Richardson | May 2022

RICHARDSON EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 9  MAY 23JUNE 26, 2022

ONLINE AT

IMPACTS

PATIO GUIDE

BUSINESS FEATURE

DINING FEATURE

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Seeking success

Over the last two years, Richardson ISD has seen its enrollment numbers drop by 5%, which has cut into the dis- trict’s state funding. Projected enrollment declines over the next decade could decrease fund- ing even further, district ocials said. Ocials had projected RISD’s enroll- ment for this school year would be 39,212 students. But an update in Jan- uary showed the district had 37,638 students. The drop in enrollment and the fear of continued funding losses come at a time when the district is focusing on teacher retention and better com- pensating its sta. With less revenue expected in the next few years, the dis- trict is looking at making necessary cuts to nonteaching sta going forward. For school districts, including RISD, average daily attendance determines the majority of funding from the state. It accounted for $82 million of RISD’s scal year 2020-21 annual rev- enue, according to district ocials. With the reported 5% drop in enroll- ment, Interim Superintendent Tabitha Richardson ISD aims to keep standards high despite declines in enrollment, revenue BY JACKSON KING

Over the last two years, a loss in enrollment and average daily attendance has caused Richardson ISD to earn less state revenue. Attendance and school revenue

Enrollment

Total revenue

39,108

$353.8M

2018-19

39,619

$382M

2019-20 2020-21 2021-22

37,787

$379.1M

37,638

$362.1M

Maria Acon teaches her second grade class at Bukhair Elementary School. COURTESY RICHARDSON ISD

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CONTINUED ON 16

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Jeng Chi Restaurant & Bakery

We’re proud to announce that some of the most trusted names in Cardiology have joined Methodist Cardiovascular Consultants. After serving the Richardson community for years, you’ll now find them just one floor up from their previous practice. Our medical group is here for all your cardiology needs including diagnostics, treatment, and prevention. Changing to meet and exceed the cardiac health needs of our friends and neighbors. That’s community. And why so many people Trust Methodist. Mention this ad for a complimentary serving of Eggdrop, Hot & Sour soup 400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 Mention this ad for a complimentary serving of Eggdrop, Hot & Sour soup with a $20 purchase Mention this ad for a complimentary serving of Eggdrop, Hot & Sour soup with a $20 purchase 400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 www.jengchirestaurant.com 400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 www.jengchirestaurant.com 400 N. Greenville Ave. #11 Richardson, TX 75081 972/669-9094 www.jengchirestaurant.com Dine in only. Expires May 31,2022 Expires June 30, 2022

Familiar Richardson faces. An entirely new name in Cardiology. Methodist Medical Group welcomes Methodist Cardiovascular Consultants.

Methodist Richardson Medical Center – Heart and Vascular Center 3001 E. President George Bush Highway, Suite 210, Richardson, TX 75082

For more information or to make an appointment, visit MethodistHealthSystem.org/

RichardsonCardiology or call 469-913-9400 .

ASAD MOHMAND, MD Board Certified Interventional Cardiologist

NHAN NGUYEN, MD Board Certified Interventional Cardiologist

MOHAMAD KABACH, MD Board Certified Interventional Cardiologist

JOSHUA BURAK, MD Board Certified Cardiologist

Methodist Cardiovascular Consultants is owned and operated by MedHealth/Methodist Medical Group and staffed by independently practicing physicians who are employees of MedHealth/Methodist Medical Group. The physicians and staff who provide services at this site are not employees or agents of Methodist Health System or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Richardson Medical Center – Heart and Vascular Center is a department of Methodist Richardson Medical Center and is not owned or operated by Methodist Medical Group. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2022

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Whether you worked too hard or played too hard, we’re here to help with your sports medicine–related orthopedic needs. Our specialties include emergency care, nonsurgical and surgical treatment options, physical therapy, on-site imaging, and more. We’re proud to provide our friends and neighbors with the highest quality, patient-focused orthopedic care. That’s community. And why so many people Trust. Methodist. You’ve already put in the miles. Get the care you need closer to home.

To find a physician on the medical staff, call 877-637-4297 or visit MethodistHealthSystem.org/Richardson

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Health System, or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 40 hyperlocal editions across three states with circulation more than 2.8 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM BARB: While the school year is coming to an end this month, Richardson ISD is already deep into planning its budget for the 2022-23 school year. In our cover story this month, Reporter Jackson King delves into what the district is doing to increase sta compensation and bring in additional students. Barb Delk, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM VALERIE: Here at Community Impact Newspaper , we’re planning our annual themed guides, which are slated to run in the coming months. June is health care, July is real estate, and August is public education. If you have story ideas related to these areas, send them our way at ricnews@communityimpact.com. Valerie Wigglesworth, MANAGING EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Barb Delk REPORTER Jackson King SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Michelle Degard ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mindy Tang METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth COPY EDITOR Beth Marshall SENIOR ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES & MARKETING Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS & DINING Local business development news that aects you

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CORRECTION: Volume 4, Issue 8 In the “City Highlights” sidebar on Page 11, the article should have stated that Richardson is limiting the use of outdoor irrigation systems from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. during the summer.

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The Time to Move is Now!

John O’Haugherty , A. Broker U.S. Navy Veteran C: 469.215.9739

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

PLANO PKWY.

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CUSTER PKWY.

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Edith and Peter O’Donnell Jr. Athenaeum

Adda

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JACKSON KING/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WILLIAM C. WADSACK/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

grand opening date has been announced. 7th Day plans to offer a variety of coffee and teas, as well as pastries, bagels and breakfast tacos. 214-264-3583. www.7thdaycoffee.com 8 ATI Physical Therapy plans to open a second location in Richardson. The new store will be located at 1450 E. Belt Line Road, Ste. 200, next to Blaze Pizza. No grand opening date has been announced. ATI Physical Therapy’s other location in Richardson is at 210 W. Campbell Road. ATI offers a variety of physical therapy services, including specialty therapy services, worker’s comp rehab, sports medicine physical therapy, hand therapy and women’s health physical therapy. 972-979-6577 (West Campbell Road location). www.atipt.com 9 The University of Texas at Dallas broke ground May 11 on the Edith and Peter O’Donnell Jr. Athenaeum , which will serve as the campus’ new “cultural district,” according to school officials. Ap- proximately 12 acres in size, the athenae- um is expected to include a performance hall, two museums and a parking garage located within a central plaza in the southeastern area of campus. The athe- naeum is supported by a $32 million gift from the O’Donnell Foundation. UTD’s campus is located at 800 W. Camp- bell Road in Richardson. 972-883-2111. www.utdallas.edu 10 Athletico Physical Therapy is coming soon to Richardson. The store will be located off Renner Road at 3501 Custer Parkway, Ste. 129, Richardson. No grand opening date has been announced.

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Jersey Mike’s Subs

COURTESY JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS

NOW OPEN 1 Yasini Jewelers soft launched its first Texas location in Richardson on May 1. The Illinois-based jewelry store is located at 201 S. Greenville Ave., Ste. 105, Rich- ardson. Yasini Jewelers offers a variety of options, including yellow and white gold jewelry, bullion, diamond jewelry and more. 972-707-7787. www.yasini.com 2 Okaeri Cafe opened Feb. 22 in Richardson at 312 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 100. The Richardson restaurant is the first brick-and-mortar location for Okaeri Cafe, which has previously operated as a ghost kitchen and pop-up eatery. The cafe offers imported teas from Japan, including matcha, as well as a diverse coffee menu. 972-685-4442. www.instagram.com/okaeri_cafe 3 Daily Deals and Furniture is now open in Richardson in the Richland

COMING SOON 6 Old 75 Beer Garden is expected to open this fall in the Richardson Restau- rant Park at 744 S. Central Expressway. Construction began in April on the 16,000-square-foot outdoor dining and entertainment plaza, which is lo- cated between Dog Haus Biergarten and the planned space for Dave’s Hot Chicken. Kirk Hermansen, developer of the restaurant park, said the area will include picnic tables, a bar, space for live music or movie screenings and more. www.instagram.com/ hermansenlanddevelopment/ 7 7th Day Coffee Co. is expected to open in Richardson’s Brick Row apartment complex this summer. The coffee shop will be located at 743 Brick Row, Ste. 350, Richardson, and plans to use local coffee roaster Edison Coffee Co. for its supply, according to the company’s website. No

Village. The furniture store opened Feb. 28 at 1300 E. Belt Line Road. Daily Deals offers a wide variety of furniture and accessories, including mattresses, at discounted prices. 469-317-7088. www.discountmattressandmore.com 4 Bruncheon opened in Richardson on May 3 at CityLine Market. The brunch restaurant is located at 1551 E. Renner Road, Ste. 830, near Whole Foods Mar- ket. The restaurant will offer breakfast and lunch options. 469-399-0846 5 Grow Me Coily has opened its first brick-and-mortar location in Richardson off of East Campbell Road. The beauty supply store opened April 23 at 955 E. Campbell Road, Ste. 300. Grow Me Coily offers a variety of hair care prod- ucts, including shampoo, conditioner and a “Strengthen Elixir” that is designed to prevent hair loss. 972-982-2592 https://growmecoily.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Great auto & renters rates for any budget. I can help you bundle your auto and renters insurance for a surprisingly great rate. Call me for a quote today.

Stephanie South, Agent 189 N Plano Rd Richardson, TX 75081 Bus: 972-690-0618 stephanie@stephaniesouth.com

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Individual premiums and budgets will vary by customer. All applicants subject to State Farm ® underwriting requirements. Availability and amount of discounts and savings vary by state.

State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company State Farm Fire and Casualty Company State Farm General Insurance Company Bloomington, IL

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State Farm County Mutual Insurance Company of Texas State Farm Lloyds Richardson, TX

The smokehouse offers brisket, sausage and more.

2101566

COURTESY 42 BBQ SMOKEHOUSE + MARKET

FEATURED IMPACT NOW OPEN 42 BBQ Smokehouse + Market ocially opened May 12 at 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 100, Richardson next to sister restaurant Lime Honey, a modern Mexican eatery. 42 BBQ’s menu features a variety of smoked brisket, pork and housemade sausage. In addition, the menu features chef-curated sides and recipes, including a family dish that the restaurant calls the “Love Boat.” “Family was an important part of the creative development process for 42 BBQ, with us featuring a few secret family recipe items as part of our extensive menu oerings,” Founder Todd Conger, said in a statement. “42 BBQ ultimately stemmed from my own family’s love of grilling together in the backyard after my son’s football games where he played under the jersey Services at the physical therapy clinic will include rehabilitation and services for work injuries. Patients can receive a free 30-minute injury/impairment assessment performed by a licensed clinician, accord- ing to the clinic website. 877-284-5384. www.athletico.com RELOCATIONS 11 The Great Outdoors Sub Shop opened at its new Richardson location May 10. The sub shop is now located at 2005 Alamo Road after closing its previous location at 242 W. Camp- bell Road on March 13. The Great Outdoors’ menu includes breakfast sandwiches, deli subs, salads, soups, sides and desserts. 972-437-5038. www.greatoutdoorsubs.com NEW OWNERSHIP 12 Sheryar Khan became the new owner of Adda in early March. Located in the Richardson Restaurant Park development at 744 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 230, the eatery serves Indian and Pakistani street food with global influences. As owner, Khan said he plans to extend Adda’s hours to seven days a week, add barbecue options to the menu and make the restaurant available for events and parties. 214-272-9737. www.theadda.io

number 42, and that’s exactly what we want 42 BBQ to feel like for our guests.” 42 BBQ Smokehouse + Market will be open for lunch from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and plans to serve breakfast barbecue options in the future, including breakfast tacos and other specialties. 214-704-4885. www.42bbqrestaurants.com

Call (972) 665-8313 or visit HomeInstead.com/278

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RENOVATIONS 13 Plano ISD is planning to conduct a complete floor replacement throughout Aldridge Elementary School in Richard- son during the summer. The district plans to replace the existing tile at Aldridge, which is located at 720 Pleasant Valley Lane in Richardson, with luxury vinyl tile that does not need to be waxed and requires less maintenance. In addition, district officials said there are plans to re- place the existing carpet tiles. According to a Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation filing, the floor replacement is expected to cost $206,500. District officials said the project will be paid with 2016 bond funds. www.pisd.ed CLOSINGS 14 One of the Jersey Mike’s Subs locations in Richardson closed at the end of April. The Jersey Mike’s location at 700 E. Campbell Road, Ste. 75, closed after lunchtime April 29, according to the store’s management. The sand- wich chain has three other locations in Richardson, including one on the corner of Coit Road and West Campbell Road. 972-994-9900. www.jerseymikes.com

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2022

TODO LIST

May & June events

JUNE 10

GROOVE TO THE MUSIC OF THE MOODY BLUES EISEMANN CENTER

Musicians Gordy Marshall and Mick Wilson perform at the Eisemann Center June 10 for a tribute concert to Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees The Moody Blues. According to the event’s description, Marshall has toured and recorded with The Moody Blues for 25 years, while Wilson was the lead singer of 10CC for 20 years. Both will be joined by Patrick Dun of Jersey Boys, Nick Kendall of We Will Rock You and Ryan Farmery of Simply Red. Tickets can be purchased online. 7:30 p.m. $32-$46. Eisemann Center, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com/events-tickets (Community Impact Newspaper le photo)

chance to take home a free paper ower craft kit after the show. 2-4 p.m. Free. Richardson Public Library, 900 Civic Center Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4350. www.cor.net/departments/public-library 13 ENJOY A NIGHT OF WINE AND CALLIGRAPHY CityLine in Richardson is hosting an introduction to modern calligraphy workshop. Class includes 90 minutes of instruction and demonstration, a beginner’s calligraphy kit and all materials to write on. The calligraphy kit includes two nibs, a black ink pot, two letter guides, tracing paper and a straight pen holder. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own wine. Tickets are available online. 6-7:30 p.m. $65. CityLine Plaza, 1150 State St., Richardson. www.citylinedfw.com/events 17 ATTEND A FREE FAMILY CONCERT The Richardson Public Library is hosting Latin Grammy-winning music duo Andrés and Christina of 123 Andrés for a concert lled with songs in English and Spanish. 2-3 p.m. Free (admission). Richardson Public Library, 900 Civic Center Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4350. www.cor.net/ departments/public-library 23 ROCK OUT TO ERIC ERDMAN Six Springs Tavern is hosting a show for ages 21 and up from guitarist Eric Erdman. According to the event’s description, Erdman is a guitarist, producer and songwriter who was formerly the frontman for the band “The Ugli Stick.” In addition to session work, Erdman has played lead guitar for The Buddy Rich Band and more. 7:30 p.m. $8.50. Six Springs Tavern, 147 N. Plano Road, Richardson. 469-917-3040. www.sixspringslive.com

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

MAY 20 THROUGH JUNE 5 WATCH A CLASSIC COMEDY MUSICAL The Richardson Theatre Centre is hosting the comedy musical “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to The Forum” at its main venue. Inspired by ancient Roman farces, this Stephen Sondheim musical tells the story of Pseudolus, the laziest slave in Rome who wishes to purchase his freedom, according to the event’s description. Tickets can be purchased online or at the box oce. Showtimes vary. $21-$25. Richardson Theatre Centre, 518 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 113, Richardson. 972-699-1130. www.richardsontheatrecentre.net JUNE 11 LISTEN TO A JOHN WILLIAMS TRIBUTE CONCERT The Lone Star Wind Orchestra and music director Eugene Migliaro Corporon honor legendary lm composer John Williams with a special program. In the show “Legacy of John Williams,” the orchestra performs selections from lm scores, such as “Star Wars,” “E.T.” and “Indiana Jones.” Tickets can be purchased online. 7:30 p.m. $22-$42. Eisemann Center, 2351 Performance Drive, Richardson. 972-744-4650. www.eisemanncenter.com/events-tickets 11 WATCH A FAMILY FILM AT THE RICHARDSON PUBLIC LIBRARY The Richardson Public Library is hosting a special screening of Disney’s “Encanto” and is oering visitors the

Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

New study will look at whether North Texas has too much parking

BY ERICK PIRAYESH

Osborn presented data at the meeting, stating there could be 10 million cars in DFW by 2045 based on population growth estimates. She said the data shows there could be around 775 miles of combined land dedicated to parking by that time. “It’s expensive to build parking, especially parking garages,” Osborn said. “Parking also takes away land in valuable areas that could be used for other purposes.” When collecting data on a parking site, the council states it will look at the total number of parking spaces, when peak use times are, nearby building occupancy numbers, special characteristics of each site, walk- ability of the area and nearby transit opportunities. Those looking to volunteer a property or learn more can visit www.nctcog.org/parking.

The North Central Texas Council of Governments’ Regional Transpor- tation Council is conducting a study to determine whether the Dallas-Fort Worth area has too much parking. The council is putting together a regional parking database to help inform area ocials on ways to develop more ecient parking. Using a 2018 study, the council estimates potentially 40% of the region’s parking spaces are typically unused. The council is an independent pol- icy board made up of ocials from across the metroplex that oversee the region’s transportation planning pro- cess. Its website states the process city planners use for determining parking needs often lacks informa- tion and can overestimate demand, leading to excess parking. During the council’s March 14 meeting, sta members said the council will be asking for property managers and owners from across DFW to volunteer their properties for multiday parking studies. The council’s website states these studies will identify local demand, reduce the chance of unused parking and inform more accurate parking standards. The study will not include single-family housing developments or neighborhoods, the website states. “What we’ll do with this [data] is try to inform parking policy by making sure our database is made up of a variety of [parking spaces] that represent dierent development types,” said Catherine Osborn, trans- portation planner with the council, during its March 14 meeting.

Work on the reconstruction of McKinney Street is planned to begin this summer.

JACKSON KINGCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

McKinney Street reconstruction project set to start this summer

NEED FOR PARKING? As of 2020, the North Central Texas Council of Governments’ Regional Transportation Council estimates there are about 6.5 million vehicles in North Texas. The council forecasts the number of cars in North Texas to increase signicantly by 2045.

BY JACKSON KING

according to city ocials. The budget is expected to be split between the 2015 bond, Dallas County and the 2021 bond. The 2015 bond will devote nearly $846,000 through savings from the Main renovation project. Dallas County is expected to contribute $680,000, and $300,000 will come from the 2021 bond. City ocials said the McKinney renovation project was previously budgeted at $1.82 million in the 2021 bond program. Construction on the project is scheduled to start in June, with trees to be planted at the site during the fall. The city is expected to complete construction near the end of 2023.

The city of Richardson plans to begin reconstruction work for McKinney Street near Main Street this summer. This road improvement project was originally included as part of the Main Street reconstruction project that began in 2019 and was completed by mid-2021. The north section of McKinney Street and the south side of Main Street were removed from the project to get within budget and were incorporated into the 2021 bond program. Plans for the road improvement project were presented to Richard- son City Council during its April 18 meeting. The scope of work for the McK- inney reconstruction project is expected to mirror the Main project, repaving the street and replacing utilities while also providing new landscaping and trees, ocials said. Dallas County will also help fund the project for pedestrian improvements along the street. The total construction project is estimated to cost nearly $1.8 million,

10 MILLION cars in North Texas 775 MILES of land dedicated to parking

SOURCE: NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ONGOING PROJECT

Gas utility repairs on Spring Valley Road The right lane of both eastbound and west- bound East Spring Valley Road between Greenville Avenue and Abrams Road may be closed to trac from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. for Atmos gas utility repairs. The work is expected to be complete by late May. Timeline: end of May Cost: N/A Funding Source: N/A

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 13. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2022

EDUCATION Plano ISD could cut programs due to rising recapture bill from state

*PROJECTED NUMBERS THE BILLION-DOLLAR BILL Plano ISD has paid almost $1.2 billion in recapture to the state in the last decade and around $2.43 billion since fiscal year 1993-94. The state has recaptured more than 30% of PISD’s property tax revenues in three of the last four fiscal years. Revenue from property taxes Revenue from state funding Recapture amount Net revenue (property taxes + state funding - recapture)

BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

certain amount of money based on [Texas education code].” District officials said 35% of PISD’s students are classified as econom- ically disadvantaged, and 19% are English language learners. PISD Board Vice President Nancy Humphrey said recapture has become another revenue source for the state. More than 30% of PISD’s property taxes over the last two years were recaptured by the state as excess revenue. “The individual taxpayer has no clue they’re being fleeced like this,” Humphrey said. “There’s no trans- parency in where that money goes.” What can be done While PISD could reduce its recap- ture bill slightly for fiscal year 2022-23 by reducing its property tax rate, Hill said that would also mean losing out on additional state funding. “We give up about $3 million [from the state] for every $0.01 we reduce [the property tax rate],” Hill said. “[As] our deficits are growing, we don’t think we can do that.” Meaningful change to the recap- ture system has long been a top legislative priority for PISD, Stolle said, and it will continue to be until something is done. Among the changes PISD is advo- cating for are limits to recapture rela- tive to a district’s total revenue. PISD officials also want to see districts refunded payments that are not used on education. District officials also said the state should create collection formulas that reflect inflation and differences in cost of living between rural and urban areas. In PISD, Stolle estimated the dis- trict likely has enough money in its accounts to cover one more budget cycle before recapture forces cuts to current school programs. “It’s like paying for your living expenses out of your savings account—you can only do that so long before you have to cut out something from your budget,” Stolle said. “We’ve so far been able to continue offering the programming that we want to offer, but that’s the cliff we see coming up very rapidly.”

After making recapture payments of more than $1 billion to the state over the last six years, Plano ISD officials project the district’s largest bill so far will come next school year. Chief Financial Officer Johnny Hill anticipates PISD will pay nearly $218 million to the state in mid-2023. This year’s payment of almost $213 million is projected to give the district the second largest recapture bill in the state, behind only Austin ISD. Recapture redistributes property tax dollars from property-wealthy districts to those deemed prop- erty-poor by the Texas Education Agency. “PISD has been planning for this day for a long time,” PISD Board Pres- ident David Stolle said of the rising bill. “We are now at the point where [very soon] we are going to have to stop delivering the programs that we currently deliver because we can’t infinitely fund a deficit budget.” For this school year, the PISD board approved a budget that had $19.6 million more in expenses than in revenue. The district tapped its fund balance to cover the difference. The decline in PISD’s student enrollment over the last several years combined with rising property tax revenues due to Plano’s strong housing market have been the main drivers for the district’s increasing recapture payments, Hill said. As PISD has had to do for the last several years, Hill said he anticipates another deficit budget will be put in place for fiscal year 2022-23. “There’s no inflationary factor built into our budget, so ... all of that additional tax collection is simply being collected by the district and being sent on to the state,” he said. “That’s why our deficits [are] going up and up and up.” Following the money One of the biggest misconceptions about recapture, according to Hill, is that the funds collected by the state benefit schools with lower property wealth levels. “This is just a flat out lie,” he said. “[School districts are] entitled to a

2019 House Bill 3 increased education funding and lowered property tax rates to help ease district payments into the recapture system.

$700M

$600M

$500M

$400M

$300M

$200M

$100M

$0

FISCAL YEAR

TOP 10 IN TEXAS The 10 school districts that paid the most into recapture during fiscal year 2020-21 made up 60% of the total funds collected by the state. While Plano ISD’s $191 million recapture bill was 31% of its maintenance and operations tax collections, Dallas ISD paid just 6% of its collections, and Wink-Loving ISD paid 83%. % OF TOTAL STATE RECAPTURE % OF MAINTENANCE & OPERATIONS TAX COLLECTIONS SENT TO STATE

Plano ISD 6% 31% $191.9M Houston ISD 7% 11% $197.8M Midland ISD 5% 45% $154.4M Austin ISD 24% 51% $710.5M

of the recapture is made up of 10 school districts 60%

Highland Park ISD 4% 68% $104.7M

Eanes ISD 3% 61% $101.8M

Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD 3% 78% $99.4M

of the recapture is made up of 148 other school districts 40%

Wink-Loving ISD 3% 83% $87M

Dallas ISD 3% 6% $85M

Spring Branch ISD 2% 18% $61.2M

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, PLANO ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEWS BRIEFS

Richardson’s Glenville Pool, which is located at 500 S. Glenville Drive, is one of four Richardson pools scheduled to open for the summer June 4.

WILLIAM C. WADSACKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City limiting pool hours; decision on aquatic center still to come

BY JACKSON KING

will be open from 1-8 p.m. Tuesdays-Sundays. The Glenville swimming pool will be open from 1-8 p.m. Wednesdays-Mondays for the summer. The Cottonwood swimming pool will be open from 1-6 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays as well as 1-8 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays after June 4. The Terrace swimming pool will be open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Wednesdays and Fridays, and 1-8 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays. The city also modied its pool hours last summer to four days a week. Both the Canyon Creek and Glenville swimming pools will close for the summer Aug. 14. The Cotton- wood and Terrace pools will switch to Fridays and Saturdays only starting Aug. 15 before closing for the season Aug. 28. City ocials said the limited hours will allow pools to be fully staed when they are open to

ensure the safety of swimmers. When a pool is closed, a sign will be placed outside the gates directing people to the nearest open pool. The daily entrance fee for each of the pools is $2, with children age 3 and under getting in for free, according to city ocials. Season passes to all four neighborhood pools are available for $30 per resi- dent, or $100 per family. Nonresident neighborhood pool passes are also available for $40. In May, the city of Richardson oered extra incentives and referral bonuses to aid in recruiting new lifeguards. Despite these incentives, Richardson Parks and Recreation Department ocials said in a statement it has only half of the sta needed to open all facilities. To complete an application and learn more about the incentives, visit www.cor.net/jobs. For more information on the city’s aquatics program, visit www.cor.net/aquatics.

City of Richardson ocials announced the sum- mer schedule for the city’s neighborhood swimming pools May 17. The four neighborhood pools will have modied opening hours because of a shortage of lifeguards, Richardson ocials said. The neighborhood pools at Canyon Creek, Cottonwood, Glenville and Ter- race will each be open six days a week starting June 4. In addition, the Cottonwood and Glenville pools will be open May 28-30 for Memorial Day weekend. A decision on whether to open the Heights Family Aquatic Center for the summer swim season is scheduled to be made by June 15. City ocials said the decision will be dependent on available recruit- ment of lifeguards to safely open the facility, which is located at 709 W. Arapaho Road. After June 4, the Canyon Creek swimming pool

Mosquito testing to continue through October

MOSQUITO CONTROL Richardson oers an interactive mosquito map under the "mosquito control" portion of its website that allows residents to nd out the latest test results in their area. The map divides the city into 12 mosquito management areas and oers weekly results for each of them.

BY JACKSON KING

spraying for mosquitoes this summer. However, the city could also decide to spray if a resident is diagnosed with the virus. The health department schedules West Nile virus spraying during overnight hours to limit exposure to people who may wish to avoid contact with the pesticide used to control mosquito populations, according to the newsletter. Spraying typically begins after 9 p.m. and ends by 4:30 a.m., with targeted neighbor- hoods being sprayed twice.

Apply insect repellent containing the chemical DEET or other eective repellents all day, every day, the health departments suggests. For those looking to protect their homes, the newsletter states resi- dents can apply commercially avail- able pesticides, according to their labels, to areas with shrubs, under raised decks and around storage areas that could harbor mosquitoes. For more information or to sign up for a mosquito spraying email list, visit www.cor.net/mosquito.

The Richardson Health Department began taking steps to combat the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, such as West Nile virus, in April. The mosquito traps that were distributed in April will be monitored through the end of October for West Nile virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses, according to Richardson’s Environmental Resources Newsletter. If a trap tests positive for West Nile or some other mosquito-borne illness, the city has the option of

PGBT TOLL

What are the results?

I N

www.cor.net/ departments/ health-department

75

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SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2022

CITY & SCHOOLS

News from Richardson & Richardson ISD

COMPILED BY JACKSON KING

Richardson City Council meets June 6, 13 and 20 at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 411 W. Arapaho Road, Richardson. www.cor.net. The meetings are open to the public and are streamed live online. Richardson ISD board of trustees meets May 23, June 6 and 13 at 6 p.m. at the RISD Administration Building, 400 S. Greenville Ave., Richardson. www.risd.org Plano ISD board of trustees meets June 21 at 6 p.m. at the PISD Administration Center, 2700 W. 15th St., Plano. 469-752-8100. www.pisd.edu MEETINGS WE COVER fine arts area. This expansion and improvement project is part of RISD’s larger middle school transformation plan. RICHARDSON City Council approved a special-use permit that will allow Another Time and Place Grille to provide dining, hookah and live entertainment on an outdoor patio. Located at 925 Abrams Road in Richardson, the special-use permit was required because the business will provide tobacco and tobacco accessories as well as allow on-site smoking. PLANO ISD During its May 3 meeting, the board re-elected Place 5 Trustee David Stolle to his position as president for the 2022-23 school year. The board also re-elected Place 3 Trustee Nancy Humphrey as vice president and Place 6 Trustee Jeri Chambers as secretary. CITY HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees picked law firm O’Hanlon, Demerath & Castillo to assist with the search for Richardson ISD’s next superintendent during its April 19 meeting. O’Hanlon, Demerath & Castillo was one of three search firms that presented during a board meeting April 13 on how they would go about assisting the district. RICHARDSON The city announced the inaugural Culture in the Core event to take place in downtown Richardson. The event, held in honor of the city’s globally oriented community, is scheduled to take place from noon-5 p.m. June 4. The free event will feature a variety of international cuisines and vendors as well as multicultural dance and music performances. RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees unanimously approved more than $31.7 million for the planned expansion and renovation project at Forest Meadow Junior High School during its May 9 meeting. The approved final phase of construction consists of all remaining work necessary for the full middle school transformation project, including updating the

Richardson slated to consider implementing restrictions on short-term rentals in the city

RICHARDSON City Council is considering implementing restric- tions on the use of short-term rentals in the city. A short-term rental is defined as a residential property that is rented wholly or partly for a period not longer than 30 consecutive days, officials said. Richardson is not allowed to prohibit short-term rentals, but can regulate them under local regulations. Council discussed potential guide- lines for short-term rentals during its May 16 meeting. No decision was made, but city staff is expected to bring an ordinance back for consider- ation by council before the end of the fiscal year in September. Under the proposed regulation, property owners would be asked to register their properties with the city in person or on a website dedicated to short-term rentals. In addition, Richardson officials

said they are looking at requiring hotel occupancy tax rates to be paid by short-term rentals upon request from the city. Officials said the hotel occupancy tax should be required since the function of the rentals is the same as a hotel or motel. The hotel occupancy tax is a mandatory state tax applied to guests who rent a hotel room that costs $15 or more each day, according to the Texas Comptroller website. The state hotel occupancy tax rate is 6% of the cost of a room, while the city charges a 7% rate. If the guidelines for short-term rentals are approved, registration will be revoked for repeated violations of any part of the proposed ordinance. If approved, Community Services Administrator Lindsay Turman said short term rentals would likely be required to register in October, with the first registration fee to be assessed in January 2023.

RENTAL REGISTRATION

Those registering a short-term rental could be asked for a list of owners, operators and agents with addresses, e-mail addresses and current phone numbers. Other requirement could include:

Name of a 24-hour contact

Nonrefundable registration fee

Floor plan with the locations of fire extinguishers and smoke detectors

Sworn statement that the owner has met all requirements

SOURCE: CITY OF RICHARDSON/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RISD OKs third phase of work at J.J. Pearce High RICHARDSON ISD The board of trustees approved the final stage for the J.J. Pearce High School renovation and expansion project. The board of trustees approved a guaranteed maximum price of a little more than $99 million for the third phase of construction during its May 9 meeting. Phase 3 of the project is slated to consist of renovating existing classroom spaces, reconfiguring existing spaces and further upgrades to existing systems/infrastructure, according documents prepared for the board.

McGowan wins District 5 race; District 2 seat goes to runoff

RICHARDSON ISD Rachel McGowan won the board of trustees District 5 seat in the May 7 election, according to official results reported in Dallas County. Sherry Clemens and Vanessa Pacheco are headed to a runoff in the District 2 race after no one received more than 50% of the votes. Three candidates were on the ballot for the single-member District 2 seat: Clemens, a small-business owner; Pacheco, a business execu- tive; and incumbent Board Member Eron Linn. Clemens came in first in the elec- tion with 41.78% of the votes, while Pacheco received 40.76%. Incumbent Eron Linn had 17.45%. The runoff election between Clemens and Pacheco is scheduled to be held June 18, with the winning candidate earning the District 2 race. McGowan received 50.99% of the

votes in the District 5 race. Realtor Jan Stell came in second in the race with 38.22%, while business developer Kile Brown was third with 10.75%.

ELECTION RESULTS

Winner of District 5 race Rachel McGowan

Runoff for District 2*

CAMPBELL RD.

Sherry Clemens Vanessa Pacheco

SOURCES: DALLAS COUNTY, RICHARDSON ISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *RUNOFF ELECTION TO BE HELD JUNE 18

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Patio Guide 2022

Outdoor dining in Richardson

Patio Richardson | 2022

PGBT TOLL

31 46

PLANO PKWY.

WILSHIRE WAY

26

21 20

19

6 32 8 44

22

PGBT TOLL

Guide Enjoy the warmer weather by dining on these patios. Listings include restaurants that oer at least ve tables outside. This list is not comprehensive. KEY R Patio reservations accepted P Pet friendly M Live music

CITYLINE DR.

PLANO RD.

25

RENNER RD.

38 4

NORTHSIDE BLVD.

BRECK

40

SHIRE BLVD.

RICHARDSON

SYNERGY PARK BLVD.

3

TE

36

9

12

CAMPBELL RD.

13

41

10

34

16

24

7

COLLINS BLVD.

42

28

45

43

14

ARAPAHO RD.

COMPILED BY STEPHEN HUNT

75

14 Chili Gordo’s 1151 N. Jupiter Road, Ste. 119 9722342505 P

15

17 33

GREENVILLE AVE.

37

1 ADDA 744 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 230 2142729737 R www.theadda.io 2 Afrah 318 E. Main St. 9722349898 M P R www.afrah.com 3 Ali Baba Mediterranean Grill 2103 N. Central Expressway 9724371222 P R https://alibabamedgrill.com 4 American Tap Room 3000 Northside Blvd., Ste. 900 4698018224 P www.atr-northside.com 5 Amigo’s 940 E. Belt Line Road, Ste. 142 9722350116 P R https://amigosrestaurantcomidacasera.net 6 Anaya’s Seafood 3600 Shire Blvd., Ste. 100

27

LOCKWOOD DR.

www.facebook.com/chiligordos/ 15 Chiloso Mexican Bistro 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 104 9722313226 P https://chilosomexicanbistro.com 16 Chocolate Angel 635 W. Campbell Road 9722348099 P R www.chocolateangel.com 17 Communion Neighborhood Cooperative 514 Lockwood Drive 9722007282 P www.communioncooperative.com 18 Dog Haus Biergarten 744 S. Central Expressway 2149359121 P https://richardson.doghaus.com 19 Edith’s Neighborhood Bistro 3551 Wilshire Way, Ste. 100 4693669934 M P R www.edithsbistro.com 20 Edoko Sushi & Robata 1250 State St., Ste. 600 9724799656 P www.edokosushi.com 21 Fernando’s Mexican Cuisine 1250 State St., Ste. 100 9722341730 P https://fernandostexmex.com 22 Fish City Grill 1415 E. Renner Road, Ste. 260 9722353474 M P www.shcitygrill.com 23 Fish n Tails Oyster Bar 807 S. Central Expressway 9727739122 www.shntails.com 24 Fish Shack 1840 N. Plano Road 4692290838 P www.shshackplano.com 25 Gillespie’s Tavern at the Shire 3600 Shire Blvd., Ste. 112 4693674651 M P R www.gillespiestavern.com 26 Good Union Urban BBQ 1150 State St. Ste. 150

29

SHERMAN ST.

11

1

18

BELT LINE RD.

30

2

39

5

SPRING VALLEY RD.

35

23

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

BRICK ROW

37 Nico’s Tex-Mex Cantina 4101 E. Renner Road 9724979222 R www.nicoscantina.com 38 Northside Drafthouse & Eatery 3000 Northside Blvd., Ste. 800 9722387915 M P R www.northsidedrafthouse.com 39 Sababa 743 Brick Row, Ste. 100 9729078200 P R www.sababacuisine.com 40 Shady’s Burgers & Brewhaha 2701 Custer Parkway, Ste. 915 2144842689 M P www.shadysburgers.com 41 Snuer’s Restaurant & Bar 300 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 100 4699981479 P www.snuers.com/locations/richardson/ 42 Sueño Modern Mex-Tex 800 W. Arapaho Road 4693726739 P R www.suenomextex.com 43 Ten50BBQ 1050 N. Central Expressway

27 Haystack Burgers and Barley 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 17 9724799424 P www.haystackburgers.com 28 Holy Frijoles 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 442 9722351724 P R https://holy-frijoles.business.site/ 29 Industrial Pizza & Brew 100 S. Central Expressway, Ste. 72 4693997877 P www.industrialpizzaandbrew.com 30 Jasmine Cafe 107 E. Main St. 9724374522 P R www.jasminetexas.com 31 Jasper’s 1251 State St., Ste. 950 2147162610 P https://abacusjaspers.com/

2145012540 M P R www.anayaseafood.com 7 Andalous 1601 N. Central Expressway 9729073000 P www.andalousgrill.com 8 Apollonia’s Italian Kitchen 3610 Shire Blvd., Ste. 108 4692090500 M P R www.apolloniasitaliankitchen.com 9 Asian Mint 300 W. Campbell Road, Ste. 140 10 Bambu Asian Cuisine 1930 N. Coit Road, Ste. 100 9724808880 P R www.bambuasiancuisine.com/ 11 Big Shucks 103 S. Coit Road 9722318202 P R https://awshucksdallas.com 12 Cafe Brazil 2071 N. Central Expressway 9727839011 P www.cafebrazil.com 13 Cafe Gecko 1381 W. Campbell Road 9723734359 M P R https://cafegeckorichardson.com 4696770767 P R www.asianmint.com

locations/richardson/ 32 Liberty Burger

3617 Shire Blvd. 4698637111 P

www.givemelibertyburger.com 33 Lockwood Distilling Co.

8557831050 M P http://ten50bbq.com 44 Texas 3609 Shire Blvd. 9726649975 P R www.thesonoftexas.com 45 TG Steakhouse 518 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 133 4692060036 www.tgsteakhouse.com 46 Tricky Fish 1251 State St., Ste. 750 9724373474 P www.tricky-sh.com

506 Lockwood Drive 4693991599 M P https://lockwooddistilling.com 34 Mena’s Tex-Mex Grill & Cantina 1851 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 500 9722356300 P R

www.menastexmexgrill.com 35 Meteor Hamburgers 1608 E. Belt Line Road 9728034880 P www.facebook.com/ meteorhamburgersrichardsontx/ 36 Mi Cocina 1370 W. Campbell Road 9726716426 www.micocina.com/ locations/in/tx/dallas/lennox/

4699134890 M P R www.goodunionbbq.com

13

RICHARDSON EDITION • MAY 2022

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