Spring - Klein Edition | November 2020

SPRING KLEIN EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 8  NOV. 14DEC. 17, 2020

ONLINE AT

Experts predict job growth in health care

VOLUNTEER GUIDE THE ROTARY CLUB 2020

Find deals in a snap: Point your camera to the QR code or visit communityimpact.com/deals .

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IMPACTS

6 HEALTH CARE

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Spring, Klein areas see record number of ballots cast

Voter enthusiasm, new programs cited as contributing factors by ocials, experts

Harris County saw registered voters turn out in droves in the November election. Here is how much the county spent on the election and the turnout for Spring- and Klein-area races. HARRIS COUNTY HISTORIC TURNOUT

BY ANDY LI

Extensive voter outreach programs in Harris County may have contributed to the historic voter turnout in the Spring and Klein areas for the Nov. 3 election, experts said. Voter turnout in the 2020 election was the highest ever, and local turnout mirrored a greater trend countywide and statewide as more voters cast their

OVERALL VOTERS

ELECTION EXPENDITURES

1.31 million 1.63 million

$4 million

2016: 2020:

2016: 2020:

$27 million

TURNOUT IN SPRING, KLEIN RACES

KLEIN ISD BOARD

HARRIS COUNTY SHERIFF

66.59% 72.35%

57.22% 67.84%

2016: 2020:

2016: 2020:

Voters line up to cast their votes during the early-voting period at the Big Stone Lodge in Spring. (Andy Li/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 18

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Assistance programs help thousands of Spring-Klein residents, but needs remain BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

JOBS Loans to Spring- and Klein-area businesses from the Paycheck Protection Program have saved more than 61,000 jobs. While business owners hope additional relief, Congress has not yet approved a second round of PPP funding. Jobs saved as of Aug. 8 Total: 61,627 Total: 6,644 Loans by ZIP code JOBS

has provided assistance to more than 44,600 families through its programs including Meals on Wheels, Emer- gency Basic Needs, the Joanne Watford Nutrition Center and Super Site Food Giveaways. This compares with 33,600 families served in all of 2019. At the same time, unemployment claims are continuing to outpace CONTINUED ON 20

Now eight months into the coro- navirus pandemic, some Spring- and Klein-area businesses and residents are still struggling despite millions of funds being infused at the federal, state and local levels to help meet basic needs. Throughout the pandemic, Spring- based Northwest Assistance Ministries

SOURCE: U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON . Complete 2020 by joining your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . Contribute today! Snap or visit

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

www.kleinisd.net/ results

The Klein ISD Board of Trustees adopts the lowest tax rate in OVER 10 years.

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TODO LIST

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Kim Giannetti, kgiannetti@communityimpact.com EDITOR Kelly Schaer SENIOR REPORTER Hannah Zedaker REPORTER Andy Li GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ronald Winters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kim Laurence

FROMKIM: This year has been one of uncertainty, change and reection. With the election over and the holidays approaching, now is a good time to look at the blessings we have in our lives and be grateful. Whether through personal donations or sharing your time, we can all come together to serve others. If you are looking for ways to help those in need across our community, check out our Volunteer Guide and nonprot spotlight (see Pages 14-15). Kim Giannetti, GENERALMANAGER

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 Harris County shifts toll road funding EDUCATION 10 Construction on LSCHouston North Fallbrook nears completion

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full- time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

VOLUNTEER GUIDE

FROMKELLY: One of our front-page stories this month looks at Spring and Klein voter turnout data from the Nov. 3 election. A lot led up to this Election Day, which ended with most seats on the ballot in Harris County being won by incumbents. The Spring-Klein area did see a record turnout, with more than 160,000 residents casting ballots during early voting alone. Kelly Schaer, EDITOR

WAYS TO GIVE BACK 14 Get involved with organizations, groups

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 25

New businesses 15

Community events 8

New college campus 1

NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT Rotary Club of Willowbrook faces membership challenges amid COVID19

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE PKWY.

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SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE

W. RAYFORD RD.

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Tumble 22

COURTESY TUMBLE 22

new location also features a drive-thru that is open 24/7. 832-353-3649. www.whataburger.com 4 Raising Cane’s opened a new location Oct. 29 at 10950 Louetta Road, Houston. The Louisiana-based fast-food eatery is known for its chicken fingers, Texas toast and signature Cane’s sauce. 281-251-0668. www.raisingcanes.com 5 Wingstop opened a new location at 8675 Spring Cypress Road, Ste. 37B, Spring, on Oct. 8. Known for its 11 different flavors of classic wings, bone- less wings and crispy tenders, the new location offers carryout and delivery services from 10:30 a.m.-midnight daily. 346-372-5922. www.wingstop.com 6 James Avery Artisan Jewelry opened a new store Nov. 4 in the Grand Parkway Marketplace, located at 6615 Grand Parkway, Spring. The Kerrville-based jeweler offers artisan charms, pendants, rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings. The new location offers complimentary soldering, cleaning and polishing on-site for James Avery jewelry. Laser and hand- engraving services are available off-site. 281-466-5004. www.jamesavery.com 7 Funtastic Learning Toys , located at 12585 Bammel N. Houston Road, Ste. 103, Houston, celebrated its grand opening Oct. 12-16. Dedicated to students with disabilities, the veteran-owned business offers educational supplies for homeschooling, parent guides, teaching aids, Christian items, study materials, STEM activities and day care supplies. 832-778-4888. www.funtasticlearningtoys.com 8 The Lego Store , which specializes in all things Lego, celebrated its grand

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

GEARS RD.

NOWOPEN 1 Fajita Pete’s opened a new location Sept. 27 at 24345 Gosling Road, Ste. 225B, Spring. The fajita-focused eatery offers a variety of Tex-Mex cuisine staples, from enchiladas and tacos to quesadillas and flautas. The restaurant’s menu also features a children’s menu; dessert items, such as sopapillas and tres leches cake;

and beverages, including margaritas and aguas frescas. In addition to dine-in service, the new location also offers catering and delivery services. 832-639-8334. www.fajitapetes.com 2 The Catch , a Texas- and Louisiana- style seafood restaurant, opened Oct. 21 at 7608 FM 1960, Houston. Menu items include seafood platters as well as Cajun staples ranging from gumbo and shrimp

etouffee to boudin balls and po’boys. 281-661-1760. www.thecatchusa.com 3 Whataburger opened a new location at 4608 FM 1960 W., Houston, on Sept. 21. The San Antonio-based restaurant chain specializes in hamburgers and is known for its All-Time Favorites, such as the Patty Melt, the Honey BBQ Chicken Strip Sandwich and the Mushroom Swiss Burger. In addition to dine-in options, the

Ages 18 months to 5 years 281-370-5001

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

9 a.m.-noon and from 1-5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m.-noon. 832-779-3330. www.rainbowpediatricshouston.com 13 CareNow Urgent Care opened Oct. 2 at 7306 Louetta Road, Spring. The after-hours walk-in clinic is open seven days a week, treats children 3 months of age or older, and accepts most major health care insurance plans. CareNow Urgent Care is offering diagnostic and antibody testing for COVID-19 and is offering both in-person and virtual care options. 281-251-0612. www.carenow.com Why Write Tutoring opened in August and is now serving students in the Spring, Klein and Cy-Fair areas. Owned by Kisha Thomas, the author of “Why Write? An Anthology For Introductory Composi- tion,” the new business offers private tutoring services in reading, writing and editing for students in grades six to 12 and college as well as math for students in grades six to eight. Thomas is offering both in-person and online tutoring services, and appointments can be made by phone or by emailing whywrite18@gmail.com. 323-577-3794. https://whywrite18.business.site COMING SOON 14 Pepperoni’s plans to open a new pizzeria at 5200 FM 2920, Ste. 110, Spring, in November. The casual pizzeria chain offers 15 signature pizzas, build-your-own calzone and pizza options, Buffalo wings, pastas, subs and salads. 832-702-8400. www.pepperonis.net 15 Tumble 22 , an Austin-based eatery, is planning to open its fourth restaurant in Vintage Park in the former location of PDQ, located at 10723 Louetta Road, Houston, in November. Inspired by Nashville hot chicken, the restaurant’s menu will offer chicken tender bites, jumbo chicken tenders, chicken sand- wiches and bone-in chicken with five heat level options, from Wimpy to Cluckin’ Hot. The menu will also offer salads; family pack options; sides, such as the dirty mac and cheese, which is made with pulled hot chicken and ranch; and dessert options. 281-547-6300. www.tumble22.com

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WoodsEdge Coffee House

COURTESY WOODSEDGE COFFEE HOUSE

opening Oct. 9 inside Willowbrook Mall, located at 1568 Willowbrook Mall, Ste. 1568, Houston. 281-970-6609. www.lego.com 9 Pet Supplies Plus opened a new location at 18550 Champion Forest Drive, Spring, on Sept. 25. The independently owned and operated full-size store offers grooming, a self-service dog wash, live fish, live small pets, live crickets and a visiting pet care clinic. 832-827-7900. www.petsuppliesplus.com 10 PetSuites Spring celebrated its grand opening Oct. 13 at 6525 Louetta Road. The new location offers pet boarding, day care, grooming and training services for dogs and cats. 346-220-6989. www.petsuitesofamerica.com 11 Aristoi Classical Academy opened its new Cypress Elementary School campus, located at 12332 Perry Road, Houston, for its inaugural school year Sept. 8. The new campus, which is currently offering in-person and virtual learning options for students in grades K-4, focuses on mastering fundamentals in phonics, spelling, grammar, mathematics, science, history and literature. Deborah Guel serves as the campus’s founding head of elementary. 281-635-8482. www.aristoiclassical.org 12 Rainbow Pediatrics of Houston opened Oct. 1 at 12822 Veterans Memorial Drive, Houston. Led by Dr. Lisa T. Lau, who is fluent in English, Canton- ese, Mandarin and Spanish, the pediatric medical office offers comprehensive care for infants and children from newborns to age 18. The practice accepts most insurance carriers, walk-ins and appoint- ments and is open Mondays-Fridays from

Geronimo Adventure Park opened on FM 2920 in Spring in mid-October.

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Geronimo Adventure Park held a soft opening Oct. 17 at 6749 FM 2920, Spring. The aerial park oers outdoor activities for participants of all ages and skill levels including zip lining, ground play and a re pit. Ax throwing will also be oered in the future. The park features three zip line courses including the Go Easy, which features ve zip lines and three bridges; the Go High, which features ve zip lines, three bridges and a 42-foot platform; and the Go Long, a 555-foot course that features six zip lines, three bridges and an optional detour through nine aerial challenges. Hammocks and picnic facilities are also on park grounds. Geronimo Adventure Park also oers group packages for team-building 16 Beard Papa’s plans to open a new location in 2021 in The Market at Springwoods Village, located at 2102-2180 Spring Stuebner Road, Spring. Known for its fresh and natural cream puffs, Beard Papa’s will allow patrons to build their own cream puffs by choosing from eight types of cream puff shells and eight cream filling flavors. The new business will also offer desserts including chocolate fondant, cheesecake, creme brulee and blended cream drinks. www.beardpapas.com

events, birthday parties, nonprot organizations and other special events. Due to COVID-19, all participants must bring their own gloves or purchase gloves on-site for $6 per pair. 830-365-5867. www.geronimoadventurepark.com

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EXPANSIONS 17 WoodsEdge Community Church, located at 25333 Gosling Road, Spring, celebrated the grand opening of its new WoodsEdge Coffee House on Nov. 2. Located inside a new building on the WoodsEdge campus, the coffee shop offers espresso, coffee, tea and pastries. 281-364-0415. www.facebook.com/ woodsedgecoffeehouse

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SPRING - KLEIN EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

TODO LIST

November, December events

COMPILED BY ANDY LI

NOVEMBER 12 THROUGHDEC. 31 GO SEE CHRISTMAS LIGHTS Hurricane Harbor Splashtown hosts a drive-thru park with Christmas lights for a socially distanced event. The park is open between 5:30-10 p.m. every night until the end of the year. Tickets are sold per car. $35. Hurricane Harbor Splashtown, 21300 I-45, Spring. 281-407-1311. www.thelightpark.com 22 SUPPORT FOOD TRUCKS Exit 73 Bar & Grill hosts its annual Battle of the Food Trucks, with participating food trucks including Tacos in Low Places, Fat Boys Pizza, Dojo Hibachi and more. 3 p.m. Free (entry). Exit 73 Bar & Grill, 24714 I-45, Spring. 281-419-8445. www.facebook.com/exit73bar 25 CELEBRATE THANKSGIVING The Abundant Harvest, a ministry of St. Isidore Episcopal Church, hosts its rst annual turkey fry, where visitors can purchase fried turkeys as well as sides and desserts. There will be games, music, photos with Santa and a rae for a turkey fryer. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. $100 per turkey. The Abundant Harvest, 24803 Oakhurst Drive, Spring. 281-474-3673. www.harvestkitchen.org

DEC. 02

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Spring-based Kailee Mills Foundation hosts a charity golf tournament to raise money to help further the foundation’s mission of seat belt awareness. The entry fee includes breakfast, lunch, golf and one hour of an open bar after the tournament. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $150-$600. BlackHorse Golf Club, 12205 Fry Road, Cypress. 512-970-6731. www.kaileemillsfoundation.org

Klein High School’s Future Farmers of America alumni host the seventh annual Klein Poultry Extravaganza, which includes a chicken show, an egg show, a silent auction, chicken poop bingo and concessions. There are two shows Dec. 4-5. 5-8 p.m. (Dec. 4),

For its rst show since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, Playhouse 1960 presents Rogers & Hammerstein’s “The Sound of Music.” Health guidelines such as face coverings are required for audience members, and temperature checks will be in place. Showtimes vary. Ticket prices TBD. Playhouse 1960, 6814 Gant Road, Ste. 116, Houston. 281-587-8243. www.ph1960.com Creek Course co-host the 75th U.S. Women’s Open in a new format due to the coronavirus pandemic. Spectators are not allowed on-site, but fans are encouraged to watch online. Tee time has not been determined as of press time Nov. 11. Free. 281-444-6262. www.championsgolfclub.com

7 a.m. (Dec. 5). Free (entry). Klein Multipurpose Center, 7500 FM 2920, Spring. www.klein.anow.org

DECEMBER 05 SUPPORT YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS

businesses. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free (entry). Acton Academy Champions, 4820 Strack Road, Houston. www.actonacademychampions.org 10 THROUGH 13 WATCHA CHAMPIONSHIP Champions Golf Course and Cypress

Acton Academy Champions hosts its fth annual children’s business fair to help children develop business and marketing skills. The fair features up to 40

Find more or submit Spring and Klein events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Harris Countyapproves $300Mtransfer of surplus toll revenue BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

COMPILED BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

ONGOING PROJECTS

DOLLAR DIVERSION

Harris County ocials authorized the transfer of $300 million in surplus Harris County Toll Road Authority revenue to the county’s general fund Nov. 10 that will be used for transportation-related priorities.

Harris County Commissioners Court approved the transfer of $300 million in surplus toll revenue to the county’s general fund at a Nov. 10 meeting that will be used for transportation needs. The move followed a discussion at a Sept. 15 meeting at which the county considered forming a new limited government corporation, or LGC, that would use surplus toll road revenue for more purposes, including those that fell outside the realm of infrastructure and mobility. At the Nov. 10 meeting, Harris County Budget Director Dave Berry said the county had since moved away from that idea. “The $300 million transfer, which was originally contemplated in a limited government corporation, would still be made to the county,” Berry said. “Now it would be restricted to transportation-related purposes.” Once transferred to the general fund, County Judge Lina Hidalgo said the funding could be used to pay o road debt and on projects that fall at the nexus of transportation and ood

HCTRA REVENUE FROM2020 TOLL ROAD PAYMENTS $901M $438M $463M Expenses Surplus

$300MILLION in funding transferred from the toll road authority to the county as a one- time payment $90MILLION to be paid annually moving forward Harris County can use the money on TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF NOV. 11. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SKLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. anticipated to begin by the end of the rst quarter of 2021 and should take six weeks to complete. Timeline: rst quarter 2021-TBA Cost: $400,000 Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4 Spring Cypress Road, Ella Boulevard intersection improvements Harris County Precinct 4 is currently in the design phase of a project that would install a dedicated westbound right turn lane on Spring Cypress Road at Ella Boulevard. According to Pamela Rocchi, director of Harris County Precinct 4’s Capital Improvement Projects Division, construction is

About $137M of toll road surplus revenue was transferred to Harris County’s four precincts last year for commissioners to use on local mobility projects.

$137M

$326M

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY BUDGET OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

control, among other uses. During the September discussions, Precinct 3 Commissioner Steve Radack and Precinct 4 Commissioner Jack Cagle opposed the formation of the LGC, arguing the money collected from toll roads should not fund projects unrelated to infrastructure. About $137 million in toll road

revenue was transferred to the county’s precincts for local mobility projects in scal year 2019-20. Hidalgo said the allocations to precincts would increase to $175 million under the new plan. The county’s engineering department is conducting a study to determine how that funding should be allocated across precincts.

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

EDUCATION

Lone Star College nears completion of HoustonNorth Fallbrook campus

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

and we couldn’t ask for a better partner than Lone Star [College],” Pender said. “This is the nal piece of the puzzle for us to be able to focus on education and jobs; that’s our community commitment.” The 51,000-square-foot facility will be able to accommodate 3,500 students and features nine traditional classrooms each with the capacity for 24 students; four computer classrooms; two science labs; one collaboration-based classroom; a warehouse lab, which will serve as a central food distribution hub for all LSCHouston North campuses; and a student services area. Programs oered at the campus include associate degrees in the following areas: arts; science; arts in teaching, or education; applied science and certicate I in logistics management; applied science in mobile app design; applied science

Lone Star College is nearing the completion of the construction of its newest campus, LSCHouston North Fallbrook, with plans of welcoming students into the facility at the start of the spring 2021 semester. LSCHouston North President Quentin Wright said the $13 million project was funded through a partnership with Fallbrook Church, which is next to the facility. As Fallbrook Church is already home to its own preschool program and charter school Fallbrook Academy, Senior Pastor Michael Pender said students will soon be able to attend preschool through college in one location. The charter school currently serves kindergarten through eighth-grade students with plans of expanding to the high school level. “Our expertise isn’t educating students, so we’ve built partnerships

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LSCHouston North President Quentin Wright (left) said the new campus was funded through a partnership with Fallbrook Church, spearheaded by Senior Pastor Michael Pender (right). (Photos by Hannah Zedaker/Community Impact Newspaper)

and certicate II in game design; and applied science in esports. “This is the rst location in which every classroom is Webex-enabled, meaning that we can do virtual conferences of classes from every classroom [so] every classroom has streaming ability,” Wright said. Construction began in November 2019, and while the new campus was previously expected to open in fall 2020, Wright said the ongoing coronavirus pandemic pushed that timeline back a fewmonths. However, the campus is now on track to open this spring, and registration events are planned for December.

FALLBROOK FACTS Lone Star College-Houston North Fallbrook will be the fourth campus in the LSC-Houston North college. THE NEW CAMPUS: • is 51,000 square feet • can accommodate 3,500 students • will open for the spring 2021 semester FEATURES: • 9 traditional classrooms each with the capacity for 24 students • 4 computer classrooms • 2 science labs • 1 collaboration-based classroom SOURCE: LONE STAR COLLEGECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE 1 in 4 jobs added by 2036 inHouston to be in health care

MEDICAL FINDINGS

BY HUNTER MARROW

to support an expansion of Medicaid in Texas, while 65% said they expect health care costs to rise by over 10% in the next ve years. The report also called for collaboration across the region’s hospital systems and stakeholders, a message shared by panelists during a discussion immediately following the announcement of the report. Panelist Dr. Faith Foreman-Hays, the assistant director of the Houston Department of Health & Human Services, said she hopes the health care system does not revert to be individualistic and working in “silos.” She said she hopes the industry continues to work together after the COVID-19 pandemic. “I do hope we take what we learned from COVID[-19] to move forward and to move our city forward by using all of these new ecacious kinds of ways that can get things done that we didn’t knowwe could get things done this way until COVID[-19] forced us to do it this way,” she said.

care workers. Social factors, including a person’s economic stability, neighborhood, physical environment and food quality, play a role in health disparities, according to the report. “Many of these social determinants help explain why we have signicant health disparities in Houston across class, racial and ethnic lines,” Scar- borough said. “[This is] something that’s absolutely clear, as we’ve seen in poor and minority communities impacted by COVID-19.” The report showed failing to develop any sort of pipeline could cost the region $18.6 billion in gross domes- tic product and 111,000 jobs by 2036. The coronavirus pandemic slowed the report’s release; it was originally set to be released in March, but the research team spent the last several months revising the report with COVID-19 in mind, Scarborough said. A survey conducted in September showed 59% of respondents said the pandemic has made themmore likely

The Center for Houston’s Future spent the last year collecting data from interviews and focus groups of more than 50 health care experts and surveys completed by some 100 executives in Greater Houston.

By 2036, one in four jobs added within Greater Houston will be created through the health care sector, generating an additional $26 billion in gross domestic product, according to a new report released Oct. 28 by Center for Houston’s Future, an economic research and strategic planning rm. The Center for Houston’s Future spent the last year collecting data from interviews and focus groups of more than 50 health care experts and surveys completed by 100 executives in the Greater Houston area. The Greater Houston area is contradictory about health, said Steven Scarborough, the lead author of the report and the center’s manager of strategic initiatives, during the report’s announcement event. While the region has great hospitals, there are many who do not have access to them, Scarborough said, and there is a need for a better workforce pipeline for future health

THE SURVEY FOUND:

By 2036, 1 in 4 jobs added within Greater Houston will be created through the health care sector, generating an additional $26 billion in gross domestic product. Failing to develop any sort of pipeline could cost the region $18.6 billion in gross domestic product and 111,000 jobs by 2036 . 59% of respondents said the pandemic has made them more likely to support an expansion of Medicaid in Texas . 65% of respondents said they expect health care costs to rise by over 10% in the next 5 years .

SOURCE: CENTER FOR HOUSTON’S FUTURE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

IS WORTH A SHOT PROTECTING YOUR FAMILY

Schedule your flu shot at BSLMG.org/FluSeason.

With no-wait appointments and locations across Greater Houston, it’s easy to protect friends and family this flu season. Keep those you love safe by booking an appointment with your doctor at Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Group today.

Find a location near you at StLukesHealth.org

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SCHOOL & COUNTY

News from Klein ISD & Harris County

Klein ISD trusteeDoug James edged out by election challenger AlvinVaughn

received 42.07% of the votes, or 35,376, per election data. Reitmeier said she appreciates the trust of the voters and is excited to serve the KISD community for another three years. Reitmeier has served on the board for the past 15 years. “It has been my

BY ANDY LI

wait until after the votes were ocially canvassed. Harris County election ocials said via email that all county votes are expected to be canvassed after press time. “I am certain that there’s a lot of work ahead of me, but I am ready to get started. I am honored to serve my community,” Vaughn said. Position 1 was also on the ballot, with incumbent Georgan Reitmeier keeping her seat on the KISD board of trustees. Reitmeier received 57.93% of the votes, or 48,710, while her challenger Lannie McKelvin Milon

KLEIN ISD After a close Nov. 3 election, challenger Alvin Vaughn is projected to replace incumbent Doug James, who serves on Position 2 for the Klein ISD board of trustees. James, who is also the board president, lost by a margin of about 10 votes, with Vaughn receiving 50.01% of the votes, or 41,424, and James receiving 49.99% of the votes, or 41,414. Under Texas law, James could call for a recount, but he said he would Harris County picks rst-ever elections administrator

Doug James

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Alvin Vaughn

joy and my pleasure to represent and advocate for all children,” Reitmeier said.

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HarrisCountyopenspet resourcecenter

BY DANICA LLOYD

HARRIS COUNTY Ocials with Harris County Public Health gathered Oct. 28 to celebrate the grand opening of Harris County Pets, an animal resource center. The center replaces the former Harris County Animal Shelter. The new facility opened years after Harris County voters approved a $24 million bond proposition in November 2015. The center provides increased capacity and expanded services for pets. The 50,000-square-foot facility can house 300 dogs and 225 cats at once. Ocials said the previous facility had the capacity for 12,000 animals annually but was averaging an intake of 24,000. “The new Harris County Pets Resource Center will help our Veterinary Public Health Division deliver enhanced programs that will save many more pets and will allow us to expand our services to both residents and to furry family members alike,” Veterinary Public Health Director Michael White said. The facility features new services, including indoor and outdoor kennel runs for dogs; a pet grooming room; cat condos with separate sleeping and litter box sections; and separate entrances for adoption, admission and wellness services. A four- section dog park and pavilion is slated for completion in late 2020.

CANINO RD.

HARRIS COUNTY Amid historic voter BY EMMA WHALEN

N

713-224-3426 1403 Spring Cypress Rd Spring

Cy-Fair ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. Dec. 10 and 14 at 10300 Jones Road, Houston. 281-897-4000. www.csd.net Klein ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. Dec. 14 at 7500 FM 2920, Spring. 832-249-4000. www.kleinisd.net Spring ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. Dec. 3 and 7 p.m. Dec. 8 at 16717 Ella Blvd., Houston. 281-891-6000. www.springisd.org Harris County Commissioners Court meets virtually at 10 a.m. Dec. 1 and 15, as the county has not hosted in-person meetings in the pandemic. 713-274-1111. www.harriscountytx.gov Meetings will be recorded or livestreamed. MEETINGSWE COVER Harris County Pets 612 Canino Road, Houston 281-999-3191 www.countypets.com Adoption hours: Mon.-Fri. noon-5 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

turnout, the Harris County Elections Commission made strides toward changing the way future elections will be organized. The commission voted Oct. 30 to tap Isabel Longoria as the nal candidate for the county’s new elections administrator position. Longoria is a longtime community organizer and currently serves as special adviser on voting rights to County Clerk Chris Hollins. The new elections administrator will take oce after the November general election. Currently, the clerk is responsible for setting poll- ing locations and counting ballots, while the tax assessor-collector is responsible for voter registration. Longoria has served on the Hous- ton Planning Commission and on Mayor Sylvester Turner’s LGBTQ Advisory Commission. She also ran to unseat incumbent District H City Council Member Karla Cisneros and was defeated by a less than 20-vote margin in the December 2019 runo election. Isabel Longoria

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SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

WAYS TOGIVE BACK Volunteer opportunities in the Spring and Klein area 2020 V O L U N T E E R G U I D E

Help out the Spring and Klein community in a number of ways throughout the year by volunteering with local nonprot groups. Volunteer opportunities included in this guide range from helping at a food pantry to event planning. This list is noncomprehensive.

info@swmin.org www.springwoodlandsministries.org 1 1 SUPPORT FAMILIES ARROW CHILD AND FAMILY MINISTRIES The child placement agency recruits and trains families to foster children. Volunteers can work with the Marketing and Development Department and at Arrow’s Freedom Place facility, which helps minors who have been tracked restore their lives. Sample activities: assisting with mailings, packaging giveaways and events; mentoring children; teaching life skills and hobbies 2929 FM 2920, Spring 2812101500 www.arrow.org 1 1 NORTHWEST ASSISTANCE MINISTRIES Volunteers can assist with the Season of Blessings program Nov. 21 and Dec. 19 as well as ongoing events, including food giveaways, Meals on Wheels and the food pantry. Sample activities: sorting and packaging groceries and toys to carry to cars with the Season of Blessings program; directing trac, sorting donations, packing grocery bags and stocking shelves at the food pantry 15555 Kuykendahl Road, Houston 2818854555 www.namonline.org 1 1 1 1 SHIELD BEARER OF NORTHWEST HOUSTON The nonprot oers professional counseling for individuals, couples, families and children as well as prevention services through parenting workshops, school services and faith-based programs. Sample activities: transferring donation items and supplies between oces, coordinating events, helping with mail outs, data entry, data organization 12340 Jones Road, Ste. 290, Houston 2818947222 www.shieldbearer.org 1 1 1 1 HELP THE COMMUNITY HABITAT FOR HUMANITY NORTHWEST HARRIS COUNTY The nonprot operates on faith-based principles and is dedicated to eliminating substandard housing locally. Sample activities: administrative duties, constructing new homes, disaster recovery repairs, serving on committees, providing lunch at construction sites, working with children’s and youth programs 13350 Jones Road, Houston 2814770460 www.habitatnwhc.org 1

VOLUNTEER REQUIREMENTS

Application

Background check

Orientation

Under age 18 allowed

FEED THE HUNGRY BRIDGING FOR TOMORROW The nonprot oers volunteer opportunities in pantry distribution, clerical work and youth programs. Sample activities: unloading food pallets, packing food boxes, entering client data, reading with students, facilitating

COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD & HANNAH ZEDAKER

EMPOWER CHILDREN CYFAIR EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION Volunteers can assist at the foundation’s oce or at events, including the B.F. AdamGolf Classic on Nov. 16, Salute to the Stars on Dec. 2 and Salute to Our Heroes on Feb. 6. Sample activities: assisting at events, oce duties 11803 Grant Road, Ste. 115, Cypress 2813700144 www.thecfef.org 1 1 1 1 D. BRADLEY MCWILLIAMS YMCA AT CYPRESS CREEK Volunteers can coach youth league sports, including basketball, ag football, volleyball and soccer. Coaching is a commitment of two hours per week with one hour of practice and one hour of game time. Sample activities: planning and implementing practice plans each week, coordinating the snack schedule, communicating with parents weekly regarding practice and game times 19915 Hwy. 249, Houston 2814691481 www.ymcahouston.org 1 KLEIN ISD EDUCATION FOUNDATION The volunteer-based organization hosts various annual events and projects to raise grants to distribute to KISD educators. The A.K. “Buddy” Brown Golf Tournament on Nov. 17 is an annual fun run and an academic banquet. Sample activities: planning, registering, CARE FOR THE ENVIRONMENT MERCER BOTANIC GARDENS Volunteers can work in the greenhouses, plant trees and assist with programs. Sample activities: propagating, assisting with online customer service, reading children’s books during story time, teaching music, leading the Women’s Restorative Hiking group, assisting with gardening tours, planting trees with the Legacy Trees Project 22306 Aldine Westeld Road, Humble 713-274-4160 www.hcp4.net/parks/mercer 1 1 setting up and tearing down events 7200 Spring Cypress Road, Spring 8322494754 www.kleinisdeducationfoundation.net 1 1 1 1

Mercer Botanic Gardens

conversations with students 5359 W. Richey Road, Houston 281-208-0830 www.bridgingfortomorrow.org 1 1 1

COURTESY HARRIS COUNTY PRECINCT 4

THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTERDAY SAINTS’ PEANUT BUTTER CANNERY Short-term volunteer groups of 12 individuals can assist at the church’s Peanut Butter Cannery to feed those in need. Sample activities: preparing ingredients, processing, packaging 16333 Hafer Road, Houston 7135943142 www.churchoesuschrist.org 1 HOPE CENTER HOUSTON Hope Center Houston serves as a day and assistance center for homeless individuals along FM 1960. Professional volunteer positions are needed for social workers, therapists, lawyers, medical personnel and skilled tradesmen. Sample activities: preparing food; doing laundry; cleaning showers; client intakes; distributing, sorting, sizing clothes 821 Peakwood Drive, Houston 8329655511 www.hopecenterhouston.org 1 1 HOPE HAVEN Volunteers can put together and donate snack packs or hygiene packs with masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, toothbrushes and travel toothpaste, deodorant and shampoo to HOPE Haven to be distributed to the homeless. Sample activities: preparing packs 14511 Falling Creek Drive, Ste. 301, Houston 8323508790 www.hhaven.org 1 1 SPRINGWOODLANDS MINISTRIES Volunteers are needed to assist with sorting and organizing food, delivering groceries to seniors, assisting in seniors’ eld trips and Christmas caroling. Sample activities: assisting at a food pan- try, Bags of Love outreach, participating in holiday activities with low-income seniors 2 120 FM 2920, Ste. 190-166, Spring

Bridging For Tomorrow

COURTESY BRIDGING FOR TOMORROW

Spring-Woodlands Ministries

COURTESY SPRINGWOODLANDS MINISTRIES

WINGS MINISTRIES: FREEDOM THROUGH TRANSFORMATION The nonprot works with marginalized women to equip themwith work and life skills. Volunteers give courses in transitional living programs and lockdown facilities. Sample activities: leading programs, translating classroommaterials from English to Spanish, performing administrative work 14511 Falling Creek Drive, Ste. 301, Houston wingsministriesbuttery@gmail.com www.wingstofreedom.net 1 1

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT

Rotary Club ofWillowbrook Service organization marks 36 years of giving back despite dwindling membership F or nearly four decades, the Rotary Club of Willowbrook has epitomized its motto “Service Above Self” despite its dwindling membership. As one of 35,000 rotary clubs Since its inception 36 years ago, Jackson said Rotary Club of had as many as 60 members at one point, Jackson said membership is now at 20—a trend he said is becom- ing common among most member- ship-based organizations. “As a society, we just don’t join BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

Willowbrook has sponsored and hosted international exchange students, awarded scholarships to Klein ISD students, provided meals for Habitat for Humanity volunteers and supported other local nonprot organizations. The nonprot also supports an Interact Club—the high school level of a rotary club—at KISD and has funded grants to build water wells in foreign countries. However, Jackson said the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has limited the club’s ability to operate normally. The club’s international exchange student program is paused due to COVID-19, and all meetings are now taking place virtually. Additionally, Jackson said the pandemic is further hindering the club’s ability to attract new members. While Rotary Club of Willowbrook

The club was founded in 1984. (Courtesy Rotary Club of Willowbrook) ROTARY ROUNDUP Rotary Club of Willowbrook is just one chapter of Rotary International, a global network of more than 1.2 million members. Rotary International: • was founded in 1905 • has more than 1.2 million members in 35,000 clubs across 200 countries Rotary Club of Willowbrook: • was founded in 1984 • has approximately 20 members • is part of Rotary District 5890 SOURCES: ROTARY CLUB OF WILLOWBROOK, ROTARY INTERNATIONALCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

things anymore,” he said. “As long as we have a Twitter or Facebook account, that’s all we need. So I don’t know where that’s going to leave us in the future.” In hopes of becoming more attrac- tive to prospective members, Jackson said the club has let go of strict attendance rules and simplied the invitation-only application process. “I have friends that I’ve had for 30-40 years that I met through rotary that I still associate with,” he said. “You build up a lot of camaraderie because you see these people once a week for years and you do service projects with them. So you develop a relationship that transcends rotary.”

across 200 countries, Rotary Club of Willowbrook was founded by current co-President Tom Jackson in 1984. Made up mostly of local small-business owners, the club focuses on promoting peace; ghting disease; saving mothers and children; supporting education; growing local economies; and providing clean water, sanitation and hygiene. “We have members from all walks of life that feel a call to serve their community and give back to their community,” Jackson said. “People that have a public servant mentality— those are the people that we encour- age to join the Rotary Club.”

Rotary Club of Willowbrook www.willowbrookrotary.org

WORTHWHILE CONVERSATIONS THREE KEYS FOR A STRANGE WORLD

EVERYONE AGREES – 2020 MAKES THIS WORLD LOOK “STRANGE”. WHAT’S THE IMPLICATION FOR WEALTH PLANNING? The three things we hear from our families are these. Interest rates are virtually zero meaning that traditional “safe” investments are offering no meaningful return. Our retired clients are mostly in a “higher risk” age category from a pandemic context. Now more home-bound, they see changing spending patterns. They need to re- evaluate budgets and capital sustainability. Also, living through a bitterly partisan election cycle this year leads to a lot of uncertainty about the future economic and investing environment. SO, MOST COULD BENEFIT FROM SOME SOUND ADVICE TO ADDRESS THESE QUESTIONS. WHAT SHOULD ONE LOOK FOR IN WEALTH ADVICE? There are three keys. The first key is to find an advisor legally obligated to look out for your best interest in 100% of your interactions, throughout the relationship. Despite what most people believe, that is still not a legal requirement for the vast majority of the 300,000+ people in the United States who call themselves “financial advisors”. Get that assurance in writing.

YOU SAID THERE WERE THREE… Seek an advisor with deep experience and solid credentials. Phillip Hamman, CFP ® , CFA, who heads our Wealth Planning Committee has often said, “After our firm’s nearly 50 years of working with families, we like saying, ‘This is not our first rodeo!’”. In a complicated world that finds intersections between taxes, investments, risk management and the like, look for an experienced fiduciary advisor who is part of a well-credentialled team that includes CPAs, attorneys, and other similarly designated professionals to collaborate on your advice. WITH THE RIGHT ADVISOR, ARE PEOPLE LIKELY TO HEAR NEW AND DIFFERENT ADVICE THAN WHAT WAS SAID BEFORE WE ENTERED THIS STRANGE WORLD? Probably not as different as one might imagine. Good disciplined financial decision-making is a long-term exercise and should not be unduly reactive. That said, we are finding that our advice has to be somewhat adaptable to these newer challenges. Our team is ready right now to meet, either in-person, or virtually, to discuss the challenges you see in your current world.

J. Harold Williams and Craig Ivy discuss the benefits of sound advice for wealth planning in this new “strange” world. (Left to right: Craig Ivy, AIF ® ; and J. Harold Williams, CPA/PFS, CFP ® )

1400 Post Oak Boulevard, Ste. 1000 Houston, Texas 77056 713.840.1000 www.linscomb-williams.com Linscomb & Williams is not an accounting firm.

15

SPRING  KLEIN EDITION • NOVEMBER 2020

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