budget documents. “What I amhearing on a daily basis is we want more support for police and re,” Turner said.

HOUSTON Property owners will see a slightly lower rate applied to their taxes this year, but some Houston City Council members pushed to limit it further. The council Oct. 21 passed a tax rate of $0.56184 per $100 valuation for scal year 2020-21, a 1.07% reduction from the previous tax rate. Based on the city’s tax rate calcu- lation, some taxpayers may still see increases, as the average value for homestead properties rose about 4% this year to $250,355. Properties at that valuation can expect to contribute about $1,407 in city taxes.

$100ne in place to protect bike lanes

April 4: 52,468

Harris County unemployment insurance claims per week

60K 40K 0 20K

2019 2020

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER Claims have dropped, but thousands are still out of work.

Oct. 3: 7,831

BY EMMA WHALEN

HOUSTON A new city ordinance will levy a ne of up to $200 for parking in bike lanes. City Council approved the mea- sure Oct. 14 after delaying the vote to work out details of the rule’s enforcement. First-time oenders will receive a warning, and anyone who violates the ordinance more than once will face a citation and up to a $100 ne. Drivers who have never received a citation can opt to take a bicy- cle-friendly driving course to avoid a penalty. While municipal judges have the ability to set nes of up to $200 for the violation, the Houston Admin- istration and Regulatory Aairs Department recommended they set a $100 ne for this specic oense. Cars parked in bike lanes can only be towed if the area has a no-parking sign, according to the department. The adjustments to the ordinance’s enforcement came primarily from Council Member Letitia Plummer, who sought to ensure the rule was strict enough to deter residents from parking in bike lanes but forgiving enough to not place too high of a nancial burden on rst-time oenders. “Our goal is to educate and also look at enforcement in a dierent manner,” Plummer said during an Oct. 7 discussion.

March 7

Oct. 3

Harris County partnerswith Lone Star College to oer freeworkforce training

BY DANICA LLOYD

federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act. Participants must be residents of Harris County who have been furloughed, unem- ployed or underemployed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, ocials said. Tuition is free, and funding for books and other costs are available as well. Training must be completed by Dec. 31.

HARRIS COUNTY More than 600,000 unemployment insurance claims have been led in Harris County since March, and a new joint program from the county and Lone Star College is providing free train- ing for in-demand careers including accounting, construction, teaching and logistics. The initiative is funded by the

Live video is available at www.harriscountytx.gov.

Coalition of political groups call for end to ‘strongmayor’ system

BY EMMA WHALEN

City Council members to be placed on the agenda for a vote by the City Council and the mayor. Under Houston’s current “strong mayor” form of government, only the mayor is permitted to place items on the council agenda. Charles Blain, one of the coali- tion’s organizers, said the eort has been forming for two years. “I wouldn’t say it was spear- headed by one person or organiza- tion, but everybody is focusing on this one issue because for far too

long we’ve heard council members say they don’t have any power to do anything with the agenda,” said Blain, who founded the conserva- tive policy blog Urban Reform. The coalition needs 20,000 sig- natures to get a proposition placed on a ballot, according to Texas local government code. The group also includes representatives from the Houston Justice Coalition, the Alief Super Neighborhood and the Houston Professional Fireghters Association.

HOUSTON Representatives from Houston’s chapter of the Demo- cratic Socialists of America joined the Houston Young Republicans and other groups across the political spectrum Oct. 26 to announce a campaign to alter the power structure at City Hall. Using the name The Houston Charter Amendment Petition Coali- tion, the group is pursuing a charter amendment that would allow any agenda item backed by at least three

13

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

INSIDE INFORMATION

COMPILED BY MATT DULIN & BEN THOMPSON

Cases by race/ethnicity in Harris County

Test positivity rate in Harris County

Houston &Harris County Taking the pulse of COVID19

The seven-day average for positive tests has been declining in Harris County since hitting its peak in late June and early July. Positivity rate 7-day rolling average

The distribution of cases by ethnicity aligns with the population, but more than half of cases were not recorded with ethnic or racial information.

30%

Percentage of Harris County population

Percentage of known COVID-19 cases

July 4 had a positivity rate of 25.3%.

American Indian/ Alaskan Native

0.1% 0.08%

Virus outbreak trends since July

20%

7.3% 3.4%

Asian

Oct. 18 had a positivity rate of 11.4%.

Ahead of u season, COVID-19 cases were on the decline in the Greater Houston area after a summertime surge, then began to climb again. Here is a look at some of the key indicators across the region.

20% 21.5% 43.7% 47.4% 2% 0.76% 28.7% 26.9%

Black

10%

Hispanic

Sept. 22 had a positivity rate of 3.7%.

Multiracial

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

0%

White (not Hispanic)

JULY

AUG.

SEPT.

OCT.

Hospitalizations/intensive care unit patients in the Greater Houston region The number of COVID-19 patients being hospitalized across the Houston Trauma Service Area, which includes multiple counties, fell by 81.5% from its peak.

Cases by ZIP code

Cases vs. deaths by age in Harris County The virus has touched every age group, but people over the age of 50 represent 90% of all deaths in Harris County.

total Harris County COVID-19 deaths 2,190

By population, the Heights-River Oaks-Montrose area has seen about 27 cases for every 1,000 residents. Harris County as a whole has seen 33.7 cases per 1,000.

Cases per 1,000 people

Cumulative cases as of Oct. 27

COVID19 PATIENTS IN GENERAL BEDS

COVID-19 ICU PATIENTS

Age

Conrmed cases

Deaths

77008 752 22

2,500

4% of cases

0-9

0%of deaths

610

9% of cases

10-19

0.27%of deaths

45

2,000

21% of cases

20-29

0.73%of deaths

10

77007 977 27

1,500

20% of cases

30-39

2.47%of deaths

77019

17% of cases

40-49

6%of deaths

566 26

1,000

14% of cases

50-59

14%of deaths

77027

500

409 26

77006 532 24

9% of cases

60-69

22%of deaths

77098 324 24

4% of cases

70-79

26%of deaths

59

N

0

JULY

AUG.

SEPT.

OCT.

2% of cases

80+

28.4%of deaths

COVID19 and the u

While caused by separate viruses, the u and COVID-19 can both cause serious disease or death, and they share some symptoms.

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SHARED SYMPTOMS

COVID19ONLY

FLUONLY

Symptoms typically appear one to four days after infection.

Symptoms typically appear ve days after infection, although symptoms may appear two to 14 days after infection.

Loss of smell or taste

Chills

Cough Muscle aches and pains

Sore throat

Runny nose

Headache Shortness of breath

Fever

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE Bianca Rivera Heights resident pushes Houston community to honor its Indigenous history G rowing up in the Northside, Bianca Rivera thought of herself, as with many of

THE HISTORY OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY

BY EMMA WHALEN

1792

The rst recorded Columbus Day celebration occurs Oct. 12. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt names Columbus Day a national holiday. Columbus Day is designated as the second Monday in October. Native American activist John Curl recommends the United Nations recognize Oct. 12 as Indigenous Peoples Day. Berkeley, California, recognizes the rst ocial Indigenous Peoples Day.

1934

not make the day a city holiday but recognizes it on the same day as the federally recognized Columbus Day. Rivera and other Native American groups have been advocating for this recognition for years. She said she gained an added sense of urgency after the recent death of Enrique Hynes, an elder of the Carrizo- Coahuiltecan nation of Texas. Rivera said Houston’s acknowledgement

her neighbors, as Tejana, a Mexican American. But her great-great-grand- mother had hinted there was more to her family’s story. “My mom said her great grandma ... used to whisper to her at night when she’d go to sleep, ‘If you want to

1971

1977

nd our people, they’re all up in Oklahoma,” she said. It was not until she was an adult that Rivera, who also goes by Abuela M’api Rainowa,

of Native history through Indige- nous Peoples Day and the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue at Bell Park is the starting point—not the endgame—

“I HOPE I CANBE A LIVING TESTIMONY FOR PEOPLE TO FEEL GOODABOUT THEMSELVES ANDKNOW WHO THEYARE.” BIANCA RIVERA

1992

1994

The United Nations marks Aug. 9 as International

Bianca Rivera founded Houston Aztec Dance Group and educates Houstonians about Indigenous history. (Courtesy Virginia C. Fairchild)

Day of theWorld’s Indigenous People.

began to research her heritage more closely. Eventually, she found census records of her family members from the early 1800s with the descriptor “Indian” crossed out and replaced with Hispanic. “We had to pick,” she said. “There was no way they were going to call us Texans because we were not of Euro- pean descent. So we became Mexican to survive.” often-overlooked Indigenous roots. In September, her advocacy led Houston to ocially recognize the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples Day. Council members voted 14-2 Sept. 30 to support the measure, which does Now, Rivera helps educate Houstonians about the city’s

when educating the public. She continues her work with

Houston Aztec Dance Group, also called Calmecac Tonantzin Yolili- tzyotl, which leads dances and drum circles in parks in the Northside, East End and at Bualo Bayou Park. The group also visits Houston ISD to reach students who may not know about their city’s or even their family’s Native history. “I’m grateful that I found out enough about it for myself,” she said. “I hope to be a living testimony for other people to feel good about themselves and knowwho they are because there is a war inside of us. ... The common root is that we may have been colonized by Spaniards ... but the original root is Native American.”

2020 Houston recognizes the secondMonday in October as Indigenous Peoples Day, joining dozens of other U.S. cities.

Houston Aztec Dance Group works with local schools. (Courtesy Houston Aztec Dance Group)

15

HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

Protests and

problem.” In an Oct. 5 memo, HPOU Vice Presi- dent Doug Griffithwrote that evenwith the rules, officers could still be fired by the chief with the mayor’s approval. He and other union representatives defended the four police officers who were fired in September after shoot- ing Houston resident Nicolas Chavez 21 times while he was experiencing a mental health crisis and pulled away an officer’s stun gun. “Iusedtocome toworkbelieving that if we followed policy and acted within our training, we would be backed and supported by our chief,” Griffith wrote in the memo. “Lately, that has not been the case.” While thefiringswere an incidenceof the chief and mayor breaking from the union to enforce stricter accountability, they did not override the need for more systemic changes, Hudson said. “There are incidents where people are let go as they should be,” he said. “But we need to look at the system as a whole. Even in the Nicolas Chavez case, the body camera video was held from the public for four months.” ‘Heartfelt conversations’ Mayors negotiate labor contracts with union presidents under a process known in Houston and other large Texas cities as “meet and confer.” The agreement, which is renego- tiated every three years in Houston, establishes pay rates and health and retirement benefits as well as disci- plinary protocols. The relationship between police and mayors, however, often begins before any elected offi- cial takes office. Unions endorse can- didates, donate to campaigns, and can mobilize large numbers of volunteers and voters. Since 2015, the HPOU has donated over $300,000 to local campaigns, according to campaign finance filings. “Police associations wield incredi- ble political power,” said Chris Harris, the director of criminal justice reform at the nonprofit Texas Appleseed. “It’s tough to challenge them in any of these avenues, but that said, I think it’s worth trying at every one.” Although Turner received the

CONTINUED FROM 1

deadline for reform in Houston is on the horizon. By Dec. 31, the three-year labor contract between the Houston Police Officers’ Union and Turner is set to be renewed. Both the mayor’s police reform task force and the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas released reports in recent months that include propos- als to alter two key HPOU contract provisions. One is the 48-hour rule allowing officers to review evidence against them in a misconduct allega- tion before making a statement, and the other is the 180-day rule prevent- ing the Houston Police Department from disciplining officers involved in misconduct that occurred more than six months prior. Both reports argue removing or revising the provisions will lead to better accountability, but some union

progress

Following calls for reform reaching new heights in May, Houston officials have increased police resources while changing some policies.

SOURCE: CITY OF HOUSTON/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

May 25

Houstonian George Floyd’s killing by Minneapolis police officers sparks national outcry.

representatives say they are crucial worker protections. What’s at stake The 48-hour and the 180- day rules are not unique to Houston, and state law allows any police union to adopt them. Advocates argue they give officers an advan- tage in misconduct allega- tions and undermine trust. “Meaningful accountabil- ity and oversight of police means we need fair disci- plinary processes in place that doesn’t give officers special treatment,” said Nick Hudson, a criminal justice

Budget details The Houston Police Department budget is primarily allocated to payroll and benefits established within the Houston Police Officers Union contract. 90%

June 3

June 10

60,000 protesters march through downtown Houston.

Houston City Council votes to approve a budget including a $20 million increase in funding for HPD and an amendment allocating $100,000 for a public police misconduct web database.

of budget is spent on payroll supplies/ equipment/ other 10%

Total budget: $965M

June 11 Mayor Sylvester Turner signs an executive order banning chokeholds and no-knock raids, except when authorized by the chief of police. It turns HPD policy into a city ordinance.

policy analyst with the ACLU of Texas. Kevin Lawrence, the executive director of statewide police union Texas Municipal Police Association, said the 48-hour rule is part of a bal- ancing act. If officers are required to submit a statement following an alle- gation but civilians have the right to remain silent, the 48-hour rule levels the playing field, he said. “If you’re a civilian, your attorney is going to request the same informa- tion,” he said. HPOU Executive Director Ray Hunt added that HPD can ask for permission from the state attorney general to dis- cipline an officer after 180 days. “It has nothing to do with us trying to say ‘hey, we want you to hurry up so you don’t find the evidence,’” he said. “If you can’t find it in six months, you’ve got a

June 24

Sept. 10

Turner announces a 45-person police reform task force.

Four officers are fired for Nicolas Chavez’s death during a mental health crisis.

Sept. 24 Council Member Edward Pollard launches the District J patrol, a community policing initiative putting officers in golf cart-style vehicles in southwest Houston.

Oct. 23 City establishes a “safe harbor court” to help low-income residents resolve fees on low-level municipal citations.

Sept. 29

Oct. 19

Houston joins Harris County’s cite-and-release program diverting some low-level offenders away from jail.

Turner allocates $4.2 million in federal coronavirus relief to cover HPD overtime.

16

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