Lewisville - Flower Mound - Highland Village | April 2021

LEWISVILLE FLOWERMOUND HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 6  APRIL 14MAY 11, 2021

ONLINE AT

SAMPLE BALLOT LOCAL VOTER GUIDE 2021

TEAHOLIC TEAHOUSE & RESTAURANT

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IMPACTS

INDIGO ART & FRAMING

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$21M in rental assistance available inDenton County Eviction Diversion Program helps renters, landlords

The decline in the number of eviction lawsuits led last year in Denton County Justice of the Peace Precinct 3, which includes Lewisville and Highland Village, coincided with the pandemic and a federal eviction moratorium that kept people in their homes. Funding increases as eviction filings fall

300 2019

2020 2021

Funding from the CARES Act and other stimulus laws will help expand eorts to prevent homelessness. Here is how that funding has increased in Denton County.

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

unable to cover her basic expenses and had to move, she said. But in January, with help from Denton County’s Evic- tion Diversion Program, Steward, age 22, was able to settle into a new apart- ment in Lewisville. “It took a lot of stress o,” Steward said of the program. “I didn’t know how I was going to pay my rent.” This eviction diversion program is a

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Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, Shonterrian Steward faced a dicult choice: Lose her income, or put her mother’s health at risk. Steward’s mother, with whom she lived at the time in Dallas, has a medi- cal condition that heightens her risk of contracting a severe case of COVID-19. In June, Steward quit her job. As months stretched on, Steward was

$500,000 $7 million $21 million

2019: 2020: 2021:

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0

SOURCES: DENTON COUNTY JUSTICE OF THE PEACE PRECINCT 3, UNITED WAY OF DENTON COUNTY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER March May July Sept. Nov. Jan.

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What’s on the ballot? Lewisville City Council is considering annexing Castle Hills this year. Proposition A asks voters whether to amend the city charter by adding another member to City Council in the event that annexation occurs.

Election: Should 6thmember be added to City Council?

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

area into the Lewisville city limits would add more than 14,000 people to the city. Lewisville’s current population is about 107,000. “If this proposition passes, that would add an addi- tional council member,” Barron said. “That would give better representation for that future population.” John Deihl has lived in the Castle Hills community for nearly 17 years and is part of a committee that is helping to educate residents about the possible annexation. Though Deihl cannot vote in Lewisville’s May election, he said he sees the ballot measure as an

Lewisville voters will decide this spring whether to alter the makeup of the city’s government. If passed, Proposition A on the May 1 ballot would add a sixth seat to Lewisville City Council. A review of 17 Dallas-Fort Worth-area cities showed that Lewisville’s governing body is among the small- est, with ve City Council members and a mayor, according to City Manager Donna Barron. The proposed change is tied to the potential annex- ation of the Castle Hills community, which could occur later this year. Bringing that unincorporated

Current council makeup:

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1

3

Proposed council makeup: Council members

Mayor

Minimum needed to conduct city business

6

1

4

Council members

Mayor

Minimum needed to conduct city business

SOURCE: CITY OF LEWISVILLECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

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FROMBARB: All the political signs posted in Lewisville, Flower Mound and Highland Village demonstrate the area’s passion for local government service. Get informed about the upcoming May 1 election with our lists of candidates and resources (see Page 10). For full candidate Q&As, visit www.communityimpact.com/l-2021-qas. As always, please reach out to me with any comments or concerns. Barb Delk, GENERALMANAGER

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • APRIL 2021

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON, KIRA LOVELL & VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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HIGHLAND VILLAGE

LEWISVILLE LAKE

35E

JUSTIN RD.

407

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EAGLE CT.

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LLELA NATURE PRESERVE

JONES ST.

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CHURCH ST.

121

Dallas Parrots

LONG PRAIRIE RD.

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COURTESY DALLAS PARROTS

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SRT TOLL

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HEBRON PKWY.

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CORPORATE DR.

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VISTA DR.

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3040

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GRAPEVINE LAKE

Wicked Bold Vegan Kitchen

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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COURTESY WICKED BOLD VEGAN KITCHEN

NOWOPEN 1 Spenga has opened registration for founders memberships. Classes for founders began April 5. A grand opening will be held May 1 at 2450 Cross Timbers Road, Ste. 130, Flower Mound. The fitness concept focuses on cardio, high-intensity interval training and flexibility exercises in one-hour sessions, according to the company website. 214-513-5003. www.spenga.com 2 A new Dallas Parrots store opened March 24 at 2608 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 201, Flower Mound. This is the first retail location for Dallas Parrots, which was previously based in Irving and open by appointment only. The family-owned store will continue to specialize in exotic

COMING SOON 7 The owners of Wicked Bold Choco- late will open a new vegan restaurant, Wicked Bold Vegan Kitchen , on April 23 at 3343 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 3347, Flower Mound. The restaurant will offer plant-based charcuterie boards and non- alcoholic cocktails as well as Wicked Bold chocolates. 239-940-0764. www.wickedbold.com 8 Blessed Hands by Ms. P and Peggy’s Fashion Closet , sister businesses owned by Peggy Glover, will hold a grand opening at 101 E. Corporate Drive, Ste. 150C, Lew- isville, on May 1. Blessed Hands by Mrs. P provides natural hair styling, specializing in box braids done in three hours or less.

5 Phenix Salon Suites opened in March at 6101 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 140, Flower Mound. The business rents suites to a variety of independent salon profes- sionals, including hair stylists, hair color specialists, massage therapists and nail technicians. 972-740-1954. www.phenixsalonsflowermound.com 6 Sephora opened April 9 in The Highlands of Flower Mound shopping center at 6101 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound. Stores carry makeup, fragrances and skin care products. The company, which was founded in France in 1970 and opened its first U.S. location in 1998, offers in-store and virtual beauty classes and a customer loyalty program. www.sephora.com

and rare birds. It offers bird supplies, such as food, toys and cages. 469-706-0972. www.dallasparrots.com 3 Steadfast Fitness and Performance personal training opened March 11 at 709 Hebron Parkway, Ste. 380, Lewis- ville. It offers group classes and boot camps as well as individualized fitness and nutrition programs for professional and amateur athletes. 972-303-8968. www.steadfastfp.com 4 Drive-thru coffee shop The Human Bean was set to open April 10 at 1001 FM 3040, Lewisville, near Vista Drive. The menu for the Oregon-based chain offers a mix of coffee and espresso drinks as well as teas, frozen beverages and more. www.thehumanbean.com

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FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON A longtime dream will become a reality for owner Sharmon Walters when she opens her new dessert shop, AshJenn Signature Desserts , in Flower Mound. Walters said she is turning her part- time home business into a full-time gig with a storefront. The bakery, located at 2601 Lakeside Parkway, Ste. 150, Flower Mound is named after Walters’ daughters, Ashley, who died in 2013, and Jennifer. The bakery is tentatively set to open in May. It will serve cake, cheesecake, pie, cookies, banana pudding and other Peggy’s Fashion Closet offers a variety of clothes and accessories. 214-524-4859. www.blessedhandsbymsp.com www.peggysfashioncloset.com 9 Sfereco , an Italian-style restaurant, is slated to open in Old Town by the end of May at 233 W. Church St., Lewisville. Lewisville City Council approved an eco- nomic development package March 15 that offers the developer up to $20,000 for improvements to the restaurant site, as well as tax grants. Sfereco, which is owned by Refined Hospitality Concepts, plans to open another location in Flower Mound. www.sfereco.com 10 Two new businesses have signed leases at the Lakeside International Office Center in Flower Mound, according to a news release from Realty Capital Management. Cloud-based telecommu- nications company A Intrado Corpora- tion and B Montare Resources , which acquires and develops gas and oil assets, will move into corporate offices in the de- velopment. Lakeside International Office Center, which is located at 777 and 737 International Parkway, Flower Mound, began construction in July 2019 and was completed in September 2020, according to the release. www.intrado.com, www.montare-resources.com RELOCATIONS 11 Church of the Resurrection , an Anglican church in Flower Mound, has moved from its previous location on Mor- riss Road. The church will host services at its temporary location at the Cross Tim- bers Family YMCA, 2021 Cross Timbers

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assorted goodies, many of them in miniature form. Walters will also oer gluten-free and plant-based vegan treats. Cupcakes and cookies for dogs will also be sold. 214-334-6896. www.ashjenn.com

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Road, Flower Mound. Capital plans for a permanent location will be announced soon. www.churchoftheres.com 12 Midnight Custom Cars has relocated to 1504 Eagle Court, Ste. 5, Lewisville, with the approval of a special use permit March 15 from City Council. The auto- motive shop was previously located on Business 121 near Southwest Parkway. The company specializes in custom upholstery, lighting and suspensions for high-end cars and trucks. 972-273-0226. 13 6 Day Dental, located at 6050 Long Prairie Road, Ste. 100, Flower Mound, has become Dental Care of Texas—Flower Mound after the business was acquired by North American Dental Group. The name change went into effect Feb. 22. Dental Care of Texas provides general dentistry for adults and children as well as cosmetic work and orthodontics. 972-587-0887. www.dentalcareoftexas.com CLOSINGS 14 Ole’s Cantina , located at 2225 S. Stemmons Freeway, Lewisville, has closed. The family-oriented Mexican restaurant opened in December 2019. www.lewisvillemexicancuisine.com 15 A Center Nails and Spa has perma- nently closed its doors at 251 S. Mill St., Ste. 150, Lewisville, according to owner Tammy Tubbs. The spa provided a full menu of nail services, waxes and more. www.midnightcustomcars.com NEWOWNERSHIP

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FLOWER MOUND 3701 Justin Rd, Suite 110

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LEWISVILLE - FLOWER MOUND - HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • APRIL 2021

TODO LIST

April & May events

COMPILED BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

APRIL 15 LEWISVILLE ISD

MAY 01 HIGHLAND VILLAGE ART FESTIVAL This festival features displays from more than 30 artists, demonstrations from artists, live music and interactive children’s art activities. Musical performances will be held in the south courtyard next to Chico’s. The event is a joint venture between the city of Highland Village and The Shops at Highland Village to benet the Kids Kastle Community Build Project. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. The Shops at Highland Village, FM 2499 and Justin Road, Highland Village. www.highlandvillage.org/786/ Highland-Village-Art-Festival 08 ART IN THE PARK FESTIVAL The Town of Flower Mound will host its inaugural Art in the Park Festival with many of the activities and booths focused on using recycled and repurposed materials to create unique art pieces. Vendor applications are available on the website and are due by 5 p.m. April 16. Activities include live performances, local artwork, an art treasure hunt, hands-on activities and a community mural. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Heritage Park, 600 Spinks Road, Flower Mound. www.ower-mound.com/artfestival

CHIN CULTURAL FESTIVAL This annual festival hosted by Lewisville ISD will be held virtually to celebrate this ethnic group from the Southeast Asian country of Myanmar. The program will feature traditional Chin music, dances and a fashion show. More than 50 graduating seniors will also be recognized. 6-7 p.m. YouTube.com/LISDAVProductions 16 & 23, 30 ACOUSTIC JAMSESSION This weekly open jam session and song circle welcomes all acoustic instruments, experience levels and music genres. The sessions are sponsored by the Visual Art League of Lewisville. 7-9 p.m. Free. Lewisville Grand Theater, 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. www.mclgrand.com 24 MY FIRST FISH: CANE POLE FISHING 101 Certied anglers with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department will oer a lesson in cane pole shing. Registration is required. 10 a.m.-noon. $10 per person (includes outtted 10-foot cane pole). Those 17 years old and up must have a valid Texas freshwater shing license. Railroad Park,

APRIL 17

COLORPALOOZA: A CELEBRATIONOF SPRING OLD TOWN LEWISVILLE

A full day of activities is planned at this festival showcasing the artistic and eco-friendly spirit of the city of Lewisville. The event includes sidewalk chalk art demonstrations, live music, cultural performances, a DIY tie dye station, artist demonstrations, interactive art activities for children and an artisan market. Recycle bins transformed into art pieces will also be on display. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 150 W. Church St., Lewisville. www.lewisvillecolorpalooza.com (Courtesy city of Lewisville)

1301 S. Railroad St., Lewisville. 972-219-3550. www.llela.org

Find more or submit events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

FOCUS

FORWARD

FLOWER MOUND, TX

ELECT JEHANGIR � JR� RAJA FOR MAYOR OF FLOWER MOUND

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

Please consider donating

1

SOMETIMES PETS ARE THEIR ONLY COMPANION

The intersection of Morriss Road and Valley Ridge Boulevard is undergoing construction to rebuild the trail and crosswalk. (Michelle Degard/Community Impact Newspaper)

expected to wrap up in late April after February storms delayed parts of the project. The total project encompasses a portion of Mill Street extending from Purnell Street to just past Walters Street; a stretch of Main Street from Mill to the rail station to the east; and the portion of Charles Street in front of the MCL Grand Theater performance venue. Timeline: January 2019-April 2021 Cost: $8.5 million Funding sources: city of Lewisville, North Central Texas Council of Governments

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON ONGOING PROJECTS

The goal of Senior Paws is to support the pet needs of Meals on Wheels clients by providing monthly pet food supplements.

Consider donating unopened dog or cat food to our Senior Paws Program. All donations can be dropped off at:

407

FLOWER MOUND

AMHERST DR.

1800 MALONE ST.,DENTON, TX 76201 940.382.2224 | MOWDC.ORG

DIXON RD.

VALLEY RIDGE BLVD.

380

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CROSS TIMBERS DR.

1 Intersection project at Morriss Road and Valley Ridge Boulevard Crews are expected to complete this project in April after moving poles at the intersection of Morriss Road and Valley Ridge Boulevard. The project involves constructing a new westbound right-turn lane on Valley Ridge as well as improving the existing southbound left-turn lane on Morriss. As part of the project, crews are also expected to rebuild the trail and crosswalk along Valley Ridge. Timeline: September 2019-April 2021 Cost: TBD Funding source: town of Flower Mound

CHINN CHAPEL RD.

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3 Waketon Road project Flower Mound is partnering with the town of Double Oak to improve a portion of Waketon Road extending from Kings Road to the western edge of the Bradford Parks subdivision. This Waketon Road project will also include the construction of a new roundabout at the Chinn Chapel intersection. The project involves replac- ing asphalt roadways with a new concrete surface. Work will also feature the installation of new, enclosed stormwater systems. Some cost-saving measures were identied last year, and the plans were modied. The town advertised the project in mid March to construction companies and is planning to begin work in June. Timeline: June-TBD Cost: $8.5 million Funding sources: town of Flower Mound, town of Double Oak

MCL GRAND THEATER

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PURNELL ST.

2 Main and Mill project Crews are wrapping up landscaping and streetscaping on three major stretches of road in Old Town Lewisville as the Main & Mill project comes to a close. Work was

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF MARCH 22. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT LFHNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • APRIL 2021

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

COMPILED BY KARIN SHAW ANDERSON & DANIEL HOUSTON

Developments underway in Lewisville

ZONING CHANGE CLEARS WAY FOR SENIOR LIVING FACILITY IN LEWISVILLE Sparrow Partners has received approval for a zoning change for a 9.25-acre tract along Valley Ridge Boulevard near Garden Ridge Boulevard in Lewisville. The zoning change from light industrial to medical district will allow the developer to build a four-story, independent-living community with 192 units for senior adults. Most units in the facility will have one bedroom and one bathroom, but plans also include 67 two-bedroom, two- bathroom units. The residential units will surround a central courtyard with communal lawn space. The property plans include a 3-acre park with a loop trail. Carports and a few garage bays will ring the exterior of the residential complex. Concept plans depict the bulk of the 3-acre park as set on the southwest edge of the facility between an adjacent neighborhood and the planned independent-living complex. Green space will separate the property from an apartment complex located east of the planned senior living community and vacant land that is zoned for light industrial on its west side. A resident in the adjacent neighborhood submitted a letter concerned about

shrinking open space and wildlife habitat in Lewisville. At a March 15 Lewisville City Council meeting, which included a public hearing on the zoning change, Kristin Green, Lewisville deputy mayor pro tem, said the new zoning would be “far less intrusive” to the neighborhood than would be a business tting the previous light industrial zoning. Green also said she hoped the developer would preserve as many of the trees on the property as possible. “But I don’t feel like I can ask the property owner to not do anything with it because the neighbors like the trees,” she said. City Council unanimously approved the

people to order and eat a meal outdoors while their dogs run and play, according to city documents. Under previous plans approved in 2015, the developer could have built as many as 345 apartment units on the property. The new plans reduced the number of units and updated a number of other requirements related to parking, outdoor patio space and other standards. “The community will become a destination for residents of Lewisville and other surrounding communities to enjoy the restaurant, bar, expansive outdoor patio, and entertainment activities,” said Matt Brendel, senior managing director of Legacy Partners, in a letter to the city. Space: 300 units, plus commercial area Timeline: TBD

Lewisville’s NorthernGatewaywould have a dog park similar to this DogHouse Drinkery andDog Park concept in Leander.

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

NEWDEVELOPMENT SET FOR LEWISVILLE’S NORTHERNGATEWAY A community with hundreds of apartment units and several restaurants linked to a dog park could come to Lewisville’s Northern Gateway area after a developer amended plans that were rst approved more than ve years ago. Lewisville City Council approved the updated plans March 15, reducing the number of residential units allowed to 300 and laying out a commercial area with up to three restaurants that incorporates a dog park similar to Mutt’s Canine Cantina in Dallas. The Lewisville property is located southwest of I-35E and Grandys Lane. The restaurant concept would allow

zoning change. Space: 192 units Timeline: TBD

GRANDYS LN.

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CITY& COUNTY

News from Lewisville, Flower Mound & Highland Village

HIGHLIGHTS LEWISVILLE City Council approved pay plan adjustments April 5 that will provide city employees with a 3% pay increase in the middle of the budget year. The changes are expected to add about $1.057 million in costs to the city budget, according to a city memo. Ocials said this year’s budget was planned under the uncertainty of the pandemic, but city revenue so far is better than projected. HIGHLANDVILLAGE The city will hold a paper-shredding day 2-5 p.m. April 24 at Pilot Knoll Park, 218A Orchid Hill Road, Argyle. The free service is only for Highland Village residents. Business shredding is not accepted. IDs are required. DENTONCOUNTY The county has continued making gains in the number of people receiving COVID-19 vaccines, with more than 257,000 doses administered as of April 5. Anyone age 16 or older is eligible to be vaccinated in Texas. County vaccines are being administered at Texas Motor Speedway by appointment only. To sign up for the waitlist, visit the county’s website: https://dentoncounty. quickbase.com/db/bq5nwntc6. MEETINGSWE COVER Lewisville City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the rst and third Mondays of each month. www.cityoewisville.com Lewisville ISD board of trustees Meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. www.lisd.net Flower Mound Town Council Meets at 6 p.m. the rst and third Mondays of each month. www.ower-mound.com Highland Village City Council Meets at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.highlandvillage.org

Old Town business to relocate, pavingway for redevelopment

BUSINESSMOVE An agreement approved by the City Council will allow John Burns Construction to relocate its operations.

BY KRISTINE HUGHES

John Burns Construction, old address

John Burns Construction, new address

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revitalize the Old Town area and cre- ate a dynamic environment for living, dining, entertainment and employ- ment opportunities. One strategy involves the redevelopment of heavy industrial sites near the Charles Emery Old Town train station, where the John Burns Construction lay- down yard and oce are located, according to a city memo. John Burns agreed in 2019 to sell its Old Town property for future devel- opment on the condition that the company receive nancial incentives as well as help nding a new home, the memo stated.

LEWISVILLE City Council has cleared the path for John Burns Construction to relocate from 655 E. Main St., Lewisville, to a larger site on Railroad Street, just southwest of Pro-Tow Wrecker Service. On April 5, council approved an economic development agreement with the company that will cost the city about $221,000 over 10 years. The agreement would also free up space in Old Town Lewisville for redevelopment in line with the city’s Old Town Master Plan. The goal of the master plan is to

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$250K in nature-themed upgrades complete for PecanOrchardPark in FlowerMound

LISD recommends shorter school days

BY MEGAN CARDONA

BY VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

at 4700 Mesquite St., Flower Mound, was completed in March, according to the town of Flower Mound’s website. The playground includes play structures for ages 2-5 and 5-12 as well as swings, a see-saw and a merry-go-round. The park also features synthetic turf surfacing and shade for the play structures and benches.

FLOWERMOUND A series of nature-themed upgrades for Flower Mound’s Pecan Orchard Park are complete, having replaced an older playground structure installed in the early 2000s. The $250,000 project was approved by Flower Mound Town Council in September 2019 when the scal year 2019-20 budget was approved, Communications Specialist Abby Aldrich said in an email. Purchase of the playground equipment was approved Nov. 16 at a Town Council regular meeting, she said. Construction on the park, located

LEWISVILLE ISD District admin- istrators are planning to move to a shorter school day starting in the fall. State law requires students to have 75,600 instructional minutes each school year. Lewisville ISD had been using 435 minutes a day but added another 25 minutes a day this school year to bank extra time in case of pandemic-related closures. Administrators are advising the district to return to 435 instructional minutes for the 2021-22 school year, according to a recommendation discussed at an April 6 board work session. The change would not apply to LISD’s STEM academies.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • APRIL 2021

GUIDE L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E 2021

D A T E S T O K N O W

W H E R E T O V O T E

April 19 First day of early voting April 20 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked)

April 27 Last day of early voting May 1 Election day May 1 Last day to receive ballot by mail (unless late- arriving deadline applies)

Denton County residents can vote at any location in the county for early voting but must vote at their assigned precinct on election day. For a full list of polling locations, visit www.votedenton.com/upcoming- election-information.

S A M P L E B A L L O T *Incumbent Read full candidate Q&As at communityimpact.com.

*Incumbent

M A Y O R A L Q & A

L E W I S V I L L E

Q: If elected, what would your top priorities be over the coming term?

Trustee, Place 1 Buddy Bonner Paige Dixon

CITY OF LEWISVILLE Mayor Tianie Fowler Timothy M. Friebel Jr. TJ Gilmore Delia Parker-Mims Council member, Place 2 William J. Meridith Council member, Place 3 Ronni Cade Penny A. Mallet Charter amendments

Trustee, Place 2 Allison Lassahn* Sheila P. Taylor TOWN OF FLOWER MOUND Mayor Stephanie Bell Derek France Itamar Gelbman Cheryl Moore Jehangir Raja Council member, Place 4 Jim Engel* CITY OF HIGHLAND VILLAGE Council member, Place 3 Andrew Crawford Michael Lombardo* Council member, Place 5

TIFFANIE FOWLER

TIMOTHY M. FRIEBEL JR.

A: I’d love to see crime reduced and improved police and community relations, especially when it comes to civil rights and ADA laws. We have a lot of under-

This candidate could not be reached.

served citizens that need to be seen and heard. I’d also love to see less concrete jungle and more green space. Old Town, especially, needs to have life breathed into it every weekend. We need to stop living in fear and start living free again.

Proposition A: would add one member to the Lewisville City Council in the event of the annexation of Castle Hills Proposition B: would remove some budget-related provisions that are covered by or inconsistent with state law Proposition C: would eliminate a requirement that residents must own real property to serve on the Lewisville Planning and Zoning Commission Proposition D: would remove a provision that gives City Council authority to administer city departments, which is the role of the city manager

TJ GILMORE

DELIA PARKERMIMS

A: My top goal will be to strengthen our neighborhoods, organizations and

A: My top priorities would be to ensure the Castle Hills an- nexation does not disrupt the balance of power or change the city’s policy directives; to protect

Jason Bates Tom Heslep* Council member, Place 7 Dan Jaworski*

businesses through di- alogue, leadership and relationships. Com- munities are strongest when [everyone] works together to create great places. I will continue building bridges between our diverse communities by being accessible and available and [us- ing] the voice of the mayor to unify those communities into policy actions.

vulnerable populations from being left behind by working within goals already established within the 2025 Vision Plan and further addressed by council; and to drive council to reach a nonpartisan con- sensus that benets the city’s interests.

LEWISVILLE ISD

SOURCE: DENTON COUNTY ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Q: If elected, what would your top priorities be over the coming term?

P L A C E 3 C O U N C I L Q & A

L E W I S V I L L E

RONNI CADE

PENNY A. MALLET

A: My rst priority will be to really study the midyear budget in order to see the full impact the pandemic has had on the city. From there, I would take a look at the projects and programs that have been placed on hold, study the impact on positions and pay that were frozen or eliminated, and then prioritize the next steps that need to be taken. I’ll then prioritize any new projects and programs.

A: If elected, I would advocate championing diversity and inclusion. This would include creating a full-time city of Lewisville position dedicated to championing diversity, inclusion and transparency within the city organization; exploring options for alternative responses to certain types of police calls through civilian personnel trained in mental health specializations; and working with the city and the Lewisville Area Chamber of Commerce to ensure inclusive- ness in small-business workshops.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Read full candidate Q&As at www.communityimpact.com/l-2021-qas *Incumbent

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF

P L A C E 1 T R U S T E E Q & A L E W I S V I L L E I S D

COMPILED BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Q: What will you bring to this oce, in terms of your qualications or perspective?

BUDDY BONNER

PAIGE DIXON

A: I am running to leverage my three decades of experience as a veteran public school educator and to continue to serve the students, parents and sta of the district. I seek to use my passion for public education to listen, act and advocate on behalf of students with no voice; parents unaware of district procedures, practices and policies; sta members hesitant to speak; and community members otherwise uninvolved. I am running to ensure the district operates eciently and eectively.

A: We owe it to every child to ensure they receive a quality educa- tion. I am running because I was once a child someone took a chance on. When we invest in our youth, we invest in our future. There is an achievement gap in this district that is leaving students behind. Our district is strong enough to close the achievement gap and propel all of our students towards success. I believe that we can create policies that are eective and inclusive.

*Incumbent

P L A C E 2 T R U S T E E Q & A L E W I S V I L L E I S D

Q: What will you bring to this oce, in terms of your qualications or perspective?

ALLISON LASSAHN *

SHEILA P. TAYLOR

A: I have learned so much in my rst term in oce, and now is the time for proven leadership on the board. I believe that the next three to ve years in LISD will be pivotal. Among other things, the district will need to hold a new bond election within this time frame to update campuses and replace aging technology. It is more important than ever for local school boards to be involved and engaged at the local and state level.

A: I think it is important for Lewisville to have a seat at the LISD board table. While it’s true that every board member represents every child, I believe having a child at a Title 1 school here in Lewisville gives me a unique perspective on the challenges facing this part of the district. I think having diversity on the board, in thought and ideas, will make our district stronger. The whole district does well when we all do well.

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LEWISVILLE  FLOWER MOUND  HIGHLAND VILLAGE EDITION • APRIL 2021

CANDIDATE Q&A

Get to know the candidates running in the local election

2 0 2 1 L O C A L V O T E R G U I D E

Read full candidate Q&As at www.communityimpact.com/l-2021-qas

*Incumbent

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF

Q: If elected, what would your top priorities be over the coming term? M A Y O R A L Q & A F L O W E R M O U N D

STEPHANIE BELL

DEREK FRANCE

ITAMAR GELBMAN

A: My rst goal in being mayor is to ensure that we attract and hire the brightest and best talent, starting with our next town manager. Active listening skills are key to communi- cating with me, council, residents and town sta at all levels. Also, as we continue to grow, we need to update

A: As a guide to use on our path for- ward, I’ve identied and established my priorities for action, which include hiring an experienced town manager; transparent government with citizen engagement; continued strong public safety; reducing regulations and fees; encouraging a business-friendly envi-

A: During my council tenure, I fought for transparency and scal account- ability against eminent domain and high density, including apartment buildings. If elected, my top priorities would be supporting our smart- growth and master plans; putting res- idents rst; overhauling the permit-

our trac lights. It may appear that we have a trac problem; in fact, we have a trac light challenge.

ronment; responsible economic growth; and maintaining opening space with town parks and amenities. With these actions, we will foster open discussions and ultimately accomplish what our residents and businesses in our town need most.

ting process; being accountable to taxpayers; balancing the budget; engaging in more government transparency; stopping the overdevelopment of our town; and no longer lowering development standards and giving in to developers.

CHERYL MOORE

JEHANGIR RAJA

A: 1) I want to protect our open spaces and trees that developers are taking over. 2) While some growth is necessary and reasonable to keep our town economically stable and vibrant, I want to keep our roads safe and avoid congestion and make it safe for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians. 3) I want to represent residents for their concerns and interests and bring that voice to the council. 4) I want to see local businesses thrive and stimulate that business growth.

A: The topmost priority is to bring the community together. The need is to build a bridge between Town Council and the residents. Town Council needs to be provided with the appropriate opportunity to increase their revenue, but not at the expense of the residents’ life- style. The town needs high-paying jobs, a growing economy and green space. We do not need to kill and burn trees to keep our houses lit.

P L A C E 3 C O U N C I L Q & A H I G H L A N D V I L L A G E

Q: What will you bring to this oce, in terms of your qualications or perspective?

ANDREW CRAWFORD

MIKE LOMBARDO *

A: Similar to the people who came before me, I am focused on enriching the community and plan to bring my strong work ethic to get things done. Plus, having traveled extensively and managed international teams, I have some understanding of the diversity of our community. Lastly, I hope to bring some fresh perspectives. Although I understand experience is important, I feel there is currently a lot of experience on council and recognize that balance is important.

A: With seven years of service, I am the most tenured member of the council, with the exception of Mayor Charlotte Wilcox. I have spent many hours over the years listening to residents, examining budgets, reviewing ordinances, interviewing senior city sta and working hard to keep Highland Village the great place to live that it is. For me, there is no learning curve, and I will hit the ground running without missing a beat.

P L A C E 5 C O U N C I L Q & A H I G H L A N D V I L L A G E

Q: What will you bring to this oce, in terms of your qualications or perspective?

JASON BATES

TOM HESLEP *

A: In 2006, I chose to serve my country and joined the Army. During my training and subsequent participation in Operation Iraqi Freedom, I was thrown into the crucible of combat, through which my study of leadership began in earnest. These experiences were tempered later by managing highly diverse teams in corporate America. My understanding of what it means to be a servant leader will guide my approach to making decisions for Highland Village.

A: I was elected to Highland Village City Council in 2019. I served on the planning and zoning commission. I have 38 years of banking and leadership knowledge. I also currently serve on the boards of Medical City Lewisville and the Lewisville Education Foundation, where I am the treasurer. I want to leave a legacy to my community and the citi- zens of Highland Village of integrity and scal leadership by demon- strating service above self.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE What’s On Tap Self-described ‘beer cafe’ owner gets to know his customers W hat’s On Tap is not just a bar, according to owner Brad Trapnell. He likened it to a beer cafe with space for community gatherings and events. “We know [customers] by name, and, you know, they’re friends of ours,” he said. “They come here a lot, and we get to know people.” What’s On Tap has three locations: Highland Village, Keller and North Richland Hills, all owned by Trapnell. He said he had the idea to start a craft beer-themed establishment after many years of balancing working in the corporate world and brewing beer at home during his free time. He opened the Highland Village location in 2015 and the Keller location a year later. The North Richland Hills location opened in late 2019. “It was, you know, a typical story of, ‘You lever- age everything but your kidneys to try and get the doors open,’” he said. Each location has a rotating selection of 40 beers, ciders and other alcoholic beverages. Customers can order a ight and taste four smaller samples. They can also buy a reusable growler or bring one from home and have it lled from the taps. Trapnell said his business was put in an awkward position by restrictions during the pandemic, with “zero sales” some days. What’s On Tap operated on a takeout-only basis until it reopened in September under expanded restaurant guidelines. Even with limited capacity, the business continued hosting events, such as trivia nights. The Highland Vil- lage location’s event calendar has expanded to include pre-pandemic favorites, such as special tappings from local breweries. Trapnell said his goal is to continue investing in his locations, which partner with Motor City Pizza and Philly Pretzel Factory for a limited food menu. “I think most entrepreneurs are optimists,” he said, “because otherwise you wouldn’t do it.” BY KIRA LOVELL

WE KNOW CUSTOMERS BY NAME, AND, YOU KNOW, THEY’RE

FRIENDS OF OURS. BRAD TRAPNELL, OWNER OF WHAT’S ON TAP

Brad Trapnell is the owner of the three What’s On Tap locations in Highland Village, Keller and North Richland Hills. (Photos by Kira Lovell/Community Impact Newspaper)

PROMOTING L O C A L BREWERIES What’s On Tap features many Dallas-Fort Worth area brews in its rotating selection. Here are a few of the local breweries that supply What’s On Tap:

Peticolas Brewing Company Taproom Oak Highlands Brewery Rahr & Sons Brewing Legal Draft Beer Co. Franconia Brewing Co.

Denton County Brewing Co. Outlaw Cider Co.

Deep Ellum Brewing Co. Panther Island Brewing

Owner Brad Trapnell said he works hard to make What’s On Tap a welcoming, community environment.

What’s On Tap 2570 FM 407, Ste. 170, Highland Village 972-966-2400 www.whatsontapbeer.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 2-10 p.m., Fri.-Sat. noon-11 p.m., Sun. noon-8 p.m.

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To schedule your free in-home informational visit, please call Sarah at (214) 535-2615 or email gethelp@vnatexas.org

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