Southwest Austin - Dripping Springs Edition - November 2021

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION

VOLUME 14, ISSUE 8  NOV. 18DEC. 21, 2021

ONLINE AT

Austin’s park space increases Builders says new fees could hurt development

Adding

350

331.75

aCs Nonprots, bonds, grants and developer fees have paid for 548 acres of parkland in Austin since 2017, such as a 2018 bond which included $45 million for land acquisition.

250

150

55.39

36.6

50

0

2017

2018 2019 2020 2021

IMPACTS

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BY MAGGIE QUINLAN

Over the last ve years, Austin has added hundreds of acres of parkland to serve its rapidly growing population after more than a decade of falling behind. Between 1995 and 2017, as Austin’s population climbed from just over 500,000 people to just under 1 million, the ratio of acres per 1,000 residents dropped from 27 to 18, according to city data. Over the last four years, however, the city has maintained that ratio of 18 acres per 1,000 people by acquiring

SOURCE: AUSTIN PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

TRANSPORTATION

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Tommy Dukes, left, and his grandson, Maurice Dukes, 8, traded o pushing a merry-go- round at Dove Springs District Park on Nov. 8 after Maurice met with his new friend, 3-year- old Christian Tocay, right. (Maggie Quinlan/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 26

BUSINESS FEATURE

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In June 2020, four months after announcing 2019 broke its passenger count record, the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport issued a bleak projection: it could take until 2024 to climb back to its pre-pandemic passenger levels. The total number of passengers reached its low point in April 2020 at 47,781 passengers, a 97% decrease compared to April 2019. ABIA was hardly alone, as the entire airline indus- try grappled with a signicant downturn in passengers. However, ABIA did prove unique in how fast it has seem- ingly recovered, according to data from the city of Austin Aviation Department and Bureau of Transportation Statis- tics. The most recent federal data available shows passenger trac 20% lower in June 2021 than the same month in 2019, compared to a 15% drop at ABIA. CONTINUED ON 28 Airport expansionplans takeo as regioncontinuesgrowing BY BENTON GRAHAM

A I RPORT PAS SENGER GROWTH SOARS Despite pandemic-related passenger decreases, indicators show it is still possible to hit 31 million annual passenger by 2037 projected in the 2019 master plan.

TOTAL AUSTIN PASSENGERS

1999 3.3million

2019 17.3 million

2037 31 million

NONPROFIT

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READER SWEEPSTAKES

Airport opens

Pre-pandemic baseline

See Page 13 for details on how you could WIN$500 just by signing up for our newsletter.

Projection in pre-pandemic master plan

SOURCE: CITY OF AUSTIN DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN - DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • NOVEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMDEEDA: Thank you to our members of the military and their families. In honor of Veterans Day, we are highlighting a local business owned by a community member who served in our armed forces. On Page 33, you can read about how his service informs the way he leads his team today. If you have a business you would like to see featured, please let us know as we love celebrating our local heroes. Deeda Lovett, GENERALMANAGER dlovett@communityimpact.com

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMDARCY: At one point during the pandemic, my sole mission became trying to build up my dog, Newton, to a 6-mile loop on a Walnut Creek trail. Sometimes, I feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of parkland we have to explore. This month, our front page story looks at how the city is adding parkland as Austin’s population grows. Darcy Sprague, EDITOR dsprague@communityimpact.com

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Deeda Lovett EDITOR Darcy Sprague REPORTERS Olivia Aldridge, Maggie Quinlan, Ben Thompson SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Miranda Baker ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Weston Warner METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Travis Baker MANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES swanews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

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CORRECTIONS: Volume 14, Issue 7 Front page: Via 313’s rst truck opened in front of the Violet Crown Social Club. Page 6: Ollyloo Shoppe can be found at www.instagram.com/ollylooshoppe. Page 9: Double L Ranch developers will update roads around RR 12. Page 34: Lebowski’s buns are sourced from a bakery called Lil’ Mama’s.

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • NOVEMBER 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon or expanding

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Austin Bouldering Project

GREEN FOREST DR.

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Violet Crown Amphitheater

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COURTESY CRAIG BRYAN

TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN NOWOPEN 1 A new H-E-B opened in Oak Hill on Oct. 27 at 7901 W. Hwy. 290, Austin. The 90,000-square-foot store features an environmentally focused design, which includes rainwater harvesting and preparations for future solar panel installation. www.heb.com 2 A new Austin Bouldering Project location opened in the Westgate Shopping Center on Oct. 17 at 4477 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 600, Austin. The space oers climbing, training and yoga. This is the second location for the gym, which opened initially at 979 Springdale Road. 737-237-0899. www.austinboulderingproject.com 3 Chair King Backyard Store opened a Sunset Valley location at 4965 Hwy. 290, Sunset Valley, Nov. 5. The space was previously home to a Pier 1 Imports store. Chair King sells outdoor furniture. 512-646-8790. www.chairking.com

4 The city of Austin’s south Utility Customer Service Center reopened Nov. 1 following months of closure due to damage caused by Winter Storm Uri. Located at 1901 W. William Cannon Drive, Ste. 100, Austin, the oce serves city utility customers seeking assistance with billing, payment and payment assistance. The city also operates a north utility service center on Research Boulevard. Its eastern oce for utility customers remains closed. 512-494-9400. www.coautilities.com 5 Austin-based drink brand Blue Norther Hard Seltzer opened its South Austin headquarters and tasting room on Nov. 5. The rustic warehouse space is located in The Yard on St. Elmo development at 506 E. St. Elmo Road, Ste. A2, Austin. Blue Norther oers a range of alcoholic seltzer products

9 A new location of the national workout studio chain Hotworx is expected to open in Southwest Austin early next year. Mike Schultz owns the new studio at 7826 W. Hwy. 290, Ste. 107, Austin. It will oer 24-hour access to its studio for a range of sauna workouts. Memberships are expected to go on sale in late December or January. 737-727-0000. www.hotworx.net 10 Developers plan to open the 20,000-plus-seat Violet Crown Amphitheater with a concert on Labor Day in 2023. International Development Management Co. chose a location northwest of Hwy. 71 and Southwest Parkway, uphill from Austin’s downtown so it overlooks the skyline. The venue will also include two residential towers, a golf course and other developments. www.violetcrownaustin.com EXPANSIONS 11 The Austin Regional Clinic South Ob/Gyn expanded its South Central

Located at 4301 W. William Cannon Drive, Ste. B114, Austin, it hosts strength-, cardio- and exibility-based programming through scheduled classes for members. 512-920-6966. www.purebarre.com 7 Cricket Wireless opened a South Austin location o I-35 in early August. The national wireless provider oers cellular service plans and devices at its new store, located at 801 E. William Cannon Drive, Ste. 210, Austin. 800-274-2538. www.cricketwireless.com COMING SOON 8 Children’s resale shop Once Upon a Child is set to open its location in Oak Hill at 7010 Hwy. 71, Ste. 155, Austin, in December. The store, owned by locals Jim and Karly English, is presently buying gently used children’s clothing, toys and child care supplies to grow its inventory. It began accepting items at the new location in October. 512-715-4868. www.onceuponachild.com

available throughout Texas. www.drinkbluenorther.com

6 Austin local Lisa O’Neill launched a Pure Barre studio franchise location o of MoPac at Arbor Trails in October.

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COMPILED BY MAGGIE QUINLAN

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Blue Norther Hard Seltzer

Pure Barre

COURTESY AUSTIN PITTMAN

MAGGIE QUINLANCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Howl N’ Woof Dog Daycare

Pleasant Hill Branch

Pulse Performance, San Antonio-based studio, opened its rst Austin location Nov. 15.

COURTESY AMY EMMONS

COURTESY AUSTIN PUBLIC LIBRARY

COURTESY PULSE PERFORMANCE

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Pulse Performance opened its new training studio at 4301 W. William Cannon Drive, Austin, on Nov. 15. Pulse oers both one-on-one and group training classes involving electronic muscle stimulation. Under owner and founder JD Busch, the brand is launching in Austin and San Antonio with plans to franchise nationwide in the future. 512-596-5225. www.pulseperformancestudio.com NEWOWNERSHIP 17 Eyecare Specialties bought Today’s Vision at 5353 W. Hwy. 290, Ste. 102, Austin, from Dr. Manish Patel, who owned the clinic for 16 years. Patel will continue to provide services through the Eyecare Specialties location as an optometrist. The transition will be complete in February. 512-899-2020.

ANNIVERSARIES 14 Howl N’ Woof Dog Daycare

Austin oce Oct. 11. Located at 4315 James Casey St., Ste. 105-200, Austin, the clinic added a 2,616-square- foot space for gynecology specialists Alinda R. Cox, Paul Mumfrey and Cheryl A. Johnston. The medical oce includes eight exam rooms, a procedure room and lab. 512-383-9752. www.austinregionalclinic.com 12 Cafe Monet Art Studio launched its new Members Studio next to the original location in Southwest Austin on Oct. 2. The new facility at 4477 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 580, Austin, features a reservation- based studio space open to community members. Included in the monthly access fee is clay, tools and equipment. 512-892-3200. www.cafemonet.org 13 A new outpatient surgery facility opened at Advanced Pain Care ’s South Oce facility Oct. 25. In addition to surgical procedures, the center at 6000 S. MoPac, Ste. 100, Austin, oers pain care and orthopedic treatments for a variety of conditions. 512-244-4272. www.austinpaindoctor.com

marked its 10th anniversary Nov. 15. The business, located at 10010 Menchaca Road, Austin, oers day care, lodging and training. Owners Cody and Amy Emmons each have 20 years of experience working with dogs professionally and focus on improving dog behavior through play. 512-282-9663. www.howlnwoof.com 15 Sage Blossom Massage celebrated ve years since opening its Menchaca location at 6603 Menchaca Road, Austin, on Oct. 8, 2016. The brand’s rst location is in Oak Hill. Services include advanced deep-tissue and corrective massage as well as prenatal massage. 512-826-3550. www.sageblossommassage.com 16 Soco Pet Lounge celebrated its 10-year anniversary at 4917 S. Congress Ave., Austin in September. The facility oers day care, grooming and boarding. The shop focuses on play during boarding stays. 512-416-7387. www.socopetlounge.com

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RENOVATIONS 18 The Pleasant Hill Branch of the Austin Public Library is set to reopen at 211 E. William Cannon Drive, Austin, on Dec. 4 after undergoing renovations. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Austin Public Library temporarily closed its locations. 512-974-3940. www.library.austintexas.gov

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • NOVEMBER 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY MAGGIE QUINLAN

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon

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Chelsea Schizas is co-owner of Little Lauretta’s Powder Room. FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Chelsea and Demetri Schizas opened Little Lauretta’s Powder Room on Sept. 15 at 2400B Hwy. 290, Ste. 7, Dripping Springs. The salon is named for Chelsea Schizas’ mother, who brought Chelsea to a small, local salon in California almost daily. It oers lash and brow services, full body waxing, roll-on sunless tans, facials and chemical peels. 512-894-2340. www.littlelaurettas.com COURTESY CHELSEA SCHIZAS

DRIPPING SPRINGS

Supreme Food Court

RENDERING COURTESY NEIL STOKES

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COMING SOON 3 Supreme Food Court will soon oer a full service indoor-outdoor bar, a coee kiosk and four food trailers. Neil Stokes, who co-owns the project with Rainey Ventures, said it is set to open in late April or May 2022 at 29035 RR 12, Dripping Springs. www.supremefoodcourt.com RENOVATIONS 4 Grawlix Lounge added 1,500-square- feet of additional space. The new space opened Sept. 21, above Mercer Dancehall. It includes a bar, pool tables and arcade games at 332 W. Mercer St., Ste. 5, Dripping Springs. 512-894-2414. www.grawlixcocktaillounge.com

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DRIPPING SPRINGS NOWOPEN

Dripping Springs. 737-274-4786. www.hyerum.com

2 A ribbon-cutting on Nov. 11 marked the ocial opening of Allegro Weddings and Events on its 10-acre Hill Country property at 5001 McGregor Lane, Dripping Springs. The wedding venue oers a chapel, outdoor pavilions, cabins for overnight stays and an air-conditioned event hall that can accommodate up to 250 guests. The business is named after owner Joe Driscoll’s daughter, Allegra. 512-813-5915. www.allegroatx.com

1 Hye Rum opened Oct. 21 in Dripping Springs. It gets its name from its former home Hye, Texas, half-way between Dripping Springs and Fredericksburg. James Davidson, who co-owns the business with Stephanie Houston, has lived in Dripping Springs for four years and wanted to move Hye Rum closer to home. The tasting room is open Thursday through Sunday at 231 Frog Pond Lane,

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SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • NOVEMBER 2021

HOLIDAY TODO LIST

November & December regional events

NOV. 27 DEC. 30

AUSTIN TRAIL OF LIGHTS ZILKER PARK

DEC. 04

CAPITOL TREE LIGHTING TEXAS CAPITOL

DEC. 10

‘ELF ON THE SHELF’ HEB EVENT CENTER

The Austin Trail of Lights returns as a drive-thru event for its 57th year. This year’s spectacle will feature more than 2 million holiday lights throughout the park spanning 90 holiday trees, lighted tunnels and more than 70 other displays. 7 p.m. $30-$40 (per car). Zilker Park, 2100 Barton Springs Road, Austin. www.austintrailoights.org (Courtesy Austin Trail of Lights)

A Christmas Musical will come to the H-E-B Center at Cedar Park this holiday season. The music tells the tale of Santa’s elves. Mills Entertainment will put on the show with an original score and dozens of holiday costumes. 6 p.m. $29.95 and up. H-E-B Event Center, 2100 Avenue of the Stars, Cedar Park.

The 45-foot Christmas tree at the Capitol will be lit on Dec. 4. The event starts with a sing along at 6 p.m. The lighting will take place at 7 p.m. In the past, the Downtown Austin Alliance has hosted a stroll ahead of the event. However, this year they will host several events throughout December instead. Free. Congress Avenue. www.downtownholidaystroll.com (Courtesy Downtown Austin Alliance)

www.elfontheshelfmusical.com (Courtesy Mills Entertainment)

NOVEMBER THROUGHNOV. 28 DONATE TOYS

ticketing system in which attendees had to reserve tables. This year will continue with the ticketing process. The show features light shows choreographed to music. 6 p.m. daily. $20 (four-person table), $30 (six-person table). Pastries and hot chocolate can be purchased before or at the event. Mozart’s Coee Roasters, 3825 Lake Austin Blvd., Austin. www.mozartscoee.com 19 THROUGHDEC. 28 DRINK TO THE SEASON The Eleanor will open for its annual Miracle on 5th Street event. The pop-up cocktail bar features holiday-themed drinks and wall-to-wall Christmas decor. The menu includes eleven cocktails and four shots, including classic drinks with a

twist. Costs and times vary. The Eleanor 307 W. Fifth St., Austin. 512-494-4094. www.miracleon5thst.com 19 THROUGHDEC. 24 SHOP LOCAL The Blue Genie Art Bazaar will return for the upcoming holiday season. The event, held at 6100 Airport Blvd., Austin, features local artists selling a range of gifts from ceramics to toys. Last year the event, which has been running since 2001, launched an online store to address COVID-19 safety concerns. This year, shoppers can purchase items online and have them shipped or pick them up at the storefront, or shop in person. 10 a.m. daily. Free entrance. Cost of items vary. 6100 Airport Blvd, 512-222-7303

Bluegenieartbazaar.com 24 THOUGH JAN. 2 CAROLWITH YOUR CREW Zach Theatre will perform its adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.” The show merges modern music with the Victorian score. $25 and up. Times vary. Zach Theatre, 202 S. Lamar Blvd., Austin. 512-476-0541. www.zachtheatre.org 26 THROUGHDEC.26 DRIVETHRU THE SEASON The Circuit of The Americas will host Peppermint Parkway, a 1-mile drive featuring millions of holiday lights synced to seasonal classics, for its second year. This year the event includes a interactive rockette-style dance performance and

Donate to Austin Police Department’s Operation Blue Santa through the Chuy’s Children Giving to Children Parade. Monetary donations can be made online. New, unwrapped toys can be donated at any Chuy’s location. The annual parade has been canceled for 2021.

www.bluesanta.org THROUGH JAN. 6 SEE A LIGHT SHOW

Mozart’s Coee Roasters will host its annual light show. In past years, the event has been free to attend and open to all. Last year, organizers changed to a

Find more or submit local events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY DARCY SPRAGUE

NONHOLIDAY EVENTS NOV.

an open-air shuttle through the parkway. $35 per car. 9201 Circuit of The Americas Blvd., Austin. www.peppermintparkway.com 27 THROUGH 28 HANG ON TOHALLOWEEN Horror for the Holidays Art and Gift Bazaar gives horror fans a last hurrah before entering the jolly season. Vendors sell horror, goth and dark gifts, such as art, home decor, clothing and vinyl. 11 a.m. $10-$15. Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Road, Austin. www.bloodovertexas.com DECEMBER 01 THROUGHDEC.31 HAVE AHISTORIC HOLIDAY While the 135-year-old Driskill’s tree- lighting ceremony will be done privately this year, it will open to the public to show o the 16-foot Douglas Fir and other holiday decor, including a gingerbread village made by children at Dell Seton Children’s Hospital. Free. Normal hours. The Driskill, 604 Brazos St., Austin. 512-439-1234. www.driskillhotel.com 04 HAVE ADRINKOR TWO The third annual 12 Bars of Christmas will start at the Blind Pig Pub. Attendees are encouraged to wear Christmas-themed outts, such as holiday onesies. Participating bars include Buck Wild Burnside’s Tavern, The Lodge and Peckerheads. 12 p.m. $12 and up. Blind Pig Pub, 317 E. Sixth St., Austin. www.xmasbarcrawl.com 04 THROUGHDEC. 23 HEAD TO THE BALLET Hundreds of Ballet Austin dancers will perform the holiday classic “The Nutcracker.” This year will be the company’s 59th annual performance of the show. The production includes music by the Austin Symphony Orchestra. $20 and up. Times vary. The Long Center for the Performing Arts, 701 W. Riverside Drive, Austin. 512-474-5664. www.balletaustin.org

DATES TOKNOW

SHOP FOR A CHRISTMAS TREE

THROUGH JAN. 30 ESCAPE INNATURE

NOV. 25 THANKSGIVING NOV. 26 BLACK FRIDAY NOV. 28DEC. 6 HANUKKAH DEC. 21 WINTER SOLSTICE DEC. 25 CHRISTMAS DAY DEC. 31 NEW YEAR’S EVE

Fortlandia is a collection of forts and hideouts created by local architects, designers and artists placed along nature trails. The forts are built in the Mollie Steves Zachry Texas Arboretum. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Free (with park admission). Lady Bird Johnson Wildower Center, 4801 La Crosse Ave., Austin. 512-232-0100. www.wildower.org 24 HAVE A LAUGH Every Wednesday the Last Stand Brewing Company hosts the Last Stand Up Show. The event is hosted by Martin Henn and Andre Ricks presented by Cheesecake Comedy. 8 p.m. Free. The Last Stand Brewing Company, 7601 S Congress, Building 6, Austin. 512-568-2800 www.laststandbrewing.com 27 SEE THE LAST SHOWAT THE ORIGINAL NUTTY BROWNAMPHITHEATRE The Randy Rodgers Band will perform the last show at the Nutty Brown Amphitheatre’s Austin location. Pat Green will play the night before. The venue will reopen in Round Rock in 2022. 6 p.m. $50+. Nutty Brown Amphitheatre, 2225 Hwy. 290. 512-301-4648. www.nuttybrown.com DEC. 04 LET THE FLOWERS INSPIRE YOU The Southwest Post Rock Collective and The Far Out Lounge will host Night Bloom Music and Art festival. The event is inspired by nocturnal desert owers and will bring together local music and art. 12 p.m. $15. Far Out Lounge, 8504 S Congress

THE ROBINSON FAMILY FARM 3780 White Owl Lane, Temple 254-931-9564 www.therobinsonfamilyfarm.com OPENS: NOV. 20 4-7 p.m. (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (Sat.-Sun.) BRUNGOT FARMS 204 E. Little Elm Trail, Cedar Park 512-750-4378 www.brungotfarms.com OPENS: NOV. 21 4-8 p.m. (Nov. 21-24), closed Nov. 25 for Thanksgiving, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. (Nov. 26-27), 10 a.m.-6 p.m. (Nov. 28), 4-8 p.m. (weekdays Nov. 29-Dec. X), 10 a.m.-8 p.m. (Sat.), 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. (Sun.) THE GREAT OUTDOORS 2730 S. Congress Ave., Austin 512-448-2992 www.gonursery.com

09 GET READY FOR A CLASSIC The Trans-Siberian Orchestra will bring its winter show, “Christmas Eve and Other Stories,” to the Frank Erwin Center. This is the 25th anniversary of the album. The band formed in 1996. 7:30 p.m. $99 and up. Frank Erwin Center, 1701 Red River St., Austin. 512-471-7744. www.frankerwincentertx.com 12 TAKE INA CHRISTMAS CLASSIC The Paramount Theatre will host the a live concert featuring music from “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” The family- friendly event is sponsored by the Austin Chamber Music Center. Times vary. $22. The Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress Ave., Austin. 512-472-5470. www.austintheatre.org 17 THROUGH 19 SHOP THE SEASON Armadillo Christmas Bazaar will return for a three-day, in-person, outside event. The pop-up market features art, including paints, jewelry and metal works. 10 a.m. $10 (admission). Outside the Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Road, Austin. 512-447-1605. www.armadillobazaar.com

TREES ARRIVE: NOV. 24 9 a.m.-6 p.m. (Mon.-Fri.), 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (Sat.-Sun.)

EVERGREEN FARMS 242 Monkey Road, Elgin 512-281-4833 www.evergreen-farms.com OPENS: NOV. 26

10 a.m.-dark (Sat.), noon-dark (Sun.-Fri.)

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11

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • NOVEMBER 2021

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY BENTON GRAHAM

71

290

N

Soundwall construction, brush removal begins at OakHill

While major construction on Oak Hill Parkway is not expected until early 2022, the Texas Department of Transportation has begun work on some elements of the project. In the lead up to heavier construction, TxDOT will begin work on a sound walls, clearing and grading the project limits, and identication of caves and voids in the project area, said Brad Wheelis, a TxDOT public information ocer. There will also be intermittent nighttime lane closures. The $674 million project will create a freeway at the Y in Oak Hill, where Hwy. Virtual open house to begin for MoPac South The Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority and the Texas Department of Transportation plan to revive the MoPac South project, beginning with a virtual open house running from Nov. 22-Jan. 7. The 8-mile project would run from Cesar Chavez Street to Slaughter Lane—a segment that sees up to 179,000 cars and trucks per day, according to a Mobility Authority press release. “If we do nothing to address congestion, drivers could spend an additional 35 minutes traveling the corridor by 2035,” the press release reads. The six recommended build proposals would add one or two express lanes in both directions and cost between an estimated

290 and Hwy. 71 intersect. According to the TxDOT website, the freeway expects to open to trac in 2026. TxDOT will soon begin work on a sound wall along the south side of Hwy. 290 from South View Road to Scenic Brook Drive near the Ridgeview neighborhood, Wheelis said. In addition, TxDOT has begun clearing trees, brush and other structures. Wheelis said that TxDOT is clearing and grading to provide room for the project’s improvements. “Neighbors should expect noise and heavy truck trac as part of this process,” Wheelis added.

In addition to the crossing signal, the corridor programoce will add high- visibility crosswalks at WilliamCannon Drive andMcCarty Lane. (Courtesy Austin Corridor ProgramOce)

HOW

ONGOING PROJECT

290

WILLIAM CANNON DR.

SCAN

MOPAC

N

COLORADO RIVER

CESAR CHAVEZ ST.

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF NOV. 15. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SWANEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Construction for the project will largely be Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., but some weekend construction is possible. One lane may be closed. Timeline: Sept. 30-December 2021 Cost: $300,000 Funding source : 2016 mobility bond New pedestrian crossing signal coming to William Cannon Drive and McCarty Lane intersection The city of Austin Corridor Program Oce began work on a new pedestrian crossing signal at William Cannon Drive and McCarty Lane on Sept. 30. The signal will allow for people crossing at the intersection to press a button that will signal to oncoming trac that someone is trying to cross. The intersection will also have Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant curb ramps and high-visibility crosswalks, according to a corridor program oce press release.

360

MOPAC

SIGNUP FOROUR CI MORNING IMPACT NEWSLETTER

290

35

SLAUGHTER LN.

N

$275 million-$350 million. The transportation agencies also still need to determine how the toll lanes would connect to downtown. The project has been on pause since a lawsuit was led by the Save Our Springs Alliance in 2016, which said that the environmental review of the SH 45 SW project, the MoPac intersection project and the MoPac South project should have been studied as one. The virtual open house will be available Nov. 22 at 5 p.m. Feedback can also be sent to mopacsouth@ ctrma.org.

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13

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • NOVEMBER 2021

NEWS BRIEFS

Abridged stories from online

Austin leaders addressing apparent hate crimes

DEVELOPMENT PAUSE

NOV. 18 - NOV. 27*

BY DARCY SPRAGUE

New development applications will not be accepted in the city or its extraterritorial jurisdiction.

one million 911 calls the department receives, even a small increase in the numbers can feel like a large percentage shift. “Just one is too many,” Chacon said. Elizalde told Community Impact Newspaper that the district is working to provide support students and reviewing its safety measures in light of the recent incidents. Police arrested a suspect in the arson case on Nov. 10.

Law enforcement, faith leaders, and city and state officials gathered Nov. 1 to address recent antisemitic acts across Austin. The Interfaith Action of Central Texas organized the event at the Dell Jewish Community Center. Attendees included Mayor Steve Adler, several state and local representatives, Austin ISD Superintendent Stephanie Elizalde and law enforcement leaders. “That hate [that] exists at the fringes of society is not the danger,” Adler said. “The danger is that that hate spreads.” The incidents include a fire at Congregation Beth Israel that investigators believe could be arson, a banner containing an antisemitic message hung over a bridge on MoPac, and antisemitic words and symbols that were found spray-painted at Anderson High School. Austin Police Chief Joseph Chacon said each incident is being investigated separately, but police have not ruled out a possible connection. “I am very concerned with the fact that we have seen so many [potential hate crimes] and so recently,” Chacon said. Chacon said given the relatively small number of hate crimes, compared to the more than

Dripping Springs enacts developmentmoratorium *THE CITY IS CONSIDERING EXTENDING THE MORATORIUM SOURCE: CITY OF DRIPPING SPRINGS/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY MAGGIE QUINLAN

The city of Dripping Springs announced a pause on all new housing and commercial developments, stating the city has reached its wastewater capacity, on Nov. 10. As of press time Nov. 15, the temporary moratorium is set to take effect Nov. 18-27. This means the city will not accept applications for new developments in the city or its extraterritorial jurisdiction. Applicants will have the option to apply for exceptions or waivers if the moratorium is extended past Nov. 27. “Our goal is to protect the treasured quality of life we have all come to know and love,” Dripping Springs Mayor Bill Foulds said. Foulds said the temporary moratorium will allow the city time to develop a plan and ensure local ordinances and regulations are appropriate for addressing rapid population growth.

HATE CRIMES OVER THE LAST FIVE YEARS

The Austin Police Department has a robust process for determining when to classify a crime as at hate crime, Chief Joseph Chacon said. Below is the number of hate crimes APD has identified each year.

20

15

10

*AS OF SEPT. 10

0

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021*

SOURCE: AUSTIN POLICE DEPARTMENT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ELECTIONRESULTS

BREAKDOWN RESULTS

Austin voters rmly reject PropA, back PropB

Austin voters are spread across Travis, Williamson and Hays County, where 22%, 12% and 12% of registered voters turned out respectively.

PROPOSITION A

BY BEN THOMPSON

Through the No Way on Proposition A campaign, opponents

Austin voters in Travis, Williamson and Hays County weighed in on two city propositions and eight state constitutional amendments during the Nov. 2 election. While Austin’s Proposition A, a police stang measure failed, Proposition B, authorization for a parkland swap deal, and all eight state amendments passed. Austin says no to PropA More than 68% of city residents voted to strike Department at a ratio of two ocers per 1,000 residents, alongside other provisions for police operations and safety training. On Nov. 2, the co-founder of Save Austin Now, which supported Proposition A, Matt Mackowiak expressed disappointment that voters did not share his group’s vision. “We thought more people in the city were going to demand that we have an adequately staed police department ... In the end, they were convinced by the other side that this is something the city could not aord ... and everything’s ne,” Mackowiak said. down the proposal to sta the Austin Police

Prop. A drew millions of dollars from local and national sources between Sept. 24-Oct. 23 .

Proposition A would have established a minimum stang requirement of two police ocers per 1,000 residents. City sta estimated it could cost $54.3 million-$119.8 million annually.

expressed concern over the questionable link between police stang and homicide rates, and the nancial eects of another police funding increase. City sta estimated the proposition would cost Austin $54.3 million to $119.8 million annually over ve years, gures that would likely have forced either a tax rate hike or cuts to several city departments. “The community rearmed that what we need is a comprehensive approach to public safety,” Mayor Steve Adler said. Voters clear path for new city park Proposition B’s passage by a 47%margin gives the city permission to trade its Central Maintenance Complex for more than 48 acres of land elsewhere and money to restore the Fiesta Gardens parkland and replace the maintenance complex. The city has not identied the 48-plus acres that could be gained, but East Austin’s Driveway Austin track on the Colorado River is the likely target. The property is surrounded by city parkland

SAVE AUSTIN NOW

31.81% For

PROPOSITION A RESULTS 106,413 of the 156,057 Austin voters who cast ballots rejected the measure

Raised $1.01M Spent $1.02M

FAILED

EQUITY PAC NO WAY ON PROP A

Raised $1.06M Spent $762K

68.19% Against

PROPOSITION B

Now that Proposition B has passed, sta can begin soliciting bids in exchange for 9 acres of property on Lakeshore Boulevard.

LAKESHORE BLVD.

35

73.28% For

PROPOSITION B RESULTS 110,995 of the 151,476 Austin voters who cast ballots approved the measure

PLEASANT VALLEY RD.

RIVERSIDE DR.

N

PASSED

26.72% Against

Austin can trade 9 acres on Lakeshore Boulevard for other parkland after Prop B passed. BEN THOMPSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SOURCES: CITY OF AUSTIN, HAYS COUNTY, TRAVIS COUNTY, WILLIAMSON COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

and adjacent to John Treviño Jr. Metropolitan Park. “We knew going into this that parkland is sacred to Austinites, and that it’s something that they are not going to trade away or sell unless they were sure that they were going to get something of tremendous

land and fulll the city’s other requirements in exchange for the Riverside maintenance complex, which is adjacent to the company’s world headquarters. Oracle did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Olivia Aldridge contributed to this report.

value in return,” said Mark Littleeld, consultant for the pro-Proposition B Grow Austin Parks PAC. Driveway President and CEO Bill Dollahite conrmed he has been in talks with the city and Oracle for a three-way deal. That process would see Oracle purchase the Driveway

15

SOUTHWEST AUSTIN  DRIPPING SPRINGS EDITION • NOVEMBER 2021

GOVERNMENT Newelectoral maps outline next decade of city, state politics

MAKING THE MAPS This fall’s local and state redistricting processes set new district lines for city and federal representation.

Austin’s new district boundaries are based around those in place since 2013.

AustinCityCouncil

BY BEN THOMPSON

mapping plan was also shaped with some recommendations from the local NAACP/Hispanic Coalition that resulted in multiple minority opportunity districts—areas where residents of a certain demographic block have the chance to elect a candidate of their choice. Puentes said that while the ICRC strived to ensure those districts remained in place, it was tough because minority populations are increasingly leaving the city. This was the first year in decades that Texas was not bound by preclearance—a 1965 Voting Rights Act provision requiring federal approval of maps from states with a history of disenfranchising minority voters. Although the Supreme Court eliminated preclearance requirements in 2013, the approved Texas maps have already been challenged in court for discrimination. The lawsuit, filed by a group called Voto Latino as well as several others claims that 95% of the population grown in Texas, as measured by the 2010 and 2020 censuses, stems from growth in minority populations, yet it says the new maps increase the number of majority white districts. State Sen. Joan Huffman, R-Houston, who led the redistricting process in the Senate, addressed similar concerns during a Sept. 24 redistricting committee session. “ ... We drew these maps race- blind. We have not looked at any racial data as we drew these maps, and to this date I have not looked at any racial data. … I have not drawn these maps on a racial basis,” Huffman said. According to census data, the proportion of white Texans fell from 72.43% to 54.99% over the last decade. “Much of Texas, if drawn correctly and geographically, would provide an increase in minority representation,”

District 1 District 6

District 2 District 7

District 3 District 8

District 4 District 9

District 5 District 10

Dual redistricting processes at the local and state levels wrapped up this fall, cementing how Austinites will be represented for the coming For the city, a panel of residents redesigned 10 Council districts. At the Texas Capitol, the majority- Republican Legislature designed its own maps for dozens of state House, Senate, Board of Education and U.S. decade at City Hall, the state Legislature and in Congress. Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission, or ICRC, moved toward an October conclusion, members pointed to importance of public feedback and impartiality. “We’re not a body of elected officials. We’re just citizens. I think that makes a huge difference that we don’t have skin in the game,” ICRC Chair Christina Puentes said. Puentes said the board prioritized transparency. The group often held public in-person and virtual meetings at night or on weekends. “Without the citizen participation, I think that’s kind of like the magic congressional districts. As the work of Austin’s sauce in a way,” Puentes said. At the state level, redistricting hearings were held during regular business hours. Both Puentes and David Thomason, an associate professor of political science at St. Edward’s University, said this meant residents had less opportunity to provide feedback at the state level and did not see their feedback incorporated at the level it was in the city. Thomason said that aspect is one of several key differences he sees between the Legislature and the ICRC’s approach. “Most of the states that are similar in their population size try to create more transparency, more accountability and more accessibility to redistricting,” Thomason said. “Texas at the state level has not historically done that.” Minority representation The Austin commission’s final

OLDMAP

APPROVEDMAP

45 TOLL

45 TOLL

35

35

183

183

130 TOLL

130 TOLL

620

620

290

290

MOPAC

MOPAC

130 TOLL

130 TOLL

290

290

71

71

183

183

35

35

45

45

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

Redistricting will alter how Travis County is represented in Congress, including the creation of a new District 37.

Congressional

District 10 District 25

District 17 District 35

District 21 District 37

OLDMAP

APPROVEDMAP

620

620

71

71

290

290

MOPAC

MOPAC

130 TOLL

130 TOLL

290

290

183

183

35

35

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

SOURCES: CITY OF AUSTIN, TEXAS LEGISLATURE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER NOTE: AREAS IN GRAY REPRESENT DISTRICTS THAT DO NOT INCLUDE ANY PART OF TRAVIS COUNTY

lines resemble the current plan. State maps have already shuffled Central Texas politics with several lawmakers announcing plans to run ahead of the Dec. 13 filing deadline. In Austin, District 4 Council Member Greg Casar announced a run for Congressional District 35 based on the new map. Longtime District 35 Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, announced his run for the newly created District 37 just west of his current constituency. Under the new maps, District 35 is broadened in eastern Travis County and still stretches through Hays and Comal counties to the San Antonio area. The new District 37 now covers the city’s central portion. Farther north, state Rep. James

Talarico, D-Round Rock, is running for the compacted House District 50 currently represented by state Rep. Celia Israel, D-Austin, a plan that would require him to move away from his current District 52. Israel is exploring a run for Austin mayor. Former state Sen. Pete Flores announced a follow-up attempt to rejoin the Senate with a run for Northwest Austin’s Senate District 24 after a 2018 election loss. District 24 now covers less of Travis County as District 25 has been extended to the north and west to absorb more of the area. Former Austin City Council Member Ellen Troxclair is running for state House District 19 to the west after previously eyeing the District 24 seat.

Thomason said. District shakeups

Locally, Austin’s new maps do not appear likely to significantly change council’s political or demographic makeup given that the boundary

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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