Chandler Edition - May 2021

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 10  MAY 18JUNE 21, 2021

ONLINE AT

City Council approves photo enforcement cameras

IMPACTS

CITY & EDUCATION

LEARNINGRX

SIDELINES BAR & GRILL

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City looks to add ocers as police chief stresses department needs

STAFFING CHANDLER POLICE Chandler Police Department Chief Sean Duggan told Chandler City Council in April the department was in need of more ocers over the next ve years.

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BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

POPULATION GROWTH 2010 population 236,123 2019 population 261,165 Percent change 10.61%

added to the department in the 2021-22 scal year and provided City Council with a plan to add 10 additional o- cers each scal year through 2026. City Council is looking at allocating $3.8 million in one-time COVID-19 relief dollars to the Chandler Police Department to fund 10 new positions and related vehicle and equipment needs in the department over the next several scal years. Duggan also requested the city ll 15 “over hire” positions, which allow the department to hire individuals and CONTINUED ON 10

The city of Chandler is adding to its police force after pleas from Chandler police ocials were lobbed at Chan- dler City Council in April saying the department is understaed and o- cers are overworked. “The issue is people are tired, and this is not a money issue any longer— it’s not about throwing money,” said Chandler Police Chief Sean Duggan during a council meeting April 8. “The issue is pressing people to work. It’s been an exhausting year.” Duggan requested that 27 ocers be

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MORE ON THE HORIZON

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ocers proposed in the next scal year

additional ocers the following four years 40

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SOURCES: CITY OF CHANDLER, U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

   

Voters approved Proposition 207 in the November election, allowing for the sale and use of recreational marijuana statewide. Sales began in late January.

The launch of legal adult-use marijuana sales across Arizona has gone smoothly since they began in January, according to various stakeholders in and out of the industry, but the eects upon municipalities like Gilbert and Chandler are still to be seen. The Smart and Safe Arizona Act passed with 60% of the vote as Proposition 207 last November, legalizing Legalizing recreational marijuana grows industry BY TOM BLODGETT AND ALEXA D'ANGELO

recreational marijuana in the state with a 16% excise tax placed on sales to fund public programs. Under the act, users must be 21 or older and are allowed to possess no more than 1 ounce with no more than 5 grams of it being marijuana concentrates or extracts. However, the licenses for retailers were largely limited to established medical marijuana dis- pensaries, as is the case for the one dispensary in Gilbert and the ve with Chandler addresses, and no new sellers are allowed in either jurisdiction. Use of marijuana for medical purposes was legal- ized in 2010 by the passage of Proposition 203, which CONTINUED ON 13

MARIJUANA REVENUES COLLECTED IN 2021

$14.58M Total marijuana tax $6.22M Medical marijuana sales tax $5.09M Marijuana excise tax $3.27M Recreational marijuana sales tax

SOURCE: ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

and trust use.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: With the city of Chandler setting local ordinances related to the business of recreational marijuana and a handful of dispensaries in the city, we look at the economic impact of the passage of Proposition 207 to our local municipalities in our front-page story. These sales began earlier this year, so our story gives an early look into the results of the proposition passing and the 16% sales tax it imposed. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMALEXA: At a City Council meeting in early April, Chandler Police Chief Sean Duggan told council his ocers were “exhausted” and that the department needed stang help. Chandler City Council held multiple meetings regarding the city’s budget in April and by April 23, the city had presented its plan for adding dozens of ocers to the police force in the next ve years. In our cover story we provide details of the proposed plan. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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CHANDLER EDITION • MAY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Dulce Churro Cafe

Jinya Ramen Bar

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COURTESY DULCE CHURRO CAFE

COURTESY JINYA RAMEN BAR

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Sibley’s West announced this spring they would be retiring in June and closing the store, and d’Vine Gourmet will take over the location at 72 S. San Marcos Place, Chandler. A specic opening date is not yet known. 480-275-5320. https://stores.dvinegourmet.com 8 Mechanical Keyboards recently acquired a 74,000-square-foot ex industrial building in west Chandler, according to an April 26 news release. The company specializes in the produc- tion of mechanical keyboards. About 40 employees will work at the facility located at 7300 W. Boston St. in Chan- dler, according to the release. https://mechanicalkeyboards.com/ 9 Kura Revolving Sushi Bar is expected to open a location in Chandler in January 2022, according to the city of Chandler. The company has locations in California; Texas; Georgia; Illinois; Nevada, Wash- ington; New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Florida; and Michigan. An exact opening date is not yet known. The restaurant will be located at 1760 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler. https://kurasushi.com/ RELOCATIONS 10 Belle Lacet Lingerie relocated this spring within its previous shopping cen- ter to a bigger storefront. The business, which sells variety of lingerie, is located at 7131 W. Ray Road, Ste. 26, Chandler. 480-940-5455. www.bellelacet.com ANNIVERSARIES 11 Big Air Trampoline Park , an indoor trampoline park, will celebrate its one- year anniversary in Chandler on June 13.

Chandler location marks the restaurant chain’s rst Arizona restaurant. 480-758-5198. www.jinyaramenbar.com COMING SOON 4 99 Ranch Market will anchor the shopping center located at the northeast corner of Chandler Boulevard and Dob- son Road. The store is taking over what used to be a Basha’s location. The store is scheduled to open in May, although an exact date is not yet known. 99 Ranch Market is the largest Asian supermarket chain in the United States. www.99ranch.com 5 Arches Climbing + Fitness , an indoor climbing gym, is expected to open this year in Chandler. According to the gym website, the space will include rope climbing, a bouldering area, auto belays, a speed wall, a kids area and climbing training. It is not yet known when exactly the business will open. The gym will be located north of the northwest corner of Gilbert and Ryan roads. www.archesclimbing.com 6 Black Sheep Wine Bar will take over the location formerly belonging to DC Steakhouse in downtown Chandler’s historic square. Details, such as the opening date, are not yet known, but the business was granted a liquor license at a Chandler City Council meeting in April. The building located at 98 S. San Marcos Place appears to be under construction with signs in the windows directing cus- tomers to www.blacksheep.wine. 7 d’Vine Gourmet will open a new location this fall in downtown Chandler when the business takes over the space occupied by Sibley’s West. The owners of

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TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Biscuit s o pened its Sun Lakes location in April. The restaurant serves breakfast and lunch with several specials and is located at 9542 E. Riggs Road, Sun Lakes. The Sun Lakes location marks the restaurant’s third location in the Valley adding to the existing locations in the East Valley. 480-895-4041. www.biscuitsrestaurants.com

2 Dulce Churro Cafe opened in Chan- dler on April 28. The cafe oer churros served with a variety of toppings. The business is located at 1050 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste. 4, Chandler. 480-900-7038. https://dulcechurrocafe.com/ 3 Jinya Ramen Bar opened its down- town Chandler location April 29. The restaurant serves ramen of dierent varieties customizable with dierent add- ons at 130 S. Arizona Ave., Chandler. The

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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The Perch Brewery

Sibley’s West

PHOTO BY ALEXA D’ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PHOTO BY ALEXA D’ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Palm Court Centre is under construction in Chandler with tenants scheduled to move in later this year. (Courtesy city of Chandler) FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON

The location is at 2840 S. Alma School Road in Chandler. The business delayed its initial opening by several months due to the eects of COVID-19 and was not able to fully open to the public due to orders from the governor last summer. 480-912-5454. www.bigairusa.com 12 Bisbee Breakfast Club , a breakfast and lunch restaurant, will celebrate its one-year anniversary in Chandler on May 28. The breakfast and lunch joint, known for homestyle breakfast and pies, took over the building that was previously home to Paradise Bakery & Cafe at 940 N. 54th St., Ste. 100, Chandler, on May 28. 480-590-7907. www.bisbeebreakfastclub.com RENOVATIONS 13 The Perch Brewery in downtown Chandler nished construction on its

renovated, new patio on the top level of the bar and restaurant. The business is located at 232 S. Wall St., Chandler. The Perch Brewery is a bar and restaurant, but it is also home to around 50 tropical rescue birds. The new patio will house live music acts and feature a bar, televi- sions and plenty of seating. 480-773-7688. https://perchpubbrewery.com/ CLOSINGS 14 Sibley’s West: The Chandler Arizona Gift Shop will close after 11 years in June. Michelle and John Wolfe opened Sibley’s in downtown Chandler in December 2010 and decided that they would retire this year, the blog post states. The business is located at 72 S. San Marcos Place, Chan-

W. WARNER RD.

Two retail buildings totaling 11,900 square feet are under construction at Palm Court Centre at 225-235 W. Warner Road. The space will bring new local and national retail concepts to Chandler, according to information from the city of Chandler. Tenants will include CaliTacos, High 5 Tea and Beep Beep Trac Survival School & CPR School, according to the city. Opening dates for the business are not yet known, according to the city of

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Chandler. The shopping center project is still under construction and a completion date is not yet known, according to the city of Chandler.

dler. 480-899-4480. www.sibleyswest.com

480-581-8298

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CHANDLER EDITION • MAY 2021

W. BASELINE RD.

W. GUADALUPE RD. TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

W. ELLIOT RD.

Cost: $904,828 Funding source: Maricopa Association of Governments funds 2 Repaving Dobson Road The city of Chandler is working to repave a section of Dobson Road from Chandler Boulevard to Ray Road. Status: The project is scheduled to begin in May, and dates will be solidified once an ongoing private utility project along the same roadway is completed, accord- ing to the city. Timeline: 15 days once started Cost: $540,000 Funding source: city of Chandler 0 3 Repaving McQueen Road The city of Chandler is repaving a seg- ment of McQueen Road from Germann to Queen Creek roads. Status: City officials said the project is expected to start sometime in May once an ongoing improvement project is completed at the Queen Creek and McQueen roads intersection. The project will include traffic control, tarping and slurry sealing in addition to restriping the roadway. Timeline: five days once started Cost: $135,000-$162,000 Funding source: city of Chandler

4 Cooper Road improvement An effort is underway to expand Cooper Road to four lanes—two lanes in each direction. The project begins about 3,500 feet north of Chandler Heights Road to Riggs Road. Improvements include the construction of raised medians, bike lanes, left-turn lanes, sidewalks, curb, gutter, street lighting, traffic signals, drainage components, landscaping and utility relocations. The project was outlined in the city’s 10-year capital im- provement plan as a necessary infrastruc- ture improvement. Status: Work continues on the west side of Cooper Road to install private irriga- tion components from Victoria Street north. Electric crews continue work on the east side of Cooper to install electric conduit, future streetlights, as part of the conversion of overhead power to underground. Work has also begun on the segment from Via de Palmas moving north toward Chandler Heights Road. Timeline: February 2020- September 2022 Cost: $17.17 million Funding source: city of Chandler

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Chandler Boulevard bike lane addition Chandler Boulevard has bike lanes throughout the entire city, with a short segment missing that will be completed as part of this project, according to the city of Chandler. The segment stretches from I-10 to 56th Street in Chandler. Bike racks will also be added at bus stops as

part of this project, according to the city. Status: As of April 21, Combs Construc- tion Co. is working on the north side of Chandler Boulevard installing curbs and gutters and preparing for new pavement, traffic signal relocation and fire hydrant relocation, according to the city of Chandler. Timeline: March 15-September

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF MAY 6. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&EDUCATION

News from Chandler & Chandler USD

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

Chandler City Council May 27, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov Chandler USD board June 9, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER April 22, Chandler City Council approved a contract with Hunter Contracting Co. for the Veterans Memorial Phase 2 in an amount not to exceed $3.5 million. The project is expected to be complete by November. The first phase of the project was completed in 2016, according to documents from the city. The design of the memorial was created with input from several local veterans groups. CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved an agreement April 22 with Sunland Asphalt Construction for improvements on Alma School Road from Pecos Road to Germann Road for a revised contract amount not to exceed $6.37 million. CHANDLER USD The Chandler USD governing board April 28 voted to approve new exits for safety at eight elementary schools for $548,761. QUOTEOFNOTE “I WILL TAKEWITHME SOMANY BEAUTIFUL MEMORIES AND LOOK FORWARD TO CELEBRATING ALL YOUR FUTURE SUCCESSES.” CAMILLE CASTEEL, CHANDLER USD SUPERINTENDENT CITYHIGHLIGHTS CHANDLER At a meeting

Council approves photo enforcement cameras CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved an agreement April 22 for photo enforcement cameras at 12 of the city’s intersections for a five-year period expected to cost around $2.5 million. Vice Mayor Mark Stewart and accidents and increase traffic safety has been positive.” Chandler City Council voted April 22 to approve the placement of photo enforcement cameras at 12 of the city’s intersections. PHOTO ENFORCEMENT CAMERAS

If the program generates a positive cash flow, the funds will be used by the police department and the city’s traffic engineering department for traffic safety enhancements, accord- ing to the agenda item. Stewart suggested the council and the city look into changing the pen- alty for being flashed by one of these cameras into a warning instead of a fine and said he was against the use of the photo enforcement cameras. “It's about safety and trust; we have a huge trust issue right now with our police, and the last thing we need to do is do things that are not transparent,” Stewart said. “I think there’s a bunch of constitutional violations within this.” The council discussed the action item for about an hour April 22 Council approves Chandler airport plan CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved a master plan update for the Chandler Municipal Airport during a meeting April 22. The master plan update process began in the fall of 2019 and serves as a recommendation for improve- ments that need to be made at the airport. In the plan approved April 22 is a potential expansion of the south runway by 680 feet from 4,870 feet to 5,550 feet. This improvement would allow

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Intersections

Council Member Terry Roe dissented, but the motion passed by majority. The city first entered into an agreement for the photo enforcement program in February 2007. “The goal of the photo enforce- ment program is to reduce overall accidents and further reduce the severity of accidents that do occur,” read the agenda item. “Studies con- ducted in Chandler show that there is a statistically significant reduction in accidents at intersections that are photo enforced. The Police Department’s experience with photo enforcement as a tool to reduce Chandler USDboard moves to continue requiringmasks CHANDLER USD The Chandler USD governing board voted April 21 to continue to require masks in classrooms but will allow for stu- dents to remove their masks while outdoors for physical education activities. If the district infection rate remains low, effective May 31, masks will be optional moving forward in summer school.

before voting and heard from several members of the public. “To me, it does come down to the safety of the intersections,” Council Member René Lopez said. “To me, by the data it means we are saving lives out there. It’s one of the tools in the toolbox.” Cameras $2.5M Contract Cost SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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CHANDLER EDITION • MAY 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE LearningRX Center oers brain training and strengthening for all ages A nyone between the ages of 5 and 95 can benet from bolstering their cognitive learning skills, according to Robyn Chancellor, the owner and director of LearningRX in Chandler. People from any back- ground and learning ability can benet from strengthening those skills, she said. LearningRX is a brain training center for children and adults, and Chancellor can attest that the programs at the center really work. Both her children went through programs at LearningRX before Chancellor bought the business four years ago and became the owner and director. “It was a day-and-night dierence,” she said. “It was a complete transformation in my son. And that is typical of our program; people see that day-and-night dierence. It changes what some people think they can do with their lives.” The learning center focuses on strengthening cognitive skills including attention, auditory processing, logic and reasoning, processing speed, visual processing, long-term memory and working memory. The rst step, Chancellor said, is to take an assessment. The assessment gauges where clients are starting from, and then LearningRX sets them up with a brain training program to help bolster the skills they may be lacking. “We can work with anyone between the ages of 5 and 95,” Chancellor said. “We also see people who have had a traumatic brain injury and lost some of their cognitive function. With brain training, they can get some of that function back.” Chancellor said the programming can help anyone at any level, but can be particularly useful for people with attention issues, reading problems, autism, traumatic brain injuries and learning disabilities. “We are often someone’s last resort,” Chancellor said. “For kids, they have likely already tried tutoring, and it just isn’t working. They can come to us pretty defeated. That’s why we are here. We are helping people to be who God has designed them to be.” BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

“PEOPLE SEE THAT DAY ANDNIGHT DIFFERENCE. IT CHANGESWHAT SOME PEOPLE THINK THEY CAN DOWITH THEIR LIVES.” ROBYN CHANCELLOR, OWNER AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Robyn Chancellor has been the owner and director of LearningRX in Chandler for four years. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

WHAT DOES LEARNINGRXDO? Chancellor said the center focuses on brain training through the strengthening of cognitive skills. Strengthening cognitive skills makes it possible for people to learn new knowledge and skills. Cognitive skills include: Attention

BRAIN TRAINING

LearningRX boosts cognitive skill eciency with brain training. That means taking the information received and strengthening the ways that information is processed.

SEE HEAR FEEL SMELL TASTE

AUTOMATIC PROCESSING • Attention • Working Memory • Processing Speed

Processing speed Working memory Auditory processing Visual processing

HIGHER THINKING • Auditory & Visual Processing • Logic and Reasoning • Long Term Memory

Logic and reasoning Long-term memory Brain training targets and

WRITING SPELLING DRAWING SPEAKING TESTING

strengthens key learning skills, according to Chancellor. Methods include: One-on-one Targeting Sequencing Dynamic loading

KNOWLEDGE BANK

SOURCE: LEARNINGRXCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

LearningRX 900 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste. A-1 480-725-5248 http://learningrx.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE Sidelines Bar &Grill After 19 years, quality keeps locals coming back S idelines Bar & Grill rst opened in September 2002, and 19 years later, restaurant owner Kristina Gwinn considers the

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

The menu boasts a variety of burgers and chicken sandwiches.

Gwinn said the shrimp tacos are among her favorite dishes on the menu.

so many regulars—that and the menu. Sidelines oers a variety of dishes ranging from shrimp tacos to burgers to a selection of wraps. But the restaurant is most known for its assortment of chicken wings. The restaurant oers grilled wings, which Gwinn said have been a customer favorite for years. “We never skimp on the quality of food,” Gwinn said. “I only want to serve the best. Nothing is served here that’s not real, good food.” The owner said that the menu

Chicken Wings $7.99 Small $13.99 Large

place the “’Cheers’ of Chandler.” “Before people even sit down, we know what the regulars are going to have to drink and eat,” Gwinn said. In the 19 years the restaurant has been open, Gwinn has watched as customers have grown up, gotten married and had kids in some cases. Her own family has grown over the years as well. When the restaurant

SWEET CHILI

opened she had her son, now 18, in a play pen in a corner while she would work. Now, both her kids will pick up shifts at the restaurant. “It’s a whole

oers a little some- thing for everyone, and she likes it that way. She said the restaurant caters to people of all ages and tastes. The business has booths and table seating, bar seating and a patio with some games adding a family-friendly touch. She said it

HEATHERHOT

“I ONLYWANT TO SERVE THE BEST. NOTHING IS SERVEDHERE THAT’S NOT REAL, GOOD FOOD.” KRISTINA GWINN, OWNER

Chicken wings are a staple on the Sidelines Bar & Grill menu, according to owner Kristina Gwinn. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper) KNOWN FORWINGS Owner Kristina Gwinn said while the entire menu oers great food, the wings are a standout. Fan favorites include the Heather Hot and the Sweet Chili. Flavors include:

family business,” Gwinn said. “I’m so blessed and so lucky. It’s been really cool to watch them come in here and work.”

Plain Mild Medium Hot

Teriyaki Sweet Chili Asian Sweet Ginger Sauce Bleu Bualo Salt and Pepper Rub Garlic Parmesan

Heather Hot Honey BBQ Honey Hot Honey Garlic

was important to her that people know Sidelines really is a bar and a restaurant and oers something for everyone. Gwinn said business has been “booming” lately and considers herself “very, very lucky.” She said as long as everyone who enters the front doors feels welcome, she is happy. “I want everyone to feel like a regu- lar,” she said. “I’ve watched genera- tions come through this restaurant. I want to keep seeing that.”

Gwinn herself stays busy coming into the restaurant most days. And the owner said no job is too big or too small for her to do. “I’m very hands-on; I’ll bartend or serve or clean the dishes,” Gwinn said. “I think the sta respects that about me.” The restaurant’s sta has largely remained the same since the business opened, Gwinn said. That consis- tency, she said, is part of what makes Sidelines a neighborhood favorite for

Cajun Rub Hot Cajun

Sidelines Bar &Grill 2980 S. Alma School Road, Chandler 480-792-6965 www.sidelinesaz.com Hours: Tue.-Thu. 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.-midnight, Sat. 9 a.m.- midnight, Sun.-Mon. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

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CHANDLER EDITION • MAY 2021

ADDRESSING DEPARTMENT N E E D S

During a budget presentation April 23, Chandler Police Chief Sean Duggan presented a potential ve-year plan to address the stang gaps throughout the department. Chandler City Council has yet to ocially approve the plan, the cost of which is still unknown.

only patch them, securing leaks as best as we can, thenwe get to a point where the car needs a huge amount of work. That’s exactlywhat is happening now.” The department has 334 ocers— the same number it had in 2008, Duggan said. Duggan told the council April 8 that due to changes in the nature of crime in the last decade and the toll of the last year—Chandler Police is working to keep the city safe. To do that they have had to move ocers around to assure patrol is staed. “We are facing all these challenges with the exact same number of police ocers that we had in 2008, and clearly the world has changed since 2008,” Duggan said. “We continue to be a safe city … We are dealing with issues that weren’t here 10 years ago and an increase in the societal issues and pressures that didn’t exist 13 years ago.” Duggan told City Council during an April 21 retreat that he needed more stang to “stop the bleeding in patrol” as stang patrol is the department’s top priority. Duggan said he felt the 27 ocers in the next scal year and the plan to hire 47 more in the follow- ing scal years for a total of 67, would address the stang issue. “This is the number that I have iden- tied that will help maintain our safe city status and will continue to ensure that we keep up this trajectory of being a very safe city,” Duggan said April 23. Addressinganeed Duggan told City Council on April 8 the city has seen a sharp increase in gun-related crimes—with 75 shooting incidents in 2020 com- pared to 59 in the previous year. In 2020, those gun-related crimes resulted in 26 injured victims and nine deaths, according to Duggan. The department has also seen a rise in sexual assaults—more than

15 over hire ocer positions for patrol 7 ocers for neighborhood response team 1 training ocer 1 sex crimes detective 1 communications training supervisor 1 school resource ocer 1 mental health & wellness coordinator 27 Officers

2021-22

5 ocers for mental health unit 2 detention ocers 1 laboratory quality assurance supervisor 1 computer crimes detective 1 gang detective 10 Officers

2022-23

10 Officers

3 bicycle ocers 1 detention ocer

2023-24

1 IT business systems analyst 1 computer crimes detective

10 Officers

1 sex crimes detective 1 IT desktop support 1 records clerk 1 assistant chief

4 bicycle ocers 1 gang unit detective 1 detention ocer

2024-25

1 crime analyst 1 IT supervisor 1 homicide/robbery detective 1 training unit lieutenant

10 Officers

3 trac ocers 1 detention ocer 1 crime analyst 2 investigative specialists

2025-26

1 property and evidence technician 1 school resource ocer sergeant 1 records clerk

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

anticipated to be received through the American Rescue Plan Act for COVID- 19 relief. A total cost has not been iden- tied by the city. The city is looking to add 40 posi- tions over the course of the next ve scal years on top of this year’s 27, according to a presentation made to council April 23. The department would get 49 new sworn police o- cers and 18 professional sta under the plan. City ocials said they have not yet identied the total cost of this proposal. Meanwhile, the Chandler Law Enforcement Association and the

Chandler Lieutenants and Sergeants Association released a proposal April 19 to hire an additional 83 sworn ocers over the next ve years. The number from the two groups asks for 16 more ocers than the number presented to City Council by Duggan in April. Chandler Law Enforcement Associ- ation President Mike Collins said the department has not kept up with the hiring of newocers in the last decade. “I compare it to a vehicle,” Collins said. “We all have vehicles and we have to put tires on them and change the oil and get regular maintenance. But if in 13 years we don’t change the tires and

CONTINUED FROM 1

train them in the police academy and in the eld while existing ocers who may be set to leave the department continue in their roles, according to the city. Duggan also requested two addi- tional positions be funded—a mental health coordinator for the department and a school resource ocer—in s- cal year 2021-22 for a total of 27 posi- tions for next year—12 new positions and 15 overhires. The positions would be funded through a combination of the city’s general fund and dollars

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INCREASES IN VIOLENT CRIME Chandler has seen a rise in the number of violent crimes in the last decade, according to the chief, despite the city’s amount of overall crime decreasing.

double 2014 numbers—as well as calls for unhoused individuals and for the detention of those with mental illnesses. “Homelessness is not a crime,” Dug- gan said. “... It’s increasing exponen- tially year after year. This is an issue not being addressed throughout soci- ety, and it falls into the lap of police.” Even with the city’s recent increase in violent crime, Chandler is experi- encing historic lows of other types of crimes—the city’s overall crime rate has dropped by more than 30% in the last decade, Duggan said. But Duggan said the city is facing the same problems as police departments across the country, and recruiting for open positions has been dicult. “There aren’t many people out there who are willing to do the dicult job of being a police ocer,” Duggan told the council. The department is rolling out hir- ing incentives, and the city is looking to contract out with a recruiter to ll vacant positions across the city, includ- ing the police department. Chandler City Council spent the better part of several meetings in April discussing police department funding. All council members were in favor of ensuring the department has the resources it needs to maintain the city’s safety. “Our cops need support,” Council Member OD Harris said April 8. “[The chief] has taken a brave stance to say what he needs. I don’t want tired cops pulling me over. I want them to be refreshed. I want them to be able to have time with their families.” Council Member Matt Orlando said he wants to make sure City Coun- cil is aware of the needs of the police department. “Obviously the council has to come up with a plan and work with sta to fund the 40 police ocers over the next four years,” Orlando said. “But we need the bodies, the chief told us we

need the bodies and now we have to gure out howwe are going to fund it.” Orlando said there is promise in using one-time coronavirus relief funds to support police salaries over the four years those funds are available. “There’s two questions,” Orlando said. “What is a legitimate number of ocers we need to continue to keep us safe, and how we fund it is a dierent discussion.” Filling thegaps Collins said the city’s population growth and the complexity of crimes have also contributed to the under- staed department. “We are cut to the bone,” Collins said. “... We have askedmore andmore and more of our ocers, and they are so burned out that they just want to go home and be able to unplug.” According to the proposal Duggan presented April 23, of the 27 positions requested for the next scal year, 15 of them are over hire positions for patrol; seven are for ocers assigned to the neighborhood response team; one is a training ocer; one is a sex crimes detective; one is a commu- nications training supervisor; one is a school resource ocer and one is a police mental health and wellness coordinator. Of those 27 positions, 10 are funded via one-time coronavirus relief dol- lars the city is expecting but has yet to receive, and 15 are over-hire posi- tions that are funded elsewhere in the budget. The proposed budget—not including that one-time money—for the personnel in the department is $69.94 million for a total of 507 police department personnel. The 5-year plan Duggan presented proposes after FY 2021-22 adding an additional 10 positions each scal year through 2026, though city ocials have yet to calculate the overall cost

Sexual assaults

Shooting incidents

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

160 140 120 100

60 80 20 40

0

0

2016

2017 2018

2019 2020

2017 2018 2015 2016 2019 2020 2014

USING COVID-19 RELIEF FUNDING Chandler City Council is formulating a plan to allocate millions of dollars from the American Rescue Plan to fund several police positions using one-time dollars for a period of two years as well as funding other department needs.

$3.8M $1.2M $750K $30K $550K

POLICE TRAINING, EQUIPMENT AND FACILITY NEEDS EARLY HIRE POLICE POSITIONS

POLICE HIRING INCENTIVES REMOTE POLICE TESTING NATIONAL RECRUITMENT CAMPAIGN

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

of that proposal. Acting City Manager Josh Wright said the city will need to re-evaluate the plan annually and there are still several unknowns— including the coronavirus relief dollars the city is expecting. “We have experienced signicant declines in crime over the past decade, with last yearmarking our lowest crime rate since the 1980s,” Mayor Kevin Hartke said. “With that said, we have a number of challenges for our police department as stang needs, technol- ogy and crimes continue to evolve.” After the chief’s budget proposal,

Collins said it was “a start” but the number outlined in the Chandler Law Enforcement Association Chandler Lieutenants & Sergeants Association proposal was what the groups repre- senting Chandler ocers feel is the true need of the department. “We think that’s a good start and recognition that we need to stop the bleeding,” Collins said. “But it’s just that—a start.”

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CONTINUED FROM 1

Ocials are still unclear how much revenue they will receive from recreational marijuana sales taxes, but there is a plan for how that revenue will be dispersed.

received 50.1% of the vote. Licensed dispensaries received approval Jan. 22 from the Arizona Department of Health Services to begin serving adult-use cannabis and related products, and business boomed imme- diately, said Steve White, CEO of Har- vest House of Cannabis, which has a dispensary in Chandler. His business increased an average of 100% at its Ari- zona locations since recreational sales started. “We expect the adult-use market to attract new consumers across all demographics who are seeking regu- lated cannabis products and are open to learning more about the benets,” he said. Demitri Downing, an industry regis- tered lobbyist, is even more bullish on the fast start. “From medical to adult use, it dou- bled or tripled the sales,” he said. “It’s been consistent for a while. Dispensa- ries are seeing two or three times their previous volume sold.” However, city ocials said until they see actual returns ow into their cof- fers, they are reluctant to speculate on howmuch it will help their revenues. Citymoves Although municipalities are not counting their new cash from recre- ational marijuana sales yet, Gilbert and Chandler ocials did what they could to prepare for the Smart and Safe Ari- zona Act. Gilbert started Oct. 13, three weeks ahead of the vote, when Town Coun- cil unanimously adopted an ordinance prohibiting new retail marijuana estab- lishments in town stores that sell rec- reational marijuana. Only medical marijuana facilities, of which Curaleaf was the only one, could oer it in town. Then, Chandler City Council voted Dec. 7 to tentatively adopt anordinance amending the city code to allow for the regulation of recreational marijuana. Like Gilbert’s ordinance, it allowed medical marijuana sellers in town to have dual licenses and prohibited test- ing facilities, use on city property and new recreational retail facilities. Vice Mayor Mark Stewart said he opposed the measure because he believes it cre- ated a monopoly. “My challenge was that whoever had a license already were the only ones who could sell recreational marijuana as well,” he said. “It prevents a free market and free-market opportuni- ties. Cannabis being sold to adults that are of age—that is something the state



    

The Smart and Safe Arizona Act denes where the revenue from the 16% excise tax on adult-use marijuana sales should go.

Proposition 207, also known as the Smart and Safe Arizona Act, was approved by voters during the November election. The law legalizes the possession and consumption of recreational marijuana in Arizona. AMONG THE PROVISIONS OF PROP. 207 ARE: allowing personal possession of limited amounts of marijuana; allowing limited, secure cultivation of marijuana plants on residential property; banning smoking marijuana in public (but not edibles or vaping); authorizing the state and local regulation of recreational marijuana licensees; eliminating criminal penalties for small- quantity marijuana possession; and allowing for the expungement of marijuana convictions.

33%

31.4%

Community colleges 17.5% Divided among districts by enrollment 15% Divided equally among districts 0.5% Divided equally among provisional districts

Municipal police and re departments Divided according to individuals enrolled in Public Safety Personnel Retirement system

ADULTUSE MARIJUANA EXCISE TAX BREAKDOWN

25.4%

10%

0.2%

Highway User Revenue Fund Money used for county and municipality road construction and maintenance

Criminal justice and public health initiatives 3.5% County health departments 3.5% Grants to nonprots for

Attorney general’s oce For enforcement of the act

criminal justice initiatives 3% Department of Health Services initiatives

MARIJUANA TAX RATES IN ARIZONA

development, and a piece of that is havingmoremoney going toward com- munity college andworkforce develop- ment,” she said. “We are going to see the impacts of that in economic devel- opment across the state.” Gilbert Tax Compliance Manager Sara Radbury said municipalities will benet in twoareas as the lawhas 31.4% of the excise tax collected going to municipal police and re departments, and another 25.4%goes to theHighway Users Revenue Fund, of which cities receive a shared portion for road con- struction and maintenance. However, the cities do not know what their share will be yet and are reluctant to even project it, much less count on spending it. “I have no idea if it’s going to be a $50,000 distribution or a $500,000 distribution or $0.50,” Gilbert Budget Director Kelly Pfost said. Industry ocials do expect growth. White said growth at Harvest House of Cannabis is resulting in jobs in cultiva- tion, manufacturing and retail. “It’s been a wild ride,” said Anders Mintz, marketing director for Oasis Cannabis, which has two dispensa- ries in Chandler. “There has been a lot of growth, and it’s about to get even bigger.”

ADULTUSE RETAIL SALES Purchases are subject to a 16% cannabis excise tax in addition to a 5.6% statewide retail sales tax , bringing the total to 21.6% .

MEDICAL MARIJUANA SALES Purchases are subject to a 6.6% state excise tax plus an additional 2%-3% optional tax dictated by local municipalities.

SOURCE: ARIZONA REVISED STATUTE § 362856.DCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

decided for us.” Downing said local jurisdictions are only now starting to gure there will not be a large inux of recreational marijuana retailers. “People want freedom, choice, lib- erty, and government has to do things like end prohibition for that to hap- pen,” he said. “It doesn’t mean every- one wants to run out and consume marijuana.” Economiceects With those issues addressed, now comes the waiting for new revenue. While municipalities are awaiting that to ow down to them, the state has received some early numbers: More than $226,000 in sales tax collection and $511,000 in excise tax collection were received in February for the por- tion of January where sales happened. In March, $3.04 million in sales tax and $4.57 million in excise tax were collected. The Arizona Department of Revenue also has collected $2.38 million in sales

taxes on behalf of the state’s cities and another nearly $563,000 for revenue sharing with cities. Even those numbers come with a caution, as ADOR spokesperson Michelle Carella said revenue to this point likely is underreported. The g- ures, for example, are short of collec- tions for medical marijuana. Similar to other new tax classi- cations the state has implemented, businesses are learning their tax obli- gations, setting up their systems, and learning how to le and pay. She said ADOR anticipates more payments for the January and Febru- ary periods in the future as businesses learn the system. Thus, Carella said it is too early to draw conclusions on revenue. Carrie Kelly, from the Arizona Asso- ciation of Economic Development, agrees it is too early but still sees the eventual benets, such as money for community colleges. “We want a robust community college system for that workforce

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CHANDLER EDITION • MAY 2021

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