Spring - Klein Edition | May 2020

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 2  MAY 8JUNE 5, 2020

ONLINE AT

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up to date as of press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

High unemployment casts unclear future for businesses, local workers

INSIDE

14

AWEEKOF TEXAS UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS BY INDUSTRY = 1% of estimated claims by industry for the week ending April 18

Arts, entertainment and recreation Information Finance and insurance

TOTAL ESTIMATED CLAIMS APRIL 1218 199,979 NOTE: OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DATA IS EXCLUDED FROM TOTAL.

Real estate rental and leasing

Mining Education services

The two hardest-hit industries include 21,201 residents, or

Wholesale trade

Professional, scientic and technical services Transportation and warehousing

21.91%

of the civilianworkforce within Spring ISD boundaries and 26,787 residents, or

Construction

Other services Manufacturing

20.84%

Health care and social assistance Administrative, support and waste disposal services

of the civilianworkforce within Klein ISD boundaries. SOURCES: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU 2018 ANNUAL COMMUNITY SURVEY 5YEAR ESTIMATES, TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Other

Retail trade Accommodation and food services

Between Feb. 16-April 25, Texas Workforce Commission estimates as of press time May 1 show the most unemployment claims were led statewide during the week ending April 25. A WEEKLY BASIS

Unemployment claims iled

45

77389

437,300

MARCH 18APRIL 18: A MONTH OF UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS BY ZIP CODE

1,272

249

77373

99 TOLL

2920

313,832

3,316

UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS * *INCLUDES OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DATA AND TWC ESTIMATES

Harris County 203,744

2,440

77388

3,350

77379

158,364

77070

77090

2,592

In one month, more than 18,000 residents within the nine ZIP codes that make up Community Impact Newspaper ’s Spring and Klein coverage area led for unemployment insurance with the Texas Workforce Commission.

2,356

77068

7,053

6,368

610

77069

926

77066

April 25

Feb. 22

March 7

March 21*

April 4*

1960

1,776

2020 WEEK ENDING

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

N

SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

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HOUSTON, WE CAN

CARE FOR OUR COMMUNITY, CONTROL THE SPREAD, SAVE LIVES

Houston is strong. When confronted with adversity, we band together and overcome. And though this coronavirus pandemic is unprecedented, we face it the same way—together.

Houston Methodist would like to thank our employees, physicians, scientists and all health care workers who are committed to helping the community. Together we can make our city healthy and vibrant again.

houstonmethodist.org | #houstonwecan

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

FROMKIM: As we have practiced self-isolation and social distancing over the past couple of months in hopes of attening the coronavirus curve, the community has come together in unprecedented ways to keep spirits bright. Senior-living facilities have helped their residents connect with loved ones by hosting parades. Sewing and quilting groups have come together to make masks. Numerous restaurants have contributed meals to hospitals and rst responders. Neighborhoods

CONTACT US 8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Ste. 220 Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES sklnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERHOUSTONMETRO Jason Culpepper GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens

have thought of ways to connect and lift our hearts. All the while, our educators have stayed connected with students through videoconferencing to help children and their parents with assignments. While we do not know what tomorrow may bring, it is small acts of kindness that connect all of us and bring joy. As American historian and author Alice Morse Earle once said, “Every day may not be good, but there is something good in every day.” Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER WHAT’S NEWAT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ? CUSTOMDIGITAL CAMPAIGNS FOR ADVERTISERS Our online partnership includes more value with record-breaking content and readership and exible weekly ad schedules. communityimpact.com/advertise EEDITIONS

EDITOR Hannah Zedaker REPORTER Adriana Rezal COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury STAFFWRITER Dylan Sherman ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Laurence DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters STAFF DESIGNERS Matthew T. Mills, Kaitlin Schmidt BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

WE NEED TO SUPPORT THE BEST GOOD CAUSE OF ALL: EACH OTHER.

Our city is famous for its Big Houston Heart. But right now, Houston is under attack. It’s a virus.

At St. Luke’s Health, we know who’s defending us – the city’s Healthcare teams, EMS, Police, Rescue Workers, and Fire Fighters. And what supports them? It’s our collective commitment to the basics: washing hands, practicing social distancing, and staying home. Simple. But critical. Because if we don’t take care of the frontline, who’s going to take care of us?

Take care of the basics. And show what our Big Houston Heart really can do. ShowUsYourHoustonHeart.org | #ShowUsYourHoustonHeart

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS INNOVATION

COMPILED BY ADRIANA REZAL AND HANNAH ZEDAKER

Local business owners adapt to coronavirus restrictions

How to make a candle Foxre Candle Works is oering at-home candle-making kits. Step 1: Mix 15 milliliters of provided oils to desired scent Step 2: Heat wax in microwave, stirring periodically, until fully melted Step 3: Pour wax into candle jar, add oils and stir Step 4: Place wick and let cool for approximately 90 minutes

What’s included? Little Craft Place’s $50 Surprise Box includes a random assortment of items such as:

• Crafting pens • Paper goods • Washi tape

COURTESY FOXFIRE CANDLE WORKS

COURTESY LITTLE CRAFT PLACE

Foxre CandleWorks

Little Craft Place

F oxre Candle Works, a locally- owned candle boutique and fragrance bar located in Vintage Park, is supporting health care providers by providing them with customized scent kits. According to owners Erica and Je Hoke, one nominated front-line worker is randomly selected each week to receive a free, customized candle-making kit. “Dierent people have sent in [nominations] ... where they tell us who they think deserves it or who

L ittle Craft Place is oering sta- tionery and crafting supplies for those who may be looking for a creative outlet while social distancing at home. Located on Spring Cypress Road, the stationery store oers curbside pickup options and e-gift cards now available on the store’s website. Customers can also purchase Little Craft Place Surprise Boxes to receive a variety of select in-store items ranging from planners and washi tape to stickers and pens. Co-owner

needs a break or needs something fun that’s not so serious,” Erica Hoke said. “[They] tell us what their favorite scents are, ... [and] we put together a kit for them.” Additionally, Foxre Candle Works is oering at-home candle-making kits available for purchase on its website via curbside pickup or delivery. 126 Vintage Park Blvd., Ste. C, Houston 832-458-5392 www.foxrecandleworks.com

Ian Lin said the boxes cost $50 to order and can contain up to $200 worth of products. “Since the kids are at home right now, it will keep [them] busy to have supplies and things they can work on since they are not able to come to the store,” Lin said. Surprise Boxes are available for curbside pickup or delivery. 9702 Spring Cypress Road, Spring 832-604-7103 www.littlecraftplace.com

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COURTESY LITTLE EXPLORERS ACADEMY

COURTESY MUSCLE UP MOMMY, INC.

Little Explorers Academy

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L ittle Explorers Academy While owner DeAna Kindt said she had originally planned to celebrate the anniversary a few weeks ago, the outbreak of COVID-19 put those plans on hold. Although day care centers are con- sidered essential workplaces, Kindt said Little Explorers Academy is one marked its rst anniversary in Spring on March 18. of the few local child care centers that remains open, despite having lost 88% of her enrollment.

M uscle Up Mommy Inc., a Spring-based tness train- ing and retail company, is now oering free virtual group training sessions for women via Zoom videoconferencing. According to founder Mykel Davis, group class fees normally priced at $129 per month have been waived for the months of April and May to support mothers who are self-isolating at home as a result of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. “We’re oering services 100%

“I am not making money; in fact, it is costing me more to stay open,” she said in a statement. “But I feel strongly about trying to do my part in our community and help the essential workers so they can continue to be responsive in our community and work.” Kindt is currently oering free reg- istration and enrolling new students.

online, and because we waived small group fees, we’ve actually met more people that have taken advantage of overcoming that mental barrier of being home, having those changes in their nancial situation, ... the kids being home. It’s just another outlet for them,” Davis said. Group sessions take place Mon- day-Thursday at 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. with online registration.

19433 T.C. Jester Blvd., Spring 281-547-8989 www.littleexplorerskids.com

248-730-1999 www.muscleupmommy.com

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

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Valid only at Honda of Tomball. Any or all coupons must be presented at time of write up in the service drive. Any or all coupons not to be utilized with other coupons nor are coupons redeemable for cash. No discount will exceed $100.00 unless specifically stated in the individual coupon advertisement. Synthetic oil usage will incur additional charges. Up to 5 quarts. Some models higher based on filter and diesel engines. See service advisor for full details. $ 29 88 OIL CHANGE SPECIAL All Makes & Models (Up to 5 quarts)

Valid only at Honda of Tomball. Any or all coupons must be presented at time of write up in the service drive. Any or all coupons not to be utilized with other coupons nor are coupons redeemable for cash. No discount will exceed $100.00 unless specifically stated in the individual coupon advertisement. See service advisor for full details. (B3G1IM) Plus $30 Off 4 Wheel Alignment with purchase. BUY 3 TIRES GET ONE FREE! WE WON’T BE UNDERSOLD

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Valid only at Honda of Tomball. Any or all coupons must be presented at time of write up in the service drive. Any or all coupons not to be utilized with other coupons nor are coupons redeemable for cash. No discount will exceed $100.00 unless specifically stated in the individual coupon advertisement. See service advisor for full details. (TBSI) ANY VEHICLE $ 250 OFF! Don’t get stranded! Timing belt fatigue cannot be detected. Includes drive belts, water pump, tensioner and coolant. Recommended every 7 years or every 105k miles.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

HOW ITWORKS HOWHAS THE CORONAVIRUS AFFECTED TEXAS DRIVER’S LICENSE EXPIRATION DATES AND OTHER DEADLINES? Effective March 18, Gov. Greg Abbott announced the temporary waiver of expiration dates for driver’s licenses, commercial driver’s licenses, election identification cards and identifica- tion cards. This means cards expiring on or after March 13 fall under the period that encompasses the state of disaster declaration related to COVID-19 and will remain valid for 60 days, after the Department of Public Safety will issues public notice that the extension period for this disaster declaration has been lifted. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced March 26 that the Real ID enforcement deadline has been extended by one year until Oct. 1, 2021. Effective March 16, Abbott issued a statement granting a temporary ex- tension to obtain initial registration, renewal of registration, vehicle titling and renewal of a permanent disabled parking placard. The temporary waiv- er is in effect until 60 days after the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles notifies the public that normal ser- vices have resumed. As such, vehicle inspections may also be delayed.

Cost: $9.4 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4 2 Gosling Road Segment 3 upgrades In the second quarter of 2020—which ends in June—Rocchi said Precinct 4 plans to advertise for construction bids on a project to upgrade the two-lane asphalt section on Gosling Road between West Rayford Road and Creekside Forest Drive to a four-lane concrete boulevard with improved drainage and traffic signal installation and modification. Timeline: TBD Cost: $6.5 million Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4 3 Holderrieth Road Segment 3 extension Harris County Precinct 4 is studying a project to extend Holderrieth Road from Hufsmith-Kohrville Road to the Grand Parkway at Champion Forest Drive as a four-lane concrete paved section with improved drainage and traffic signal installation and modification. A construc- tion timeline and an estimated cost of construction have not yet been identified, Rocchi said. Timeline: TBD Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County

2

CREEKSIDE FOREST DR.

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MOSSY OAKS RD.

SPRING STUEBNER RD.

3

2920

99 TOLL

249

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

1960 ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Gosling Road Segment 2 upgrades Construction is underway on a project to widen Gosling Road to a four-lane concrete section with improved drainage between Mossy Oaks and West Rayford roads. Originally anticipated for comple- tion in fourth quarter 2019, the project

has been delayed by inclement weather days and the need to continually adjust the project to accommodate the rapidly developing corridor, according to Pamela Rocchi, the director of Harris County Precinct 4’s Capital Improvement Projects Division. Construction on the project is slated to wrap up in the first week of May. Timeline: March 21, 2018-May 2020

“We Have to Find Time to Stop and Say Thank You to the People Who Make a Difference

Especially Now This is to the people of the St. Luke’s Health family who, every day, stand on the frontlines of a pandemic that’s attacking our country and our community. The people who put themselves in harm’s way to provide the medical expertise that mitigates and heals. The people who provide what doesn’t come in a specified therapy or prescription; the comfort and support that alleviates fear and anxiety. People in Houston may never know your names, but they will never forget how you made this community feel.

in Our Lives.” — John F. Kennedy

It all comes down to two small words, words that come from the bottom of our hearts: Thank You

9

SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PUBLIC SAFETY Domestic violence calls climb inHarris County

A ‘petri dish’ for domestic violence Officials added they suspect actual incidences of domestic violence are much higher because more cases are going unreported as connections to the outside world are more limited. “Isolation is literally just exagger- ating any abuse that might have been taking place previously,” said Sheryl Johnson, the director of NAM’s Family Violence Center. The same can be said for inci- dences of child abuse, said Sarah Hernandez, the communications and outreach coordinator for The Chil- dren’s Assessment Center—a Harris County-based organization—as many children are now separated from adults they trust such as teachers, who are also mandated to report child abuse to the state. To make matters worse, for those who do choose to leave an abusive relationship, Spencer said many Greater Houston-area shelters have also had to cut bed space in half to comply with social distancing guidelines to curb the spread of the coronavirus. “Several of the domestic violence shelters in our areas have closed to new clients because they’ve already got a full house and they’re practicing social distancing,” Johnson said. “So it’s even more difficult to get some- body into a shelter.” Finding sanctuary Local officials offered several options for victims of domestic abuse to find refuge if he or she is stuck at home with the abuser, including con- fiding in someone the victim trusts, creating a safe space inside the home and coming up with a signal for when police intervention is needed. “It’s hard to encourage domestic violence survivors to [confide in someone they trust] because ulti- mately, domestic violence is a crime of secrecy,” Colter said. Once those allies are made, Colter added having a code word or some other type of signal that could be used to notify the ally when police intervention is needed is also a good plan to have in place. Colter also recommends creating a safe space in the house where there are no weapons or items that could be used as weapons. She also

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

CALLS

Throughout the duration of Harris County’s “Stay Home, Work Safe” order, officials said the combination of encouraged isolation, coronavirus- related financial stressors and limited shelter space as a result of social distancing have created an ideal environment for escalated domestic violence. “All of those things create a petri dish for domestic violence,” said Mai- sha Colter, the CEO of Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse, a Houston-based organization that provides free legal representation and counseling for survivors of domestic abuse. “We’ve actually seen an uptick in calls for service related to victim programs ... specifically around the time when the stay-at-home orders started to come down.” The same trend could be seen for most organizations dedicated to help- ing survivors of domestic violence, including Northwest Assistance Ministries’ Family Violence Center, the Houston Area Women’s Center, the Children’s Assessment Center and the Harris County Sheriff’s Office, which has a dedicated Domestic Violence Unit and Crime Victim Assistance Unit. “Stay-at-home measures may help prevent the spread of COVID-19, but home may not be the safest place,” said Chau Nguyen, chief public strategies officer for the Houston Area Women’s Center. “Calls to the hotlines have spiked up to 40% on some days, averaging about 60-80 domestic violence-related calls a day.” According to the sheriff’s office, while calls related to domestic violence saw a 10.28% decrease from January to February, that number shot back up in March, growing 19.84% from February with 1,558 domestic violence-related calls reported countywide. “People are confined [in] their homes, [and] many people are not working or working from home,” HCSO Director of Public Affairs Jason Spencer said. “Those that are not working have no income, so their stress is up, which can cause them to lash out much more quickly. For the batterer, they are home more, which gives themmore access to the victim.”

FOR HELP

While calls to the Harris County Sheriff’s Office related to domestic violence saw an overall 10.28% decrease between the months of January and February, that number shot back up in March by 19.84%.

REAL . LOCAL . SAVINGS .

Family-related aggravated assault

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JANUARY

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16

219

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FEBRUARY

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184

1,104

713-224-3426 1403 Spring Cypress Rd Spring

MARCH

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SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

encouraged families to make space when they are able to by taking a walk or a trip to the grocery store to de-escalate a heated situation. “People are still able to go to the grocery store, the pharmacist—places like that might be a place of sanctu- ary right now for a victim of domestic violence,” Colter said. As with many past crises, Johnson added she anticipates domestic violence calls to continue to climb even after the stay-at-home orders are lifted. “Quite frankly, the longer we’re in this scenario and the longer [the vic- tim] is isolated, the more entrenched some of those behaviors are going to become once we go back to ‘normal life,’” she said.

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

CORONAVIRUS BRIEFS

Local birth centers, midwives see increasing demand fromexpectantmothers

Precinct 4 quilters, church groups come together to sewmasks for workers

Exploring THE OPTIONS Here are a few local alternatives to traditional hospital births.

BY ADRIANA REZAL

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

Bank, among others. Additionally, local churches, including Windwood Presbyterian Church in Spring, have also sewn masks for Precinct 4 ocials to distribute. Since partnering with Precinct 4, Director of Ministry Operations Meredith Ridenour said the church’s Prayerful Stitchers and Prayerful Quilters have made approximately 800 masks. GET INVOLVED To join Precinct 4’s mask-making eorts or donate supplies, the following contacts can be reached: • Precinct 4: Cyndi Hill at chill@hcp4.net • Coppereld Church: care@coppereldchurch.com • The MET Church: Hannah Bush at hbush@themet.church • Windwood Presbyterian Church: Meredith Ridenour at Meredith@windwoodpc.org

While expectant mothers typically decide early on in their pregnancy which type of birthing option they would like to pursue, some are deciding to transfer out of traditional hospital deliveries much later in their pregnancies as a reaction to newly implemented precautionary restric- tions in hospital delivery rooms, local health care providers said. “Right now what’s happening is people are getting to be [36-37] weeks [pregnant] and talk to their provider and their providers are tell- ing them, ‘Hey, you can’t have your spouse, you can’t have your doula [in the delivery room].’ ... Now, they’re scrambling, calling around, talking to dierent midwives about what options they have,” said Jaelin Stickels, a certied nurse midwife at Holistic Heritage Homebirth. However, safety measures vary by hospital. In addition to screening

Over the past month, as face masks have become fewer and farther between, Precinct 4 sewing and quilting groups, as well as volunteers from local churches, have joined forces to make masks for those in need. “During Hurricane Harvey, we saw our boating community come together to quickly provide emer- gency rescue to their neighbors in need,” said Cyndi Hill, assistant director of Precinct 4 Encore!, the precinct’s senior program. “In the same manner, our sewing commu- nity has come together using the tools of their hobbies.” Within two weeks, Hill said in an April 23 interview that their volunteers had provided more than 979 masks to entities including the Harris County Fire Marshall’s Oce, Harris County’s mobile COVID-19 testing sites and the Houston Food

Cy-Fair Birth Center www.cyfairbirthcenter.com Holistic Heritage Homebirth www.hhhomebirth.com

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visitors and employees in desig- nated entrances and restricting children under the age of 18 from entering facilities, CHI St. Luke’s Health hospital is allowing only one visitor in labor and delivery rooms.

Bridging for Tomorrowdistributes over 63,000pounds of food

BRIDGING FOR TOMORROW

1960

BY ADRIANA REZAL

Bank’s Food for Change Market program, allowing the nonprot to distribute fresh produce, dairy and meat to Food for Change clients. “We realized that families who were underresourced before this [pandemic] now have huge chal- lenges, and then, families who were making it month-to-month and were doing okay before are now bumped down to being thrown into chaos,”

Connor said. “The biggest need that we’re seeing is a need for food and access to enough nutritious food.” Since March 17, the nonprot has distributed 63,580 pounds of food from its food pantry to 1,227 families, essentially feeding 5,497 people. People only need a form of identi- cation to be eligible for food dona- tions and can visit the food pantry once a week for curbside pickup.

45

As of April 21, Northwest Houston nonprot Bridging for Tomorrow has distributed over 63,000 pounds of food to more than 1,200 families in need during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. In July 2019, Communications Director Hannah Connor said Bridging for Tomorrow’s food pantry became a part of the Houston Food

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359 W. Richey Road, Houston 281-203-0830 www.bridgingfortomorrow.org Food pantry hours: Tue. noon-3 p.m., Wed. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

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*Some restrictions apply. You must be 21+ to shop and order online, receive delivery, or pick up in store. All deliveries require in-person verification of a legal photo ID at point of delivery. Orders will NOT be left unattended. Limited delivery area and pick up only available at select locations. All in-store promotions and pricing do not apply to online orders. Exclusions apply. Please drink responsibly.

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Liquid Bean Cafe Old Town Spring cafe boasts 28 coee varieties W hen husband and wife Charles and Rhonda Blair opened Old Town Spring’s which change seasonally, Liquid Bean Cafe also sells its coee beans in quarter-, half- and full-pound bags for patrons to take home. “We always try to nd out what BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

Housemade whipped cream

Seasonal fruit

Homemade wae

Liquid Bean Cafe in August, they opted not to include a drive-thru for fear it would eliminate their favorite part of owning a business—getting to know their customers. However, to comply with countywide mandates during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the couple had no choice but to begin oering only curbside service in mid-March. “We like getting to know our customers so even though I’m in the back cooking, I will get out here and meet all the customers because we want everyone to feel welcome and feel like they’re at home and feel like they’re family,” Rhonda said. The cafe features 28 types of coee beans from local roasters, loose-leaf herbal teas and homemade pastries. In addition to crafting coee-and espresso-based beverages in-house,

Milk and white chocolate drizzle

Powdered sugar

they’re brewing [the coee] with so that we can grind it the right way for them because the grind that you use and the water is very key to good coee,” Rhonda said. To complement the coee, Liquid Bean Cafe also oers all-day breakfast and lunch with signature items such as the LBC Taco, which is a pancake lled with scrambled eggs, shredded cheese and a choice of meat, served with syrup and salsa. Once the dining room reopens, patrons can enjoy counter and table service, an outdoor patio, worksta- tions with charging ports, free Wi-Fi, and a lounge area with couches. “The name-brand places will be ne, but us locals have to go above and beyond to keep going,” Rhonda said.

TheAweyWaey ($9.99) is a homemade wae topped with fresh seasonal fruit and housemade whipped cream, drizzled with milk and white chocolate and dusted with powdered sugar. (Photos by Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

LiquidBean Cafe 317 Gentry St., Spring 936-444-3130 www.theliquidbean.com

Temporary hours: Curbside service is available Thu.-Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Husband and wife Charles and Rhonda Blair opened Liquid Bean Cafe in Old Town Spring in August.

N

WORTHWHILE CONVERSATIONS WHEN CAN WE UNBUCKLE THE SEATBELTS?

THE LAST 4-5 MONTHS WERE FULL OF TURMOIL IN FINANCIAL MARKETS. IS THIS UNUSUAL COMPARED TO OTHER MARKETS L&W HAS OBSERVED OVER 49 YEARS? In our 49-year history, we’ve seen a lot of markets that created financial uncertainty, which makes planning difficult. The “flavor” of each dish offered up by a market is always distinct, but the basic ingredients are the same. The key to a successful outcome in personal financial health is not unlike following a healthy diet – get sound ongoing advice from someone who has your best interest at heart. WHAT DO YOU MEAN, “…YOUR BEST INTEREST AT HEART”? Linscomb & Williams has a long-tenured executive client who was recently and unexpectedly forced to retire early from the hospitality industry. We explained it this way: Ask someone, “What should I eat?” and you likely won’t get the same recommendation from your neighborhood butcher as from a Registered Dietician. Your butcher might recommend the pork spareribs that just arrived, knowing you’ll find that recommendation appealing. The dietician, on the other hand, insists on a balanced program that will achieve your ultimate

health goal, though it includes items you might not like. WHERE’S THE CONNECTION TO FINANCIAL ADVICE DURING MARKET TURMOIL? Much of what passes for financial “advice” today is equivalent to the butcher selling you the pork spareribs. The pork spareribs are what he has on hand to sell; he thinks they will work OK for you and that you’ll be happy. He’s not that concerned whether it is the best option for your long-term health. The majority of financial advisors today still operate outside a pure fiduciary standard, and are under no legal obligation to put your best interest above their own. PRESUMABLY, L&W FOLLOWS A DIFFERENT APPROACH? At Linscomb & Williams, we are like that Registered Dietician. Following the fiduciary standard, we are obligated to put your interest ahead of our own. This is always important, but most especially, in times of market turmoil -- times when it makes sense to get a second opinion from an experienced firm with no products to sell. We have an experienced team to deliver that second opinion right here, right now. Call Grant Williams at 713.840.1000.

Craig Ivy and J. Harold Williams, discuss the Fiduciary Standard and placing the client’s best interest first. (Left to right: Craig Ivy, AIF ® ; and J. Harold Williams, CPA/PFS, CFP ® )

1400 Post Oak Boulevard, Ste. 1000 Houston, Texas 77056 713.840.1000 www.linscomb-williams.com Linscomb & Williams is not an accounting firm.

13

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

HOW TO FILE FOR UNEMPLOYMENT To le for unemployment through the Texas Workforce Commission either online at ui.texasworkforce.org or by phone at 800-939-6631, applicants should take the following steps.

Spring andKleinworkforce, businesses face unprecedented unemployment BY ADRIANA REZAL

close their doors through April 30 to curb the spread of COVID-19. As the state saw unemployment numbers soar beginning in mid-March as a result, local economic leaders now say the future of the job market remains unclear despite Gov. Abbott’s April 27 announcement to begin reopening some businesses, eective May 1. Across the state, TWC had processed more than 1.5 million unemployment claims from March 14-April 15—a nor- mal year and a half’s worth of claims in just one month’s time, Gamez said. In Harris County alone, the num- ber of claims led the week of April 18 saw a spike from 2,337 claims that same week in 2019 to 40,712 in 2020. In Spring and Klein, more than 18,000 residents led for unemployment insurance between March 18-April 18, according to TWC data. According to TWC, the state’s retail industry was hardest hit, with more than 29,000 unemployment claims led in the week ending April 18, fol- lowed by the accommodation and food services sector with 28,860. Within Spring ISDboundaries, 21,201 residents, or 21.91%, of the civilian workforce, are in the two industries, according to 2018 Annual Commu- nity Survey ve-year estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. Meanwhile, 26,787 residents, or 20.84%, of the population within Klein ISD’s bound- aries work in those sectors. Patrick Jankowski, senior vice pres- ident of research at the Greater Hous- ton Partnership, said during anApril 28 webinar that he estimated more than 400,000 unemployment insurance claims in the Greater Houston area had been led for March and April. Bobby Lieb, president and CEO of the Houston Northwest Chamber of

Since Harris County ocials issued a disaster declaration March 11 for the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, social distancing, curbside pickup and iso- lation have become the new norm for many residents and businesses. As a result, severe job losses have been felt across the state as seen by record-high payouts in unemployment benets from the Texas Workforce Commission. “[The week of April 17], we saw the largest amount of benets being paid ... April 13 at $183 million in benets paid out to 137,000 claimants,” said Cisco Gamez, TWC media and public relations specialist, in a Facebook Live event April 15. “On April 6, we [paid out] $41 million to 64,000 claimants.” In addition to record unemployment claims, the eect of the coronavirus outbreak has also been felt among small businesses in Spring and Klein. Janna Sewell, co-owner of Still- Goode Home Consignments on Lou- etta Road, said her business had to cut its services and let go of employees. “We had to [lay o employees] so they can at least collect unemploy- ment because we can’t pay them,” Sewell said. “We don’t have anymoney coming in. We’re a consignment store, so it’s a little bit dierent. We’re selling things for other people, so we’re hav- ing to pay our consignors as well.” Additionally, despite access to nan- cial assistance at the federal, state and county level, many business owners have faced challenges nding lend- ers and receiving funds, leaving their futures uncertain. Swellingunemployment In late March, Harris County ocials mandated nonessential businesses

Exhausted unemployment on or after July 1, 2019

Already approved for unemployment benets

Eligible for regular unemployment benets

Nontraditional applicant*

New applicant

Already applied

Wait for notication

May be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance

13 weeks of additional benets

Apply online at ui.texasworkforce.org

Eligible to receive either unemployment or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance benets for up to 39 weeks

Additional $600 per week available until July 31

WE HAD TO LAYOFF EMPLOYEES SO THEY CANAT LEAST COLLECT UNEMPLOYMENT BECAUSE WE CAN’T PAY THEM. JANNA SEWELL, COOWNER OF STILLGOODE HOME CONSIGNMENTS

DISCLAIMER: THIS CHART IS NOT ACCURATE FOR ALL CASES. SOURCE: TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

The following are a few resources local businesses can benet from. Houston Northwest Chamber of Commerce www.houstonnwchamber.org Spring-Klein Chamber of Commerce BUSINESS RESOURCES

Commerce, said it will take time for the local economy to get back to where it was pre-pandemic. “Labor is always the last thing to be brought back, [as it is the] most expen- sive cost,” he said. Depleting funds In response to the pandemic, the Small Business Administration has given business owners the opportu- nity to apply for nancial assistance programs such as the Paycheck Protec- tion Program, a fee-less loan designed to cover payroll for 2 1/2 months. As part of the Trump administra- tion’s Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act’s $2 trillion economic relief package, the PPP allo- cated almost $349 billion to eligible small business applicants with another $320 billion allocated for applicants starting April 27. Mary Ann Landry, the executive director of Consultants in Dental Aes- thetics, said her business, located on Cypresswood Drive in Spring, was quick to apply for the PPP and Eco- nomic Injury Disaster Loan—an emer- gency advance to cover operating expenses—shortly after the programs were announced in late March. Landry said she had to lay o almost

80% of her sta due to restrictions on nonessential services but has since been able to rehire several administra- tive employees to work remotely. “We did receive word this week that we were approved [for the loans], and so that is a great relief,” Landry said in an April 16 interview. However, many applicants are hav- ing trouble nding participating lend- ers and receiving PPP funds, said Joe Harper, executive director of the Small Business Development Centers at Texas State University. “The challenge is we’re running out of money,” Harper said in an April 15 webinar. Similarly, Harris County paused a $10 million forgivable loan program just four days after it was launched April 9 due to overwhelming interest. Sewell said she applied for the PPP and EIDL programs through Chase Bank but was disqualied based on inaccurate claims that her business had employees outside of the country. She said her consignment business has since reapplied with another bank and will continue to operate out of a depleting emergency fund to cover rent, utilities and insurance costs. While she expects to rehire 100% of her sta as soon as possible, Sewell

said she foresees challenges. “If ... people are uncomfortable get- ting out, it doesn’t really do me much good to have my employees if there’s no one coming out to shop,” she said. Gradual steps to reopen In late March, the Houston North- west Chamber of Commerce launched an online survey to gauge how cham- ber members were faring during the county’s stay-at-home order through April 30. According to the results released in early April, 92.6% of 95 respondents said their business is being negatively aected by the coronavirus. Addition- ally, 25.5% of 98 respondents said their business was currently closed. On April 17, Abbott announced a plan to gradually reopen the state by allowing retail businesses to oer to-go services beginning April 24. On April 27, Abbott announced an order allowing retailers, restaurants, movie theaters and malls to reopen with 25% occupancy May 1. DYLAN SHERMAN AND HANNAH ZEDAKER CONTRIBUTED TO THIS REPORT.

www.springkleinchamber.org Small Business Association www.sba.gov

NEED A JOB?

Despite record-high unemployment claims, several entities are still hiring in the Greater Houston area. Additionally, prospective applicants can visit www.workintexas.com to view more than 484,000 job openings statewide. H-E-B https://careers.heb.com The Houston Police Department www.hpdcareer.com Kroger https://jobs.kroger.com The Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County https://jobs.ridemetro.org SOURCES: HEB, HOUSTON NORTHWEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, THE HOUSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT, KROGER, THE METROPOLITAN TRANSIT AUTHORITY OF HARRIS COUNTY, SPRING KLEIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, SMALL BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

We’ve Been Here We’ll Be Here Our pledge to the health and safety of our residents has long been paramount. It has engrained in us a commitment to preparedness, even for the unpredictable.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE

Featured Neighborhood n i

SPRING LAKES, 77373 Spring Lakes is located between I-45 and the Hardy Toll Road in Spring and includes 786 single-family properties featuring traditional architecture. A gated master-planned community, Spring Lakes is 10 minutes from Old Town Spring and 15 minutes from the George Bush Intercontinental Airport.

249

77373 77388 77389 77090

MARKET DATA FORMARCH

99 TOLL

2920

77069 77070 77379

HOMES SOLDAVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET 77066 77068 77069 77070 77090 77373 77379 77388 77389

77068

$500,000 +

- - - - -

- -

2/225

- - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - -

15/99 2/150

- -

16/92 5/140 5/115 9/48

1960

$450,000-$499,999 $400,000-$449,999 $350,000-$399,999 $300,000-$349,999

1/19

77066

45

N

1/100

- -

5/94

1/38

Homes on the market* 10 Median home value $250,000 Homes under contract* 4 Average days on the market* 41 Median annual property taxes $7,671.50 Median price per square foot $89.37

Build-out year: 2003 Median square footage: 2,967

-

9/98 2/114

1/93

7/28

2/17

21/65

2/83

9/84

Home values: $183,000-$283,000 HOA dues (estimated): $815 annually Property taxes (in dollars):

$250,000-$299,999 1/157

4/42

9/66

7/60

5/29 15/86 7/24

16/53

$200,000-$249,999 14/79 6/54

- - -

20/42

11/96 23/47

28/58 29/44

7/21

$150,000-$199,999 6/119

4/1

10/40 11/48 55/38 16/33

26/35

8/53

Lone Star College System Harris County

0.11 0.41 0.01 0.10 0.03 0.03 0.17 1.43 0.78 0.01 3.08

$150,000 or less

5/54

1/245

-

1/4

23/27

1/7

1/6

8/2

Harris County Dept. of Education Harris County Emergency Services District No. 7 Harris County Emergency Services District No. 11 Harris County Flood Control District Harris Health System Spring ISD Harris County Municipal Utility District No. 249 Port of Houston Authority Total (per $100 valuation)

MEDIAN PRICE OF HOMES SOLD WITHYEAROVERYEARPERCENTAGE CHANGE

2019 2020

77066 77068 77069 77070 77090 77373 77379 77388 77389

$400,000 $350,000 $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000

0.93%

+8.5%

13.3%

+6.2%

+9.6%

0.94%

+21.5%

+8.1%

+3%

NEIGHBORHOOD DATA PROVIDED BY SHARON TEUSINK, CHAMPIONS OFFICE MANAGER WITH BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE GARY GREENE. 2814445140 • WWW.GARYGREENE.COM

* AS OF APRIL 1

$0

CHAMPION WOODS ESTATES 17119 ASHLEY WOODS CT. | $850,000 281.444.5140

FALLS AT IMPERIAL OAKS 31406 PARK PINE LN. | $490,000 281.444.5140

CHAMPION FOREST 5423 CHAPEL BROOK | $387,500 PAM HUGHES | 713.725.1213

Champions Office

GaryGreene.com

8817 Louetta Rd Spring,TX 77379 | 281.444.5140

©2019 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens® is a registered trademark of Meredith Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Franchise is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • MAY 2020

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