Plano South | September 2022

PLANO SOUTH EDITION

VOLUME 9, ISSUE 1  SEPT. 15 OCT. 12, 2022

ONLINE AT

HIGHER EDUCATION FOCUS 2022 GUIDE

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IMPACTS

BUSINESS FEATURE

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Flying high

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HIGHER EDUCATION FOCUS

Local automotive tech program earns top accreditation

ATTENDANCE

2022 93,000 2019 93,200 2017 88,200 2016 58,100 2015 104,700 2014 103,200 2013 95,104 2012 104,600

Plano Balloon Festival ocials provided attendance estimates for past editions of the festival, though the event was canceled in 2018 and 2020-2021. Attendance for this year’s festival on Sept. 22-25 is expected to be on par with the 2019 event.

BY MIRANDA JAIMES & SHELBIE HAMILTON

Going into its third year, Collin College’s Automo- tive Technology program has received the highest level of accreditation recognized by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. In the post-pandemic world, the automotive industry is struggling to nd employees, area o - cials said. Universal Technical Institute representa- tives predict a wave of older mechanics retiring will create 100,000 auto technician job openings over the next decade. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projected a 4% decline in employment in the eld through 2029, according to a 2022 study conducted CONTINUED ON 14

SOURCE: PLANO BALLOON FESTIVAL’COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The HEB/Central Market Plano Balloon Festival will have balloons, vendors and more. (Courtesy Plano Balloon Festival)

Return of annual festivals expected to help increase tourism in Plano

support our citizens and workforce through these festivals and the chamber is thrilled for the organiz- ers ...and the businesses who are able to utilize the opportunity.” A major indicator of tourism activity is HOT col- lection, which is a 13% tax levied on hotel room costs. Once collected, 6% of that rate goes to the state, while the remaining 7% is kept by the city, Visit Plano Executive Director Mark Thompson said. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Thompson said the city saw its hotel occupancy tax collections drop more than 40%. Those collections CONTINUED ON 22

BY ANDREW NORSWORTHY AND WILLIAM C. WADSACK Hotel Occupancy Tax collections are on the rise in Plano after a downturn in 2020 and 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. For the rst year since 2019, two of Plano’s biggest events - the Hot Air Balloon Festival and the Plano International Festival - will take place. “I can think of no better way to celebrate and rec- ognize our recovery from the pandemic than safely coming together as a community for both the Plano Balloon Festival and Plano International Festival,” Plano Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Kelle Marsalis said via email. “Companies of all sizes

Students work on cars in the automotive bay of the Collin College Technical Campus in Allen.

COURTESY COLLIN COLLEGE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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PLANO SOUTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

OCTOBER 1-2 SATURDAY: 10a-7p SUNDAY: 10a-5p Cottonwood Park • Richardson, TX FREE ADMISSION FREE PARKING CottonwoodArtFestival.com There’s an art to having fun! • 200 Artists • Live Music • Hands-On Kids Area • Food Court • Craft Beer & Wine in Cupcake Vineyards Courtyard

Featured Artist: Michelle McDowell Smith

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with circulation more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM LEANNE: It is exciting to see community events, such as the Plano Balloon Festival, returning after a two-year break. Our new reporter, Andrew Norsworthy, worked on our front- page story on Plano tourism that continues inside (see Pages 22-23). As temperatures start dropping, we hope Plano families get out and enjoy all the fall season has to oer around town. Leanne Libby, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM WILLIAM: In this issue, learn more about Collin College’s Automotive Technology Program and how it is helping prepare students for careers in the automotive service industry (see Pages 14-15). Also, be sure to check out upcoming events in Plano on our to-do list (see Page 10). If you have an idea for a story, send your suggestion to plnnews@communityimpact.com. William C. Wadsack, MANAGING EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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PLANO SOUTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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Knockout Sports Bar COURTESY KNOCKOUT SPORTS BAR

PARKBLVD.

NOW OPEN 1 Eddie V’s Prime Seafood opened Aug. 18 at the corner of Preston Road and SH 121 in Plano. The restaurant is a luxury dining location known for its hand-carved steaks and seafood own in from around the world. Signature dishes include Chilean Sea Bass Steamed Hong Kong Style, Parmesan Sole and Crab Fried Rice. The eatery’s The V Lounge features a stage for performances by local musicians on select nights. It also has a walk-thru wine tower with a selection of more than 300 wines and champagne. Eddie V’s is located at 5300 SH 121. The dining room is open seven days a week beginning at 5 p.m. with the lounge opening every day at 4 p.m. 469-268-3758. www.eddiev.com 2 SauceBros opened in Plano on July 10. The eatery is a Bangladesh- and New York-inspired pizzeria oering multiple specialty pies. Signature items include the Jhura beef pesto pizza and the spicy naga chicken pizza. SauceBros is located at 3115 W. Parker Road. 972-769-9100. www.saucebrosmenu.com P L A N O P K W Y . DNT TOLL

3 Knockout Sports Bar opened at 3937 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 100, Plano, this spring. According to its website, the restaurant is “anything but a typical sports bar experience.” The location has wall-to-wall at-screen televisions and oers more than 20 varieties of beer as well as daily drink specials. Known for its wings, the bar also oers burgers and pizza as well as entree dishes, such as meatloaf and salmon. 972-423-6683. https://kosportsbar.com 4 Ishchicks opened Aug. 22 at 4025 Preston Road, Ste. 180, Plano. Ishchicks is a home goods store oering items for gifts, home decor and parties. Ishchicks is located in the Lakeside Market development behind Starbucks. 972-403-3272. www.ishchicks.com 5 MC Skin Studio Med Spa opened Aug. 15 in the West Plano Village development. The med spa oers a variety of body and skin treatments for clients, including Botox, facials, laser hair removal and more. MC Skin Studio is located at 3300 Dallas Parkway, Ste. 110. 972-378-7657. https://mcskinstudio.us 15THST.

6 Sakhuu Thai opened in early September at 7300 Lone Star Dr., Ste. C128, Plano. The restaurant oers traditional Thai and Lao dishes such as fried pork dumplings, crispy Thai Basil and red curry for lunch and dinner in a relaxed environment, according to its website. The Plano location is located in The Shops at Legacy development. Sakhuu Thai also has locations in Dallas and Richardson. 469-562-4055. 7 Grimaldi’s Pizzeria is expected to open next year at The Shops at Legacy in Plano. According to a listing with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation, renovations totaling $750,000 began in September and are scheduled to be completed in January at 5717 Legacy Drive, Ste. 100, Plano. The pizzeria also has locations throughout the U.S., including one in Allen. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria serves pizza, starters and desserts, and has a seasonal menu option. 214-383-9703 (Allen location). www.grimaldispizzeria.com www.sakhuuthai.com COMING SOON 1 4 T H ST. PGBT TOLL

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Grimaldi’s Pizzeria

COURTESY GRIMALDI’S PIZZERIA

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ANDREW NORSWORTHY & WILLIAM C. WADSACK

CAR SHOW Saturday, October 15

Brunch Club is the second restaurant concept brought to life by Chef Brett Curtis.

8:30 - 11:30AM Location: Crest Pre-Owned

COURTESY BRUNCH CLUB

FEATURED IMPACT NOW OPEN Brunch Club opened this summer at Legacy Hall in Plano. The new eatery is a weekend brunch spot. “We’re excited to grow within the hall,” Curtis said in a statement. “Brunch Club is a place that oers something for everyone, whether you’re looking for a family-friendly day out, a work lunch or a late-night out with live music and dancing. Brunch Club adds a unique oering to the food hall that we feel complements the programming and existing eateries.” Brunch Club is the second concept from Chef Brett Curtis, who also created Dock 8 Truluck’s Ocean’s Finest Seafood and Crab is slated to open its new Plano location in The Shops at Legacy in 2023. Truluck’s is known for its fresh seafood, cocktails, wine and live entertainment. Diners can enjoy dishes from the eatery’s Jewels of the Sea selection that features its fresh crab claws, South African cold- water lobster, prime king crab and more. Truluck’s will be located at 7161 Bishop Road, Plano. www.trulucks.com 9 Lucid Motors is expected to open in its new studio at Legacy West this fall. This will be its rst studio location in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. Lucid Motors is an electric car company that allows customers to design their own vehicles. The Lucid Motors showroom will be located at 5908 Headquarters Drive, Plano. 844-367-7787. www.lucidmotors.com 10 Plano Fire-Rescue will host an open house Oct. 1 for its new training facility that will allow reghters to simulate real emergencies, rescue operations and maneuvering through buildings found in the city. During the Aug. 22 Plano City Council meeting, Fire Chief Chris Biggersta reported work on the $15 million facility had been completed after nearly two years of construction. The facility is located

6280 State Hwy 121, Frisco, TX 75034

Local at Legacy Hall in 2020. Brunch Club is located on the third oor of Legacy Hall at 7800 Windrose Ave., Plano. The eatery is open from 6 p.m. to after midnight on Fridays and Saturdays and 11 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. www.legacyfoodhall.com/vendor/ brunch-club/

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at the northwest corner of McDermott and Robinson roads, just south of the police substation. 972-941-7159. www.plano.gov/436/Fire-Rescue RELOCATIONS 11 Chelsea Pharmacy and Wellness moved in May to its new location at 3115 W. Parker Road, Ste. 395, Plano. The pharmacy moved from its former location at 3304 Coit Road, Plano, for a bigger operational space. The store oers COVID-19 vaccinations and testing as well as other pharmaceutical services. The pharmacy will have a grand opening in November. 972-905-5504. https://chelseapharmacyrx.com CLOSINGS 12 After 16 years in business, drive-thru drink shop Sugar Mountain closed in late August. The last day of operations for the business was Aug. 28 at 909 W. Parker Road, Plano. The business was known for its shaved ice, smoothies and more. The owners said on Instagram they are looking for a new location for the business. www.instagram.com/ sugarmountainplano

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PLANO SOUTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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NOW OPEN 1 Legend Tattoo opened for busi- ness Aug. 4 at 1428 K Ave., Plano. The business offers tattoos of all styles and designs, allowing customers to use pre- made designs or bring their own. Legend Tattoo’s owner Patrick Carmack said he has nearly three decades of experi- ence in the industry. Carmack said he is excited about opening in the Downtown Plano Arts District and has hopes for its continued growth. 214-380-0131. www. legendtattoos.com 2 Tex-Mex restaurant Taco Joint announced in early August that its new Plano location had opened. This new lo- cation at 1300 W. Plano Parkway will be part of the 156-acre Heritage Creekside development. Taco Joint offers a variety of traditional Tex-Mex dishes, 64-ounce margaritas, daily happy hour deals and anytime breakfast tacos. 469-443-0559. www.thetacojoint.com 3 Groomer-owned salon for dogs Oh the Pawsibilities opened in Plano on June 13. The business specializes in grooming, day care and boarding for dogs and cats. All pets served by Oh the Pawsibilities must have up-to-date rabies vaccina- tions. The salon is located at 3198 W.

Parker Road, Ste. 3160, Plano. 469-910- 8000. www.ohthepawsibilities.net 4 BitCare Clinic + MedSpa opened its new Plano location Aug. 18. This facil- ity offers telemedicine, mental health, aesthetic, and general health and wellness services. Those services include Botox, laser hair removal, skin tightening, oxygen therapy and more. Bitcare Clinic + Medspa is located at 2100 Dallas Parkway, Ste. 115, Plano. 469-750-2273. www.bitcare.co 5 The Shade Store opened in early Sep- tember at 4909 W. Park Blvd., Ste. 110, Plano. Founded in 1946, the company has more than 125 showroom locations in the United States. The Shade Store sells handcrafted shades, blinds and drap- eries. There are nine other showrooms in Texas with four of those in the Dallas metroplex. Home and business owners can make an appointment with design consultants or walk in at the showroom. Consultations are also available by video, phone, live chat or email, according to the company’s website. 469-440-9030. www.theshadestore.com 6 Fitness business StretchLab opened this summer at 1713 Preston Road, Plano. StretchLab offers one-on-one stretches customized for patrons’ specific needs and group stretches led by a trained flexologist for up to six participants. The company’s stated goal is to improve flexibility, en-

hance movement, reduce pain and improve quality of life, according to its Facebook page. 972-641-4444. www.stretchlab.com COMING SOON 7 Larita Fashion will open in Plano at The Shops at Willow Bend in the third quarter of this year. The business is a con- temporary regional fashion and clothing vendor offering shoes, dresses, outer- wear and more. This retailer also offers a personal styling service with all-over image consultation. Larita Fashion will be located at 6121 W. Park Blvd. on the lower level of The Shops at Willow Bend. www.laritafashion.com 8 Smoothie and energy bar Fit Kingdom Nutrition expects to open by the end of September at 2200 Los Rios Blvd., Ste. 120, Plano. Fit Kingdom will offer shake flavors, such as cara- mel brownie, wedding cake, strawberry cheesecake and more, as well as tea flavors, including ocean breeze, water- melon crawl, sunset passion and more. www.instagram.com/fitkingdomnutrition 9 Rebel Athletic will open in Plano in the third quarter of 2022 at The Shops at Willow Bend. Founded in 2013 as a couture cheerleading uniform company, Rebel Athletic has expanded to include

Taco Joint

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StretchLab

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a school cheerleading apparel division, a retail division and a dance division with products, such as shoes, bags, cosmetics, sports apparel, athletic wear and more. Rebel Athletic will be located at 6121 W. Park Blvd., across from H&M on the upper level near Macy’s. 855-732-3568. www.rebelathletic.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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Sfereco is an Italian-American restaurant chain known for its meatballs.

COURTESY SFERECO

FEATURED IMPACT NOW OPEN Sfereco was slated to open its newest location in Plano on Sept. 15, as of press time on Sept. 12. This is the chain’s fourth location after restaurants in Dallas, Lewisville and Flower Mound. Sfereco is an Italian-American restaurant chain known for its specialty pizza, pasta, meatballs and more. The eatery features a bar that oers diners a curated selection of beer, wine and craft cocktails, including a menu of Italian-inspired specialty libations and signature house frozens, according to a news release. The menu features a “build-your-own” approach that allows diners to customize pizzas and meatballs to their liking along with the restaurant’s signature “that savory sphere,” which oers meatballs in ve dierent styles, the release stated. Diners will also have vegan and gluten- free options.

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“We’ve been wanting to bring Sfereco to Plano for a long while now, so we’re really excited to open in such a prime location at Park [Boulevard] and Preston [Road],” Rened Hospitality Concepts CEO Robert Hall said in the release. “With personal roots and long family history in Plano, we think local diners will really enjoy our atmosphere and chef-driven, Italian-American menu.” Sfereco is located at 1941 Preston Road, Ste. 1004, Plano. https://sfereco.com

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10 Apricot Lane Boutique will open in the third quarter of 2022 at The Shops at Willow Bend mall in Plano. This will be its second location in Plano after the one at The Shops at Legacy. The business sells clothes, accessories and fashion items. Each boutique is locally owned, and all styles are picked by the owner. Apricot Lane Boutique’s address will be 6121 W. Park Blvd., located across from Neiman Marcus on the mall’s upper level of the mall. https://apricotlaneboutique.com

11 Tell Me Something Sweet Bakery is slated to open at 930 E. 15th St., Ste. 200, in Downtown Plano. The bakery was started by husband-and-wife team Kevin and Candace Ford. It will feature classic homestyle desserts, such as layer cakes, lemon bars, pecan bars and more. The Fords said they are pushing to open the bakery before the end of September. 469-551-3582. www.tmssbakery.com

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PLANO SOUTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

TODO LIST

September & October events

COMPILED BY BETH MARSHALL

SEPT. 22

GIVE BACK TO NORTH TEXAS NONPROFITS WWW.NORTHTEXASGIVINGDAY.ORG

North Texas Giving Day is Sept. 22, but early giving opportunities began Sept. 1. North Texas Giving Pay provides an opportunity for donors to support nonprots of their choice. With more than 3,000 organizations to choose from, those who give can search for specic nonprots, organizations in certain cities or nd nonprots that align with their passions on the North Texas Giving Day website. www.northtexasgivingday.org/giving-events/ntx22/home

Festival organizers said attendance this year could surpass 93,000.

LOOK TO THE SKIES DURING A BALLOON FESTIVAL COURTESY PLANO BALLOON FESTIVAL

15 THROUGH 22 CATCH THE LAST WEEK OF AN ART EXHIBITION The Art Gallery at Collin College hosts the “Collin College Annual Art Faculty Exhibition,” featuring works by Collin College ne arts professors. The exhibition began Sept. 1 and presents diverse media and styles. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. (Mon.-Thu.), 9 a.m.-3 p.m. (Fri.-Sat.). Free (admission). Collin College Plano Campus, 2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Room A175, Plano. 972-881-5873. www.collin. edu/department/artsgallery/index.html OCTOBER 15 ATTEND THE PLANO INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL This multicultural festival brings the sights, sounds and tastes from around the world to Plano. Haggard Park hosts a day of food, entertainment and activities. A wellness fair is set for 10 a.m.-1 p.m., and a Dancing with the Symphony event is from 6-7 p.m. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free (admission). 901 E. 15th St., Plano. www.planointernationalfestival.org

COMPILED BY BETH MARSHALL SEPTEMBER 17 CELEBRATE PRIDE The 11th annual Come As You Are Festival at the Saigling House in Haggard Park includes sponsor and vendor booths; food; opportunities to donate; and live entertainment for all ages. The annual festival serves as a fundraiser supporting the vision a central resource center for communities north of Hwy. 635. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. $13 (age 13 and up); $25 (VIP, age 21 and up); free (age 12 and under). 902 E. 16th St., Plano. www.northtexaspride.com 18 RELIVE THE REPUTATION TOUR This event features hits by Taylor Swift performed a tribute act at Legacy Hall. Attendees can enjoy dinner from one of nearly 20 eateries, and a no- cover Souled Out Saturday DJ Night event will follow for those age 21 and older. 7 p.m. (doors), 8 p.m. (showtime). $10-$300. 7800 Windrose Ave., Plano. Search Taylor Swift Tribute: Reputation via Eventbrite.

The 41st Plano Balloon Festival and Run, presented by H-E-B and Central Market, includes live entertainment, a 5K run/walk, children’s activities, skydivers, food and hot air balloons. From a Plano Symphony Orchestra concert to nighttime “Balloon Glow” events to reworks shows, the weekend has a variety of entertainment options. Free (kids 36 inches tall and under, and all military and rst responders), $5 (ages 3-12, age 65 and older), $10 (adults). Oak Point Park, 2801 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano. 972-867-7566. www.planoballoonfest.org SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 Hours: 6 a.m.-10 p.m. • Half marathon and 10K races • Balloon activities • Balloon pilot competition • Parachute team exhibition, concert and reworks show • Balloon Glow SUNDAY, SEPT. 25

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 Hours: 5-9 p.m. • Balloon activities • Plano Symphony Orchestra concert • Balloon Glow FRIDAY, SEPT. 23 Hours: 4-10 p.m. • Balloon activities • Parachute team exhibition, concert and reworks show • Balloon Glow

Hours: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • 1K and 5K run/walks • Balloon activities

• Balloon pilot competition • Parachute team exhibition

Find more or submit Plano events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

FREE ADMISSION

PLUS: Free flu shots, health screenings and fitness demos! 10am - 1pm www.planointernationalfestival.org P L ANO International F E S T I VA L i c , a n d h e w

October 21-23rd Preview Night Hours Fri. 4 pm-8 pm General Admission Hours Sat. 10 am-6 pm Sun. 11 am-5 pm $10 Preview Night Shopping $6 General Admission

Plano Event Center 2000 E Spring Creek Pkwy, Plano, TX 75074 Gift Market Holiday shopping with 125+ vendors! Shop local and support small businesses this holiday season!

Sat Oct 15 11am - 5pm • Haggard Park, Plano

www.homefortheholidaysgiftmarket.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

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SPRING CREEK PKWY.

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2A

6

75

PARKER RD.

2B

3

PARK BLVD.

4A

COIT RD.

1 5TH ST.

H S T .

5

PGBT TOLL

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

in late August and will continue through September. From September-October, an ultrathin overlay will also be placed on B Coit Road between Parker Road and SH 121. One lane will remain closed at all times at both sites, with another lane closed from 9 p.m.-6 a.m. Monday-Saturday. Timeline: August-October Cost: $4.6 million Funding source: city of Plano 5 Jupiter Road repairs Crews will be making pavement and side- walk repairs on Jupiter Road from SH 190 to 14th Street in both directions. One lane will remain closed to traffic at all times, with a second lane to be closed daily between 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: August-December Cost: $500,000 Funding source: city of Plano 6 Western Parker Road repairs Crews will be making pavement and side- walk repairs on Parker Road from Plano’s western city limits to Preston Road in both directions. One lane will remain closed to traffic at all times, with a second lane to be closed daily between 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: July 2022-September 2023 Cost: $5.93 million Funding source: city of Plano 7 Eastern Parker Road repairs Crews will be making pavement and side- walk repairs on Parker Road from Plano’s eastern city limit to Alma Drive in both directions. One lane will remain closed to traffic at all times, with a second lane to be closed daily between 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Timeline: July 2022-October 2023 Cost: $6.47 million Funding source: city of Plano

COMPILED BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

ONGOING PROJECTS 1 Legacy Drive ultrathin overlay Crews will be placing an ultrathin overlay from Custer Road to US 75. One lane will remain closed at all times, with an additional lane closed from 9 p.m.-6 a.m. Monday-Saturday. Timeline: mid-August-September Cost: $1.27 million

Funding source: city of Plano 2 Parker Road intersection improvements

A project to improve intersections of Park- er Road with A Alma Drive and B Coit Road will widen the road, improve signals and realign intersections. Crews have yet to start due to franchise utility reloca- tion efforts, but they will begin at Coit Road and move to Alma Drive following completion. Timeline: December 2020-February 2023 Cost: $2.1 million Funding sources: city of Plano, Collin County 3 Park Boulevard repairs Crews will be making pavement and side- walk repairs on Park Boulevard from Los Rios Boulevard to Shiloh Road/East Spring Creek Parkway. One lane is scheduled to remain closed to traffic at all times. Timeline: April-September Cost: $300,000 Funding source: city of Plano 4 Plano Parkway and Coit Road ultrathin overlay Crews will be placing an ultrathin overlay on the section of A Plano Parkway between Preston Road and Park Boulevard

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 31. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

11

PLANO SOUTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY ANDREW NORSWORTHY & WILLIAM C. WADSACK 2022 HIGHER EDUCATION FOCUS GUIDE

STACYRD.

6 University of North Texas at Fris- co-Hall Park UNT’s Hall Park campus was the rst independent presence the university had in Frisco, and it primarily oers courses in business and science. Housing: none Opened: January 2016 Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s College type: two-year, three-year 2811 Internet Blvd., Ste. 100, Frisco 9726687100 https://frisco.unt.edu/ 7 The University of Texas at Dallas The mission of the school is to provide the state of Texas and the nation with excellent and innovative education and research.

WARREN PKWY.

3

1

SRT TOLL

PLANO

6

INTERNET BLVD.

LEGACYD

Collin College

SPRING CREEK PKWY.

DNT TOLL

4 The Chicago School of Professional Psychology’s College of Nursing and Advanced Health Professions The College of Nursing and Advanced Health Professions, formerly Dallas Nursing Institute, oers vocational, undergraduate and graduate-level academic programs that reect the various aspects of health care—nursing, hospital administration, policy development and mental health services.

75

2

PARKERRD.

3

PRESTON PARK BLVD.

WATERVIEW PKWY.

PARKBLVD.

PALISADES BLVD.

7

Housing: yes Opened: 1969

8

5

4

75

Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s, Ph.D. College type: four-year 800 W. Campbell Road, Richardson 9728832111 www.utdallas.edu 8 West Coast University

W CAMPBELL RD.

PGBT TOLL

Housing: yes Opened: 1991 Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s College type: four-year 2101 Waterview Parkway, Richardson 469948300

PLANO AND AREA LEARNING INSTITUTIONS 1 Amberton University Amberton University’s programs focus to- ward working adults looking for exibility and cost eectiveness in their higher education pursuits. College type: two-year, four-year 3880 Parkwood Blvd., Bldg. 7, Frisco 9722796511 www.amberton.edu/locations/frisco-location. html 2 Collin College Plano Campus Collin College is a student- and commu- nity-centered institution committed to developing skills, strengthening character and challenging intellect. Housing: none Opened: 2006 Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s

Housing: yes Opened: 1985 Levels of degrees oered: associate, bachelor’s

College type: two-year, four year 2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano 9728815790 www.collin.edu/campuses/springcreek 3 Collin College Courtyard Center Collin College: Continuing Education oers career skills training for adults who are not seeking a degree. Housing: none Opened: 1993 Levels of degrees oered: none College type: two-year 4800 Preston Park Blvd., Plano 9729853750 www.collin.edu/campuses/courtyard

WCU combines student-centric learning with training opportunities to facilitate a compre- hensive health care education.

www.thechicagoschool.edu/college-of- nursing-and-advanced-health-professions 5 Dallas Baptist University-North The mission of Dallas Baptist University is to provide Christ-centered quality higher education in the arts, sciences and profes- sional studies at both the undergraduate and graduate levels to produce servant leaders who have the ability to integrate faith and learning through their respective callings. Housing: yes Opened: 1898

Housing: none Opened: 1909 Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s College type: four-year 2323 N. US 75, Richardson 2145434533 https://westcoastuniversity.edu

This list is not comprehensive.

Levels of degrees oered: bachelor’s, master’s, Ph.D. College type: four-year 2001 W. Plano Parkway, Plano

2143335777 www.dbu.edu

Nation’s First Women-focused University System

twu.edu

13

PLANO SOUTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

CONTINUED FROM 1

degree program and certicate programs that pre- pare students for certication in Maintenance and Light Repair, Automotive Service Technician, or Mas- ter Automobile Service Technology designations. Bill King, provost of the Technical Campus, said accreditation was an important step in the Automo- tive Technology program’s development. “This accreditation is an indicator of how seriously we take providing industry-standard training,” King said in a statement. Prior to the pandemic, it was already a tough indus- try to ll positions, said Brent Franks, president with the North Texas Automobile Dealers, which serves multiple counties, including Collin. It is a challenge that has remained constant, as workers in this indus- try are “essential,” he said. “Our communities are so spread out,” Franks said. “We need to have qualied technicians to x our vehicles to maintain our ability to get our kids to school and to go to work,” he said. A growing problem Collin College has several industry partners for its automotive technical program, including North Texas Automobile Dealers. To earn certications, students must complete at least one internship in an automotive-related job, Elias said. Partners are often reaching out to the college asking if students are available for help, he said. “The demand for technicians is very high,” Alba said. “We have people that are retiring or leaving or left the workforce, so you can say our partners are kind of desperate, and they need a lot of technicians.” Data from the Texas Workforce Commission shows job postings for automotive technicians were one of the top listings in Collin County with 268 postings between January-July of this year. Only two other job post categories had more than that with retail trade at 641 postings and “other services” with 1,187 postings. The top two cities in the county posting automo- tive tech job openings were Plano and McKinney. Texas Workforce Commission data shows an entry- level position can earn a salary of $28,626 with an average wage of $50,224. Technician shortages end up costing drivers more time, data shows. According to the CCC study, from

CHARTING a course A career in auto tech can start immediately after high school and oer a multitude of opportunities.

in automotive technology Most automotive dealerships use a tiered system. Here are some basic guidelines to them. LEVELING UP

Entry level • Tasks may include basic maintenance • Estimated annual wage: $28,626

Students can choose to take some automotive courses while still in high school.

Students receive certications after high school. This can be done through private

or public entities.

Associated tech • In the process of completing training • Performs general maintenance and most repairs • Estimated wage: $50,224

Students receive training with an original equipment manufacturer or a dealer.

Collin College cost: $1,960

2019-21 the time between the start and completion of a repair increased 2.1 days. It is also taking longer to get an appointment to bring a vehicle in for repairs with 96% of the shops in the study reporting in 2021 they had backlogs of two weeks. “A work shortage would mean people won’t be able to get their cars xed, their re engines xed, their emergency vehicles xed,” Franks said. A changing industry Ewing Automotive Group has three dealerships in Plano, including Ewing Buick GMC on West Plano Parkway. The dealership oers a range of service and repair options for drivers in Plano and Frisco, accord- ing to its website. Je Gaden, general manager at Ewing Buick GMC, said he believes Collin College’s Automotive Technology Program is going to benet area dealerships and service providers. “We were very pleased to hear that they were going to be in our backyard and oer the program,” Gaden said. “I actually went out and toured the campus, and it’s a great facility.” With stang shortages being reported nationwide, Naeim Fard, manager of Luxur Automotive on Ohio

Specialized master • Mastered most vehicle systems and can train others • Able to accurately diagnose and repair vehicles • Mastered all vehicle systems and has leadership potential • May specialize in a certain system • Estimated wage: $61,022+

SOURCES: NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE DEALERS ASSOCIATION, TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

by software as a service platform for the insurance industry CCC Intelligent Solutions Inc. But with its program and its accreditation, Collin College is training up a new generation of technicians to serve Collin County and cities like Plano. “Our classes are in high demand,” said Elias Alba, Collin College’s interim director of automotive and collision technology. “Our classes lled up so quickly I had to open up a new section.” The Automotive Technology program oers a full

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After earning certications, graduates can take a variety of career paths.

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In the tech eld, graduates can work for a car dealer or a private shop or become a at-rate technician, a parts sales manager, or a service adviser or manager.

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Fueling a shift The accreditation has created even more student interest in the program, Alba said. During the spring semester, the Automotive Technology Program at Collin College had about 123 new and continuing students enrolled in the program, according to data from the college. At the start of the new fall semester, the program had 189 new and continu- ing students, including general popu- lation college students as well as about 25 dual-credit high school students, Boyll said. Since the program began in 2020, enrollment has more than doubled, data shows. Jobs in automotive technology can- not be outsourced, Alba said, so stu- dents going into the program know they will have jobs available right at home. In addition, a career in the eld can be high-paying, he said. The career paths in automotive tech vary as well, Boyll said. “You can go any direction you want; you don’t have to turn a wrench,” Boyll said, adding that people can go into customer service with their certica- tions, automotive engineering or work- ing with automotive manufacturers and the various positions that can oer. “The sky’s the limit for somebody coming into this industry,” Alba said. Andrew Norsworthy contributed to this report.

Drive in Plano, said he believes that the Collin College program’s focus on educating the next generation of tech- nicians prove useful to Plano and the region. While Gaden said Ewing Buick GMC has not had the same issues hiring technicians that others in the indus- try have experienced, when they are needed it is important to nd skilled and well-trained employees. “We’ve been pretty fortunate [with being] able to keep our technicians, but as demand increases and service departments become more busy, [nd- ing] good, qualied technicians is so dicult,” he said. “If someone does retire or change career paths, it’s hard to nd someone else to build that kind of position [experience].” One of the key challenges with nd- ing skilled workers in this eld is that cars have become more electrical than they were two decades ago, said Sean Boyll, professor of Automotive Tech- nology at the college. The develop- ment of electric vehicles has added a new element to repairing vehicles, but also gas-powered cars now have elec- trical components to consider. “All the mechanical parts have got- ten to a point where the maintenance is fairly minimal,” Boyll said. The challenge associated with elec- tric vehicles not only adds an extra layer of training, but it also can require more time spent by technicians performing scans and calibrations, researching repair methods and even recharging electric vehicles, the CCC study stated.

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PLANO SOUTH EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

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18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Plano ISD trustees add $1.49B bond election to November ballot

BY DESTINE GIBSON

of the work needed in the district. If approved by voters, the propo- sition will fund major and minor districtwide renovations, including projects for safety and security, infrastructure and transportation, ne arts programs, technology, athletics, the career and technical education program, and more. Proposition C is for $173.45 million for instructional technology; Proposi- tion D could give PISD $130 million for a district event center; and Proposition E totals $19.21 million to be used for stadium renovations and safety improvements as well as new turf. In total, the district is in need of more than $2.24 billion in projects, but that was cut by about a third to land at the nearly $1.5 billion total, the task force co-chairs said during the board’s Aug. 2 meeting. The district is able to issue up to $1.52 billion without increasing the district’s property tax rate, district sta said Aug. 2. The proposed bond was suggested without knowledge of the district’s threshold for a tax increase. District ocials said the task force worked for more than ve months on the bond package recommendation. Nearly 79% of district voters passed a $481 million bond in May 2016. That bond provided funds for districtwide renovations and facility upgrades, the Robbie & Lynore Robinson Fine Arts Center, technology improvements, early childhood education and more. It also did not result in an increase to the district’s property tax rate.

The Plano ISD board of trustees unanimously called for a $1.49 billion bond election during its Aug. 16 meet- ing. The bond package, which includes four propositions ranging from $19.21 million to $1.17 billion, will go before PISD voters during the Nov. 8 election. The board also called a voter-approval tax rate election to appear on the same ballot as a separate proposition. If voters approve all ve proposi- tions, the district’s property tax rate will still be $0.061 lower than last year’s rate, according to a news release from PISD. “It has been more than six years since Plano ISD held a bond election to address major facility, infrastruc- ture and technology needs,” board President David Stolle said in a statement. “Safety and security was also a focus for our task force, and the proposed bond will address safety systems across the district. Our voters will have the opportunity to consider our district’s needs and to consider additional funding that could be made possible by the tax rate election.” If all four bond propositions are approved, PISD would be able to spend more than $1.49 billion for “critical” projects in the district, 2022 Future Forward Task Force represen- tatives said Aug. 2. “We as a district ... need this bond to be competitive and to not fall behind other districts,” Board Member Lauren Tyra said during the Aug. 16 meeting. Bond proposition B will total $1.17 billion to cover the majority

Plano ISD’s Nov. 8 bond package includes funds for the district’s career and technical education program and more. (Courtesy Plano ISD)

BREAKING DOWN THE BOND In addition to the voter-approval tax rate election that will be Proposition A on the ballot, Plano ISD voters will decide on four bond propositions totaling nearly $1.5 billion. Those would address safety and security, renovations, infrastructure, transportation, career and technical education programs, ne arts, athletics and more.

Proposition B: $1.17 billion for school renovations and safety • Safety and security: $54.31M • Major renovations: $423.13M • Minor renovations: $86.49M • Infrastructure maintenance: $194.78M • Technology infrastructure: $61.8M • Transportation: $47.63M • Career and technical education: $134.84M

Proposition C: $173.45M for instructional technology Proposition D:

$130M for an event center

TOTAL $1.49B

Proposition E: $19.21M for safety and maintenance at stadiums

• Fine arts: $14.59M • Athletics: $155.42M

SOURCE: PLANO ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The voter-approval tax rate election will seek voter approval for the district’s property tax rate of $1.25975 per $100 valuation because that rate exceeds the district’s voter-approval tax rate. If approved, the tax rate election would bring around $9 million in funds for PISD without changing its property tax rate, district ocials

said. PISD plans to hold informational meetings on the bond and voter-ap- proval tax rate election via Zoom on Sept. 27-28 as well as a community meeting Oct. 6 at the Sockwell Center, 6301 Chapel Hill Blvd., Plano. Additional information about the proposed bond and the tax rate election can be found at www.pisd. edu/election2022.

2022 VOTER GUIDE COMING SOON

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