Cy-Fair Edition - June 2020

CYFAIR EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION VOLUME XX, ISSUE XX  XXXXXXXXXX, 2020

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VOLUME 11, ISSUE 10  JUNE 16JULY 20, 2020

Cy-Fair’s uninsured rate expected to increase Texas has the nation’s highest percent of residents without health insurance, and because of an unemployment uptick in the wake of the coronavirus, local health care experts said providers are struggling to meet needs and communities can anticipate even higher rates.

Percentages below show how many residents in each demographic category were uninsured in northwest Harris County in 2018.

A CLOSER LOOK

TOTAL POPULATION BY DEMOGRAPHIC

1.8% UNINSURED POPULATION BY AGE Younger than 19 8% 19-64 65+ UNINSURED POPULATION BY RACE White Hispanic 12.2%

240,204 481,656 76,876

16.8%

521,237 216,557 140,075 137,424

22.6%

INSIDE

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BARRIERS TO CARE

HOWHEALTHY IS CY-FAIR?

12.3%

Black Other

14.2%

11.8% of Cy-Fair residents did not have health insurance in 2018.

UNINSUREDRESIDENTS

35.3% UNINSURED POPULATION BY EMPLOYMENT STATUS Employed 14.7% Unemployed Not in labor force 20.8% UNINSURED POPULATION BY HOUSEHOLD INCOME Less than $25,000 $25,000-$49,999 $50,0000-$74,999 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000 and more: 11.2% 5.7% 22.6% 24% 17.3%

365,154 19,484 97,018

Most ZIP codes in Cy-Fair exceed the U.S. rate for the percent of uninsured residents.

17.4%

9.4%

68,486 124,906 128,199 118,699 358,093

9.4% 17.6% 13.9% 13.6% 10.3% 6.8% 10.7%

77040 77064 77065 77070 77095 77429 77433 U.S.

Texas

SOURCE: 2018 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Debates ensue over voting inHarris County during coronavirus pandemic BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

and therefore was not enough to make a voter eligible for a mail ballot. “We agree, of course, that a voter can take into consideration aspects of his health history that are physical conditions in deciding whether, under the circumstances, to apply to vote by mail because of disability,” the court wrote. “We disagree that lack of immu- nity, by itself, is one of them.” Meanwhile, a separate but similar lawsuit is making its way through fed- eral court, where an appeals court also ruled against expanding mail ballot

“I DON’T SEE THIS CONFLICT GOING AWAY REGARDLESS OF WHATEVER IS RESOLVED FOR JULY." RENEE CROSS, SENIOR DIRECTOR

Eorts to expand access to mail bal- lots in Texas during the coronavirus have been blocked in several recent court rulings, including a May 27 ruling by the Texas Supreme Court. However, in that same ruling, Supreme Court justices upheld a piece of voting law that essentially allows voters to decide for themselves

whether they qualify for a mail ballot and said election ocials are not obli- gated to verify those qualications. In the May 27 ruling, the Supreme Court agreed with state ocials, who argued that a lack of immunity to COVID-19—the disease caused by the coronavirus—did not qualify as a “dis- ability” in and of itself under state law,

OF THE HOBBY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

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SPONSOREDBY • America’s ER • Houston Methodist • Lone Star College HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT HEALTH CARE EDI T ION 2020

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